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Woman looking happy as red hearts float around her head.
No one's actual work life, ever.
"Do what you love" sounds like a great mantra. But, in an important essay, Miya Tokumitsu argues that the problems with "do what you love" extend beyond the privilege embedded in the idea that it's possible for everyone to do that or the erasure of people for whom survival requires doing things they don't love:
By keeping us focused on ourselves and our individual happiness, DWYL distracts us from the working conditions of others while validating our own choices and relieving us from obligations to all who labor, whether or not they love it. It is the secret handshake of the privileged and a worldview that disguises its elitism as noble self-betterment. According to this way of thinking, labor is not something one does for compensation, but an act of self-love. If profit doesn’t happen to follow, it is because the worker’s passion and determination were insufficient. Its real achievement is making workers believe their labor serves the self and not the marketplace. [...]

Ironically, DWYL reinforces exploitation even within the so-called lovable professions where off-the-clock, underpaid, or unpaid labor is the new norm: reporters required to do the work of their laid-off photographers, publicists expected to Pin and Tweet on weekends, the 46  percent of the workforce expected to check their work email on sick days. Nothing makes exploitation go down easier than convincing workers that they are doing what they love.

The whole thing is worth a read—even if, like me, you do love what you do.

A fair day's wage

  • You can go see Misty Upham onscreen with Meryl Streep and Julia Roberts in August: Osage County. So you might think she's the kind of person who can hire someone to clean her big house for her, not a domestic worker like the character she plays in the movie. But in fact, she was cleaning houses for a living at the time she was asked to audition for the movie, and she's written a great piece about that:
    For many years, domestic workers have worked in relative invisibility—unseen, unprotected and undervalued. Most are excluded from basic federal and state labor laws that protect the rest of us from workplace abuses, wage theft, and unpaid overtime. And their work is not just practical, but emotional as well. Like Johnna, domestic workers often report for work during a family’s most trying, intimate moments. Whether the need is for childcare as new parents navigate their emotional return to the workplace, or like the Westons, for elder care when a parent receives a difficult diagnosis, domestic workers provide positive solutions when families need them most.

    Where the film’s fiction and the real world diverge is in the way domestic workers today are changing their circumstances by organizing and mobilizing. Across the country, hundreds of thousands of workers are waging—and winning—campaigns to pass domestic worker bill of rights laws that restore basic labor protections to this vital workforce. In September 2013, the National Domestic Workers Alliance and Caring Across Generations—two organizations that I actively support and encourage you to explore—joined allies across the country in celebrating a historic victory when the Department of Labor updated its regulations to extend minimum wage and overtime protection to millions of the nation’s homecare workers. This landmark change is just the beginning of the road to opportunity for this workforce. More is needed, including a living wage.

  • Hey Macklemore, can we go new wireless provider shopping?
  • Tennessee Republicans want to roll back a law requiring meal breaks for workers who've worked six consecutive hours.
  • The fable of dependency: How the GOP kills unemployment benefits.
  • Go, team!
    The Raiderettes, cheerleaders for the NFL’s Oakland Raiders, sued the franchise in a California court Wednesday, alleging that the team failed to pay them for all hours worked and engaged in other unfair employment practices.

    According to the suit, the Raiders withheld the cheerleaders’ annual pay until after the season ended and forced them to pay for many of their other expenses, the San Jose Mercury News reported. Their annual salary, according to the suit, is $1,250, which works out to less than $5 per hour worked once games, practice, and other events are included (the California minimum wage is currently $8 per hour).

  • Fan-freaking-tastic. The postal service is putting outlets in Staples stores using Staples' low-wage workers rather than postal workers making a living wage and benefits.
  • Lovely. Concerns about privatizing airport security further. Because, again, we want our lives monitored by low-wage workers rather than professionals who stay on the job for a while?
  • Kellogg's cereal has locked out its overwhelmingly black Memphis workforce and brought in scabs rather than bargain a reasonable contract.
  • Rep. Charlie Rangel and nine New York City councilmembers were among the 32 arrested rallying for higher wages for LaGuardia airport workers.
  • What would it look like if magazines covered single mothers like they cover celebrities?

Education


Originally posted to Daily Kos Labor on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 10:55 AM PST.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Excellent series, thanks! (5+ / 0-)

    Move Single Payer Forward? Join 18,000 Doctors of PNHP and 185,000 member National Nurses United

    by divineorder on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 11:04:00 AM PST

  •  I want to play poker for a living (11+ / 0-)

    But I'm not very good at it.


    i just baptized andrew breitbart into the church of islam, planned parenthood, the girl scouts and three teachers unions. - @blainecapatch

    by bobinson on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 11:06:31 AM PST

    •  Did you see this bobinson? (0+ / 0-)

      http://www.futuresmag.com/...

      Follow Futures
      New York Times once again gets it wrong
      Blog first appeared in DanCollinsReport on Nov. 19, 2013

      By Daniel P. Collins

      January 19, 2014 • Reprints

       

      All that they lost? Are the commodity trading advisors that shut down as a result of monies guaranteed by law to be segregated away from firm assets going to get their businesses back? How about the introducing brokers forced out of business or at least out the commissions they earned. While the announcement that 100% of customer money illegally (yes illegally) taken (yes taken not lost) out of segregation will be returned more than two years later that doesn’t mean the millions in commissions owed to IBs will be paid. If there is money left over perhaps they will get some. How about the customers of CTAs that survived and performed well over the next year. Those customers were out those returns, the CTAs were out the incentive fees and the brokers were out commissions.

      And what of the farmers and ranchers out millions unable to buy seed or restock herds due to their money being gone. Some went out of business and all took a hit. How about those traders so faithful of the futures industry that they left millions in their MF Global account because they thought the guarantee of segregation was safer than the limited FDIC guarantee? Or those with physical metals holdings that had to put up more of their own money to claim property rightfully theirs (warehouse receipts held but not owned by MF Global).

      The DealBook story continues to minimize the crime of MF Global. It noted “[MF Global] improperly transferred customer money to its banks and clearinghouses, violating a cardinal rule of the financial industry.”

      .

      Move Single Payer Forward? Join 18,000 Doctors of PNHP and 185,000 member National Nurses United

      by divineorder on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 11:15:38 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  CAN WE PLEASE TEACH DEMOCRATS HOW TO TALK (0+ / 0-)

    You don't go in front of reporters and say a charter school 'just feels icky'.

    WORDS ARE POWER you asshat. And you choose to sound like my five year old sibling. You could have approached this with grace and power and used the most simple words to address an issue that should be tackled and torn apart with the greatest fervor.

    http://callatimeout.blogspot.com/

    by DAISHI on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 11:15:16 AM PST

  •  I love to sleep in, take long naps and listen to (7+ / 0-)

    obnoxious music at earsplitting levels when I'm awake. Who's hiring?

  •  I've read stories of (28+ / 0-)

    people who are doing what they love and who sell the idea as something anyone can do.

    Susan Cain, author of Quiet, for instance. I love her book,  nearly cried when I heard her TED talk because she hit so close to home, to who I am.

    But she came out on LinkedIn with a piece that encouraged everyone to do the same as she had--give up your day job and follow your passions. She doesn't mention that her experience and education and connections made it easy for her to slide into consultancy work or that her husband made a salary big enough to support them while she wrote her book.

    Many of us can't simply walk away from our day jobs. I also know several people (progressives) who are doing what they love but who also had their way eased by families with money who could help with college and help them working while earning degree--and who sometimes helped them find plum internships.

    While these folks are sympathetic to the struggles of those who are working to make ends meet, they really don't have a good understanding of what that's like.  They speak well to the issues, but have no problem underpaying home help or being a little too demanding of wait staff, for instance.

  •  Another insidious HR buzz-phrase today (18+ / 0-)

    is "Work/Life Balance." Wake me up when we start talking about "Life/Work Balance."

    A few years ago I was trapped in a soul-killing Fortune 500 job. My closest co-worker, another manager who was almost even a friend, was a 'lifer' at this corporation -- the only company she'd ever worked for. She was fast approaching retirement and, as near as I could tell, she had no life to speak of outside of work. Once she gave me some grief for packing up and heading home at 5 PM while she, as usual, intended to keep working until 6:30 or 7:00 PM. "Hey," I told her with a shrug, "unlike you, I work to live. I don't live to work." She looked at me like I had suddenly started spouting Sanskrit or something.

    Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read. - Groucho

    by DocDawg on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 11:23:25 AM PST

    •  Reminds me of memorable words... (4+ / 0-)

      from a photographer I met years ago ( photographer wasn't his day job btw )

      he said he often has to remind himself that he needs to work to live....not live to work

      thought it was a good distinction

      PLEASE donate to a global children's PEACE project: Chalk 4 Peace

      by RumsfeldResign on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 11:30:28 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  For many people, their job is their identity (4+ / 0-)

        "No special skill, no standard attitude, no technology, and no organization - no matter how valuable - can safely replace thought itself."

        by xaxnar on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 11:44:18 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  It's not quite my identity... (4+ / 0-)

          ...but it's close.  I work on servers and write software for them.  If I'm not getting paid to work on computers, I work on computers and write software for them as a hobby.  I'm good at it.  I love bending these machines to my will and making them do the digital equivalent of EVERYTHING.

          I'm fortunate enough that this skill is in high demand and therefore I get paid stupid money for all the hours I put in doing this.  And I do put in far more than 40 a week, especially when it's my turn on the on call rotation.

          I've always told people to do what you love, but the connotations that it seems to take on in this diary never crossed my mind.  I've always said to do what you love because...

          1.  There are few things more soul crushing than having to spend 40 hours or more a week doing something you hate.  I know how lucky I am that I can make a living doing something I love, and if I've sounded like a privileged, patronizing asshole every time I've said this...that really sucks.

          2.  If you don't like what you're doing, you'll rarely excel at it.  Which is very reasonable -- things that I don't like doing but have to do generally get just enough effort out of me to get the job done rather than the whole burrito.  That, and for many of the "enjoyable" professions, you need to spend hours upon hours honing your craft, and if you hate doing it, you'll never spend those hours.

          So while I disagree with the premise of this portion of the diary, I do appreciate the alternate perspective it's given me.  And yes, this can be used to take advantage of people in the HR realm.  In systems engineering and programming, they pay enough to make it worthwhile, so I've never felt particularly exploited.  On the other hand, if a job ISN'T paying enough to make those extra hours worthwhile, then this is called an HR guilt trip and can seriously sap the will of the workers.

          Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic. -- Clarke's Third Law

          by The Technomancer on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 01:52:24 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Guilt trip is exactly what it is (0+ / 0-)

            If you are self-employed, the worst customers are the ones who think they are doing you a favor by paying you - and make it very clear that you should be grateful to them for giving you money to do what you love. Ditto for working for some company under some kinds of bosses.

            And in one sense that's very true, you should be glad there are people who want to give you money in exchange for your skills. But…

            Where it goes wrong is when they think they own you - that that is what their money is buying, because that is what money means to them: power over others. They resent you because you have something they have to give away some of their power to get, they resent you because you have something they don't have but need, and at the same time they feel superior to you because they have the money to make you do what they want.

            This is part of the reason I suspect Ayn Rand wrote Atlas Shrugged - she treated everything as a transaction of some kind, and always felt like she was being taken advantage of.

            Doing what you love is still good advice - but letting others use that love to manipulate you is not.

            "No special skill, no standard attitude, no technology, and no organization - no matter how valuable - can safely replace thought itself."

            by xaxnar on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 03:49:28 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

        •  Capitalism in its purest form asks not (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          xaxnar

          Who you are but what you do.

    •  work/life balance is a sham (5+ / 0-)

      I worked at a Lab that touted its "work/life balance" as an employee benefit. Theoretically it was available to all employees, but it was only rarely approved even for salaried staff.   If you were hourly staff (secretarial, etc) it didn't exist.

      When I see this phrase I take it as code for working hours/arrangements that benefit the employer by allowing them to squeeze the most they can from employees within legal limits.

      •  Like all else HR (5+ / 0-)

        it is, indeed, about squeezing the last drop of life from the workers in the name of 'productivity'. HR hated me in that last corporate job of mine because I was old enough, and secure enough, that I no longer had to pretend to buy into the game. Still, it was wearying. When a new CEO came in and imposed the old Jack Welch policy of firing the 'bottom five percent' every year...even if your team didn't have a bottom five percent...I literally told my boss to "take this job and shove it." The technology I'm expert in is arcane enough, and valuable enough, that I was able to hang out a shingle as an independent consultant, where nowadays I make twice what I made as a Fortune 500 drone and work about a quarter of the hours, while answering to no one but my own conscience. This isn't exactly doing what I love, but it's darn close enough, and leaves me plenty of time to run the farm.

        Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read. - Groucho

        by DocDawg on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 01:40:33 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Gone Fishin'. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW, thanatokephaloides


    If my life was really that important someone would have made it into a musical by now.

    by glb3 on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 11:28:06 AM PST

  •  I reject that it is an act of self-love. (10+ / 0-)

    I work as a teacher not because of the love of myself, but because of my love of others.  I want to make the world a better place.  

    The fact that I love doing what I do just makes the work more bearable.

  •  One (of oh, so many) problems with the (6+ / 0-)

    DWYL deal is that we would end up with way too many people producing  precious little handmade whatevers and nobody who can repair your toilet. Do what a lot of other people are willing to pay for is a better guide.

    "Le secret des grandes fortunes sans cause apparente est un crime oublié" Balzac

    by gelfling545 on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 11:31:16 AM PST

  •  On Do what you love (5+ / 0-)

    Many excellent points made. It's part of the mythos that if you just work hard enough the money will roll in and if you're not wealthy it's because you're lazy or lacking in abilities or imagination. We here "Go for it" a lot - as if all it takes is the will to try.

    Ginny Mayer, Ph.D. Democrat CA State Senate Candidate - SD-35 (Orange County)

    by Ginny Mayer on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 11:32:16 AM PST

  •  Tony the Tiger is dead to me! nt (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW

    "The object of persecution is persecution. The object of torture is torture. The object of power is power. Now do you begin to understand me?" ~Orwell, "1984"

    by Lily O Lady on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 11:34:54 AM PST

  •  Only fools work for a living in today's economy (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    thanatokephaloides

    It's all about making your money (and other people) work for you.

    "No special skill, no standard attitude, no technology, and no organization - no matter how valuable - can safely replace thought itself."

    by xaxnar on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 11:42:33 AM PST

  •  Love work? Need work? F*** work! (4+ / 0-)

    thanks to automation in production and modern distribution systems we have no need for people to work 2000 hours a year. It has become nothing but a means for social control. Yes we were treated better in the past because we organized and made them treat us better, but we succeeded because ultimately we were needed. That is no longer true.
    Today we are trapped in an abusive system because we believe that we need things and that we need to take whatever shit the bosses give us in return for those things. The fact is that neither of that is true - we do not need things and we do not need to work to get them, and until we realize that the infamous "they" will continue to abuse us.

    •  We do not need THINGS? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JeffW

      The THINGS I work for are the rent, multiple co-pays for the medical care I need more of because I am older, and for the care of my three parrots, who are love and joy to me.  I make just enough to cover that in a clerical job and no more.

      •  Somehow... (0+ / 0-)

        ...I don't think s/he means those "things".  OTOH, having a few of those "things" can help keep you from feeling you're living like a monk.

        We are all needed; it's just that we're not needed that often.  Reduce the work week by a day per week and you'll see.  As long as there's work to be done, there's no such thing as "surplus labor".

        The '60s were simply an attempt to get the 21st Century started early; don't mistake an unfulfilled dream for a lost one. A dream has no deadline!

        by Panurge on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 10:11:29 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Coaches/HR/Recruiters Blame Mental Problems (5+ / 0-)

    This seems to be something of a trend in the HR game - to tell anyone that's underemployed that they aren't living the dream hard enough. Even if a person is out of work because they've been chasing their dream on the hi-tech start-up merry-go-round or opened that business they always dreamed about, it's because the job searcher hasn't been chasing their bliss hard enough.

    A variation on this is take the job seeker and immediately start making accusations about their personalities and defects of character..  This seems to be the trend for career coaches.  Because the job seekers is supposedly some sort of emotional cripple that can only be saved by the coach.  And the coach knows that based on absolutely nothing, but they simply conclude that the job seeker is suffering from such mental problems as to be virtually unemployable.

    The problem is that in real life, people that do things like leveling ad hominem attacks against people they don't know probably have a serious mental illness themselves.  This includes the "cluster B" personality disorders.

    Which raises the question - are these people being trained to behave like they have borderline personality traits, or is this just a profession that attracts people with the need to talk down to people?  Because the need to appear as the "savior" sure fits with borderline personality disorder.  

    It doesn't help that the people making these pitches are not the most impressive specimens.  This line of attack seems to come from the pall flabby types who don't follow up, who don't keep in touch, and who don't seem particularly successful. I always wonder if their dream was to work for some bottom of the barrel outfit like Kelly.

     

    Men are so necessarily mad, that not to be mad would amount to another form of madness. -Pascal

    by bernardpliers on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 11:50:51 AM PST

    •  "Mind Reading" Micromanage & Punish Bad Thoughts (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      thanatokephaloides

      Again, this is something shared by bad HR people and borderline personality disorder, untreated bipolar, and what laymen  would call a codependent dry drunk.

      Men are so necessarily mad, that not to be mad would amount to another form of madness. -Pascal

      by bernardpliers on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 12:41:56 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  coaches (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      bernardpliers, JeffW
      This seems to be something of a trend in the HR game - to tell anyone that's underemployed that they aren't living the dream hard enough. Even if a person is out of work because they've been chasing their dream on the hi-tech start-up merry-go-round or opened that business they always dreamed about, it's because the job searcher hasn't been chasing their bliss hard enough.
      Ranks right up there with another of their favorite tools, "You don't really want to be here!"

      I had a boss throw that at me once. I was being criticized for being late to this job. Never mind that I wasn't making anywhere near enough at that job in base (40-hour) net wages to qualify for credit of any sort, or that I had to be available to work any shift they chose (which means that a personal car was an absolute necessity). No, it was exclusively my fault that I couldn't just get myself a reasonably young car and live nearby so I could meet their attendance demands.

      A later boss at that same job asked me why I didn't just get a younger and more reliable car -- in just as many words. My answer: "With what you're paying me, I'm lucky to be able to pay attention, let alone the installments on any sort of debt!"

      Of course, that's why they call 'em bosses (read "double SOB") and why it's called WORK.  :->

      Anarchism is anti-capitalist, and advocates egalitarianism, mutual aid, and reciprocity, and goes back centuries. -- DailyKos User ZhenRen

      by thanatokephaloides on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 02:45:53 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  DWYL is Marx's communist fantasy here and now!` (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sillycarrot, thanatokephaloides
    In communist society, where nobody has one exclusive sphere of activity but each can become accomplished in any branch he wishes, society regulates the general production and thus makes it possible for me to do one thing today and another tomorrow, to hunt in the morning, fish in the afternoon, rear cattle in the evening, criticise after dinner, just as I have a mind, without ever becoming hunter, fisherman, herdsman or critic.
    http://www.marxists.org/...

    It's not the side effects of the cocaine/I'm thinking that it must be love

    by Rich in PA on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 11:53:11 AM PST

  •  DWYL means nothing if you are not willing to (6+ / 0-)

    walk.  If you 'love' being an educator but work for morons, DWYL hardly means you stick around.  You can very easily DWYL somewhere else.  I've done it and I've been vocal about it (I work in technology).

    And we love to wear a badge, a uniform / And we love to fly a flag But I won't...let others live in hell / As we divide against each other And we fight amongst ourselves

    by ban48 on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 11:54:01 AM PST

    •  BTW - I'm not boasting. I realize that many (3+ / 0-)

      people don't have this option.  I think the people that do have the ability need to exercise it every now and then and be vocal about it.  Being a Dilbert is not a compliment.

      And we love to wear a badge, a uniform / And we love to fly a flag But I won't...let others live in hell / As we divide against each other And we fight amongst ourselves

      by ban48 on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 01:13:43 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  This Ny Times article today - similar topic (5+ / 0-)

    Following Your Dream Brings Bliss But Not Always Money

    People get downsized, can't get re-hired and have to "recreate" themselves. Sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't.

    A good point is made that some people don't have a "passion". Their passion is having a steady income and a happy uneventful life with a roof over their heads. I think that is a great point.

    If I might offer one word of advice -

    Want to know how to make a small fortune in the restaurant business? Start with a large one.

    “Human kindness has never weakened the stamina or softened the fiber of a free people. A nation does not have to be cruel to be tough.” FDR

    by Phoebe Loosinhouse on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 11:59:06 AM PST

  •  An important topic--thanks. (6+ / 0-)

    The popular rhetoric around the importance of "doing what you love" came into vogue during the 1980s--when off-shoring and "down-sizing" were getting into swing.

    Such talk was meant to divert our attention.

    Around this time, too, I can remember a particular contempt flowering for workers who "seemed only interested in pay" rather than "doing a good job" (as if the two were mutually incompatible).

    It's here they got the range/ and the machinery for change/ and it's here they got the spiritual thirst. --Leonard Cohen

    by karmsy on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 11:59:25 AM PST

  •  You only live once, so, DON'T do what you love. (3+ / 0-)

    Instead, just live to work for survival, cause that's the best that you're ever going to get in this shitty life.

    Says the guy who has time to think about and write that shit.

  •  And every job - even if you love it (5+ / 0-)

    has aspects that you won't (boring paperwork, anyone?). This is similar to the " you can be whatever you want to be" myth that some insist on dumping on children.  Set goals, sure.  Work hard, absolutely.  But don't think that just because you want something to be true that it is.  Talent may be a requirement.

    "I'll be more enthusiastic about encouraging thinking outside the box when there's evidence of any thinking going on inside it." Terry Pratchett

    by kiwiheart on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 12:05:32 PM PST

    •  if you love it (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JeffW

      that carries you through the drudgery. And loving it fosters the dedication that results in the talent.  

      •  talent (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        peptabysmal, JeffW
        if you love it that carries you through the drudgery.
        That may well be true, depending on the ratio of drudgery to the part loved.
        And loving it fosters the dedication that results in the talent.  
        Umm, no.

        Talent is what you start off with, what you are born with.

        Skill is what you get when you apply dedication to your talents.

        The term you wanted there was skill.

        When kiwiheart sad:

        But don't think that just because you want something to be true that it is.  Talent may be a requirement.
        her/his use of the word talent was congruent with my description above. And it almost always is a requirement. If you don't start off with the talent, no amount of "work and dedication" will result in the skill level required for success.

        There are areas where anyone can develop skill through work and dedication; where no base talent is required in order to succeed. I respectfully submit that these areas are fewer -- and generally less rewarded in any way -- than those which do require some sort of innate talent.

        Anarchism is anti-capitalist, and advocates egalitarianism, mutual aid, and reciprocity, and goes back centuries. -- DailyKos User ZhenRen

        by thanatokephaloides on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 02:20:01 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  not my experience (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          thanatokephaloides
          If you don't start off with the talent, no amount of "work and dedication" will result in the skill level required for success.
          Being very well rewarded at an endeavor 90% fail at; I was no better than the rest at the  start.
          •  endeavor 90% fail at (0+ / 0-)
            Being very well rewarded at an endeavor 90% fail at; I was no better than the rest at the  start.
            Then you had some sort of talent -- as I use the term (and as I'm pretty sure kiwiheart did as well). Either that, or you found one of those really rare endeavors which does respond to effort only, without requiring innate talent. The usual, ordinary case, however, is as I describe it: innate talent and effort are both indispensable requirements for major success. This also is what kiwiheart was asserting; the sole difference between us is that kiwiheart said that sometimes innate talent was required, whereas I asserted that it is required oftener than not. Perhaps I am guilty of over-generalization here, painting with too wide a brush; but that is indeed my experience.

            Might I ask what kind of endeavor you were in?

            Anarchism is anti-capitalist, and advocates egalitarianism, mutual aid, and reciprocity, and goes back centuries. -- DailyKos User ZhenRen

            by thanatokephaloides on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 07:08:31 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

  •  Why not have a job with which (7+ / 0-)

    you can support yourself - and your family if you have people who depend on you - but still allow you time to spend with friends and family, and/or pursuing whatever passions you do have?

    Thom Hartmann illustrated this in his latest "Coming Crash" book - telling the story of a cab driving company (worker-owned) that pays decently, provides great service, but doesn't require those who work for it to exhaust all of their time doing that job.

    Of course worker-owned businesses are but a small piece of the puzzle and not a one-size-fits-all economic model, but my point is that this is what life/work balance is supposed to look like. While on company time you're expected to do the job you're paid to do, but you're not expected to constantly carry a cross for the compnay's quarterly profits.

    liberal bias = failure to validate or sufficiently flatter the conservative narrative on any given subject

    by RockyMtnLib on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 12:18:51 PM PST

    •  God I hate the inability to edit comments here. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      thanatokephaloides, JeffW

      Employers will give lip service to "work/life balance" but as was pointed out upthread, it's a ruse for squeezing the most out of workers for the least. They'll always push to oppose increases in the minimum wage, or anything else that would force them to treat their employees like actual human beings (opposing mandatory sick leave laws, e.g.). And they'll always have paid shills and unpaid (sometimes willful) ignoramuses to carry water for them, to make "arguments" for why economic royalty should be allowed to benefit as much as they do - if not more.

      liberal bias = failure to validate or sufficiently flatter the conservative narrative on any given subject

      by RockyMtnLib on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 12:33:30 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Look. Bitches. You're here to shake (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    thanatokephaloides

    your money maker.  Just don't expect to make any.
    – Raiders management

  •  The job I retired from... (4+ / 0-)

    ...was ultimately interesting, but since I worked for a public agaency, wasn't always loveable. When I came to it I had failed to break into an engineering specialty I had hoped for, and had been unemployed for 11 months, with only one month before I was off UI.

    In retrospect, I wish I had just gone into traffic engineering right out of school, but it didn't work like that. But I did manage to get to early retirement, so there you go.

    If I was to pick what I'd love to do, it would be setting up a small shop to make stainless steel metal construction parts by laser cutting (Meccano Erector stuff), but I'd need a windfall to set that up.

    Float like a manhole cover, sting like a sash weight! Clean Coal Is A Clinker!

    by JeffW on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 12:31:47 PM PST

  •  I had a job for several years where I did do what (5+ / 0-)

    I loved.

    However, to complete the cliche, if the money was following, it did a good job of staying out of sight.

  •  For many, its 'Do What You Barely Tolerate' (8+ / 0-)

    Great piece.
     As the person who worked at 'do you want fries with that' for years, this is a welcome, and underrepresented take on that part of the workforce.

     I was too tired from raising 2 kids as well to stay up nights thinking of innovative ways to make my 'career' more meaningful.

    Most service jobs are underpaid 'scut jobs'. You are considered no more than 'Human Capitol' by your employer. People do this  to put food on the table and a roof over their heads, DWYL is not an option for many in the workforce.

     The forced positivity behind DWYL is, at best an unreasonable expectation, and at worst smacks of smug. Any one who expects this is out of touch with people who work at drudge jobs.

    Most people, especially women, have jobs, not careers. We should take that into consideration if we want to connect and relate to a large part of todays workforce.

  •  Paul McCartney once released a compilation CD... (3+ / 0-)

    ...to customers of Fidelity Investments, which was titled Never Stop Doing What You Love.

    I imagined Paul commenting: "For instance, I love being a billionaire music legend.  What do you love?"

    •  Paul (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JeffW, peptabysmal
      Paul McCartney once released a compilation CD to customers of Fidelity Investments, which was titled Never Stop Doing What You Love.

      I imagined Paul commenting: "For instance, I love being a billionaire music legend.  What do you love?"

      [snark]
      Now Paul really IS dead.
      [/snark]

      "......I.....bury.....Paul......" -- The Beatles (End of "the Walrus", if memory serves)

      Anarchism is anti-capitalist, and advocates egalitarianism, mutual aid, and reciprocity, and goes back centuries. -- DailyKos User ZhenRen

      by thanatokephaloides on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 02:28:27 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Facepalm (5+ / 0-)
    Tennessee Republicans want to roll back a law requiring meal breaks for workers who've worked six consecutive hours.
    Because hungry, exhausted workers will get the job done better?  I understand greed, even when it's repulsive; I don't understand mean-for-the-sake-of-mean.

    I shall die, but that is all that I shall do for Death; I am not on his payroll. - Edna St. Vincent Millay

    by Tara the Antisocial Social Worker on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 01:50:01 PM PST

  •  Sometimes doing what you love (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    bartcopfan, thanatokephaloides, JeffW

    as a job, takes the love out of the task.  There are a number of skills that I use recreationally.  I've been asked if I would do them for money but I've found that when I do, things like deadlines and other routine job things ruin it for me.  I guess if I lost my regular job, I would have skills to fall back on but not sure I would want to do these things I love to pay the bills.

    “It is the job of the artist to think outside the boundaries of permissible thought and dare say things that no one else will say."—Howard Zinn

    by musiclady on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 02:06:00 PM PST

  •  Tokumitsu's piece incredibly elitist and (8+ / 0-)

    disrespectful of working people.

    She makes the same basic mistake that Maslow did in formulating his hierarchy of needs: to assume that everyone must be the same as an academic intellectual, therefore satisfaction must involve some form of creativity, self-actualization,etc.

    It's true: we can't all make a living at something we love.

    Some of us can.
    Others of us can find ways to make our jobs more pleasurable.
    Others can compartmentalize their lives and remember that the job serves other needs.

    But -- loving your job is not the sole province of intellectuals, elites, and artists.

    I've known mechanics who wouldn't do anything else if they could, letter carriers who loved the opportunity to get outside walking every day and chatting with the people on their routes. Different strokes for different folks.  And taking pleasure in a job that gets your hands dirty is no less valid and no less to be celebrated than crafting the perfect line.

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 02:20:37 PM PST

  •  I'm entitled and white, and you can be too! :DDDD (0+ / 0-)

    That's the subtext too often of the DWYL proponents.

    "I grew up having the entire computer industry cater to my wants and needs because I was smart enough to be born with a penis, and now I make tons creating games for white guys with money just like me. You can do that too!"

    "Oh gosh, just quit that awful job and do what you love! You're working to pay rent and bills and feed three kids? Wow, I'm just the same - except that my husband handles the bills and the nanny has the kids, so I can concentrate on teaching my yoga class. It's SO fulfilling, you should look into that! ...How much IS rent these days anyway?"

    Thank God, the Bob Fosse Kid is here! - Colin Mochrie

    by gardnerhill on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 05:56:34 PM PST

  •  Hey Chicago... (0+ / 0-)

    Check out Washington Park Freedom School......NOT a charter!

    ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

    by Arianna Editrix on Sat Jan 25, 2014 at 07:56:20 PM PST

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