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Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) speaks during a  news conference to announce legal action against government surveillance and the National Security Agency's overreach of power on Capitol Hill in Washington June 13, 2013. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas (UNITED STATES - Tags
Carnival barker Rand Paul.

I'm sure this is a totally principled effort and not purely political grandstanding by the junior senator from Kentucky who is looking for any traction he can get for 2016 that doesn't involve Monica Lewinsky.
Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul (R) and Matt Kibbe, president of the conservative organizing group Freedomworks, are filing a lawsuit against President Obama and other members of his administration over the National Security Agency's collection of phone metadata, a practice they believe violates the 4th amendment. In a YouTube video released yesterday, Paul compared the government surveillance to the warrantless searches practiced by the British military prior to the American independence. [...]

The lawsuit includes Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, Director of National Security Agency Keith Alexander and FBI Director, James Comey, as well as Obama, as defendants. Ken Cuccinelli, a former attorney general of Virginia who lost a gubernatorial bid in the state last fall, is the suit's lead counsel. In a statement released by RandPac, the main super PAC supporting the senator and his top issues, he said," We have assembled a legal team and we expect to be opposed by the vast resources of the federal government, yet I am optimistic that we will prevail, because we are seeking to protect a cornerstone of the Constitution.”

The most we can hope from Paul's grandstanding is that doesn't derail real efforts by serious lawmakers to rein in the program legislatively. Paul's a sideshow.

Originally posted to Joan McCarter on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 10:35 AM PST.

Also republished by My Old Kentucky Kos and Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (26+ / 0-)

    "The NSA’s capability at any time could be turned around on the American people, and no American would have any privacy left, such is the capability to monitor everything. [...] There would be no place to hide."--Frank Church

    by Joan McCarter on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 10:35:30 AM PST

  •  collect all you want, AquaBuddha (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Pluto, stone clearing, Aquarius40, doroma

    Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "I’m not the strapping young Muslim socialist that I used to be" - Barack Obama 04/27/2013 (@eState4Column5).

    by annieli on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 10:38:55 AM PST

  •  Why aren't progressives leading this charge? (25+ / 0-)

    How did we let right-wing a**holes take the lead on this issue?

    None are so hopelessly enslaved, as those who falsely believe they are free. The truth has been kept from the depth of their minds by masters who rule them with lies. -Johann von Goethe

    by gjohnsit on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 11:33:18 AM PST

    •  AGREE! (8+ / 0-)

      I'm disgusted that Paul is out front on this.  Yes, where are the progressives??  It needs to be done, but he's not who I want doing this.  

    •  The fruits of partisanship (4+ / 0-)

      "Pragmatic centrism" and all that takes precedence over the sort of extremist fringe purity pony you naively demand.

      "Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will." ~Frederick Douglass

      by ActivistGuy on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 11:59:49 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  They are. Didn't you read the article? (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Pluto, stevemb, doroma, poco

      Down at the end, it mentions an existing suit by the ACLU.

      Art is the handmaid of human good.

      by joe from Lowell on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 12:00:56 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  IMHO I don't count the ACLU (6+ / 0-)

        as a progressive organization.
           To me they are non-political. They've come to the defense of extreme right-wingers as often as extreme left-wingers. That's why I respect them (even if the right-wing hates them).

          Regrardless, where are the progressive politicians? Where are the Democrats?

        None are so hopelessly enslaved, as those who falsely believe they are free. The truth has been kept from the depth of their minds by masters who rule them with lies. -Johann von Goethe

        by gjohnsit on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 12:09:31 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Is that what a progressive is? Someone who... (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          doroma, poco

          sides with the progressives, and against the right-wingers, regardless of the principle?

          Some of the client-plaintiffs in the welfare-rights cases were conservatives. Did that make the groups that argued those welfare-rights cases non-progressive?

          Progressivism has to be more than just siding with the people on your team

          Art is the handmaid of human good.

          by joe from Lowell on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 12:19:30 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  Hold it - fallacy of compound question (0+ / 0-)
          Regrardless, where are the progressive politicians? Where are the Democrats?
          There is no identity between those two classes except in the person of Barbara Lee, who has been against all of this shit since day one.

          That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

          by enhydra lutris on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 02:35:45 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  Progressives have been ahead on this (0+ / 0-)

      ever since Frank Church helped create the FISA Court's ability to oversee data collections and Obama along with congressional liberals has been working to reverse the abuses of the Bush era.  Some may, however, regret that emo-progs have waited so long to jump on to the Libertarian band wagon opposing Obama.

      •  Yeah, Obama's been a real leader in this area. (4+ / 0-)

        Those damn johnny-come-lately emoprog libertarians are so transparent. Clearly their only reason for caring about this issue is because they just want to hate on Obama.

        They were nowhere to be found on this issue when Bush was president, I'm sure.




        Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. ~ Garcia

        by DeadHead on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 12:41:00 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  If people spent more time intelligently reading (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Inland, poco

          the documents Snowden dumped instead of entertaining their distrust of government they would discover that beginning in early 2009 the NSA not only increased its requests for warrants to examine protected contents but also explicitly forbid using protected content without warrants.  But during the Bush years these niceties had been dispensed with.  And from documents released through FOIA it is seen that Frank Church's FISA court was more proactive in shaping NSA surveillance than Libertarian propagandists want people believe.  What is alarming is that so many self styled "progressives" are willing to accept Rand Paul as a hero while denouncing Obama as an enemy of liberty.  

          •  Questions: (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            GreatLakeSailor

            Who's accepting Rand Paul as a "hero?" People here, or elsewhere?

            Do you feel we should just "trust" people like James Clapper?

            You don't think people have been "intelligently reading" Snowden's documents? What about this person?




            Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. ~ Garcia

            by DeadHead on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 02:35:13 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  And going back to why it's a yawner. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Jack Hare

            Obama administration's program is pursuant to statute and approved by a judge.  Bush's program was pursuant to an express claim that a wartime president didn't need either: in fact, neither congress nor the judiciary could stop it.

            It takes a particular dense person to say the programs are "the same".
            The distinction is the same distiction as the one between a search with a warrant and one without.  

            Maybe a case can be made that the program should be illegal but that's not going to win purity points in the competition to denounce.  So it's down to blog LCD of purity challenges.  And that doesn't have legs in the real world.

            The dossier on my DKos activities during the Bush administration will be presented on February 3, 2014, with an appendix consisting an adjudication, dated "a long time ago", that I am Wrong.

            by Inland on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 04:17:17 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Thankfully (0+ / 0-)

              No one's saying they're "the same," as in, identical.

              It's the lack of outrage and excuse-making that's changed from one president to the next.




              Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. ~ Garcia

              by DeadHead on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 05:32:01 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Of course the reactions changed. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                sviscusi

                Because the programs aren't "the same"; you're right to be thankful nobody is so stupid as to say they are.  

                Why would people have the same reaction to two different things?  Unless they were some sort of knee jerk reactionaries who would rather assert the utmost of purity in sort of a bloggy victory rather than deal with realities.

                Thankfully, I'm not a person like that.  

                The dossier on my DKos activities during the Bush administration will be presented on February 3, 2014, with an appendix consisting an adjudication, dated "a long time ago", that I am Wrong.

                by Inland on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 06:34:51 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  No, that isn't the reason. (0+ / 0-)

                  Obama is the reason.

                  If Snowden disclosed under Bush, would you be making the same excuses as you are now?




                  Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. ~ Garcia

                  by DeadHead on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 07:13:43 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Disclosed what? (0+ / 0-)

                    You've already admitted the programs aren't the same  

                    The dossier on my DKos activities during the Bush administration will be presented on February 3, 2014, with an appendix consisting an adjudication, dated "a long time ago", that I am Wrong.

                    by Inland on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 05:34:21 AM PST

                    [ Parent ]

    •  Because hopefully progressives understand... (0+ / 0-)

      ...that the recent admittance of the NSA that they were only bulk collecting domestic landline metadata would mean that the court rulings from the late '70s and early '80s still apply. Those rulings specifically stated that landline metadata was the property of the phone companies alone, and that individual citizens couldn't expect their 4th amendment rights to extend to the exclusive property of a private company.

      •  So don't worry about it? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        DeadHead

        You can trust the domestic spying program that Bush/Cheney set up to not violate your privacy? Is that what you saying?

        None are so hopelessly enslaved, as those who falsely believe they are free. The truth has been kept from the depth of their minds by masters who rule them with lies. -Johann von Goethe

        by gjohnsit on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 12:28:41 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  I'm thinking you mean admission (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        DeadHead, GreatLakeSailor

        not admittance. I find your defense of domestic spying to be misguided, at best.

        Il est dangereux d’avoir raison dans des choses où des hommes accrédités ont tort. - Voltaire
        Don't trust anyone over 84414 - BentLiberal

        by BentLiberal on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 01:42:47 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  "Progressives" have been trying, but they (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      BradyB, GreatLakeSailor

      have to fight "pragmatists", "centrists", "liberals" and almost 100% of the Democratic party.

      That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

      by enhydra lutris on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 02:32:22 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  The Political Problem For Our Side... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ColoTim, quill, DeadHead

    ...is that this sort of flashy public gesture makes it easier for the opposition to grab the issue and run with it.

    On the Internet, nobody knows if you're a dog... but everybody knows if you're a jackass.

    by stevemb on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 11:35:09 AM PST

    •  Wish all our problems were so small. (5+ / 0-)

      The entire metadata collection program is a huge yawner.  Paul figures he'll fight, lose and be able to blame the federal judiciary, and he's right.  But it'll translate into a big yawn on substance and a general feeling that he's a grandstanding loser.  Like Cruz.

      The dossier on my DKos activities during the Bush administration will be presented on February 3, 2014, with an appendix consisting an adjudication, dated "a long time ago", that I am Wrong.

      by Inland on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 11:48:25 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yeah right, a 'huge yawner' (7+ / 0-)

        I totally disagree

        •  Answers the plaintive question posed above. (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          doroma, Jack Hare

          http://www.dailykos.com/...

          Why aren't progressives leading this charge?
          I have an explanation.  It's a big yawner.  

          The dossier on my DKos activities during the Bush administration will be presented on February 3, 2014, with an appendix consisting an adjudication, dated "a long time ago", that I am Wrong.

          by Inland on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 01:20:21 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Just like it was when Bush was president. (0+ / 0-)




            Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. ~ Garcia

            by DeadHead on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 02:42:55 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Nobody knows what you mean by "it". (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              doroma

              And nobody's asking.

              The dossier on my DKos activities during the Bush administration will be presented on February 3, 2014, with an appendix consisting an adjudication, dated "a long time ago", that I am Wrong.

              by Inland on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 02:51:11 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  That's your fault, not mine... (0+ / 0-)

                You were the one who first referred to "it" when you said this above:

                It's a big yawner.
                So when they figure out what you're talking about, they'll know what I'm talking about.




                Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. ~ Garcia

                by DeadHead on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 03:35:57 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  Sadly, no. (0+ / 0-)

                  You don't have the same "it" in mind. But it's pretty funny that you're trying to fake your way through it.  

                  The dossier on my DKos activities during the Bush administration will be presented on February 3, 2014, with an appendix consisting an adjudication, dated "a long time ago", that I am Wrong.

                  by Inland on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 04:03:39 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  I don't? (0+ / 0-)

                    You're a mind-reader now.

                    One of your many "talents."




                    Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. ~ Garcia

                    by DeadHead on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 05:19:07 PM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  Not mind reading. Just reading. (0+ / 0-)

                      But since you asked: no, afraid not.

                      The dossier on my DKos activities during the Bush administration will be presented on February 3, 2014, with an appendix consisting an adjudication, dated "a long time ago", that I am Wrong.

                      by Inland on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 05:31:08 PM PST

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  "No, afraid not," what? (0+ / 0-)

                        That you don't know what "it" I was referring to?




                        Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. ~ Garcia

                        by DeadHead on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 07:08:45 PM PST

                        [ Parent ]

                        •  No. (0+ / 0-)

                          That you really don't understand anything beyond bloggy meta crap and purity posing.

                          Since you asked  

                          The dossier on my DKos activities during the Bush administration will be presented on February 3, 2014, with an appendix consisting an adjudication, dated "a long time ago", that I am Wrong.

                          by Inland on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 05:36:05 AM PST

                          [ Parent ]

      •  Yeah, because collecting not only the actual (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        stevemb

        contents of any SMS text messages (hint: the reason that they are limited to 140/160 characters is because they are sent as metadata) but tracking everyone's location 24/7 is no big deal.  I hope you feel that way once they finally decide to set up something like the Sibyl System and you end up detained indefinitely (yes, Obama issued a signing statement saying that he would not do that but that does not bind any other president, such as Hillary) or even summarily executed without trial.  After all, "due process" does not necessarily mean "judicial process".

        You have watched Faux News, now lose 2d10 SAN.

        by Throw The Bums Out on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 12:01:59 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Loyal corporatists (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          stevemb, DeadHead

          will NEVER be detained.  Those whio forever justify the accelerating concentration of wealth and power in ever fewer and fewer hands will be warmly embraced in the Corporate State.  The "pragmatists" know this and act accordingly.

          "Power concedes nothing without a demand. It never did and it never will." ~Frederick Douglass

          by ActivistGuy on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 12:06:45 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  If you're talking about domestic telephone data... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Jack Hare

          ...then you're incorrect. They're not legally allowed to collect location information domestically, which is one of the reasons the NSA recently admitted that the domestic bulk collection program was limited to landline metadata and didn't include cellphones. They don't have a reliable method for removing the location data from cellphone calls yet, so they can't U.S. cellphone calls.

    •  file under: Blowback (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      stevemb

      The wingers have been looking for a real scandal to pin on Obama for years now and now they finally have it. Be sure to thank our President and authoritarian Dem reps and senators.

      "Tell the truth and run." -- Yugoslav proverb

      by quill on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 11:55:12 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  We should consider a lawsuit against (5+ / 0-)

    Congress for theft of services. We certainly aren't getting what we paid for.

    “He talks a lot and he's not very bright. And that's a combination I like in Republicans.” James Carville

    by Mokislab on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 11:35:17 AM PST

  •  He says it'll go all the way up (5+ / 0-)

    To the Supreme Court. With Rand Paul and the Cooch running this, I think Joan is right... total sideshow.

    •  Don't the courts usually punt on issues like this? (0+ / 0-)

      I thought the courts usually say a struggle between the other two branches of government is a political question.

      If I remember correctly, no court would enforce the Congressional subpoena of Karl Rove, for example.  I was disappointed the House didn't send the Sergeant at Arms to arrest Rove, and lock him up in the cell in the basement of the Capitol Building.  The courts probably wouldn't have ordered Congress to release Rove, either, on the same excuse.  

      Anyway, I'd expect the courts, at least the Supreme Court, to pass on this.  After all, if a majority of Congress is in agreement, they can deny funding to the NSA.

      We're all pretty strange one way or another; some of us just hide it better. "Normal" is a dryer setting.

      by david78209 on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 02:49:35 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Side show? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    doroma, Aquarius40

    More like freak show.

  •  Rand Paul has to trump Ted Cruz's upcoming (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ColoTim, Thomas Twinnings, HeyMikey

    scene stealing Filibuster2, for Tea Pot most likely to demand a spot on the Repo Ticket 2016.  

    Rand decided beating up on Hillary Clinton for her husband's cheating was not a winning move for now (Good rethink there Brillo), and this is as good a move as the next, since it bites at both the corporate Republicans hawks and the Obama Administration.

    Absent Rand Paul's decision, someone needed to sue the Obama administration over metadata collection.

    "Out of Many, One Nation." This is the great promise of the United States of America -9.75 -6.87

    by Uncle Moji on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 11:38:23 AM PST

    •  Good move, Randy (4+ / 0-)

      There is a lot to commend a move such as this - good politics and good principle.  I still won't vote for the guy though.

      An illusion can never be destroyed directly... SK.

      by Thomas Twinnings on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 11:49:56 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Will NEVER vote for the guy (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        poco, HeyMikey

        because I don't believe he is doing this out of principle, he seems to have plagiarized whatever "good ideas" he has, and at his base, he's a mean-spirited selfish bully whose only allegiance is to himself and his own advancement.  

        Just because I love German Shepherds and so did Herr H, isn't a vote of anything for ein Rand.

        "Out of Many, One Nation." This is the great promise of the United States of America -9.75 -6.87

        by Uncle Moji on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 12:02:41 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  He'll be the GOP nominee. He's dangerous. (0+ / 0-)

        He does the occasional thing like this that's actually a good idea. But most of his ideas are terrible.

        "The true strength of our nation comes not from the might of our arms or the scale of our wealth, but from the enduring power of our ideals." - Barack Obama

        by HeyMikey on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 08:03:49 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  C'mon, Rand's busy scheming... (0+ / 0-)

    ...how to get to the next level. You can't expect him to actually, um, legislate. Let the lawyers handle it.

    I feel like I'm taking crazy pills!

    by itsjim on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 11:38:32 AM PST

  •  Standing? (7+ / 0-)

    How will Paul demonstrate standing to sue? He'll have to show he's been the subject of NSA surveillance, and I doubt that information is going to be forthcoming.

    He has no standing as a legislator, so I don't see this suit going anywhere, no matter how egregious the NSA's conduct is. He's grandstanding, and that's sad, because this issue deserves better than that.

    "Ça c'est une chanson que j'aurais vraiment aimé ne pas avoir écrite." -- Barbara

    by FogCityJohn on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 11:41:21 AM PST

    •  issue certainly deserves better treatment, but (0+ / 0-)

      Who else in our government is doing anything significant and how likely will they be to succeed?

      I laughed when I read this:

      The most we can hope from Paul's grandstanding is that doesn't derail real efforts by serious lawmakers to rein in the program legislatively.
      These days, the term "serious lawmaker" is mostly an oxymoron regardless of party, when it comes to being responsive to the public needs.

      "Tell the truth and run." -- Yugoslav proverb

      by quill on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 12:04:32 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  The irony here ... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        quill

        is that it's quite likely Senator Paul is a subject of NSA surveillance. The agency hasn't denied it's been collecting info on members of Congress, since it's collecting info on pretty much everyone.

         But since we so far have no proof that Paul is a surveillance subject, he can't prove the injury necessary for standing. Which in this case is probably just as well. I'd rather have a serious plaintiff than a nut job like Rand Paul.

        "Ça c'est une chanson que j'aurais vraiment aimé ne pas avoir écrite." -- Barbara

        by FogCityJohn on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 12:25:23 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Agree, but it's the "nutjobs" they're watching (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          FogCityJohn

          It seems to me that there are two classes of people who might have standing in a lawsuit:

          1) Everybody. That is, they are collecting some kind of data on virtually everyone, and they have admitted that. If it can be proven that at least some of this was illegal (despite the claims of legality by supporters of these programs), then a massive class action lawsuit might be possible.

          2) Persons of interest. That is, targeted surveillance and data collection on people deemed a threat. Mostly the public thinks this means "Islamic terrorists", but there's evidence and a lot of speculation that the NSA has targeted on other groups, including human rights activists, environmentalists, hacktivists, climate change activists, etc. Who knows, maybe they take a special interest in problematic politicians like Rand Paul (or Jeff Merkley, or Alan Grayson)? Those people would have even stronger ground for legal action, but they would need to get some proof, which as you point out is the tricky bit.

          Then of course, there's the likelihood that even with evidence in hand, the courts may refuse to proceed with legal action on national security grounds, as they have so many times before...

          "Tell the truth and run." -- Yugoslav proverb

          by quill on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 01:06:04 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  Will Not Help Him In 2016. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Pluto, stevemb

    It will strengthen his libertarian base and ensure that he inherits his Dad's ability to finish a strong third in many primaries. It was amusing that the IRS phony scandals and the NSA disclosures hit the news at the same time. The GOP decided to focus on the IRS phony scandals.

  •  He's piggy-backing off your outrage (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    TheLizardKing, doroma, Aquarius40

    and he's not the only one.  Unfortunately for all you who've convinced yourselves of an impending apocalypse, Paul & Co. will be very successful, miring Congress DEEP in Republicanism for a few more years, making legislative reforms a pipe dream.

    It burns….

    'Slower Traffic - Keep Right!'

    by luvbrothel on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 11:43:37 AM PST

  •  To be sure, (6+ / 0-)

    in addition to the ACLU and EFF, some of the better legal challenges to domestic spying have come out of the conservative Judicial Watch.

    Government and laws are the agreement we all make to secure everyone's freedom.

    by Simplify on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 11:44:20 AM PST

  •  We can make fun of him, but this is (13+ / 0-)

    probably going to go over very well with a small segment of progressives. Remember all the praise Paul got when he did his fake filibuster against drones?

    Facebook
    If you say "gullible" real slow, it sounds like "green beans."

    by weatherdude on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 11:44:58 AM PST

  •  Yeah, like the 2 or 3 who care about this (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    stevemb

    are getting anywheres . . ..

    The most we can hope from Paul's grandstanding is that doesn't derail real efforts by serious lawmakers to rein in the program legislatively.
  •  I would actually like him to get someone like (4+ / 0-)

    Mark Udall (D - Colorado) as a co-plaintiff.  Mark Udall is up for election this fall and he could use some support to fight off the tea party crowd here in Colorado.  Mark has been trying to fight against this NSA program for years, but he's been hamstrung by not being able to present evidence and even with Snowden's releases, he still knows more than he can say.  However, joining Rand Paul (and yes, I know about Rand Paul's issues, his ultimate agenda and the rest) would give this lawsuit a bit more gravitas, would make it bipartisan and might have more ability to get Congress to finally act rather than being able to dismiss it as Rand Paul electioneering.

    We need this program reined in and if it takes an unholy alliance between a Democrat and Rand Paul, I would sanction him doing this.

  •  I am just glad someone is doing it.. (6+ / 0-)

    Dems wont.. its abysmal.

    "We need a revolution away from the plutocracy that runs Government."

    by hangingchad on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 11:50:05 AM PST

  •  We should not be giving this issue to Republicans. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Pluto, stevemb

    And that's exactly what's happening.

    Thank gob for religious extremists. Because if they didn't exist, and continuously fuck up elections, I'm convinced Republicans would be making soylent green out of all of us by now.

  •  I don't care why he's doing it, he's doing it (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Pluto, Isara, stevemb, aliasalias

    I support this lawsuit, and we can all support it or file lawsuits of our own.

  •  Pass the popcorn (6+ / 0-)

    He retained the Cuch as lead counsel. What could possibly go wrong? Open mouth...Insert vaginal probe.

    “He talks a lot and he's not very bright. And that's a combination I like in Republicans.” James Carville

    by Mokislab on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 11:56:49 AM PST

  •  is this a bad time to tell Paul (4+ / 0-)


    that HE is a member of the federal government?

    "Kossacks are held to a higher standard. Like Hebrew National hot dogs." - blueaardvark

    by louisev on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 11:58:57 AM PST

  •  Kicking a dead horse (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    doroma

    The government spying program will not end, it just won't. This is a ruse to make Paul seem reasonable on something, anything. That ship has sailed. I will believe he has something valid to say about privacy and personal freedom when he condemns GOP for infringing on women's right to safe and legal abortion.

    “He talks a lot and he's not very bright. And that's a combination I like in Republicans.” James Carville

    by Mokislab on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 12:06:33 PM PST

  •  We shouldn't dismiss Rand so contemptuosly (0+ / 0-)

    Lot of people including the author of the post are mocking Paul as someone who is  serious about civil liberties.  I tend to think he is a staunch defender of civil liberties like his father.  This is not going to be a big winner for Paul with the Republican base at large so we should give him the benefit of the doubt.  Secondly, though I may find many of his other positions ridiculous (as probably do most of the people on Dailykos), progressives should looks to work with Paul, Cucinelli, and Kibbe to check abuses of the NSA.  Strength through numbers.  When left and right some together, its easier to make a stronger case to the public at large.  Although some dismissed Paul's drone filibuster, he was able to bring attention to this issue in a way progressives have not been able to do.  Remember Ted Olson and David Boies (each on the opposite political side of the 2000 electoro-judicial debacle of Gore v Bush) were able to successfully take down Prop 8 same sex marriage ban.  Whether it be marriage equality, net neutrality, or civil liberties, we should actively work with the opposite side to advance the positions can agree upon.

    •  If libertarians were staunch defenders... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      doroma, poco

      ...of civil liberties, then they wouldn't routinely advocate that the federal government should not have the power to enforce certain forms of civil liberties on private property.

    •  Oh Rand Paul's great on civil liberties (0+ / 0-)

      except for those who have just a tad too much melanin, or have genitalia that's on the inside or have genitalia on the outside but are attracted to other people who have genitalia on the outside.  

      But yeah other than the civil liberties of those 65+% of the people he's great on civil liberties.

  •  The clown car has a new driver. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    middleagedhousewife, doroma

    Why hasn't this guy voted to repeal and replace the Patriot Act?

    "I'm super brain. That's how they made me." - Goldfrapp

    by Beg4Nothing on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 12:25:39 PM PST

  •  Mock all you want (0+ / 0-)

    And I despise Rand Paul, but this seems to me to be a broken clock situation.  Broken clocks do tell the correct time twice a day.  

    "When fascism comes to America, it will be wrapped in the flag and carrying a cross."

    by dankester on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 12:31:33 PM PST

  •  Both Pauls offer a few appetizers (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    poco

    On the way to main course poison.

    honor the treaties. honor the honorable.

    by renzo capetti on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 01:18:01 PM PST

  •  oh the pure mr Paul is suing somebody? lol (0+ / 0-)
  •  this should lead to impeachment (0+ / 0-)

    The President has not protected and defended the constitution and this is what the lawsuit is all about.  Those of us on the left and those on the right need to join hands across America and get the constitution back as the law of the land. This President has merely carried on the egregious activities of the previous bunch.  The change we got was a short change of constitutional liberties. We're damned near broke now.

    I voted for the President in 2008 I did not vote at all in 2012.  I did not vote for for the President in 2012 because his actions did not live up to his promises.  He sold us short with nice sounding words.

    Furthermore he did not protect and defend the constitution and that is an impeachable offense in my book and I believe it is a dereliction of duty on his part.

    I'm so far left I read the socialist website and agree. But it is time for all of us peons to join hands and get our life back in order.  

    "I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness," Allen Ginsberg

    by Hermenutic on Wed Feb 12, 2014 at 04:27:21 PM PST

  •  Metadata collection is just like British searches (0+ / 0-)

    in the Revolutionary War.  Really?  This shows how poorly
    the role of government surveillance of the internet and wireless is understood by the public but could appeal to the reactionary sensibility of the Supreme Court. Of course some would argue that the government should not monitor
    the Internet and wireless at all--after all, 4th Amendment!
    I would imagine you'd need to do a lot of serious consideration to  get a handle on the issue, but as usual demagogues jump in where angels fear to tread.

    Misinformation works!-Rand Paul MD

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