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West Virginia is currently experiencing, on a wide scale, what people near hydraulic fracking sites have had to put up with for years.  As the State and Federal government scramble to provide minimal clean water to hundreds of thousands of people, perhaps it's time to rethink our love affair with carbon based fuels before it is too late for the water, land, flora, fauna and humans over even larger areas than are already impacted.

Just in the last year, Arkansas had a bitumen (liquid asphalt) pipeline break in a subdivision.  Do you think the people that bought homes there knew about the pipeline?  If you said yes, you'd be wrong.  The first they knew was when sludge started oozing from the ground.

Oklahoma city is currently experiencing silica sand pollution in its' city water supply.  Where did the sand come from?  It's used in the fracking process and seems to have leaked from the concrete drilling sleeves, which have a 50% failure rate on first use, around the many fracking wells that have popped up in and around the city.  Would you trust your water supply to something that fails half the time the first time its' used?
And we can also add in the earthquake swarms in the area which could get very interesting when the New Madrid fault line wakes up.

Illinois lawmakers went against science and public opinion and passed the "first, well regulated hydraulic fracturing law".  But not really.  The law was written with the "help" of the industry and its' suppliers and is so full of holes that the "energy companies" will be able to drive their semis right through it.  This bodes ill for the southern half of the state which has suffered through many years of drought and has no water to spare for drilling these time bombs.

Pavillion, WY water supply is now under testing by the severely underfunded EPA.  Why?  It's frack central up there.

Go straight south and you find over 20 fracking wells have blown out in the Barnett Shale formation in TX. Along with an explosion that seriously burned two workers and resulted in the partial evacuation of a town near Dallas/Ft. Worth.

Head west and find that California is about to allow fracking fluids to flow directly into the Pacific Ocean!  We don't know what's in the fluids as the chemical brew is labeled "proprietary".  Kind of hard to regulate or clean up something when you don't even know what it is.

The list, unfortunately, goes on and on and probably will go on and on until there is no more clean water.  Believe this, once water is contaminated by these chemical stews, it can't EVER be used by living beings again.  To see where you and yours fit into this mess, click on this link: http://earthjustice.org/... and for more information: http://www.npr.org/....

Poll

Are you aware of pipelines or gaswells in your area?

25%6 votes
12%3 votes
25%6 votes
37%9 votes

| 24 votes | Vote | Results

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Comment Preferences

  •  Al jazeera covers the WV disaster here: (7+ / 0-)

    West Virginia chemical spill declared federal disaster:
    Grocery stores sell out of bottled water as officials warn residents not to drink tap water or bathe

    http://america.aljazeera.com/...

    Dick Cheney 2/14/10: "I was a big supporter of waterboarding"

    by Bob Love on Sat Jan 11, 2014 at 03:58:09 AM PST

  •  In one word (6+ / 0-)

    Greed is what has cause this to happen Water is our most valuable resource and we need to do everything in our power to protect it from the greed of big business!

    Dogs and Philosophers do the greatest good and get the fewest rewards (Diogenes)

    by Out There on Sat Jan 11, 2014 at 05:14:32 AM PST

    •  Greed (6+ / 0-)

      But more than Greed.

      First I believe that here in WV once all the facts are out, if they ever are, that it will turn out that the WV DEP turned a blind eye to the problems at the chemical storage facility.

      But we here in WV know that all of our regulatory agencies basically are here to serve and protect industry. The inspectors are mostly on the up and up but the state overrules any significant enforcement.

      Perfect example is for years WV did not enforce businesses making their regular contributions to Workers Compensation so the fund was terribly underfunded. Solution? Gov Manchin privatized workers compensation and he made the fund solvent by the new privatized fund being much more strict and cutting people off rather than going after the people who did not pay in.

      Then WV American Water company is a private business and has pushed to expand service and take over various municipalities using public funds.

      If the legislature had mandated that they continued to run the local PSD's they took over, or even got the water a local area uses from the local area no problem. Instead we have single source drawing from a river with numerous danger zones contamination wise and then piping it over a broad area. Maybe efficient for them to make money but from a homeland security viewpoint dangerous.

      Natural gas. Pollution aside the state could make a huge amount of money taxing this resource and invest it in infrastructure and education preparing WV for a post natural resources economy but they refuse to do so because 90% of the WV Legislature sees themselves as a facilitator for industry.

      •  Hollering to the Hollow (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Calamity Jean, Creosote

        You are invaluable as an on the ground reporter of what is happening in your state. It is no coincidence that the "War on Poverty" was almost a direct result of exposure of the conditions in the Appalachian and Smoky Mountains.  Please keep hollering about what is going on there and know you have allies in other places that are doing the same.

        ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

        by Arianna Editrix on Sat Jan 11, 2014 at 03:44:36 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  This just in... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Oh Mary Oh

        The NBC News said tonight that 40,000 MILES of pipe have to be flushed, tested and cleared before this is over.

        ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

        by Arianna Editrix on Sun Jan 12, 2014 at 11:14:56 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  the problem is.... (12+ / 0-)

    WV is mostly owned by outside interests.  We live in an extraction and tourism economy that are at war with each other, and extraction pays better.  link

    West Virginia is less concerned about fracking wrecking the well water than happy that fracking is providing some high pay jobs for those displaced from other industry.  And fracking is turning neighbors against one another as some sell out and others remain and get their wells contaminated.

    The folks owning the chemical company that linked into the Elk River assembled this company from several others, only two weeks ago. link

    More up to date information on the tank leaks.

    It is like fracking in that we don't really know much about what was actually in the chemical that got into the water intake valves only a short distance away.

    You shall know the truth, and the truth shall make you mad. Aldous Huxley

    by murrayewv on Sat Jan 11, 2014 at 05:29:12 AM PST

    •  Thank you (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Calamity Jean, Creosote

      I am always open to more information and I'm hoping that more and more will become available as the crisis goes on.  My main point, which a lot of folks seem to have missed, is that it's all about the water.  Water for mining, water for fracking, water for coal processors, and on and on.  

      ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

      by Arianna Editrix on Sat Jan 11, 2014 at 03:40:11 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  It would be cool if you provided links (4+ / 0-)

    The OKC Silica sand stuff is news to me.

    And a better question for someone in Oklahoma or Texas is--We live near pipelines but what are you going to do?

    They are all over the place in these states. Not to mention gas pipelines that are used to heat houses in some places like Moore.

    So putting it in there like- it's no bother--one becomes acutely aware of them in severe weather or when some construction crew damages one while digging.

    Gentlemen, congratulations. You're everything we've come to expect from years of government training (Zed, MIB).

    by GreenMother on Sat Jan 11, 2014 at 07:02:15 AM PST

    •  Silica Sand in OKC (0+ / 0-)

      Here  is the link to the news station report, though there is much more now. http://www.news9.com/...  

      As to the question of what are you going to do about the pipelines already in place here's a few concrete actions: Use as little carbon based energy as you can.  Eventually this will disincentivise oil and make clean energy more attractive.  Protest any more pipelines being built near you or anywhere for that matter.  BE AWARE of where they are now and keep yourself safe as you can.

      ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

      by Arianna Editrix on Sat Jan 11, 2014 at 03:21:11 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  You need to be sensitive to the fact that (0+ / 0-)

        as much as we would all like to go solar and wind, many of us cannot yet afford to do that.

        Remember this isn't just changing "bad habits" this is fighting the way our infrastructure is set up for our cars and homes. And it is a financial hardship for many to just jump like that.

        It can affect home insurance and sales for starters.

        So I agree with the sentiment because we do all we can to reduce our carbon footprint, but we are not wealthy people who can just throw caution to the wind and just do it. Though we have known some people who can and did, even out here.

        As for the pipelines, those pipelines have been here since before I was born. TX and OK are oil and gas states. These aren't new things just put in.

        Gentlemen, congratulations. You're everything we've come to expect from years of government training (Zed, MIB).

        by GreenMother on Sun Jan 12, 2014 at 07:44:21 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Poverty Sucks (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          GreenMother, Oh Mary Oh

          In more ways than one.  I'm not rich, not even middle class so believe me, I do understand that we all can't go out and get the latest, greenest thing going.  It may just be about changing bad habits though.  How many of us let the tap run when we're brushing our teeth or shaving?  My Monday entry is on how to live with the least potable water.  Sorry, no citations as it was drilled into my head by Salt River Project in AZ, my parents, and USAF survival school.

          ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

          by Arianna Editrix on Sun Jan 12, 2014 at 11:13:08 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Living with small amounts of potable water (0+ / 0-)

            Just putting it out where you learned it, is fine.

            The stuff that needs citing, statistics, numbers, news story sources, quotes, etc.,

            So many of our MSM stories have very few sources and look how quality has gone down. I almost prefer the school house ALA  just so we can double check.

            Gentlemen, congratulations. You're everything we've come to expect from years of government training (Zed, MIB).

            by GreenMother on Mon Jan 13, 2014 at 06:23:56 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

      •  Also here is another story on the Silica Sand (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Oh Mary Oh

        http://www.reddirtreport.com/...

        Thank you for the heads up. I didn't know about this and will be putting the word out to friends.

        Gentlemen, congratulations. You're everything we've come to expect from years of government training (Zed, MIB).

        by GreenMother on Sun Jan 12, 2014 at 07:45:47 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  No links (0+ / 0-)

      Sorry about the lack of links. As a independent reporter/writer who does her own research, I tend not to use them as I don't believe everything can be found on the Net and much that is is not true or only partially reported.  I suppose I should just go back to MLA and notate with links where I can.

      Also, if you find something wrongly reported and back it up, I'll research it and retract where necessary.  Thanks for the input!

      ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

      by Arianna Editrix on Sat Jan 11, 2014 at 03:48:07 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  If you think that the web reports are wrong, then (0+ / 0-)

        you still need to cite your work.

        You creating whole from the aggregate. So it's important to show where you got the information from. It's okay if you don't agree with another site's assessment of the information.

        Gentlemen, congratulations. You're everything we've come to expect from years of government training (Zed, MIB).

        by GreenMother on Sun Jan 12, 2014 at 07:28:11 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Thank you for this. There has been a curious (7+ / 0-)

    lack of interest on this site about the West Virginia spill and resulting water crisis, which is affecting 300,000 people of 16% of the state's population. It's great that we have so much info about Christie's bridge scandal, but the way it's drowning out everything else, it's almost like it's becoming our "benghazi."

    Fyi - the West Virginia spill is not related to fracking as much as coal. The chemical is used in processing coal after extraction. But your larger point - that fossil fuel industry is making our very homes unlivable - is well-taken.

    I don't love writing, but I love having written ~ Dorothy Parker // Visit my Handmade Gallery on Zibbet

    by jan4insight on Sat Jan 11, 2014 at 08:11:17 AM PST

  •  You said: (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    misslegalbeagle
    West Virginia is currently experiencing, on a wide scale, what people near hydraulic fracking sites have had to put up with for years.
    This incident does not have anything at all to do with hydraulic fracturing.   The incident is a discharge to surface waters of industrial process wastewater and chemicals.   Discharges to surface waters from hydraulic fracturing rarely happen and are clearly illegal, contrary to what you hear from Josh Fox.
    Oklahoma city is currently experiencing silica sand pollution in its' city water supply.
    Silica sand would not have any toxicity in a drinking water system.   Your claim does not have any links, and there isn't any way that hydraulic fracturing would inject sand into a public water system.
    Head west and find that California is about to allow fracking fluids to flow directly into the Pacific Ocean!  We don't know what's in the fluids as the chemical brew is labeled "proprietary".  Kind of hard to regulate or clean up something when you don't even know what it is.
    All process wastewater discharged from off-shore oil/gas facilities is required to be done under a National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit and enforceable effluent guidelines under the Clean Water Act and this requirement has been in place for a considerable length of time.....another thing that Josh Fox did not tell you about when he said the oil and gas industry was exempt from the Clean Water Act.
    •  Also, all constituents of a process wastewater (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      jan4insight, misslegalbeagle

      surface water discharge (including discharge to oceans in the United States) are required by the Clean Water Act to be publicly disclosed when requested.  The identity and amounts of pollutants contained in a process wastewater discharge are 'effluent data' that is required to be disclosed upon request.  See 33 U.S.C. Section 1318(b) which excludes 'effluent data' from items for which confidentiality designations may be authorized.

      •  Guess you missed it (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        WakeUpNeo, Creosote

        Fracking is inextricably linked to water pollution.  As to the CWA, you have got to be kidding.  The Clean Water Act has been gutted by Congressional exemptions and funding cuts to the EPA.  And while quoting, you might want to Bold something that matters:

        "surface water discharge (including discharge to oceans in the United States) are required by the Clean Water Act to be publicly disclosed when requested. "

        You have to know it's even there to request it.  Also, have you ever filed an FIA request?

        And I don't get my information from Josh Fox, I got my degree in geology in 1982.

        A faulty drill sleeve will leak into aquifers when under pressure and the sand mixed into the drilling mud can follow as it has in OKC.  And if you want to drink water with sand in it, be my guest.

        ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

        by Arianna Editrix on Sat Jan 11, 2014 at 03:36:37 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Do you mind if I'm a pain in th' butt... (0+ / 0-)

    and ask where this 50% figure might be sourced?

    "Oklahoma city is currently experiencing silica sand pollution in its' city water supply.  Where did the sand come from?  It's used in the fracking process and seems to have leaked from the concrete drilling sleeves, which have a 50% failure rate  on first use, around the many fracking wells that have popped up in and around the city."

    Otherwise, I am SO with you, but before I raise sand about that number with some of the people I debate with, I'll need to back up that figure.

    What th' heck do I know, I work for a living...

    by SamuraiArtGuy on Sat Jan 11, 2014 at 08:13:28 PM PST

    •  Don't mind at all (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      WakeUpNeo

      I'm a fact checker myself.  The figures are all over the place, as you can imagine in an issue like this, so I'll give you some links to MSM type pubs on the web along with a single EPA presentation and the article where the EPA abandoned its' own study.  Also, the 50% on first use is from industry people I've asked and, as you'll see from the slide show, cement failures and remediation are specifically addressed.  Also, they tried pumping cement into the Blue Water Horizon well, and that worked well neh?

      Links are: http://water.epa.gov/...

      http://rt.com/...

      http://www.forbes.com/...

      http://watrnews.com/...

      http://www.bing.com/...

      ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

      by Arianna Editrix on Sat Jan 11, 2014 at 11:14:57 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

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