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Koohan Paik writes New Ambassador Caroline Kennedy Shocks the Japanese with Her Strong Criticism of Japan's Cruel Dolphin Slaughters. What Comes Next?:

Cetacean lovers are celebrating the recent, brash statement of newly appointed U.S. ambassador to Japan, Caroline Kennedy, in her condemnation of Japan’s tradition of dolphin slaughter. Now that she finds herself professionally and geographically smack-dab in the middle of Obama’s “Pacific Pivot” toward Asia, she has the opportunity to bring more to light on the veritable ecological holocaust taking place in the Asia-Pacific.  

While the Pentagon describes the Pacific Pivot as a shift of military forces to the Asia-Pacific to counter a rising China, we hear precious little about how this plays out environmentally. The military pivot is reigning terror over cetaceans, coral reefs, migratory seabirds and marine ecosystems throughout the vast, dying Pacific Ocean.

Local residents in Okinawa, the Mariana Islands, and Jeju Island (South Korea) are the communities that have been most vocally opposed to the plan to blanket the Asia-Pacific with destructive military bases. The most appalling example is the proposed Mariana Islands Training and Testing region (MITT), which would open up approximately one million square miles of open ocean to full-spectrum, year-round live-fire military practice, over an area larger than the states of Washington, Oregon, California, Idaho, Nevada, Arizona, Montana and New Mexico, combined. It would also include the whole of the supposedly “protected”  Marianas Trench Marine National Monument, established by President Bush in 2009.

Full-spectrum” live-fire military exercises means year-round amphibious attacks, bombing, torpedos, underwater mines and other detonations from the air, from the sea, and from the ground, as well as sonar training that will result in permanent hearing loss for scores of whales and dolphins.

The U.S. military has been conducting such full-spectrum live-fire training for the past three-and-a-half years over a half-million square miles of the open Pacific, and also upon the island of Farallon de Medinilla. Farallon de Medinilla, once teeming with amazing sea life and rare migratory birds, has been bombed and disfigured to unrecognizability.


Blast from the Past. At Daily Kos on this date in War opposition still increasing2003:

Yet another poll is showing increased opposition to Bush's new war in Iraq. The USA Today/CNN/Gallup Poll has opposition at 43 percent, up from 38 percent Jan 10-12. Actual support from the invasion is at 52 percent.

Of course, those numbers could move over to the "support" column if either the US or UK present evidence of Iraqi non-compliance. As of yet, all we're hearing is the same "trust us, we have evidence" bullshit, while all CIA leads to the weapons inspectors have come up empty.

There may also be movement in the polls following the president's SOTU address, though it will be interesting to watch how long any such "bounce" will last. And it will also be interesting how the markets react, not just the Wednesday after the speech, but two weeks out. Bush may claim to ignore polls, but it'll be increasingly difficult to ignore his Wall Street supporters. War jitters alone continue to pound the market today.


Tweet of the Day:

Brendan Byrne likes to say that he realized he wasn't governor of NJ anymore when he got in the backseat of his car and it didn't move.
@SteveKornacki



On today's Kagro in the Morning show, Twitter says the news is that Trey Radel is resigning because cocaine. Greg Dworkin says it's the latest ACA polling. SOTU tomorrow, so today's the day to find out why Cathy McMorris Rogers will say it sucked, and why they picked her to do it. The War on Women is over, which Daily Caller Free Beacon marks with its "smokes" tag. The military's got a bit of a libido problem, too. A rich guy complains that everyone else's complaints are Kristallnacht. In privatization news, more on the Google Bus and Uber stories, and another news outfit is thinking about compiling a concealed weapon permit database.


High Impact Posts. Top Comments.

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Comment Preferences

  •  The, "Hillary is married to Bill" osmosis (11+ / 0-)

    game has begun, so, sharpen your knives and buy stock in rumor. This is big.
    Women will be asked if want to elect a woman whose husband should truly be the poster boy for a war on women, or words to that effect. How well and early this attack is blunted means the sooner we can move toward, at least, a semblance of issue oriented discussion. How we go about doing this (as always), is the ultimate question.

    After 65 years, the ONLY thing I know absolutely and positively about life is that the check is SUPPOSED to be in the mail. That's it. Nothing else. PERIOD.

    by franklyn on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 08:34:01 PM PST

  •  Psychopaths sometimes torture animals... (10+ / 0-)

    before killing humans, or after. We have psychopaths running our country and military. I pray folks wake up. It chilled me, these words: "the dying Pacific Ocean".

  •  Scam... (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    palantir, Jeff Y, Aunt Pat, LinSea, high uintas

    ...or redoubt for the rich?

    You decide!

    Float like a manhole cover, sting like a sash weight! Clean Coal Is A Clinker!

    by JeffW on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 08:39:30 PM PST

  •  Son Doong Cave, The World's Largest Cave (17+ / 0-)

    Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos

    Picture links to 54 gorgeous images of the cave system.
    •  I'll say. Stunning. (7+ / 0-)

      Thanks, palantir.

      Now that's the kind of cave I could explore. One where you can stand up and breath. Not sure about the rappelling part though. Beautiful pictures at the link.

    •  ermagerd...so wondrous that such exists... n/t (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      palantir, OLinda, Aunt Pat, Jeff Y, side pocket

      Dance lightly upon the Earth, Sing her songs with wild abandon, Smile upon all forms of Life ...and be well.

      by LinSea on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 08:49:30 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  looked it up (6+ / 0-)

      Wiki

      Wouldn't this be fun.

      In early August 2013, the first tourist group explored the cave on a guided tour at a cost of US$3,000 each. The group had six members from Australia, Norway, Russia, the United States and the UK and spent seven days and six nights for the tour. Future exploration trips will be arranged.
      The cave is in Vietnam, on the north central coast.
    •  Overwhelmingly beautiful, Leave it alone! (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Jeff Y, LinSea, palantir, MadMs

      Caves are so very delicate and "die" so easily.  I do hope they keep it shut or at the very least SEVERELY limit visitors.

      ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

      by Arianna Editrix on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 09:23:01 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Tell me those aren't silicon nodules! (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      palantir, JeffW

      I wouldn't want to make the Horta angry!

      I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched c-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhäuser Gate.

      by Ender on Tue Jan 28, 2014 at 12:14:00 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Actually, if the cave were wet there (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        palantir, Uncle Moji, Ender

        You might see something like this:
        http://i32.photobucket.com/...

        http://i32.photobucket.com/...

        The frills are called rimstone.....wish I could find a bacon and eggs formation to show you.

        A cave pearl is a small, usually spherical, speleothem (cave formation) found in limestone caves. Cave pearls are formed by a concretion of calcium salts that form concentric layers around a nucleus. Exposure to moving water polishes the surface of cave pearls, making them glossy; if exposed to the air, cave pearls can degrade and appear rough.

        ~Arianna----The peripatetic geologist

        ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

        by Arianna Editrix on Tue Jan 28, 2014 at 02:23:27 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Cave pearls (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Ender

          Thank you for the wonderful description and information.  What a beautiful phrase and metaphor for so much.  Glossy in its formative element, exposed to air it degrades and its surface changes.  But at its nucleus it remains the same...

          I always wonder why more geologists or scientists don't write and publish more poetry.  Your field is full of glorious words and ideas and phrases.

          "Out of Many, One Nation." This is the great promise of the United States of America -9.75 -6.87

          by Uncle Moji on Tue Jan 28, 2014 at 08:56:38 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I don't know where you live (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Ender, Uncle Moji

            But there are lots of caves in the US too, even in places like AZ.  Some, unfortunately, are "dead" now.  The term dead refers to the fact that the formations are no longer growing which happens when caves are too open, to the public or the outer air or if there is long term drought in an area.  

            As to poetry, trying to get published as a geologist is hard enough! lol  Seriously though, I have some science centered ones that I might post.  Otherwise, have you seen www.symphonyofscience.com?  I love the ones with Carl Sagan the most.

            ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

            by Arianna Editrix on Tue Jan 28, 2014 at 03:50:58 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

  •  I demand to see a Superb Owl post tomorrow (7+ / 0-)

    night!!!

    if a habitat is flooded, the improvement for target fishes increases by an infinite percentage...because a habitat suitability index that is even a tiny fraction of 1 is still infinitely higher than zero, which is the suitability of dry land to fishes.

    by mrsgoo on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 08:50:08 PM PST

  •  We'll Fight the Pacific War Till We WIN It !!! nt (6+ / 0-)

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 08:52:03 PM PST

    •  The environmental impact story of US Military in (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JeffW, just another vet

      Asian land and waters is significant, and it needs to get some traction.  Listened to a "What about Caroline's whale concern" piece on NPR, and there was nary a mention of the footprint that Western military forces leave on the land and seas of Asia and Oceania. Why was that?

      But beyond another media fail, we would all agree that an Ambassador's unexpected cultural/moral announcement of disapproval of a nation's behavior better damned well be vetted.  What is disappointing is that State didn't understand how missteps of the USA could cause pushback.

    •  I heard the other day (0+ / 0-)

      That the last Imperial soldier died.  Do you suppose this is why we're "going in" again?

      ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

      by Arianna Editrix on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 10:11:01 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  He wasn't the last Imperial soldier (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Ender, Uncle Moji, JeffW

        After all, we still have WWII veterans kicking around. I'm sure there are some octogenarian Japanese WWII veterans still out there.

        The guy who died recently was Hiroo Onoda, who was assigned to doty on an island in the Philippines. With one thing and another he ended up going into the hills and staying there for over 30 years. He didn't realize the war was over until the mid-seventies. They actually had to find his former commanding officer and fly him in to get Onoda to come out and repatriate himself. I remember hearing about him when the story first broke back in the seventies. It's an amazing story.

        Some men aren't looking for anything logical, like money. They can't be bought, bullied, reasoned or negotiated with. Some men just want to watch the world burn.

        by Omir the Storyteller on Tue Jan 28, 2014 at 12:08:34 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  How can anyone of conscious even bear to live with (6+ / 0-)

    the concept of

    the vast, dying Pacific Ocean
    ?
    Be we already way too late??? OK, I've been awake way too many hours in a row... but, still .. WTF! Yeah, I weep for my grandbabies...and their ilk.

    Dance lightly upon the Earth, Sing her songs with wild abandon, Smile upon all forms of Life ...and be well.

    by LinSea on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 08:53:29 PM PST

  •  Daft Punk (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    mrsgoo, palantir, Aunt Pat, Ender

    I don't like them, I just like saying, 'Daft Punk'.

    :)

    “I would like to get rid of the homophobes, sexists, and racists in our audience. I know they're out there and it really bothers me.” ― Kurt Cobain

    by Jeff Y on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 08:54:27 PM PST

    •  I'm good with that. Does have a ring to it. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      palantir, Jeff Y, side pocket

      Even though it comes across as slightly English - snobby bastards. Yeah, so they're French - same thing! Only snobbier! They couldn't even lift their lids to acknowledge the award!

      Sheesh - I am going to pile a stack of Ore-ida Freedom Fries in the oven right now! Which I will smother in good ol' USA Ketchup!

      It's the Grammys! Why did they let all those furriners in there?

      Isn't Yoko a communist??

      if a habitat is flooded, the improvement for target fishes increases by an infinite percentage...because a habitat suitability index that is even a tiny fraction of 1 is still infinitely higher than zero, which is the suitability of dry land to fishes.

      by mrsgoo on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 09:06:03 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I think they should be sued for using "punk" (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        mrsgoo

        in their name. What they're doing is straight up disco.

        :)

        “I would like to get rid of the homophobes, sexists, and racists in our audience. I know they're out there and it really bothers me.” ― Kurt Cobain

        by Jeff Y on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 09:20:56 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  sniff - how 70's of them! Take those helmets off (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Jeff Y, viral

          and you will probably find the spawn of John Travolta!

          if a habitat is flooded, the improvement for target fishes increases by an infinite percentage...because a habitat suitability index that is even a tiny fraction of 1 is still infinitely higher than zero, which is the suitability of dry land to fishes.

          by mrsgoo on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 09:29:25 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  Yes, plus the State Dept issued a statement (7+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      LinSea, Aunt Pat, OLinda, JeffW, palantir, Jeff Y, Ender

      backing her up - her statement was, in fact, totally consistent with US policy.

      Good for Caroline, and the State Dept!

      (sorry no link - my computer is kind of borked right now :( and I can only do minimal things with it)

      I don't love writing, but I love having written ~ Dorothy Parker // Visit my Handmade Gallery on Zibbet

      by jan4insight on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 09:04:57 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Caroline Kennedy really shined the light (7+ / 0-)

      on the dolphin slaughter in Taiji, Japan.  Sea Shepherd has been documenting the slaughter for years and only this year has it hit the mainstream media.   It only happened after she spoke up against it.  I have friends who are there now and who are going in the next few weeks as well as many who have been there in the past.  The photos and stories they have are haunting and horrible.  

      This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

      by DisNoir36 on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 09:14:11 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  It's also coming to light that this isn't the (5+ / 0-)

        only place such slaughter is going. I saw pics of a dolphin kills recently on Twitter from an island off the coast of Denmark, of places. Really, Denmark???

        I don't love writing, but I love having written ~ Dorothy Parker // Visit my Handmade Gallery on Zibbet

        by jan4insight on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 09:30:34 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  It's called the Faroe Islands (3+ / 0-)

          They have a ritual called the Grind where they drive whales into the shores and the people there slaughter the whales right on the beaches til the water is scarlet red from their blood.  It's like some vampiric blood orgy.  The Faroe Islands belong to Denmark but they're actually located between Iceland and Scotland.  Had a friend who went under cover there too. Some of the photos you saw were probably his.

          This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

          by DisNoir36 on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 09:42:49 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  How barbaric! What an obscene "ritual" /nt (0+ / 0-)

            I don't love writing, but I love having written ~ Dorothy Parker // Visit my Handmade Gallery on Zibbet

            by jan4insight on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 10:45:19 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  That's not an accurate description (5+ / 0-)

              (This post is more aimed at the GP, but I wanted it here so you could see it as well)

              First off, the water turns red not because there's some unusually vast quantities of blood, but because blood spreads around in water. It only takes a tiny bit to change the color. If you killed cattle on the beach, the exact same thing would happen.

              Secondly, they're not killed as a sport, they're killed because whale is part of the diet in the Faroes, and has been such since the islands were settled. Would you call Americans killing cattle "some kind of vampyric blood orgy"?

              It's nobody's decision to kill them in a place where it looks ugly. They just happen to live in the ocean, so it's going to work out that way.

              Third, and I promise you this, the more outsiders try to force their values on the Faroes concerining whaling, the more they'll lash back. It has the exact opposite effect of what you want to happen. Picture if the US was a tiny, easily-bullied nation and there was a huge, powerful nation that thought that eating pigs was wrong. How do you think your average American would react if someone from some other country who's never eaten pork and knows next to knowing about America started telling them how evil they are for eating pork? They'd respond by eating more pork as a big F.U. to the nation they perceived as lecturing/bullying them.

              It's the exact same thing in the whaling nations. I live in Iceland. There's a company now that's even introducing "whale beer" - it includes powdered whale bone. Now this is obviously just a stupid gimmick, there's no reason whatsoever to put whale bone in beer. In the old days, nobody would have ever even thought of it, they would have just thought it ridiculous. But now it's a big middle finger at nations who try to force Iceland to stop whaling.

              You know the Icelandic word for windfall? "Hvalreki" - "beached whale". Because in the olden days, a beached whale literally could mean the difference between life and death for an entire village. People have been eating whale here for a long, long time. And nobody's going to take kindly to foreigners who know nothing about Iceland telling them how to live. Especially, getting a lecture on morality from a country that tortures people goes over like a lead balloon.

              Want to stop whaling? Here's some tips.

              First off, clean up your own glass house first. Alaskan natives consume nearly as much whale meat as Icelanders. Are those whales somehow less dead because they're killed by Alaskan natives? Is it somehow less "traditional" for Icelanders to eat whale than alaskan natives? And if your concept is that the problem is "mechanized" hunting, you have way too romanticized version of how Alaskan natives hunt whales nowadays, they hunt them with speedboats and drag them on shore with backhoes.

              Secondly, don't come across as so condemning. Seriously, you think saying that people are committing a "vampyric orgy" is conducive to effective debate? You need to understand the issues first. This is food. They look at it like you look at pork. You need to go into the conversation understanding that. And you need to learn their counterarguments to whatever arguments you're thinking of. Here, let me give you a random example of how your typical debate with an Icelandic or Faroese whaling supporter will go. If you go into a debate and talk about how "brutal" it is, they'll point out that they've been allowed to live free and full lives without any pain in the ocean right up to the end, and hey, how humane are those battery hens and other atrocious-condition livestock that most Americans eat without remorse?

              Just to be clear, I'm not a whaling supporter. I'm a vegetarian. I oppose all meat production. But I want people here to know the other perspective that they're up against. Want an effective argument? Point out how much mercury/other toxins are in whale meat. Or you can take the intelligence argument, but I warn you, you're going to have to be brutally honest with yourselves about how intelligent many of the things that you eat, such as pigs, actually are. Even lab mice pass metacognition studies, while pigs are smarter than dogs in most measures and can (largely) pass the infamous Mirror Test that young children have difficulty with.

              (Again, this isn't aimed at you specifically, Jan, this is just in general for the DK audience)

              Já þýðir já. Nei þýðir nei. Hvað er svona erfitt við það?

              by Rei on Tue Jan 28, 2014 at 01:06:59 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Two wrongs don't make a right (0+ / 0-)

                I certainly get you're argument Rei, however as you yourself are a vegetarian I hope you will understand mine as well.  There are far more humane alternatives to eating whale meat.  I don't support any form of animal cruelty.  I have just about cut out any and all meat from my diet as well and if we as a civilization are to live beyond the next century or two we ALL will have to find a much more sustainable diet that doesn't involve so much meat.  For reasons that go beyond the inhumane nature of it.

                It may take a tiny bit of blood to taint the water but when you're killing up to 100 or even more whales at a time, that is ALOT of blood spilled.  It's not just a few drops that disperses across the water.  It's also ALOT of whale meat for such a small population.  This goes beyond need to eat.  These people are not starving for whale meat.  It's part of their diet the same way that turkey is part of our diet on Thanksgiving.  They don't need to eat it to survive any less than we need turkey on Thanksgiving to survive.  

                Also they're not just killing them where they live out in the ocean.  They're going out and driving the whales to the beaches with a bunch of boats, the same way the Japanese drive dolphins to the rocky shores.  Once the whales are beached the local people partake in the slaughter of the whales.  That means this isn't about feeding themselves or survival as you infer by the 'beached whale' analogy.  If it was about survival they would simply catch them and haul them in, then process the meat either right on the boat or at some warehouse.  They wouldn't go through the whole show of boats driving the whales in and the people wading into the water to partake in the killing.  It's a ritual, a tradition according to them.  The fact that they refer to it as a tradition going back to their roots also shows that this is not about mere survival.  

                Finally, this two wrongs argument that 'well you guys torture and kill people and slaughter all sorts of animals so we should be able to do whatever the fuck we want to'  doesn't make it right.  It's arrogant, obnoxious and really ignorant.  If anything one should choose to lead by example not thumb their noses at everyone else and say 'fuck you I'll do whatever the hell I want' because frankly especially a small place like the Faroes has ALOT more to lose if everyone follows their lead and takes a fuck you attitude.  If we all take a fuck you attitude when it comes to the environment and our oceans, then small island nations like the Faroes will be the first to feel the severe impact.  Nobody has their house in order and we all have a far way to go but someone has to take a step and ending the barbaric slaughter of whales for the sake of tradition is a very easy step to take.  If they want to continue eating the mercury laden whale meat then so be it, that is their choice after all, but there are far more humane looking ways of doing it at the very least.  Engaging in mass slaughters and bloody rituals so they can thumb their noses at foreigners stupid beyond belief.  It not only makes them look ignorant, arrogant and obnoxious but also barbaric.   Ending that tradition, even if they didn't end the practice of eating whale meat, would at the very least end the media scrutiny and the criticism that they're getting over this.  

                This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

                by DisNoir36 on Tue Jan 28, 2014 at 11:06:12 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  Faroes (0+ / 0-)
                  There are far more humane alternatives to eating whale meat.
                  I'm not actually convinced that what your average American eats without remorse - battery hens, pigs castrated without anethesia, and on and on down the list of standard abuses - is more humane than an animal that lives free its whole life right up to the end. And neither are the Faroese.

                  It's commendible that you're mostly vegetarian. But most Americans aren't. So start with your own glass house. And if you still want to focus solely on whaling, stop your own whaling first before condeming another nation for doing the same.

                  It may take a tiny bit of blood to taint the water but when you're killing up to 100 or even more whales at a time, that is ALOT of blood spilled.
                  What do you think it would look like if all of the US's annual 42 million slaughtered cattle were killed on the beach? Seriously now?

                  Again, it's nobody's choice that whales live in the ocean. But where exactly are they supposed to be doing this where it's not as ugly?

                  [quote]It's also ALOT of whale meat for such a small population.[/quote]

                  Not really. It's 500 tonnes of whale meat for 50000 people for a year. That's 27 rams of whale meat per person per day. If that's "a lot", I'd hate to see what word you come up with to describe how many tortured chickens, cattle, and pigs Americans eat. Even with your "reduced" meat diet, I bet you eat a lot more than that as a whole.

                  [quote]This goes beyond need to eat.  These people are not starving for whale meat.  It's part of their diet the same way that turkey is part of our diet on Thanksgiving.   They don't need to eat it to survive any less than we need turkey on Thanksgiving to survive.[/quote]

                  Completely correct. But given that by and large I don't see Americans giving up turkey, your analogy as to why they need to stop whaling falls flat.

                  If America was some big nation of vegetarians, you might have a point. But it's not. It's a country that eats way too much meat, from animals raised by and large in torturous conditions. What moral high ground do you think that you as an American have to lecture other countries about what they eat?

                  [quote]Also they're not just killing them where they live out in the ocean.  They're going out and driving the whales to the beaches with a bunch of boats, the same way the Japanese drive dolphins to the rocky shores.[/quote]

                  And? I'll ask you again, where do you think the whales live? People live above water. Whales live underwater. Some meeting of the two has to happen for people to eat whale meat.

                  If it was about survival they would simply catch them and haul them in, then process the meat either right on the boat or at some warehouse.
                  Wait, wait a minute - so you WANT the Faroese to build the sort of big factory whaling ships with supporting harpoon fleets that countries like Japan use? Would you stop criticizing them if they did?

                  Of course you wouldn't, so don't be facetious by making that argument.

                  I actually find it doubly insulting because I often hear people like you also excuse the Alaskan natives under the grounds that they're not conducting "mechanized" / "factory" whaling (as if it makes a difference, and as if speedboats and backhoes don't count as mechanized), but then level this especially harsh criticism at the Faroese specifically for not doing mechanized / factory whaling.

                  [quote]They wouldn't go through the whole show of boats driving the whales in and the people wading into the water to partake in the killing.  It's a ritual, a tradition according to them. [/quote]

                  It is not a "ritual", and you will never find anyone from the Faroes call it that. Every single person in the Faroes that you ask about it will tell you the exact same thing: it's about food. The same way they've been getting food for a thousand years. They find it extremely offensive when foreigners who know next to nothing about the Faroes treat it like it's some sort of blood sport. And once again, seriously, how do you expect them to kill the whales if they're to be eaten? Should they build a factory whaling fleet?  As if that would somehow stop your criticism? As if a country whose capital city is smaller than Coralville, Iowa could support a factory whaling fleet?

                  [quote]Finally, this two wrongs argument that 'well you guys torture and kill people and slaughter all sorts of animals so we should be able to do whatever the fuck we want to'  doesn't make it right.[/quote]

                  Two wrongs don't make a right, but it's still massively blatant hypocrisy. I can be here and encourage people not to eat meat (in actually effective manners, not completely counterproductive manners like what you're doing) while still seeing the massive hypocrisy of claiming the food moral high ground which is anything but.

                  [quote]If we all take a fuck you attitude when it comes to the environment and our oceans, then small island nations like the Faroes will be the first to feel the severe impact. [/quote]

                  It's not a fuck you attitude toward the environment, it's a fuck you attitude toward ignorant, self-righteous, hypocritical bullying nations. It's the nations who condemn the Faroes for whaling like the US and UK that have ravaged the worlds' oceans through trawling and overfishing. Icelandic and Faroese whaling rates are a tiny fraction of the replacement rate.

                  [quote]Nobody has their house in order and we all have a far way to go[/quote]

                  Then focus on your neighbors before jumping halfway around the world to a tiny island chain of 50k people who you know next to nothing about. Seriously, what is hard about this for you? If you actually believed what you're saying that "nobody has their house in order" you would do this. But you seem more than content to ignore your very neighbors - and with your "small" meat consumption, yourself.

                  Já þýðir já. Nei þýðir nei. Hvað er svona erfitt við það?

                  by Rei on Wed Jan 29, 2014 at 12:08:18 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  To add... (0+ / 0-)

                    Probably the best analogy that's easiest for Americans to understand concerning whale hunting in the Faroes is like deer or moose hunting in rural America, esp. places like Alaska. Yes, it is traditional. No, it is not a "ritual". No, it's not pleasant for an animal to die. Yes, the animal did get to grow up and live a peaceful life in the wild right up to the final day, unlike livestock. Yes, it's technically possible for the hunting to be "mechanized". No, that is neither desireable nor practical. Yes, it's about getting food which will feed you all year. No, it's not about brutality or bloodsport. Yes, trying to get as quick a kill as possible is the goal. No, it's not pretty (although water makes any blood look vastly worse, and due to the schooling nature of the whales, the hunting is done at once rather than in thousands of individual hunts like in moose / deer hunting). Yes, it's been going on for a long, long time. No, neither take kindly to strangers criticizing them for it. No, telling them how evil, brutal, and bloodthirsty they are will not reduce the hunting. Yes, doing that is likely to actually encourage them.Yes, there are far better ways to try to reduce the hunting.  Yes, being hypocritical will be taken poorly by the people you're criticizing.

                    Já þýðir já. Nei þýðir nei. Hvað er svona erfitt við það?

                    by Rei on Wed Jan 29, 2014 at 03:53:16 AM PST

                    [ Parent ]

      •  But according to the headline, (0+ / 0-)

        if you don't like the slaughter of dolphins, you're "Japan bashing." Also, it's just fine, because the U.S. has military bases.

        False equivalence is fun!

        Early to rise and early to bed Makes a man healthy, wealthy, and dead. --Not Benjamin Franklin

        by Boundegar on Tue Jan 28, 2014 at 01:24:35 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Sorry--I posted above on this. (0+ / 0-)

      As reprehensible as the dolphin killings are, that's only the icing on the cake of environmental fail.  That's the point that the author is trying to make...

  •  Chris Hayes, absent his chipmonk persona, got a (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW, palantir

    lot right tonight.

    Dance lightly upon the Earth, Sing her songs with wild abandon, Smile upon all forms of Life ...and be well.

    by LinSea on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 08:57:47 PM PST

  •  For your dKos late night entertainment... (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LinSea, OLinda, palantir, Jeff Y, side pocket

    The Justice Department: Musique sans Frontieres on Netroots Radio presents tonight,  

    "The Afterthought A Comet Leaves On Its Way Out"

    Music to lean forward to, or to roam the Big Orange by.

    Who luvs ya, baby?

    Listen to The After Show & The Justice Department on Netroots Radio. Join us on The Porch Tue & Fri at Black Kos, all are welcome!

    by justiceputnam on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 09:05:08 PM PST

  •  2014 (7+ / 0-)

    I am not that ambitious at my age. Keep the car running, cut, split and stack enough firewood, and keep the bills paid while improving the house as we can. But if we lose the Senate and don't take back the house, giving Congress to the Republicans, I'm following OPOL to Costa Rica. I can still vote absentee, I just wouldn't want to live in such a country.

    But I don't want to leave. That's why I fight.


    Libertarianism is something that most people grow out of, not unlike, say, hay fever or asthma. Bob Johnson

    by randallt on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 09:06:19 PM PST

  •  I had not heard of MITT or Farallon De Medinilla. (6+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat, LinSea, JeffW, palantir, RainyDay, Jeff Y

    Absolutely horrific.

    I'd like to see a President that would put an end to such practices, period.

  •  From Ron Paul land... (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW, Jeff Y, side pocket, Ender

    it seems they're unhappy with a Bitcoin startup CEO getting arrested on money laundering charges.  As one of my Ron Paul friends wrote today about that:

    If the government is serious about catching those who "aid and abet" the purchase of drugs, maybe they should do some internal raids and also look into the pharmaceutical pushers in bed with their own kind. Good to know the buffoons of the state are terrified of free currency and people making the choice of what to put in their own bodies. SCARY STUFF GUYS.
    Good to know.  I'd ask her exactly which laws the pharmaceutical industry is breaking here, given how their lobbyists helped write many of our laws so that what they're doing may not actually be illegal, or at least is very hard to prove in a court of law.  But, her boyfriend just got out of jail last week and is coming to California, and I don't want him hunting me down and murdering me.
  •  Science Geek On: Kagro...RE Polar Vortex (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW, OLinda

    Is ALWAYS with us.  It's the way the winds wind around the top and bottom part of the earth as in circumpolar.  

    ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

    by Arianna Editrix on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 09:20:00 PM PST

  •  Colorado Marijuana News (7+ / 0-)

    The Denver County Fair adds a section and new categories.

    Pot Pavilion

    Blue Ribbon for best pot brownies and best plant among others.

    Judging will be done offsite. No smoking pot at the fair.
    Pictures of the winning entries will be displayed.

    (This is for real. Just saw it on local news. :) )

  •  Twitsted Owl (7+ / 0-)

     photo knottyowl_zps8be71606.png

    ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

    by Arianna Editrix on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 09:21:32 PM PST

  •  Can someone kindly clarify for me (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LinSea, JeffW, Jeff Y, high uintas

    whether the white house reversed,or not, the 2009 proclamation to protect this ecologically rich area of the Mariana's. The following is a link regarding a recent signing by Obama that sounds to me like the protection was reversed, but I'm not sure I understand the language.

    http://www.whitehouse.gov/...

    'A civilization flourishes when people plant trees under whose shade they will never sit' Greek Proverb

    by janis b on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 09:22:03 PM PST

    •  Can you say underwater land grab? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JeffW, janis b

      1(b) of the Act to subsequently convey the submerged lands adjacent to the land leased by the United States on the islands of Tinian or Farallon de Medinilla when the Secretary of the Navy and the Government of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands have entered into an agreement that ensures protection of military training within the excepted area.

      Or as mom always said, read all the way to the end.  Basically we gave it back to them, after creating a "marine reserve/monument and then they are leasing it to us so we can bomb the F out of them without qualm i.e. we paid for it right?
      It's the
      "excepted area" part is the tip off.

      ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

      by Arianna Editrix on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 09:38:03 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  From the Sierra Club in Michigan (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW, side pocket

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                
     Monday, January 27, 2014                

    Statement from Sierra Club On Proposed Oil Industry Sweetheart Bills
    Giant Tax Breaks, Eminent Domain Privileges Considered Tuesday By House Panel

    LANSING--Proposals before a legislative panel Tuesday that would give oil and gas companies new powers to construct pipelines on private property over the objections of Michigan landowners--and give new tax breaks to the industry--were strongly opposed today by the Sierra Club Michigan Chapter, which issued the following statement from State Director Anne Woiwode:

    On Tuesday the state House Energy and Technology Committee will hear testimony for the first time on House Bills 4885, 5255 and 5254.   House Bill 4885 would reduce state revenues from oil and gas development by dramatically reducing the so-called severance tax on gas and oil enhanced recovery drilling, including the controversial fracking process. Under the proposed legislation, oil and gas companies would get a 50% break on the oil severance tax, from the current 6.6% to 3.3% while gas drilling taxes would be reduced by 40%, from 5% to 3%.  This proposed handout to the oil and gas industry not only gives them an unneeded tax break, but encourages drilling activities that threaten our Great Lakes system, putting our waters at risk.  We believe fracking is too risky to continue in Michigan and should be stopped.  Giving tax breaks to the oil industry to encourage more fracking is the last thing Michigan’s elected officials should be considering.  Instead, Michigan lawmakers should take up legislation introduced last year that would strengthen weak environmental protections for fracking and invest more money in environmental monitoring of our water and air and other protections to safeguard human health and our natural resources.

    Moreover, House Bills 5254 and 5255 pose an alarming new threat for all local Michigan residents who are facing aggressive oil, gas and related pipeline construction in their communities.   Sierra Club strongly opposes giving new eminent domain authority to private oil and gas companies at the expense of the rights of private property owners and the public.  We call on lawmakers to reject both bills. The proposed legislation would also restrict the amount of information pipeline companies would have to release to the public. The recent expansion of oil and tar sands pipelines in Michigan has led to many private landowners witnessing pipeline construction within a few yards of their homes or businesses.  Giving oil and gas companies more ability to take lands for the transportation of fossil fuels and pipeline development is the wrong decision for Michigan, for clean water, and for property owners.

     ###
    The Sierra Club is the nation’s largest grassroots environmental organization, with over 150,000 members and supporters in Michigan.

    David Holtz
    david@davidholtz.org
     313-300-4454

    •  Sierra Club were bad actors (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JeffW

      In the Illinois fight against fracking.  In order to pacify the eco groups, the State invited Sierra Club and a few other "fully funded" types of groups to the table when drawing up the "regulations" for our new "highly regulated" fracking we got.  They were more than happy to sit down with the Oil/Gas lobbyists etc. before the People from IL stood up and said "no!".  Then they scuttled back to the people's side.  So, Dave, good luck with that up there, I'll alert the actual people I know up there, though they probably know all about it.

      ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

      by Arianna Editrix on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 09:51:36 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  If you think that the idea of government (0+ / 0-)

        regulating oil and gas industry operations is bad, then you may want to consider whether your position is distinguishable from Tea Party types who also say that government cannot accomplish anything good.

        The oil and gas extraction industry is not illegal in the United States and while it conducts its operations.... public safety, public health and environmental protection in how the oil and gas conducts its business is a valid area for governmental regulation....which is very effective if it is properly designed.

        •  The overwhelming majority of people in IL (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          viral, JeffW

          Don't want fracking, regulated or not.  We wanted to MAKE it illegal.  And if you'd glance through the "regs" that were "helped" by SC, IDNR, etc. and the gaping holes in it, you'd know why we were so po'd at the "fully funded" types.  Down here in Southern IL, the frackers were AT the county courthouse the day it was signed looking for "public land" they could lease.

          ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

          by Arianna Editrix on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 10:31:31 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  Yes, I went off on you (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JeffW

      But once was a proud member.  For quotes and story since I know Kossacks are so fond of them:

      "The four organizations who betrayed Southern Illinoisans on the fracking bill -- Sierra Club, Natural Resources Defense Council, Environmental Law & Policy Center, Faith in Place -- are now whining that the legislation which they so loved last Spring has putrefied by Winter," said Sam Stearns, a former oil rig worker, coal miner and long-time Shawnee National Forest activist in southern Illinois. "They might as well save their hand-wringing histrionics. We here in Southern Illinois have seen this show before."

      ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

      by Arianna Editrix on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 09:59:10 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Yukon Government Opens Vast Wilderness to Mining (6+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LakeSuperior, JeffW, MadMs, viral, OLinda, Ender

    Check out the photo of this pristine region, to be turned over to mining interests against the wishes of First Nations and enviro groups. http://news.nationalgeographic.com/...

    Initially, First Nations leaders wanted the entire 26,000-square-mile (67,000-square-kilometer) Peel region to be off-limits to miners....
    The planning commission reached a compromise that would allow 20 percent of the area to be staked and mined. "Nobody got everything they asked for," says Loeks, "but we expected the agreement to be honored."
    The government's new plan sets aside only 29 percent of the Peel region as "protected lands."
    (My emphasis.)
    •  Phhhhhhhuuuuuuuuck! (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Mark Mywurtz, marina

      Well, I guess I know where I'll be this coming summer.  Can someone spot me some DEET?  The blackflies and mosquitos are horrid up there, but Idle No More will be out most likely.

      ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

      by Arianna Editrix on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 10:15:03 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  This entire post and comments . . . (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      marina

      makes me wonder whether climate change will kill us all before we totally destroy the ecosystem that allows us to live here in the first place.

      Feel any kinship to cancer anyone???

      "Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please" Mark Twain

      by andersr on Tue Jan 28, 2014 at 04:19:26 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  If we need metals or minerals (0+ / 0-)

        at this point, why aren't we recycling from our landfills, instead of ruining more of our precious planet? Do we always have to have newly mined ore for everything we do? I know, I know, gotta keep the profit margins up for the extraction industries.

        Maybe we should recycle more of our war machines, for starters. Melt 'em down into plowshares.

  •  Saw the Herblock documentary on HBO tonight. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    OLinda, Albanius

    Highly recommended. He was a rare guy and left a great mark.

    "The soil under the grass is dreaming of a young forest, and under the pavement the soil is dreaming of grass."--Wendell Berry

    by Wildthumb on Mon Jan 27, 2014 at 10:53:24 PM PST

  •  Triangle Invitation to Moral March on Raleigh (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    marina

    Triangle Invitation to Moral March on Raleigh | Triangle NAACP - YouTube

    "HKonJ Coalition Coordinator, Rev. Curtis Gatewood along with Triangle NAACP Branch Presidents, personally invite you to the Moral March on Raleigh this February 8th."

    http://m.youtube.com/...

  •  The horrifying "driven" dolphin kill, (0+ / 0-)

    along with the murderous "finning" of sharks, butchery of rhinos and elephants and "canned hunts" of creatures on the brink of extinction are written off with empty words like "cultural tradition".

    Back in the mid-Forties, we had a "cultural tradition" of dropping nukes on Japanese cities.

    We gave up ours. How about these myth-worshipping dullards and stains on humanity give up theirs?

  •  Not to minimize other aspects of the harm we do... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    marina, just another vet, JeffW

    But ultra long-range sonar is much, much worse. Since I'm not in the loop for some reason, I don't know how far along the US military is in developing this cetacean-deafening technology, but unless it's been abandoned, it's an ecological disaster waiting to happen.

    Many of you probably have no idea what I'm talking about. Why should you? Thankfully we live in an age of search engines, so you don't have to take my word for it.

    Anyway, ultra long-range sonar uses very low frequencies 'theoretically' so a sub in SF can see a sub in Hainan. To do this very large 'infrasounds' are emitted in pulses.They are loud enough to reach the far side of the Pacific and then bounce back. Think about that. Then think about what that would do to you if you were a whale or a dolphin. Yeah, no more hearing or echolocation for you.

    Again, I'm not denying other wrongs... if you haven't seen "The Cove", you should... but be warned it shows the awful, terrible, horrible truth.

  •  Oil spill in the Delaware River (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW

    This kind of thing is getting really old.
    http://www.delcotimes.com/...

    "A thousand gallons is a significant spill because when oil hits the water, it spreads out," said Tracy Carluccio of the Delaware Riverkeeper Network.
    "These things happen unfortunately all too often in the Delaware River watershed," Carluccio said. "We're a very big port."
  •  Horrible to hear what it happening to Cheju Do. (0+ / 0-)

    Such a beautiful island.

    "The next time everyone will pay for it equally, and there won't be any more Chosen Nations, or any Others. Poor bastards all." ~The Boomer Bible

    by just another vet on Tue Jan 28, 2014 at 07:14:54 AM PST

  •  My beautiful Pacific (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW

    bears the scars and wounds of the direct actions of US military war exercises and weapons testing.

    For some bizarre reason, people think that the vast waters of the Pacific are "empty" and bombable.  They are not.  The waters are teeming with life, except where we have made them uninhabitable for people and for sea life.  

    After relocated by the US from the nuclear contaminated Bikini Atoll, Lore Kessibuki wrote an anthem for the island:

    No longer can I stay, it’s true
    No longer can I live in peace and harmony
    No longer can I rest on my sleeping mat and pillow
    Because of my island and the life I once knew there
    The thought is overwhelming
    Rendering me helpless and in great despair.

    Despair, despair.  That is what I feel when I read what our government plans for my beautiful Pacific.  When will we stop?

    "Out of Many, One Nation." This is the great promise of the United States of America -9.75 -6.87

    by Uncle Moji on Tue Jan 28, 2014 at 09:13:27 AM PST

  •  Even Boner grudgingly smiled at that one. (0+ / 0-)

    Nuclear Reactor = Dirty Bomb

    by olo on Tue Jan 28, 2014 at 06:56:56 PM PST

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