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uninsured polling from Gallup, dropping rates at 5 year low
U.S. Uninsured Rate Drops in 2014 from Gallup
NY Times  on Sen. Cruz and the winning more on debt limit:
“In my view, every Republican should stand together against raising the debt ceiling without meaningful structural reform to rein in our out-of-control spending,” Mr. Cruz said Wednesday. However, when asked if he thought a default on the nation’s debt was an option, he said, “Of course not.”

But Mr. Cruz’s high-profile gambit created the drama of the day.

Senate Republicans — unwilling to default on the nation’s debt but hoping to avoid voting for any debt ceiling increase — seethed at Mr. Cruz’s move, which many said was purely political and which forced them to scramble to produce at least five votes to end debate and move on to a final vote.

Mitch McConnell must have loved it.

Greg Sargent:

Progressives and liberal lawmakers who are working hard to block the massive free trade deal being negotiated by the Obama administration have just gotten a big boost from someone they’d been aggressively courting: Nancy Pelosi.
More politics and policy below the fold.

Think Progress:

“We’re seeing a healthy growth in enrollment,” said Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Kathleen Sebelius in a conference call with reporters. According to Sebelius, an additional 6.6 million Americans have been deemed eligible for Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Plan (CHIP) during the first four months of the open enrollment period.
Sam Baker:
Obamacare Enrollment Is Back on Track
Julie Rovner:
After January Surge, More Than 3 Million Have Enrolled In Obamacare

Reaction to the January numbers was, not surprisingly, mixed.

Brian Haile of Jackson-Hewitt, who has been urging officials to move the open enrollment to dates that don't conflict with holiday spending, says the unexpectedly strong January signups prove his point.

"Given the cash flow pinch at the holidays, most lower- and middle-income consumers wait for their tax refund before they take on new financial obligations," Haile said in a statement. "So the key to enrollment success among low and middle income Americans is to offer products when those consumers have the cash to purchase what is for sale."

Insurance consultant Robert Laszewski, however, was less impressed. "The feds made a big deal in the release about getting an improved age result," he wrote in an analysis of the numbers. "But the greater challenge for them is the overall low number of people enrolling."

I like they they identify the extremely knowledgable Laszewski for what he is: on the side of insurance plans.
ACA enrollment in the federal marketplace growing faster than in state exchanges. Catching up from Oct/Nov problems. http://t.co/...
@larry_levitt
In terms of the mammogram study covered yesterday here, CBS:
The BMJ researchers said that the current screening guidelines may be too much, and should be reconsidered.

Breast cancer screening guidelines in the U.S. have been a source of debate in recent years.

The U.S. Preventative Services Task Force, a panel of medical experts that advice the government, said in 2009 that women should only get mammograms every two years starting at 50. Before that age, the decision to be tested should be between the woman and her doctor, which usually meant it was not recommended unless the woman had high risk factors for breast cancer like specific genes or family history.

The panel argued that many mammograms lead to false positive results, and were detecting cancers that were too small to need treatment, leading to unnecessary procedures.

A later JAMA study showed that women who followed the panel's recommendation were at no higher risk of late-stage cancers than women who got the test every year. However another study found that in women over 50 who had mammograms, for every one life saved, there were three women who were overdiagnosed.

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Comment Preferences

  •  snow starting to become heavy in Rhode Island (9+ / 0-)
  •  Poll: Alex Sink 42, David Jolly 35 (20+ / 0-)
    Democrat Alex Sink narrowly leads Republican David Jolly in Pinellas County's hotly contested congressional race, according to a new poll that also shows district voters deeply split over Obamacare.

    In the hard-fought and nationally watched campaign, 42 percent would vote for Sink, 35 percent for Jolly and 4 percent for Libertarian candidate Lucas Overby, according to an exclusive Tampa Bay Times/Bay News 9/WUSF Public Media poll of likely voters in Congressional District 13. The margin of error was 4 percentage points.

    http://www.tampabay.com/...

    "Tax cuts for the 1% create jobs." -- Republicans, HAHAHA - in China

    by MartyM on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 04:34:29 AM PST

  •  The snow here (5+ / 0-)

    is turning to sleet now.  It looks like we got 9-12 inches of snow outside.

    Sigline? What Sigline?

    by Khun David on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 04:34:55 AM PST

    •  where are you? (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Pinto Pony, skohayes, rl en france

      "Tax cuts for the 1% create jobs." -- Republicans, HAHAHA - in China

      by MartyM on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 04:36:40 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Here's the good thing with the freezing rain.... (4+ / 0-)

      all of the weak limbs on your trees will fall to the ground leaving you with stronger trees.....(you should see my yard....after it stops raining I can go out and get a hernia)

      •  Those branchers are takers n/t (4+ / 0-)

        And any that are on the ground for more than a month  or two shouldn't be allowed back on the tree.

        Yeah, I know... tees up corporations from never hiring anyone who is ever unemployed, even for one day, ever again.

        Surely, we'd NEVER go that crazy.

        Right?

        (Pause)

        Wow, cricket chirping is really pretty...

        :)

      •  no power x 8 days x 2 occasions a few months apart (4+ / 0-)

        here in CT because of that, a few years ago.

        No thanks.

        "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

        by Greg Dworkin on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 04:51:14 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  In the last Snowmageddon (0+ / 0-)

          on the east coast, after about 5 days without power, my brother finally bought a generator to run the refrigerator and freezer and be able to cook a little.
          I think he's finally going to get to use it again, but he's in north Jersey, so they may not see much ice.

          Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

          by skohayes on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 05:38:58 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  Care is warranted (8+ / 0-)

        I've got some big oaks whose branches are would be widow makers.  I'm watching this one through the windows.  The pines are probably more dangerous, having a propensity to snap and come down as a unit.  Putting in underground power was a real good idea.

        •  During an ice storm in the 80s, (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          salmo

          I had a friend living in Rochester, NY who did not lose power. He was the only one on his entire street that kept his power on throughout the 2-week crisis.
          He had a very crowded house for those 2 weeks.

          The same friend was driving to work the morning after the ice storm hit in a Chevy Suburban. Big vehicle. One of his neighbors was walking her dog and was waving at him and he was waving back until he realized she was waving with BOTH hands and frantically.
          He stopped just shy of a 4' deep hole where the street had collapsed into some sort of culvert.

          I love weird weather, but I don't love being on the very fringe of my power district. Last time we had an ice storm, my power was off 3 days longer than the nearest town, 4 miles away. When I called on the 3rd day after the town's power was restored, the lady on the other end of the conversation sounded surprised. I guess I should have called a couple of days earlier, but I had got used to the wait.

          "Non-violence is a powerful and just weapon which cuts without wounding and ennobles the man who wields it. It is a sword that heals." - Martin Luther King, Jr.

          by Gentle Giant on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 09:22:38 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  GOP Civil War spills out on to the senate floor... (11+ / 0-)

    for all to see.

  •  We have 13 inches of snow in Reston, Virginia (5+ / 0-)

    and now it looks like freezing rain. We haven't seen this much since Snowmageddon.

    My parents loved Sid Caesar and Imogene Coca.  I was too young to understand what was going on.

    "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

    by Diana in NoVa on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 04:39:42 AM PST

  •  Grist for Bevin in KY (10+ / 0-)

    ...ol McTurtle had to vote on the side of the Dems to pass cloture

    LOL

    Whatever the Foxteapublicans say, the opposite is the truth.

    by Forward is D not R on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 04:40:56 AM PST

      •  After the DEMOCRATS shut down the gov't? (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        skillet, Ohkwai, Laconic Lib, Gentle Giant

        EricksonofErick seems to have short term memory loss. From September 2013:

        House Republicans give one person the most credit for bringing Congress to its current standoff over funding for the federal government: Ted Cruz.

        With the clock ticking toward the first government shutdown in 17 years, many lawmakers said they never would have been here had it not been for the junior senator from Texas.
        "I think he's played a lot of role in where we are right now," Rep. Tom Cole (R-Okla.) said as he left a closed-door meeting of the House Republican conference on Saturday afternoon.

        During the meeting, GOP leaders announced plans to advance a bill that would keep the government funded beyond Sept. 30 in exchange for a one-year delay of Obamacare and repeal of its medical device tax. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) declared the proposal dead on arrival a couple hours later.

        But conservatives were jubilant as they left the meeting, and they identified Cruz as the force that pushed a reluctant GOP leadership to the brink.

        http://www.huffingtonpost.com/...

        Only one smart one among all the comments there (except he doesn't know the difference between "rein" and "reign":

        No, they gave Obama the ability to raise the national debt as much as allowed by the budgets passed by the House and Senate with Republican support. This fight was lost last year when Republicans passed a budget that did nothing to further reign in spending.

        Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

        by skohayes on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 05:50:54 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Alec macGillis (13+ / 0-)
    Chris Christie's Entire Career Reeks

    It's not just the bridge

    http://www.newrepublic.com/...

    no punches pulled.

    "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

    by Greg Dworkin on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 04:44:45 AM PST

  •  My friend that has had breast cancer (0+ / 0-)

    doesn't get mammograms, she gets thermograms, which are safer.  In January, my physician wanted me to get a mamogram since I haven't had one since 1991, but I refused.  When I got the one in 1991, I was appalled at the procedure and decided right then I would never subject my body to that again.

    If you acknowledge it, you can change it.

    by Raggedy Ann on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 04:45:43 AM PST

    •  thermograms are quackery (10+ / 0-)

      the sad part about this is that's what happens.  People selling crap surface.  In my book, they're below pond scum on the evolution tree.

      Despite widely publicized claims to the contrary, thermography should not be used in place of mammography for breast cancer screening or diagnosis.

      The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) says mammography— an X-ray of the breast—is still the most effective way of detecting breast cancer in its earliest, most treatable stages. Thermography produces an infrared image that shows the patterns of heat and blood flow on or near the surface of the body.

      The agency has sent several warning letters to health care providers and a thermography manufacturer who claim that the thermal imaging can take the place of mammography.

      Web sites have been touting thermography as a replacement for mammography and claim that thermography can find breast cancer years before it would be detected by mammography.

      The problem is that FDA has no evidence to support these claims.

      Apparently from the new study, though, no harm done. Just no good.

      "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

      by Greg Dworkin on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 04:54:51 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  btw how powerful and emotional is this? (7+ / 0-)

      terrific NEJM story today asking what's the number one health killer for women?

      “Misfearing” — Culture, Identity, and Our Perceptions of Health Risks

      “I know the right answer is heart disease,” she said, eyeing me as if facing an irresistible temptation, “but I'm still going to say `breast cancer.'”...

      Whether we're aware of our group commitments or not, we cannot shed our deeply rooted herd mentality nor change our visceral allegiances to our tribe. Indeed, when I read Angelina Jolie's New York Times editorial last May about her decision to undergo prophylactic double mastectomy, my own limbic and cognitive systems went to war. The woman in me got goose bumps. She's beautiful and brave, I thought, and I want to be like her. The cardiologist in me, however, said, “Oh no — will this make it even harder for us to help women believe they're at risk for cardiovascular disease?”

      Among those of us in the business of evidence-based risk reduction, terms such as “social values” and “group identities” may elicit a collective squirm. But developing an understanding of how such factors inform our perceptions of disease is critical to improving the health of our population. Certainly, understanding of one's risk for any disease must be anchored in facts. But if we want our facts to translate into better health, we may need to start talking more about our feelings.

      alas behind a paywall.

      "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

      by Greg Dworkin on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 05:24:48 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  this one is not behind a paywall (9+ / 0-)
      Studies show that women — and doctors — grossly overestimate their risk of developing breast cancer and dying from it. One study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute found that women in their 40s overestimated, by a factor of 20, their risk of dying from breast cancer over the next decade. I have to think that the media is partly to blame. Fewer than seven percent of breast cancers are diagnosed in women younger than 40, (the median age at diagnosis is 61), but when the disease strikes younger women, it tends to be more aggressive and less responsive to treatment than it is for older women. Scary stories like those of Susan G Komen, who died of breast cancer at age 36, invoke fear, and for good reason. Komen did not bring her cancer upon herself. Her disease was random, undeserved and very aggressive. And if you flip through the women’s magazines during their October “breast cancer awareness” extravaganzas, most of the stories you’ll read are about beautiful young women like Komen who were diagnosed at a young age. The way to prevent such a fate, most of these stories will tell you, is obvious — screen early and often.

      This solution is the only reasonable option if you think of breast cancer as a relentlessly progressive disease that will inevitably kill you if you don’t remove it in time. That story about breast cancer — I call it the “relentless progression” model — has truthiness on its side. It makes common sense and offers a measure of comfort: Every cancer can be cured if you just catch it in time.

      There’s just one problem, as I’ve written here numerous times before — research has shown that the relentless progression model is wrong.

      http://www.lastwordonnothing.com/...

      "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

      by Greg Dworkin on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 05:29:11 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I agree with this. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        sillia, Greg Dworkin

        It's another way to frighten women.  Also, estrogen replacement therapy has been proven to cause breast cancer.  My friend is one of 7 children and the only girl in her family to have developed breast cancer and she had estrogen replacement.  In my opinion it's "let's give you something to help you while we kill you."  I decided to go on a plant-based diet after reading "The China Study."

        If you acknowledge it, you can change it.

        by Raggedy Ann on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 06:53:28 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  I just happen to be one of the women with a (0+ / 0-)

        family medical ancestry that includes "diagnosis of breast cancer under age 40", a mother that died before age 60, her sister that died at age 50, an aunt & uncle who developed kidney cancer, etc., etc., etc.

        I have a cousin who a decade ago had a double mastectomy like Angeline Jolie.

        For me, breast cancer, and cancer in general, does seem more real than heart disease although I do not doubt that I should be as wary, or more so, of heart disease.

        Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever has. - Margaret Mead -

        by FlamingoGrrl on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 10:59:28 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Not smart. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      skohayes

      Try an MRI if you cannot handle a mammogram.  But please do not ignore testing. Trust me, breast cancer is no fun, and its a lot easier to cure at Stage 0 than Stage III or IV.

      If a free society cannot help the many who are poor, it cannot save the few who are rich. John F. Kennedy ( inaugural address, January 20, 1961)

      by Outraged Mom on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 05:45:01 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Ultrasounds can work too (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      wintergreen8694

      I usually have to do a follow up ultrasound because of fibroids, and honestly, they're much more comfortable!
      I have a family history of breast cancer (2 aunts died from it), but still only get a mammogram about every 10 years.

      Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

      by skohayes on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 05:58:36 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  In the study, the "control" was a thorough (0+ / 0-)

      physical exam -- emphasis on "thorough" -- by a highly trained nurse.

      So skipping mammograms may be a rational choice. But if you do, insist on a very thorough, centimeter-by-centimeter, manipulation by someone trained to do it. If it takes under ten minutes it's not thorough enough.

      And the study saying mammograms aren't cost-effective measured survival, not how extensive the disease was when discovered, and hence the amount of treatment that would be recommended/needed.

      I hate mammograms too. But my second round of cancer was caught on one, very small, so I put up with them.

      •  counterpoint (0+ / 0-)
        Women in the control group were taught self-exam and were therefore better cared for than actual “no care”. In other words, people are claiming that the women in the no mammogram group don’t represent the real world. They’re arguing that we need to use mammograms because in the real world, women don’t get the care and exams that they got in this study.

        First of all, I don’t know if this is true. But it’s an argument for us to do a better job teaching women to do self-exams and going to checkups. Since that performs as well as mammograms, is cheaper, and involves no radiation, why would that not be a better choice? Seems awfully odd to just throw up our hands and just go with a more expensive and more harmful alternative that isn’t superior.

        I leave you with one final thought. If you’re not going to be swayed at all by a randomized controlled trial of 90,000 women with 25 year follow up, excellent compliance, and damn good methods , it might be time to consider that there’s really no study at all that will make you change your mind.
        http://theincidentaleconomist.com/...

        "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

        by Greg Dworkin on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 10:38:33 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  brainwrap's done it again (17+ / 0-)

    "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

    by Greg Dworkin on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 04:46:02 AM PST

    •  Too many poor people (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      wintergreen8694, Gentle Giant

      falling through the cracks.
      Texas:

      In 2013, Israel began to develop severe headaches. They soon turned into seizures. He went to the emergency room, where the neurologist diagnosed him with depression and sent him home. The seizures stopped for a while, but soon came back with a vengeance.
      “Maybe if I did have some type of health insurance, I would’ve been able to afford to get a second opinion,” Israel said. But he was caught in a doughnut hole. The jobs he’d worked didn’t offer insurance and he was too poor to buy it on his own. Last year, his income was $13,334, but that was nearly $10,000 higher than Texas’s cutoff to qualify for Medicaid. So he went without.
      After six months he finally went back to the hospital where he was diagnosed with terminal brain cancer. The doctors removed as much as they could, but it was too late to get it all. “So right now they’re just trying to work as far as extending the length of…time that I’ll have,” Israel told ThinkProgress, choking back tears. Doctors estimate Israel has 18 months to live.
      http://thinkprogress.org/...

      And I've been helping a friend in Pennsylvania negotiate applying for Medicaid, now that her unemployment has been cut off- on unemployment, she was making too much money to qualify for Medicaid.  
      She's in her late 50s and having a hard time finding another job, but she needs health care, as she suffers from clinical depression.

      Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

      by skohayes on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 06:04:19 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  No doubt Mitch McConnell is having a bad week. (10+ / 0-)

    First Cruz's maneuver that forced McConnell and others into a corner in an election year with primary challenges, but a federal judge ruled yesterday that KY must recognize and legally respect same-sex marriages.

    Har Har - whoops! Did I say that out loud?

    As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. John F. Kennedy

    by JaxDem on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 04:47:53 AM PST

  •  This wording is troubling: (0+ / 0-)
    However another study found that in women over 50 who had mammograms, for every one life saved, there were three women who were overdiagnosed.
    Does that mean "to prevent 3 overdiagnosis it is preferable to let 1 woman die?"
    •  more complex (10+ / 0-)

      this latest reported study is the longest and largest but matches others.  overdiagnosis leads to unnecessary treatment.

      if mammograms don't save lives as the study suggests compared to not doing them, their role is still to be determined.

      So far, best explainers are here:

      Mammograms did not affect mortality at all.

      However, they did affect diagnosis. During the screening period, 666 cases of cancer were diagnosed in the mammography group versus 524 in the no mammography group. This meant an excess of 143 breast cancers were diagnosed with screening. Fifteen years later, the excess settled in at 106 cases of cancer.

      More than 20% of the cancers detected by mammography were over-diagnosed. This means that mammography over-diagnosed one case of breast cancer for every 424 women screened with mammography. Do you know how many women we screen a year here?

      This study is going to make a whole lot of people upset. It’s a large, well designed randomized control trial with a really long follow-up period. The people in the mammogram groups actually complied with screening in surprisingly high numbers. It’s hard to find fault with much of this. The data make a really good case that universal screening with mammograms does almost no good, and likely does harm.

      Oh, they did find that the 25-year survivial rate was significantly better in the mammogram group (even if mortality wasn’t). But you all know why, right?

      "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

      by Greg Dworkin on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 05:02:22 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  We succeeded in getting medical marijuana (6+ / 0-)

    on the ballot here in Jacksonville, Duval County, FL despite Governor Scott and his minions screaming bloody hell.  Today I see that a conservative Clay County Republican, Sen Rob Bradley of Fleming Island filed a bill to legalized medical marijuana in that county as well.

    Clay County lawmaker files measure to legalize milder strain of medical marijuana

    “I think it’s just the right thing to do,” state Sen. Rob Bradley, R-Fleming Island, said. “We need to give these parents every tool that is available to provide relief to their children.”

    As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. John F. Kennedy

    by JaxDem on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 04:55:22 AM PST

  •  Re: CHIP eligibility ... 4 months ...still waiting (4+ / 0-)

    Tomorrow 2/14 will make it 4 months since our 4 children have been part of the 6.6 million were "deemed eligible" for Medicaid/CHIP on Healthcare.gov

    Yet we've heard nothing. I've called several times, and the sympathetic but clueless call center folks keep telling us it's appealed, or escalated, or in the pipeline, whatever.

    How long will this take, Sec. Sebelius?

    •  likely another month (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      rl en france

      the early signups with the glitchy site have to manually resubmit.

      "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

      by Greg Dworkin on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 05:03:37 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Isn't CHIP handled through your state? (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      rl en france, DRo, askew, Josiah Bartlett

      Ah, you must live in a state that isn't doing their own plan. The problem with Medicaid CHIP is that you can be denied or unenrolled for any of a ton of bureaucratic mistakes. It's easy to happen, and then you are in a lengthy appeals process because some $13 an hour overworked employee couldn't make a phone call to clear something up, they just tossed it in the reject pile.

      My kids are good for another year but I"m anxious to get us all on some kind of regular ACA insurance.

      “Conservation… is a positive exercise of skill and insight, not merely a negative exercise of abstinence and caution…” Aldo Leopold

      by ban nock on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 05:19:09 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Don't you have to actually apply for Medicaid/CHIP (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Gentle Giant

      My understanding is that healthcare.gov tells you that they think you're eligible for it. But then you have to actually apply to the state program.

      This is not Sec. Sebelius's fault. This is your state bureaucracy and/or state legislator and/or governor's fault.

      Stop with healthcare.gov and contact your state Medicaid office.

  •  Time to fix the Medicaid claw back (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DRo, David54, rl en france, skohayes

    and somehow get health care to the millions in red states too poor for the ACA but denied Medicaid because of their state's intransigence.

    There are lots of tiny fixes that a bill like the ACA normally gets soon after implementation, until bill killers on the right (are there any remaining on the left? Hello Fire Dog Lakers) join the  human race I'm not holding my breath.

    “Conservation… is a positive exercise of skill and insight, not merely a negative exercise of abstinence and caution…” Aldo Leopold

    by ban nock on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 05:14:37 AM PST

  •  Snow coming down at 2 inches an hour..... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    on the cusp, rl en france, skohayes

    Good Grief!

  •  3 million + 6 million (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    wintergreen8694

    Thats a lot of votes.

    Assume 30% would voted to cut social security by burning their own check that still leaves 6 million new happy people.  Now further assume only 1/3 were previous Republicans who disliked Democrats but believed President Obama was born in Hawaii of humans not Satan.  

    2 million.

    Maybe the don't vote for a Democrat, maybe they do.  Maybe they just listen.  Maybe they don't write a check to the RNC.  Maybe they don't tell their kids "we only vote Republican."  Maybe instead of holding their nose and voting for all the Republicans on the ticket they sit on their hands.  Call it voter suppression the right way.  

    It going to be hard for parents of small children to vote for TeaPublicans after their first visit to the doctor.  Its going to be hard for middle aged white guys to vote for TeaPublicans after free wellness checkups discover cancer early enough to stop it.  Impossible to vote for them?  No.  hard?  Yes.  

    It is well that war is so terrible -- lest we should grow too fond of it. Robert E. Lee

    by ksuwildkat on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 05:46:01 AM PST

  •  Rand Paul is at it again (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    wintergreen8694

    This man is incredible at stealing other people's work:

    The Washington Post's Dana Milbank reported that Paul originally drafted the class action suit he filed under former Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli's (R) name with the help of Bruce Fein, who recently served as an attorney for former NSA contractor Edward Snowden's father.

    From the Post:

    But a Jan. 15 draft of the complaint written by Fein has long passages that are nearly identical to those in the complaint Cuccinelli filed Wednesday. Except for some cuts and minor wording changes, they are clearly the same documents.
    Fein's ex-wife and spokeswoman, Mattie Fein, told Milbank that Cuccinelli stole "the work product, intellectual property and legal genius of Bruce Fein" without payment.
    http://talkingpointsmemo.com/...

    From Milbank's column yesterday:

    And there are other clues. In Fein’s version, Sen. Mark Udall (D-Colo.) was listed as a plaintiff along with Paul, but in the final complaint the Democrat was gone and the tea party group FreedomWorks was added in his place. Both suits list as defendants the director of national intelligence, the FBI director and the director of the NSA, but Fein’s version had named the defense secretary and the attorney general. Cuccinelli’s version dropped those two — but added President Obama as a defendant, an incendiary change.

    Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

    by skohayes on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 06:19:50 AM PST

  •  Great article on the dysfunctional GOP (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    I love OCD, DRo
    Most Republicans badly wanted the debt limit to be raised…They just did not want their fingerprints on it.
    The implications for governing are obvious. If many lawmakers are unwilling or refuse to vote for legislation that they understand to be necessary, and even beneficial, out of fear of retribution from an empowered and outspoken wing of their party, reaching agreement on major policy like immigration becomes difficult if not impossible.
    Therefore, with many mainstream conservatives secretly willing to enter into such compromises, the only route to resolution is for GOP leaders to accept the need to cut the Tea Party loose and endure the consequences.
    The real story of the debt limit resolution is that Dems came to accept those fundamentals, and readjusted accordingly, refusing to engage entirely in order to force Republican leaders to reckon with them on their own. The rest is history. What’s next?
    It's

    Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

    by skohayes on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 06:28:58 AM PST

  •  Way To Go Ted! (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Gentle Giant

    Leave it to Ted Cruz to be the organizer of the Republican circular firing squad.  Opps!  Looks like you hit Mitch McConnell.

    "Some men see things as they are and ask, 'Why?' I dream of things that never were and ask, 'Why not?"

    by Doctor Who on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 07:22:24 AM PST

  •  Masterful take-down of Christie in New Republic (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    rockdart

    Yeah, I know everyone is sick of Chris Christie stories. But this one is well worth the read, and names names.

    http://www.newrepublic.com/...

  •  Let me get this straight: (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Gentle Giant

    They make hay about getting young people to join, else the entire system will collapse. When young people join, they claim those numbers don't matter, and it's the overall numbers that count.

    I'm living in America, and in America you're on your own. America's not a country. It's just a business.

    by CFAmick on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 08:06:15 AM PST

    •  what actually matters is this (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Gentle Giant
      Enrolling healthy people of all ages in ACA plans is more important than signing up young people. (1 of 2)
      @larry_levitt
      Why aren't we hearing if healthy folks are signing up for the ACA? U no longer give your medical history on insurance applications. (2 of 2)
      @larry_levitt

      "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

      by Greg Dworkin on Thu Feb 13, 2014 at 08:08:47 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

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