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Today's CBO report revealed how the media really only understands employment through the lens of labor demand, and they struggle with supply
@JustinWolfers
Michael Hiltzik:
The Congressional Budget Office is out with its latest report on the Affordable Care Act, and here are a few bottom lines:

— The ACA is cheaper than it expected.
— It will "markedly increase" the number of Americans with health insurance.
— The risk-adjustment provisions, which Congressional Republicans want to overturn as a "bailout" of the insurance industry, will actually turn a profit to the U.S. Treasury.

Given all this, why are the first news headlines on the CBO report depicting it as calling Obamacare a job killer?

You can chalk up some of that to the crudity of headline-writing, and some to basic innumeracy in the press. But it's important to examine what the CBO actually says about the ACA's impact on the labor market. (You can find it at pages 117-127, excerpted here.)

Media Matters:
Right-wing media figures rushed to claim the Affordable Care Act will destroy 2 million jobs, citing a new Congressional Budget Office report, but that's not what the report found -- the CBO report projected that the law will give workers the freedom to voluntarily reduce their employment after gaining health insurance.

The CBO released its Budget and Economic Outlook for the years 2014 to 2024 on February 4, which projected in part that the number of full-time workers would decline by about 2 million by 2017. Right-wing media quickly pounced on the report to distort the CBO's projections about the ACA's effect on future employment.

Glenn Kessler/Fact Checker:
No, CBO did not say Obamacare will kill 2 million jobs
Sarah Kliff:
Why CVS thinks it can win big by ending cigarette sales
This is a big effin' deal: CVS won't sell ciggies any more.

More politics and policy below the fold.

if you missed the creationism vs science debate, here it is on NPR:

"Thank you, Mr. Ham. But I am completely unsatisfied. You did not, in my view, address this fundamental question: 680,000 years of snow-ice layers, which require winter-summer cycle."

There simply hasn't been enough time to generate the species on Earth, Nye says.

"Then, as far as Noah being an extraordinary shipwright, I'm extraordinarily skeptical," Nye says. He cites his own family's background in New England, where people spent their lives learning how to build ships.

"It's very reasonable, perhaps, to you that Noah had super-powers and was able to build this extraordinary craft with seven family members," Nye says. "But to me, this is just not reasonable."

When scientists make assumptions, Nye says, "they're making assumptions based on previous experience. They're not coming out of whole cloth. So, next time you have a chance to speak, I encourage you to explain to us why we should accept your word for it that natural law changed just 4,000 years ago – completely – and there's no record of it.

"You know, there are pyramids that are older than that. There are human populations that are far older than that – with traditions that go back farther than that. And it's just not reasonable to me that everything changed 4,000 years ago."

Nye also asks Ham to discuss the billions of people on Earth, including Christians, who don't agree with Ham's point of view about the planet's age.

"So, what is to become of them, in your view?" Nye asks.

You'd think I'd be a creationist, but these days I prefer to deny any involvement in this fiasco.
@TheTweetOfGod
Jill Lawrence:
Stopping Keystone won’t stop climate change

Why should Democrats hand Republicans a cause celebre?

Jon Ralston:
From what I’ve seen and reported, Obama appreciated Reid’s willingness to always (or almost always) have his back in a congressional process he disdained, and Reid loved that the president let him do what he does best—wrangle votes for impossible tasks such as passing Obamacare—without much interference. The White House knew that down the avenue was Harry’s House, and the president respected that.

Until now, perhaps?

Reid has been inconsistent on many issues during his long career in the Senate—immigration reform, gay marriage, gun rights. But if there are two subjects on which he has not deviated, they are opposing free trade agreements and blocking incursions into congressional authority.

Lindsay Beyerstein hosted an interview with me on flu issues/flu science:
This week, Point of Inquiry welcomes Greg Dworkin, MD. Dr. Dworkin is a founding editor of Flu Wiki, an international, wiki-format clearinghouse of Influenza information designed to help local communities prepare for and perhaps cope with a possible influenza pandemic. He’s an expert on pandemic Flu preparedness and is joining us to discuss the Flu, the vaccine and staying healthy this H1N1 season.
It took over 3 yrs for #H5N1 to infect >300 people. It took #H7N9 less than 1 yr. By @lisaschnirring http://t.co/... @CIDRAP #flu
@HelenBranswell
Some older and newer 3R's explainers from Kaiser Family Foundation and AHIP:
What Are The 3Rs and How Do They Work?
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Comment Preferences

  •  Don't wory - I have not YET disappeared (19+ / 0-)

    is the title of this piece in which I briefly explain why I have not been posting.

    Offered because I have had several direct inquiries of concern from people.

    Peace.

    "Teachers teach. Well-trained teachers teach better. Great teachers change lives." - David Greene, from "Doing the Right Thing: A Teacher Speaks"

    by teacherken on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 04:33:11 AM PST

  •  Thanks for the roundup, Greg! (17+ / 0-)

    Wonder how this year's 'flu season compares with those of previous years? Possibly the data won't be available yet.

    "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

    by Diana in NoVa on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 04:37:13 AM PST

  •  Reports of the ACA demise are premature.... (14+ / 0-)

    but good for fundraising and bloviating I guess.

  •  Damned WaPo Has it all over O's house…. (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    marykk, DRo, wintergreen8694, rl en france

    That the jobs are being kilt…it's a forward projection people!  We can't even predict the weather 24 hours ahead reliably!  Man I wish people would caveat properly.

    •  ACA Creates job opportunities (27+ / 0-)

      The 2.5 million jobs "lost" figure comes from people, mostly older, leaving the workforce voluntarily or reducing hours, because they aren't locked into a full-time job by the need for healthcare. This creates more opportunity for unemployed and younger workers to fill those hours.

      Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' ― Isaac Asimov

      by GoodGod on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 04:59:25 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Or from working mothers (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Amber6541

        who are finally able to stay home with young ones, then return to the workforce if they chose. The party of "family values" ought to appreciate that, but of course they'd prefer lying.

        We know we will have won when Obamacare is no longer called that b/c it's a commercial for a great president's finest achievement, say in 5 years?

        What stronger breast-plate than a heart untainted! Thrice is he arm'd, that hath his quarrel just; And he but naked, though lock'd up in steel, Whose conscience with injustice is corrupted. Henry VI Part II Act 3 Scene 2

        by TerryDarc on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 09:04:07 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Imagine that (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        I love OCD, Amber6541

        Someone no longer having to work two jobs so they can afford to pay $1,000 a month in health insurance premiums will decide to not work one of the jobs and actually enjoy life a bit.  

        This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

        by DisNoir36 on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 09:27:32 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Sorry, that doesn't fly (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DRo

      If we accept the CBO's forward projections on savings, impact to the deficit and number of people who will gain insurance you also have to accept the negatives.  One of the key criticisims of ACA by the GOP was that it would encourage people to drop out of the workforce or choose to cut their hours to go on the dole or gain subsidies.  And this report strongly supports that conclusion.

      You can try to put spin on it, but the report is terrible for supporters of the law as a practical matter.

      It is also politicallly devastating.  Poll after poll says "jobs" are the number one issue for everyone in this country.  And you've now got a CBO report saying that the ACA will cost the economy the equivalent of 1.7 million more jobs than expected.  When the WH says, but people freed from the worry about having health insurance, that is like saying I just got laid off! I'm so excited my tax bill will be going down!

      •  People voluntarily leaving... (15+ / 0-)

        the workforce means more jobs available for those who want them.

        I'm not paranoid or anything. Everyone just thinks I am.

        by Jim Riggs on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 05:30:47 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Flys better than the rights' strawmen (17+ / 0-)

        This reduction in hours projected by the CBO is VOLUNTARY. It includes people like my son who is now freed up to start the business that he's been wanting to do for years, but hasn't been able to make the leap due to the need to keep healthcare for his disabled daughter. If he's successful, he'll create jobs and meanwhile his current company will need to hire someone to take his place.

        Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' ― Isaac Asimov

        by GoodGod on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 05:34:41 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  No no no no (13+ / 0-)

        Did you read the report? Is said explicitly

        The estimated reduction stems almost entirely from a net decline in the amount of labor that workers choose to supply, rather than from a net drop in busi- nesses’ demand for labor, so it will appear almost entirely as a reduction in labor force participation and in hours worked relative to what would have occurred otherwise rather than as an increase in unemployment (that is, more workers seeking but not finding jobs) or underemploy- ment (such as part-time workers who would prefer to work more hours per week).
        The demand will not change. Period.

        Republicans who fear the US turning into Greece want to implement austerity measures... like Greece.

        by feloneouscat on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 05:47:38 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  I read (0+ / 0-)

          So, people are making the choice to leave the workforce because economically in many cases if they make $1 over some threshold they lose thousands of dollars in subsidies.  So, people are leaving the workforce to accept gov't payments.  And, if you look at pg 127 - Appendix C - you'll also see that it is unclear how many are leaving voluntarily and how many are having hours cut.

          I stick with my original point, the report is incredibly negative and is one more piece of bad news that will help the GOP come November and that gives one more push towards the eventual repeal or gutting of the law.

          •  disagree (8+ / 0-)

            NYT has it right in terms of what it does say:

            The report clearly stated that health reform would not produce an increase in unemployment (workers unable to find jobs) or underemployment (part-time workers who would prefer to work more hours per week). It also found “no compelling evidence” that, as of now, part-time employment has increased as a result of the reform law, a frequent claim of critics. Whether that will hold up after a mandate that requires employers to provide coverage, which was delayed until 2015, kicks in is uncertain.
            http://www.nytimes.com/...

            "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

            by Greg Dworkin on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 07:10:07 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  in fact (6+ / 0-)
            Douglas Elmendorf  (CSPAN) says ACA likely boosts demand which will likely boost jobs and reduce unemployment. Not quantified, though.
            @DemFromCT
            right now, in answer to Chris van Holland.

            "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

            by Greg Dworkin on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 07:36:39 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  wrong again. As in any program with income (6+ / 0-)

            eligibility, there will be some people who need to stay under that eligibility level to qualify.
            But that's not the main driver here. For many decades people have been staying in jobs they hate because the job provides health coverage (I had to do that for several years when my disabled son was alive), or are working longer hours in order to pay for over-priced health insurance. So what CBO is talking about is people being able to cut back -- maybe just to a reasonable 40 hour/week schedule, or maybe so they can spend part of each day with their children or their sick parent. Or it might mean people leaving a salaried job with health coverage in order to start up their own business.
            This is a good thing, a better chance for people to have happier lives. Pursuit of happiness is very patriotic (read the Declaration of Independence).

            While Democrats work to get more people to vote, Republicans work to ensure those votes won't count.

            by Tamar on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 07:38:39 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Or even from (4+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              bear83, GoodGod, Tamar, FogCityJohn

              one parent staying home to care for children because now they CAN.

              Isn't that the vaunted 'family values' the GOP goes on and on about?

              •  Yes! Maybe the headlines should read: (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                FogCityJohn, I love OCD
                ACA Helps Parents Get More Time With their Children
                Or, if we want to be in full conservative "family-values," traditional gender roles mode:
                ACA Means More Stay-at-Home Moms!
                I worked at a depressing government job for almost 4 years because I had a son with severe disabilities and the insurance coverage was great. If I had changed jobs, he would not have been covered because of the pre-existing conditions exclusions.
                If the ACA had been around then, I would have been looking for a new job from the day I realized what a dead-end my job was, about 3 or 4 months into it. But as it was, I was there until he died. It was only after his death that I was able to move to my dream job which, ironically, involved work on children's health coverage and protecting children with disabilities.
                (I have to give kudos to my fellow workers at the government job. Some truly wonderful people. And at least a few of them were there for the same reason I was -- insurance coverage for a disabled family member).

                While Democrats work to get more people to vote, Republicans work to ensure those votes won't count.

                by Tamar on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 08:24:17 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  Insurance is a big reason I work. (3+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Tamar, I love OCD, RadGal70

                  Although I'm too young to retire yet, one of the things that gets me out of bed in the morning is knowing that my government job provides good health insurance benefits.  As someone living with HIV, I can't do without them.

                  I'm not the biggest fan of the ACA (for reasons I won't get into here), but I very much appreciate the fact that it'd provide a safety net for me if I ever were to lose my job.  I'm one of those people who simply can't afford to go without health insurance.  For me, it's quite literally a matter of life or death.

                  "Ça c'est une chanson que j'aurais vraiment aimé ne pas avoir écrite." -- Barbara

                  by FogCityJohn on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 09:20:02 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

            •  Also, people stuck in jobs instead of starting (4+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Tamar, GoodGod, I love OCD, RadGal70

              their own businesses, which is a real driver for economic growth.

              The most violent element in society is ignorance.

              by Mr MadAsHell on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 08:46:52 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

          •  A lot of the reduction is from (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            bear83, ratcityreprobate, I love OCD

            people retiring. Voluntarily.

            We DO have a huge baby boom population that's starting to retire, you know. And if they're not retiring completely, they sure as hell will be cutting back the number of hours they work.

          •  Um NO (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            I love OCD

            people will voluntarily choose to leave a job or work less because they no longer will have to work two shit jobs to pay for their ridiculously expensive insurance premiums.

            This is your world These are your people You can live for yourself today Or help build tomorrow for everyone -8.75, -8.00

            by DisNoir36 on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 09:31:18 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

      •  You've got it wrong and backwards. Fewer FTEs (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        johanus, FogCityJohn, I love OCD

        has nothing to do with the number of jobs, it has to do with the number of hours worked.
        FTE does not mean full time jobs, it means total hours worked in a period of time divided by the number of hours that is equivalent to full time in that same period of time.
        For example, a person who works 60 hours per week is 1.5 FTE. Still one person -- just more than fulltime hours.
        So fewer FTEs is not the equivalent of fewer jobs. In fact, it might translate into more job openings -- if someone was working two jobs in order to afford health insurance and because of the ACA can now reduce to one job -- that second job is now available perhaps to an unemployed person.

        While Democrats work to get more people to vote, Republicans work to ensure those votes won't count.

        by Tamar on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 07:30:36 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Counter argument from Dems (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        I love OCD

        is that workers are now free to reduce their hours or retire and keep their health insurance - FREEDOM, BABY!

        In contrast, the GOP plan is work until you DIE!

        Election Day is Nov 4th, 2014 It's time for the Undo button on the 2010 Election.

        by bear83 on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 08:05:01 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  This is flat-out wrong. (0+ / 0-)

        No, it does NOT sat the ACA costs jobs. It says many people will choose to quit their jobs - but the employers will still have the job to fill, and will hire someone else.

        You're correct, that the right has complained that the ACA could enable some people to quit jobs they hate, or quit to devote time to family.  They think that's a bug.  Less rabid people thinks it's a feature.

    •  I also suspect the CBO is wrong about this. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Stude Dude, Caniac41

      Current statistics show that the percentage of people working is increasing in the 55-65 age group, probably because they're finally starting to realize that they don't have enough saved up to retire.

      I'll bet that in the next 5-10 years we're going to see an increase both in the number of people working past age 65 and in the number of formerly retired people rejoining the job market as they realize they're running out of money.

      •  But (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        bear83

        they won't work full time hours. They won't need to, they'll be collecting SS. And besides, until age 70 you CAN'T make unlimited money and not get penalized in your SS.

        So THAT might be the big driver in dropping those full time hours. It's not worth it.

        It wasn't for my husband. He gets SS, and he works part time. He retired early and went to part time because he works less and winds up at about the same place. A lot of older workers who don't make a lot will likely be looking at it the same way.

      •  That's already happened. (0+ / 0-)

        I think Laura Clawson posted a diary about this sometime last year.  She showed that workforce participation was declining in all age groups save in the 55-64 and 65 and older cohorts.  The greatest increase was in the latter group, and the reason seems to be the one you identify -- people who have reached retirement age and who realize they don't have enough money to stop working.

        "Ça c'est une chanson que j'aurais vraiment aimé ne pas avoir écrite." -- Barbara

        by FogCityJohn on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 09:25:12 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Well, it's Nye by a hypothesis (4+ / 0-)

    Followed that debate on Twitter while waiting in the car, reading both "sides" - wow. I think we need a bigger boat.

    •  Ham won the "debate" simply by virtue of it (6+ / 0-)

      having happened.

      He could never have bought such a vast level of exposure and publicity.

      Nye did him a tremendous favor.

      In the end, reality always wins.

      by Lenny Flank on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 05:05:08 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Maybe.... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        hulibow

        I've seen a few skeptics and cynics raving about Nye winning over at Facebook. I've haven't seen any Fundies raving about Ham winning (so far).

        "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

        by Stude Dude on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 06:45:45 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Nope (0+ / 0-)

        Ham is in it for the money, because his Creation Museum is sinking.

        The Skeptical Teacher
        Musings of a science teacher & skeptic in an age of woo.
        Creation Museum Running Out of Cash and Going Extinct?

        He got good ticket sales for the debate, and he is selling DVDs and downloads of the debate to good Christian Creationists to show to each other and to their children. He means for this to go into the Creationist homeschool and private school curricula to show what a successful dragon-slayer and great all-around guy he is, and in the process to sell more tickets and more merchandise.

        He and his people thought they won so big, they are going to brag about it to their children, who will thus get a strong exposure to a real technologist (Nye designed a part in the Boeing 747) talking about real science. I predict that it will lead to a modest increase in the number of Fundielings falling away from the Faith, even though Nye made some unforced errors that let Ham score a few points.

        Ceterem censeo, gerrymandra delenda est

        by Mokurai on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 08:09:07 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Noah did n/t (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      marykk, rl en france, hulibow

      "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

      by Greg Dworkin on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 05:07:11 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Ham claimed that genetics pioneer (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Stude Dude, hulibow

      Craig Venter is a creationist.  However, Wikipedia says that he is an atheist.

      I know that Wikipedia is not always correct, but it makes a lot more sense than Ham.

      www.tapestryofbronze.com

      by chloris creator on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 06:02:25 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Change of Heart? (9+ / 0-)

    I notice that Drudge and CNBC took the "Obamacare Kills 2.5 Million Jobs" headlines down. Maybe they've realized that those were false statements? Maybe Nye convinced Ham that he's been hawking a false headline all of these years......... is hell freezing over?

    Anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that 'my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge.' ― Isaac Asimov

    by GoodGod on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 04:49:21 AM PST

  •  McTurtle on Immigration: No way Jose.... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skohayes, hulibow, rl en france
  •  My son is one of those statistics (39+ / 0-)

    that the CBO is theorizing -- left a full-time job with benefits to go freelance/part-time/start his own shop, knowing that he would have an option other than COBRA. He hopes to earn enough to exceed the subsidy cut-off -- but worst case, if his first year is rockier than that, he can collect the subsidy retroactively on his taxes. He's not a huge risk-taker, so this eliminated one big barrier to doing what he wanted.

    And I know a lot of people in that 55-65 bracket who may well ease back to part-time or quit entirely, as a number have basically stayed in whatever job they could find that had health insurance.

    We have no idea how the employment-health insurance link has warped our economy and our individual choices. Come back in five years (assuming the GOP doesn't kill the ACA before then) and we'll see what a difference it's made in people's choices.

  •  Stupid Cincinnati Enquirer Headline This Morning (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skillet, hulibow, marykk, SoCalSal

    "How Can We Know ?" It's about that creationism debate which was held just across the river in KY last night.

    I wish the argument would move on to higher biblical criticism and the fact that Noah and his Ark is just a story to illustrate a religious point.

    It is fun, though, to think about Jesus riding a dinosaur.

    "Obama inherited so much Republican-strewn garbage, it makes my head spin to think about it." Bill in Portland, Maine

    by wild hair on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 04:51:46 AM PST

    •  That would require (6+ / 0-)

      someone with more knowledge of theology than Ken Hamm. He's just drumming up support for his museum.
      holy shit this is awesome photo jesus-raptor.jpg

      Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

      by skohayes on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 05:11:05 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  missing the Uzi, though. nt (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        skohayes, Heart of the Rockies

        Help us to save free conscience from the paw Of hireling wolves whose gospel is their maw. ~John Donne

        by ohiolibrarian on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 05:54:00 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  And I loved Nye saying several times that Hamm's (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        bear83

        source was a book that was translated many times to end up finally in American English (and then he compared it to the game of telephone).
        Exactly.
        Unless Hamm can read the Bible in its original language, he can't claim to really know what it says.
        Not that I would base any view of the origins of the universe on the original Bible anyway.

        While Democrats work to get more people to vote, Republicans work to ensure those votes won't count.

        by Tamar on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 07:45:11 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  The Fundys always set up a false dichotomy (7+ / 0-)

      That either you accept all the stories in the Bible are literally true or you're saying the Bible is lying, so you're obviously the spawn of Satan's buttcrack.
      "Gawd duzint Lie!" etc.
      Metaphors? Poetic imagery?
      They never heard of them.
      Its quite easy to make a case that the KJB stands at the very summit of Western lit, perhaps rivaled only by Shakespeare. But thats not enough. They want to treat it like its a combination history book-science text.
      Because theyre cowards, fools, or cheap conmen.

      •  They claim to be literalists yet manage to avoid (5+ / 0-)

        doing what Jesus plainly said to do.

        You're not going to find much support for "tough love" from the Gospels.  For example, in one parable God (as the father in the "Prodigal Son" story) doesn't care about his estranged son's misbehavior, and responds with what one commentator called "insanely generous love".

        Then there's Jesus saying things like, "Whatever you did to help the least {wealthy} you did for me." and vice versa.

        Jesus's primary topics were love of others, regardless of whether you liked them or not, helping others, especially those poorer than you, and that the poor were "blessed".

        Many (most?) rightwing Christians claim they need to withhold love from people who don't agree with them, that the government is evil for taxing them to support people who are poor, and that the poor are lazy and lack morals.

        And they do this while focusing the majority of their time and energy around issues related to sexuality, a topic that Jesus rarely addressed and generally only in response to questions.

      •  actually Hamm said that some of the bible is (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        mmacdDE

        poetic, some history, etc. Nye suggested that Hamm was picking and choosing which parts to consider literally and which parts to view as figurative.
        I've always said that the people who say they follow the bible literally don't. They follow the parts they agree with. And even those parts are questionable since they're translations of translations of translations (as Nye so effectively pointed out).

        While Democrats work to get more people to vote, Republicans work to ensure those votes won't count.

        by Tamar on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 07:47:22 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  There was a time when the official Bible (0+ / 0-)

          was a translation of a translation (Hebrew and Aramaic to Greek Septuagint to Latin) but translations from the Vulgate to King James and later mostly been from the usual Masoretic Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek texts, with some manuscript variation. Many missionary bibles are translations from English to some local language, where there are no scholars who know all three source languages and the target language.

          Ceterem censeo, gerrymandra delenda est

          by Mokurai on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 08:52:38 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I'm no expert but my understanding is that the (0+ / 0-)

            King James version got lots of things wrong (but is very poetic).

            While Democrats work to get more people to vote, Republicans work to ensure those votes won't count.

            by Tamar on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 09:22:56 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  It is very Christological (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              I love OCD, Tamar

              twisting the prophets to seemingly predict Jesus.

              I own a copy of a Jewish version of the Jewish parts of the KJV with the Jewish sentiments put back in, and the Hebrew and in some cases Aramaic on facing pages with the English.

              It remains an astonishing mixture of wisdom with arrant nonsense, documenting a millennium of spiritual growth of an entire people.

              Ceterem censeo, gerrymandra delenda est

              by Mokurai on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 09:32:12 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

    •  What is that religious point? nt (0+ / 0-)

      "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

      by Stude Dude on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 06:48:00 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  The CBO report, page 117: (16+ / 0-)
    The estimated reduction stems almost entirely from a net decline in the amount of labor that workers choose to supply, rather than from a net drop in businesses’ demand for labor, so it will appear almost entirely as a reduction in labor force participation and in hours worked relative to what would have occurred otherwise rather than as an increase in unemployment (that is, more workers seeking but not finding jobs) or underemployment (such as part-time workers who would prefer to work more hours per week).
  •  If Republicans are going to LIE about CBO (12+ / 0-)

    saying that ACA is going to cost 2.5 million jobs in ads, all Democrats have to do is run ads saying the OPPOSITE that CBO has said that ACA will create millions of jobs.

    President Obama, January 9, 2012: "Change is hard, but it is possible. I've Seen it. I've Lived it."

    by Drdemocrat on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 05:03:16 AM PST

    •  I know, right? (6+ / 0-)

      It's not like Chuck Todd is going to do any fact checking.

    •  Yeah, but deep pockets get to talk very loudly. (5+ / 0-)

      First "this":

      Americans for Prosperity, the advocacy group backed by the billionaire industrialists Charles and David Koch, is emerging as the most powerful ally of the Republican Party ahead of the 2014 midterm elections, bombarding Senate Democrats with early air attacks that could help the GOP retake the Senate.
      And an opinion piece by Nancy Pelosi, "Reversing the grievous error of Citizens United" in which she makes a very pertinent observation (we all know it):
      This has been the impact over the past four years of the Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision. The narrow court majority, overturning decades of precedent, opened the floodgates to millions of dollars in secret, special-interest spending on elections. Indeed, Citizens United shook the foundation of our democracy: the principle that, in the United States of America, it is the voices of the people, not the bank accounts of the privileged few, that determine the outcome of our elections and the policies of our government.

      Our Founders established a government of the many, not a government of the money. That’s what the American people deserve.

      Now, as I've always said, an alert, observant and sensible electorate could not be swayed by tons of money dumped into propaganda rivaling that of 20th Century dictatorships. Unfortunately reality is that far too many "citizens" pay more attention to a new outfit to wear than the facts and record of those running for office and are swayed by sound bites and blurbs. They simply sell their vote, often against their best interest, to the ads money buys. Though I give Pelosi's points in that article to correct (somewhat) the imbalance brought by that subversive Citizens United decision a snowflake's chance in hell it is something we should do to preserve some semblance of democracy in this country. Of course that requires people not falling for the campaigns backed by all that deep dark money later this year.

      The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

      by pelagicray on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 05:48:05 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  It's time for Democrats to start raising money for (4+ / 0-)

        a deep pockets that are going to say the OPPOSITE and not just in presidential election years.

        President Obama, January 9, 2012: "Change is hard, but it is possible. I've Seen it. I've Lived it."

        by Drdemocrat on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 06:00:42 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  I think of vampires. (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          wintergreen8694, rl en france

          Yes, but then our many pockets have been damaged by the growing disparity of wealth and the economy those deep pockets brought us. Some of us have less ability to continually contribute as we have helped family hit by job loss and less serious impacts. I've less "disposable" cash now myself than even five years ago.

          Why do I think of vampires? Those deep pockets have used them to destroy jobs, elect people feathering their nests while sucking the green blood from those outside the 1% and 5%. Democrats are having too often to depend on those small contributors who themselves are being sucked dry by the vampire of the TP/GOP and its backers.

          Unless we wake up, gather strength enough this year to drive a sharp oaken stake into the heart of that monster we may well end up in an England like world described by Dickens where the "gentry" ruled and sucked all economic benefit to the themselves.

          The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

          by pelagicray on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 06:10:06 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  Deep pockets (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Stude Dude

          By and large, the people with deep pockets fund ads and politicians that will help them keep those deep pockets filled. Their donations are an investment and they expect a return. There are exceptions, but it's a losing game.
          And of course more deep pockets investment in Democrats just means the Democrats are more beholden to those interests and it's the Democrats most receptive to corporate power that will get that investment. That's a good part of how we got where we are.

          We can't fight Republican big money with big money of our own because big money isn't on our side. It's that simple.

          The Empire never ended.

          by thejeff on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 06:53:04 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  One point (4+ / 0-)

        We did elect Obama twice, and have held the Senate (even gained a seat) that whole time.
        So I believe we still have a somewhat observant and sensible electorate.
        But I agree, we need to reform campaign finance laws.
        We need more progressives in the House, at the very least, to even consider reform, though.

        Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

        by skohayes on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 06:04:18 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Unfortunately the "somewhat observant and (5+ / 0-)

          sensible electorate" isn't sensible enough to understand that acting in presidential years is just not enough. I just watched the off off year Virginia election. Yes, "we won," but if you look at the numbers in that squeaker, particularly the AG race and then in the specials to fill vacated Senate seats, that electorate for the most part took another holiday.

          I know entirely too many on our side in those presidentials that cannot seem to grasp the basics. For example, 2009 here. Yay! WE ELECTED OBAMA! VIRGINIA TURNED BLUE!

          Then the next year we let a state legislature and all statewide offices go mad dog red. Thus we got a state electoral map enshrining a red tilt for the next decade through gerrymandering and some truly idiotic laws and actions—including a governor now under indictment for corruption.

          Kinda like the flood threatened homeowner sandbagging the front door and going off to watch a ball game and have some beers leaving the back door open.

          The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

          by pelagicray on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 06:18:15 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  That would mean the Democrats (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Stude Dude

      got their act together and properly promoted themselves and their positions.

  •  Good on CVS (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    One Opinion, Stude Dude, askew

    Local company.  I once worked at their corporate offices doing IT support as a contractor.  Long hours, little pay.

  •  What next, alcohol & guns? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    wintergreen8694
    Why CVS thinks it can win big by ending cigarette sales
    Just saying, it's an awfully slippery slope when you stop selling legal products just because you're concerned about things like the consumer's well being.

    Quite frankly, that's not what this country and its corporate masters is about.  What's happening out there?  In my worst nightmares, in fact, I see this type of mentality paving the way for things like legalized marijuana and gay marriage . .. .. (which CVS may start providing to augment lost revenues from cigarettes, who knows).

  •  ... (17+ / 0-)
    Re CBO coverage: "If you are explaining, you’re losing” say the pundits tendentiously. Except if you’re Chris Christie. Then it’s premature.
    @DemFromCT

    "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

    by Greg Dworkin on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 05:17:40 AM PST

  •  ... (11+ / 0-)
    •  Why are most of my favorite (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      wintergreen8694

      people from Vermont? McKibben, Thom Hartmann, Bernie. I'd trade the entire AZ congressional delegation for any of them.

      It is not the private interests of the individual that create lasting fellowship among men, but rather the goals of humanity. ~ The I Ching, 13th Hexagram

      by Blue Intrigue on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 06:03:09 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Kaine Gets It (5+ / 0-)
      “I believe the key environmental impact of this project is not the literal construction but rather the market signal that construction would send.  We currently have the tools to build an energy strategy to get cleaner tomorrow than today.  Building this pipeline would dramatically ramp up capacity for tar sands oil that moves us in the opposite direction of an innovative, make-it-cleaner approach.  President Obama has made his position clear that this project would be acceptable only if it does not significantly exacerbate the problem of carbon pollution.  In my view, there is now enough evidence to conclude that construction of this pipeline is not in America’s long-term interest.”
      Construction of the Tar Sands Pipeline effectively guarantees that the tar sands oil is extracted and burned. Those who favor or are resigned to the Tar Sand Pipeline should answer this question:
      What do our foremost climate scientists say the impact will be if the tar sands oil is extracted and burned?
      Catastrophe. Game over for the climate, according to James Hansen. We cannot do anything that facilitates such horror, which is precisely what constructing the pipeline will do. Obama should listen to Kaine.
  •  New York Times' pitiful display yesterday (5+ / 0-)

    Their first headline on the CBO report could've been taken directly from Fox News or Drudge--it said "Health Law to Cost Two Million Jobs" or something quite similar. The content of the article wasn't much better than that, unfortunately. Such a headline leads me to conclude the editor who chose the blaring headline had simply heard what GOP politicians and right-wing screaming heads had said regarding the CBO report and thus the editor figured "hey, if they're all saying it, it's gotta be accurate." What a pathetic display by the Times. It only took them a few hours to put a far more measured and accurate headline up, indicating that they 1) had actually read the report by that time and 2) had seen the Dem/liberal pushback against the distortions of the right, which only reinforces my earlier conclusion that the editor chose the "gotcha" headline based on what the right was yelling. As such, I personally believe that editor should be fired. When fucking CNN Is showing greater restraint and nuance than the New York Times, that's a problem.

  •  Bravo, CVS! Message from the CVS CEO (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ChemBob, wintergreen8694, Stude Dude

    Finally, a CEO does the right thing!

    CVS/pharmacy will stop selling cigarettes and all tobacco products at its more than 7,600 stores nationwide by October 1, 2014

    Ending the sale of cigarettes and tobacco products at CVS/pharmacy is simply the right thing to do for the good of our customers and our company. The sale of tobacco products is inconsistent with our purpose – helping people on their path to better health.

    As the delivery of health care evolves with an emphasis on better health outcomes, reducing chronic disease and controlling costs, CVS Caremark is playing an expanded role through our 26,000 pharmacists and nurse practitioners. By removing tobacco products from our retail shelves, we will better serve our patients, clients and health care providers while positioning CVS Caremark for future growth as a health care company. Cigarettes and tobacco products have no place in a setting where health care is delivered. This is the right thing to do.

    Let's hope it's the start of a new wave!

    “Hardworking men and women who are busting their tails in full-time jobs shouldn't be left in poverty.” -- Elizabeth Warren

    by Positronicus on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 06:14:40 AM PST

  •  Some one should fact check the fact checker. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    wintergreen8694, mmacdDE, SueDe

    Because they also make this statement which ties right into what the rightwingers have been saying about the "moochers". WE all know that's not true. Most people would prefer full time jobs that pay a living wage.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/...
    snip
    "One big issue: the health insurance subsidies in the law. That’s a substantial benefit that decreases as people earn more money, so at a certain point, a person has to choose between earning more money or continuing to get the maximum help with health insurance payments. In other words, people might work longer and harder, but actually earn no more, or earn even less, money. That is a disincentive to work. (The same thing happens when people qualify for food stamps or other social services.)"
    snip

    But very few of the kinds of jobs that too many people have to accept do not pay a living wage.

    Until that happens people will be forced to work within the system as it is. If that means working less hours to qualify for aid, it is only because working more hours doesn't equal the amount of aid they would have to forego.

    It is the same for seniors on Social Security. We can work and still receive our full S. S benefits, but after a certain point it is counter-productive because then we have to pay more in taxes which doesn't equal out to the amount of extra money earned. There is a cap on how much a retired person on S.S can earn: it used to be $25K - that number may have changed in recent years.

    Seniors still have to pay taxes on Social Security even though we already paid taxes on the money we earned as we paid into the system. So after a certain point: unless you have always earned big bucks and can continue to do so, staying in the work force doesn't make a lot of sense.

    •  Dean Baker of CEPR is also wondering about NYT (0+ / 0-)

      reporting on economics.  In this article he points out another piece of bad reporting on the subject of income inequality and wonders Inequality and Mobility: Is the NYT Writing News Stories from Republican Talking Points?

      Incredibly the piece presents the Republicans' official line uncritically, telling readers:

      "Republicans generally argue that government should do little; a free market and a growing economy will create opportunity. Their ideas to overhaul education, job-training and safety-net programs often double as budget-cutting initiatives."

      Of course Republicans argue that the government should do lots of things to redistribute income upward, they just don't highlight the fact that the government is doing these things.

      Baker is forever taking on shoddy, incomplete and misleading reporting in both papers, but until lately the Post has been on the receiving end of his ire.  Now it seems the Times is catching up.

      "In this world of sin and sorrow there is always something to be thankful for; as for me, I rejoice that I am not a Republican." - H. L. Mencken

      by SueDe on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 09:28:56 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Tweet of God-is only following one person. (4+ / 0-)

    Justin Bieber. That is brilliant.

    PS-I've met David Javerbaum, he's a very cool, quiet guy.

  •  Harry Reid's Opposition to Fast Track TPP (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Stude Dude, ratcityreprobate

    Obama Official Said to Complain About Reid Trade Comment

    White House Chief of Staff Denis McDonough telephoned Reid to say he was unhappy that the majority leader publicly went against the White House, particularly on the day after the president’s State of the Union address Jan. 28, said the aides, who spoke on condition of anonymity to describe a private call. ...

    On the call with McDonough, Reid said his opposition to going ahead with fast-track trade authority wouldn’t change, one of the aides said. The majority leader’s staff had informed Obama’s aides of Reid’s opposition ahead of the State of the Union speech, this aide said.

  •  Golly. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Stude Dude
    The CBO released its Budget and Economic Outlook for the years 2014 to 2024 on February 4, which projected in part that the number of full-time workers would decline by about 2 million by 2017.
    Sure are a lot of Baby Boomers nearing retirement age.
    Right?

    "Non-violence is a powerful and just weapon which cuts without wounding and ennobles the man who wields it. It is a sword that heals." - Martin Luther King, Jr.

    by Gentle Giant on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 06:44:46 AM PST

  •  Asking for faulty product advice? (0+ / 0-)

    I just bought an used Up Plus 2 printer off eBay. The thing won't connect the USB to any of the ports of any of my computers. After a little Googling, I found that the under-engineered little bastard is prone to this because static discharge from something as basic  and common as connecting the USB cable can cause this. Today, I'm going to contact the manufacturer and see how that plays out. If that doesn't pan out, I'm wondering if there's a basis for a consumer recall or class action suit? And who at which agency should I contact tp prime the former? Thanks!

    "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

    by Stude Dude on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 07:08:08 AM PST

  •  i am not as angry (0+ / 0-)

    at the gop for exaggerating the report on the aca as i am at the uninformed and gullible electorate for believing anything the cons say or do, how many times do the right have get caught in one of their lies for people to get it.

    fool me once shame on you fool me twice shame on me, shame on america for not being more vigilant and informed about its own self interests.

    save america defeat all republicans and conservatives

  •  On labor supply -- this is good news all around. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    mmacdDE

    Many of the people that will step away from working will be older, but not yet quite Medicare eligible. They were working full time for the insurance and will cut back to part time. That will open at least a part time job for someone younger who can eventually replace them. Or, someone will quit a job they hate to start a business or expand one they had on the side. That shift might open more than one job (the one they left and others that they might ultimately hire).

    The media seems unable to ever note, or understand, the positive side of anything.

    We have only just begun and none too soon.

    by global citizen on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 08:00:25 AM PST

  •  How can anyone (0+ / 0-)

    believe in evolution after what happened a Benghazi????

    "Trying to shovel smoke with a pitchfork in the wind... " - John Lennon

    by Paragryne on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 08:30:34 AM PST

  •  Jon Ralston tweeted me back once (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Greg Dworkin

    Me: I wish NV had been 1st to legalize mj. Would have been good for tourism and NV's libertarian reputation.
    Him: Indeed.

    IT WAS A BIG DEAL OKAY.

    "We need institutions and cultural norms that make us better than we tend to be. It seems to me that the greatest challenge we now face is to build them." -Sam Harris, neuroscientist

    by MarthaPeregrine on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 09:19:36 AM PST

  •  The San Diego Union (0+ / 0-)

    put the CBC  issue on the front page.   And, of course, emphasized the "job killing' aspect of it. No surprise,given Doug Manchester's politics.

    What irks me about it is the CBC report, which says that labor would be behind the loss of jobs. No - it's management that will be behind the loss of jobs, by pulling a "Papa John"and cutting workers' hours to keep from having to pay for health care.

    I am not religious, and did NOT say I enjoyed sects.

    by trumpeter on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 09:37:40 AM PST

  •  If this is a REAL question, here's help, Michael. (0+ / 0-)
    Given all this, why are the first news headlines on the CBO report depicting it as calling Obamacare a job killer?
    The answer is because (to paraphrase an excellent bumper sticker), the so-called "liberal" media is only as "liberal" as its conservative, compliant, corporate owners allow.

    "Push the button, Max!" Jack Lemmon as Professor Fate, The Great Race

    by bartcopfan on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 10:07:43 AM PST

  •  We are not at the end of Tobacco Road, (0+ / 0-)

    but we can see it from here. Only 18% of Americans smoke now, but the cost to our society is still vast. About 500,000 of us will die this year from smoking. And this addiction costs us more than we spend on education, for example. I wonder whether we might not try something radical to hasten the end of tobacco. The Federal government should issue a 5-year warning that, on January 1st 2020, it will be illegal to sell tobacco or grow it commercially in the United States. This gives smokers time to switch to E-cigarettes or quit. It would also really push non-smokers not to start. To be sure, there would be a few dedicated souls who would grow and cure their own tobacco, but it would be a small number.

    Smokers often talk of their freedom to smoke, but your freedom of action is limited by how much you ask me to subsidize it and the cost is far too high even now for us to continue to enable this addiction.

    Voting is the means by which the public is distracted from the realities of power and its exercise.

    by Anne Elk on Wed Feb 05, 2014 at 11:11:07 AM PST

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