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The Four Tops - "It's the Same Old Song"

Fri Apr 24, 2015 at 5:19 AM PT (Anonymous Coward): good articles
jordan new releases http://jordanshoes-releasedates.com

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Comment Preferences

  •  weekend tunes: Anti-Valentine songs (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sacman701

    Muse - Hyper music
    http://youtu.be/...

    Alice Cooper- Poison
    http://youtu.be/...

    “The Republican party can’t be the party that thinks one of the biggest problems is that there’s too much love in the world.” - Alex Castellanos

    by lordpet8 on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 05:36:11 PM PST

  •  HI-01 (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    TofG, GleninCA

    It's a dark blue district where a solid progressive can get elected. It would be a shame if a conservative Dem like Mercado Kim won in a district as blue as this one is. Have any of the other Democratic candidates positioned themselves to the left of Mercado Kim? Is there any clear progressive in the race?

    Proud Progressive Social Studies teacher. (-9.50, -8.05) "Teach a man to reason, and he'll think for a lifetime."--Phil Plait

    by betelgeux on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 05:48:00 PM PST

    •  Don't really know (0+ / 0-)

      I assume any of the other major candidates would be partyline Democrats.  Espero is just about broke and Anderson is from outside the district, so if I had to guess this race is really between Kim, Takai, and Chang, with Takai slightly favored at the moment.

    •  VA-08 (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      betelgeux, lordpet8

      With Congressman Jim Moran retiring, everyone and their mother is running for this seat.  Could Virginia State Senator Adam Ebbin, who represents parts of Arlington, Alexandria and Fairfax County, all of which is in this congressional district, become the first gay congressman from Virginia, and instantly become a progressive star in Congress?  

      Ebbin has a good shot at winning this primary, against a former Lt. Governor, 4 sitting members of the state legislature, a sitting mayor of Alexandria, and a woman who has deep community roots after committing her life to heading the urban league, but it is going to take a lot of organizing and money from progressives and progressive organizations across the country to secure this nomination, since the winner of the primary is a shoe-in for for election in this overwhelmingly Democratic, well educated electorate.

      "The quote on the Statue of Liberty doesn't say 'give me your english-speaking only, Christian-believing, heterosexual masses'

      by unapologeticliberal777 on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 06:03:45 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  All of the other Democratic candidates have... (4+ / 0-)

      Positioned themselves to the left of Mercado Kim. We just have to hope that they don't split the anti-conservaDem vote and leave us with a troglodyte like Mercado Kim as the Democratic nominee. Hopefully Manahan will cut into Mercado Kim's base now that he's in the race.

      Pragmatic progressive. Oregonian, Cascadian, and American. Keeper of the DKE glossary.

      by SaoMagnifico on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 10:15:35 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  PPP is asking where to poll (7+ / 0-)

    http://publicpolicypolling.com/

    Options are Arizona, Connecticut, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oregon, and Rhode Island.

    Oregon (again of course) and Kansas look like they're massively cheating with 83% of votes so far and over 3,000 cast, so assuming they get disqualified Maryland currently leads with 6% and New Mexico and Arizona tied for 2nd at 4%. Kansas wouldn't have been a bad choice but I don't buy that it has 1200 votes already or especially Oregon with 1500.

    I went with New Mexico since it hasn't seen a 2013 or 2014 general election poll despite the sitting AG running against the incumbent governor and a handful of other competitive downballot races, but I would be very interested in seeing Arizona as well. Maryland would be quite boring with Anthony Brown demolishing Gansler and every Democrat easily winning the general.

    •  Only one key race out of the bunch IA (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Taget

      The last time IA was polled Braley had tepid leads against every GOP opponent. Even though the GOP field is scattered I'm still concerned and would like to know how he's doing. Also two big races in Oregon as well a lot of noise about Merkeley being vulnerable, which I don't believe for a second and I'm curious how the Cover Oregon debacle has affected Kitzhaber.

      •  it's not a debacle anymore (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Stephen Wolf, MichaelNY, askew, pademocrat

        the website still doesn't work but we're 24th in enrollees out of the 50 states and 7th out of the 14 states that have their own exchanges.

        Kitzhaber will do fine. Even if it significantly weakened him Oregon would not replace him with an archconservative pro-life anti-gay nutball, which is the most prominent candidate running against him.

        ...better the occasional faults of a government that lives in a spirit of charity, than the consistent omissions of a government frozen in the ice of its own indifference. -FDR, 1936

        by James Allen on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 07:44:00 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  I voted for Kansas, actually. (8+ / 0-)

      Because I wanted to see how Brownback polls now against possible challengers, especially since the more moderate Republicans hate him.

      •  It would be interesting to see (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        MichaelNY, Taget, bjssp, madmojo

        How Chad Taylor performs against Milton Wolf, too.

        26, Practical Progressive Democratic Socialist (-9.38, -8.51), Gay, IN-02 - Defeat Wacky Jackie!

        by HoosierD42 on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 10:21:44 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Definitely. (0+ / 0-)

          On the off chance there's something wrong with Moran in the future or he's not on the ballot that year, it'd be nice to have a tested candidate ready. Taylor could run then if he doesn't win this year but still does well.

          "Once, at a formal dinner, when [a rich] guest complained about the cost of welfare programs for the poor, Buffett replied tartly, 'I'm a lot more concerned about welfare for the rich.'"--from a book on Warren Buffett

          by bjssp on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 07:03:24 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  Analyzing State Legislative Voting Records. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    nimh

    I don't know how many of you use Python, but I wrote a thing called OpenStatesParser in Python that uses the OpenStates API to analyze state legislative voting records.  

    For any state legislature (that OpenStates has the records of), you can scan for their voting records, find the specific votes two legislators differed on, or sort the legislature by the percentage of agreement with a particular legislator.

    For example, I used it for the New York Senate and put in beloved Bronx Senator Ruben Diaz Sr.  Let's see, of legislators with a significant number of votes, he agreed most often with...Republican leader Dean Skelos and kinda-Democrat Jeff Klein, voting with each of them 668 times and voting against each of them only 42 times.  

    This is particularly interesting since Diaz, as far as I know, is not formally one of the "independent Democrats" like Klein,  who actually caucus with the Republicans.

    The New York Senators with significant votes this session who voted against Diaz most often?  Velmanette Montgomery, a Democrat representing Downtown Brooklyn, only voted with Diaz 69% of the time, but the lowest Diaz % is actually the former Congressional Candidate, Republican Greg Ball, who voted with Diaz only 62% of the time and is apparently something of a lone wolf--nobody with a significant number of votes voted with Ball more than 70.4% of the time.

    27, Dem, Dude seeing a dude, CT-04(originally), PA-02/NY-10 (formerly PA-02/NY-12, then PA-02/NY-14). Also at http://xenocrypt.blogspot.com.

    by Xenocrypt on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 05:55:39 PM PST

  •  Tennessee vw election results should be announced (5+ / 0-)

    about 10 P. M. EST.

    •  Anyone have any inside info? (0+ / 0-)

      Does the UAW still feel confident?

      GODSPEED TO THE WISCONSIN FOURTEEN!

      by LordMike on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 06:21:49 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Who knows (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      LordMike

      but there needs to be criminal penalties against those who interfere in union elections, such as Bob Corker.

      Racism, misogyny, and homophobia should NOT be protected by the Constitution.

      by TeaBaggersAreRacists on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 06:33:53 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  AFLCIO blog is down.... (0+ / 0-)

      They've probalby never have gotten this much traffic... either that or they are being DDOS'ed.

      GODSPEED TO THE WISCONSIN FOURTEEN!

      by LordMike on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 06:37:10 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  UAW facebook (0+ / 0-)

      The UAW is updating their facebook page pretty regularly, tonight.

    •  Looks like (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY

      they lost by about 90.

      •  But someone posted (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        MichaelNY

        that Sen. Corker may have broken the law.  The UAW is looking into it according to one tweet I saw and consider another vote in the future or something.

        “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

        by KingofSpades on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 07:14:31 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Or maybe not, it's confusing (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          MichaelNY

          and is probably left up for lawyers to read.

          “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

          by KingofSpades on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 07:17:25 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  wish I knew enough to know (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          MichaelNY

          my gut tells me he didn't do anything wrong, but that's all. I can't even take Labor Law till next year.

          ...better the occasional faults of a government that lives in a spirit of charity, than the consistent omissions of a government frozen in the ice of its own indifference. -FDR, 1936

          by James Allen on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 07:19:50 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I think our best hope would be if some (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            MichaelNY

            local VW supervision decided to quietly interfere based on their own political beliefs, while acting under color of authority of their position.

            I know very little about union law, but I'm pretty sure they can't get a do-over for a year unless the NLRB finds something wrong with this election.

            I doubt Corker's statements would be a grounds for a re-run, what I'm hoping is that he actually WAS talking to somebody in management at VW, who was running their own anti-union campaign quietly.

            Iron sharpens Iron. Normal is a dryer setting. STOP illegal immigration NOW! -- Make it LEGAL. If Corporations are People--Let's draft them.

            by benamery21 on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 11:08:19 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

      •  real bummer (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        MichaelNY
    •  UAW lost because they kneecapped themselves (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      bjssp, James Allen, MichaelNY
      In the case of the Chattanooga drive, the neutrality agreement barred the UAW from making negative comments about Volkswagen. It also specifically prevented the UAW from holding one-on-one meetings with workers at their homes except at the worker’s express request. House visits are a common tactic used by union organizers to build trust with workers and answer questions about individual needs and concerns.
      This articlegoes into some good detail.

      "Pillows, but no sleep / Feathers, but no birds." | Pro-transit young black urban progressive (not liberal) | SSP/DKE | -9, -7.79 | NJ-05 | Yard signs don't vote. | $15 and a union!

      by gabjoh on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 07:37:58 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Worried about Ginsburg (5+ / 0-)

    I really hope she retires sometime this year with the Senate looking 50/50 right now, Obama might not be able to pick another SCOTUS Justice for the rest of his term. She's 80 now but with a history of health problems and anything could happen. The absolute worst thing that could occur is we get another Clarence Thomas on the court. All it takes is one more conservative judge and Roe v. Wade and pretty much everything else is at risk.

    •  There's zero chance of another Thomas under Obama (9+ / 0-)

      if R's took the senate they'd force Obama to nominate a moderate Dem, but public outcry over them voting down qualified nominees would prevent them from being able to force him to pick a conservative.

      However Ginsburg seems adamant about staying on past the end of his term and who knows what the actual politics are behind that. I wish she would step down now, but that seems like a non-starter so it's not really helpful to dwell on it. I think she has publicly stated she wishes to exceed Louis Brandeis' length of tenure to become the longest serving justice which would require her to stay on until at least the end of 2015.

      •  If the Rs take over the Senate (11+ / 0-)

        they won't confirm any Obama nominees for the Supreme Court or the Circuit courts.  Period.  Especially after the nuclear option was invoked this year.

        Racism, misogyny, and homophobia should NOT be protected by the Constitution.

        by TeaBaggersAreRacists on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 06:32:32 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  And they'll get roasted alive in the press (17+ / 0-)

          for blocking an utterly qualified totally moderate SCOTUS nominee. That kind of shit has never happened before and I strongly doubt Republicans want to start down that road. It's one thing for them to block appeals court nominees like Jesse Helms did in the 1990s in his state, but SCOTUS nominees are far too high profile and it's an accepted fact by the public that presidents get to appoint court nominees and there's little chance they wouldn't heavily support him if he puts forth someone extremely well qualified and moderate. Talk about running against gridlock and dysfunction in Washington, blocking that sort of SCOTUS nominee is dropping a tank of gasoline on the fire.

          •  Well Said (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            LordMike, MichaelNY

            NY-9/NJ-10; Russians can give you arms but only the United States can give you a solution. -- Anwar Sadat

            by BKGyptian89 on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 06:45:04 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  And when have republicans ever cared about that... (6+ / 0-)

            They get elected despite being enormously unpopular.  They can do whatever they want, whenever they want and never be punished for it.

            GODSPEED TO THE WISCONSIN FOURTEEN!

            by LordMike on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 06:53:04 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  The shutdown would disagree with you. (4+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              BKGyptian89, LordMike, MichaelNY, jncca

              They were heavily pummeled by that.

              “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

              by KingofSpades on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 06:54:18 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  And it hasn't hurt them one bit... n/t (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Midwesterners

                GODSPEED TO THE WISCONSIN FOURTEEN!

                by LordMike on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 06:56:46 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  Do you read polls?? (5+ / 0-)

                  They where getting killed during the shutdown. What saved them was the botched rolled of the ACA website. In which we're still recovering from. Please come back down to Earth.

                  NY-9/NJ-10; Russians can give you arms but only the United States can give you a solution. -- Anwar Sadat

                  by BKGyptian89 on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 07:02:02 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  *were (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    Midwesterners

                    NY-9/NJ-10; Russians can give you arms but only the United States can give you a solution. -- Anwar Sadat

                    by BKGyptian89 on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 07:13:56 PM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                  •  That's a bit abrasive (4+ / 0-)

                    If you disagree with LordMike fine, but "Come back to Earth" is really not productive at all.

                    Also, please avoid calling community members "Concern Trolls". That phrase has a dishonest connotation: A concern troll is someone who pretends to to care about one side's well being while really just trying to sow discord. I'd really rather we avoided hinting that about people here.

                    Contributing Editor, Daily Kos Elections. 24, male, CA-18 (home and voting there), LA-02 (resident).

                    by Jeff Singer on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 07:29:31 PM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                  •  People Have Short Memories..... (0+ / 0-)

                    Even if it wasn't for botched ACA rollout, the law of political gravity would have undone over a fairly brief amount of time the short-term damage the GOP did unto itself with the shutdown.   The fact that the Republicans are the opposition party in a time of mediocre economic growth (that's generally not being felt by the average joe) and a polarizing President whose approval rating was barely above water at the height of the shutdown positions them well for a midterm election cycle.  Similarly, if the hypothetical GOP Senate were to spend two years obstructing Obama's attempt to fill Ginsburg's Senate seat, it's hard to believe that in the heat of a Presidential campaign that the party would suffer for it unless the President and his party became popular again.  

                    •  The one difference is that (1+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      PassionateJus

                      obstructing a Supreme Court nomination would be current.  Unlike the gov't shutdown, which came to end, this would not come to an end.  Since the GOP would have to obstruct for a full year and a half to block one from getting on the Court, it would invariably remain a campaign issue.  

                      Nothing prevents Obama from repeatedly putting up nominees, getting them blocked by the GOP, withdrawing him/her, and nominating another. That cycle may repeat 2 or 3 times in 2015 and 2016.

                      Racism, misogyny, and homophobia should NOT be protected by the Constitution.

                      by TeaBaggersAreRacists on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 08:30:22 PM PST

                      [ Parent ]

                •  Because the ACA early rollout undid that (7+ / 0-)

                  if it weren't for that, they'd be behind in every generic ballot poll still.

                  “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

                  by KingofSpades on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 07:02:14 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                •  Oh it did (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  MichaelNY

                  I'm confident that with how close VA-Gov ended up being, Cuccinelli would Governor of Virginia right now were it not for the GOP being roasted alive due to the shutdown (especially in federal worker-heavy NoVa and Hampton Roads) just two weeks before the election.

                  Gay suburbanite in NJ-11

                  by interstate73 on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 04:53:10 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

            •  Pretty Much Agreed.... (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              MichaelNY, Taget

              With the stakes so high as a generation-long realignment of the SCOTUS, a Republican Senate would spend two years rejecting each and every Obama appointee if that's what it took to run out the clock.  Of course the most likely scenario is that if Ginsburg and Breyer stay on till the end of this term, they will stay on for the next two years as well and never force a hypothetical GOP Senate to go that far.

              •  I doubt the GOP would do that but if they did... (3+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Mark27, MichaelNY, Zack from the SFV

                A smart electoral move would be for Obama to nominate a well qualified nominee from a group the GOP needs to win.

                Say Obama nominated a Latino and s/he was voted down, especially after some racial rhetoric crops in from the fringes. Would likely do wonders for GOP minority outreach.  

                Contributing Editor, Daily Kos Elections. 24, male, CA-18 (home and voting there), LA-02 (resident).

                by Jeff Singer on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 08:21:29 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

              •  And they would pay a very heavy price for that (3+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Darth Jeff, sacman701, MichaelNY

                people do not like obstructionism and there's no legitimate argument that Republicans can make without coming across as total partisan hacks if they rejected multiple centrist nominees. There's a reason that's never been done even when the opposition controls the senate. They have far too many vulnerable members up for election in 2016 and it would just take one or two voting for confirmation for the nominee to be confirmed.

                •  Not so (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  MichaelNY
                  They have far too many vulnerable members up for election in 2016 and it would just take one or two voting for confirmation for the nominee to be confirmed.
                  Rs have many ways for the nominee to never get a floor vote.  The Judiciary chair can refuse to hold a hearing, the committee can vote down the nomination, the Majority Leader can refuse to bring it up for a vote, or the nominee can be filibustered (Reid exempted the Supreme Court in the nuclear option.)

                  Racism, misogyny, and homophobia should NOT be protected by the Constitution.

                  by TeaBaggersAreRacists on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 08:53:32 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                •  It's also worth noting how many blue/ purple Sens (2+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Stephen Wolf, MichaelNY

                  will be up in 2016. Assuming 2016 isn't a debacle, the Dem POTUS nominee will carry or get very close in Illinois, Wisconsin, Iowa, Ohio, Florida, Pennsylvania, and New Hampshire.

                  Ron Johnson and Marco Rubio may not care, and Chuck Grassley will probably be popular enough he can keep voting no. But do Rob Portman, Pat Toomey, Kelly Ayotte, and especially Mark Kirk really want to look like massive partisan hacks and lose some crossover support they may need? If they vote no and the nominee's confirmed that's one thing, but being responsible for killing these nominees is probably not something they want.

                  Contributing Editor, Daily Kos Elections. 24, male, CA-18 (home and voting there), LA-02 (resident).

                  by Jeff Singer on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 08:58:54 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                •  I Think Alot Would Depend On The Political Climate (2+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Darth Jeff, MichaelNY

                  .....heading into 2016.  I seriously doubt that the GOP's obstruction of SCOTUS nominations would by itself be the driving force of the 2016 election.  The 2016 election will largely be decided by the state of the economy, the state of Obamacare, or another not-yet-defined factor that could emerge and hijack the political narrative (war, terrorism...who knows what the next two years could bring?).  If Obama is seen as keeping a steady course and being in control of events, the GOP would be likely to retreat from an obstructionist posture.  But if the political fundamentals were trending the Republicans' way, I doubt they'd see a price to pay in the polls for denying Obama his SCOTUS picks. Certainly if the Republicans are heading into 2016 with the political fundamentals as bullish as the Democrats were heading into 2008, I think they'd fight dirty and get away with it.

                •  I think the keep pushing the line on what is (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  MichaelNY

                  acceptable, and by now a lot of them would have no problem with that level of obstruction.

                  ...better the occasional faults of a government that lives in a spirit of charity, than the consistent omissions of a government frozen in the ice of its own indifference. -FDR, 1936

                  by James Allen on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 09:36:39 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

              •  Doubt Ginsberg lasts another 8 years (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                MichaelNY

                We have a Democrat President and Senate right now we can't guarantee that in the future. I don't see why they should wait until the end of his term or any time after that, they should've retired soon after Obama was re-elected. O'Conner was a team player for the Rs and resigned soon after Bush was re-elected and while they controlled the Senate why can't Ginsberg do this?

                •  I agree that Justice Ginsberg... (2+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  MichaelNY, askew

                  Should retire. I think she's one of the greatest jurists to never lead the Supreme Court, but if she really cares about preserving her legacy, she'll step down while President Obama has a chance to appoint a fitting successor to uphold it.

                  Pragmatic progressive. Oregonian, Cascadian, and American. Keeper of the DKE glossary.

                  by SaoMagnifico on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 10:11:14 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

            •  And they must be fully aware... (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              MichaelNY

              Democrats can go nuclear on Supreme Court nominees whenever they like.

              It would be a high-risk, low-reward movement for Republicans to filibuster the likes of a Judge Merrick Garland or a Leah Ward Sears for Supreme Court. The public might be more sympathetic were they to block the likes of a Judge Sidney Thomas or a Pamela Karlan, but President Obama is probably savvy enough to know his limits.

              Pragmatic progressive. Oregonian, Cascadian, and American. Keeper of the DKE glossary.

              by SaoMagnifico on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 10:09:40 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  They can go nuclear (3+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                TeaBaggersAreRacists, DCal, betelgeux

                providing that they still have the majority.

                Formerly Pan on Swing State Project

                by MichaelNY on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 10:48:30 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

              •  Even then, I don't think they'd get very far. (0+ / 0-)

                I don't know much about Pamela Karlan, but she's no doubt a respected legal mind. Same for Sidney Thomas.

                Maybe they'd get some initial traction, especially with Karlan who is supposed to be brilliant as well as very liberal, but in the end, you're opposing a circuit court judge and a woman who taught at one of the finest law schools in the world, argued before the Supreme Court, and worked for the Justice Department. There's no question they're qualified.

                "Once, at a formal dinner, when [a rich] guest complained about the cost of welfare programs for the poor, Buffett replied tartly, 'I'm a lot more concerned about welfare for the rich.'"--from a book on Warren Buffett

                by bjssp on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 07:10:51 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

          •  Really? (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            MichaelNY

            We have seen the Rs do unprecedented obstruction after unprecedented obstruction, and you still think that somehow they will be reasonable?  

            Come on.  They just filibustered three DC Court of Appeals nominees for no other reason but that they were appointed by Obama.  The smart money was that they'd let one or two of them through.  But guess what, they refused to confirm even one, basically forcing the Ds to invoke the nuclear option.

            Racism, misogyny, and homophobia should NOT be protected by the Constitution.

            by TeaBaggersAreRacists on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 08:21:36 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

        •  No one will be retiring if they take the Senate (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Midwesterners, lordpet8

          It's now or never right now with the fate of our majority uncertain. If anyone is stepping down now is the time to do it to get the most progressive nominee possible. You don't think for a second if a Republican were elected, Scalia and Thomas wouldn't step almost immediately and let a younger conservative take their place why can't liberal judges think like this.

      •  Merrick Garland will probably be the choice... (4+ / 0-)

        GOP would allow him through both because he's a moderate and because he'd be 63 years old.  

        I think RBG has been pretty selfish - but it is her right as the position is for life or as long as she wants it and she has some personal benchmark she wants to surpass.  

        Glenn Greenwald promotes far-right fringe extremist group The Oath Keepers - https://twitter.com/ggreenwald/statuses/377787818619064320

        by Jacoby Jonze on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 06:33:08 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  GOP won't confirm Garland in 2015 (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          LordMike

          They would simply refuse to hold a vote until after the 2016 election.  
          And assuming they lose that, they would then try to jam Garland through in the lame duck session to prevent Hillary (or whatever other D) from nominating someone worse.

          If they confirm anyone, it would be someone more conservative than Garland.  Possibly someone like Scott Matheson.

          Racism, misogyny, and homophobia should NOT be protected by the Constitution.

          by TeaBaggersAreRacists on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 06:45:59 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  I think she's the best on the court (4+ / 0-)

          and I'm not the only one.

          If she wants to stay that's her prerogative.

          ...better the occasional faults of a government that lives in a spirit of charity, than the consistent omissions of a government frozen in the ice of its own indifference. -FDR, 1936

          by James Allen on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 07:28:09 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  She will be replaced question is by a R or D (5+ / 0-)

            I'd much rather prefer Obama picking her replacement than a possible Republican President down the road.   I would love to see more young progressive voices on the court who'll be around for many more years to come.

          •  And if she`s replaced by a Repub Prez? (5+ / 0-)

            Locking in a 6-3 SCOTUS for the next 20 years (because you know Scalia and Kennedy will retire under GOP Prez, probably Thomas near the end of GOP Prez 45's second term?

            She's beaten cancer twice, but it also means she had it twice - the second time in the pancreas.  She's 80 years old and has served for 20 years and all the issues and perspectives and findings near and dear to her are at incredible risk if she gambled on staying past the 2016 election, and Pres Obama will have to nominate somebody to her far right, even if left-of-center overall, if the GOP takes the Senate in 2014.  

            If she retired last year, shortly after Obama re-election she could have been replaced by somebody much closer to her belief spectrum that was 30 years younger.  

            Glenn Greenwald promotes far-right fringe extremist group The Oath Keepers - https://twitter.com/ggreenwald/statuses/377787818619064320

            by Jacoby Jonze on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 08:56:50 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Exactly, I think she's being selfish (6+ / 0-)

              Her legacy will be ruined if she ends up dying and gets replaced by some younger Scalia under a R President. At this point she's just being selfish, she doesn't seem at all concerned about the current political environment right now and how high the stakes are. A 6-3 conservative court would be disastrous and unimaginable just looking at the damage they've done with 4 conservative judge and Kennedy who occasionally is a swing judge. Roe v. Wade could be gone in the next decade...

            •  she won't be (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              BKGyptian89

              Our eventual nominee is leading all comers by decent margins.

              ...better the occasional faults of a government that lives in a spirit of charity, than the consistent omissions of a government frozen in the ice of its own indifference. -FDR, 1936

              by James Allen on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 09:37:54 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

        •  I firmly believe (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          MichaelNY, askew

          That Obama would never appoint another white man to the SCOTUS. If Democrats hold the Senate, he'll appoint Jacqueline Nguyen.

          26, Practical Progressive Democratic Socialist (-9.38, -8.51), Gay, IN-02 - Defeat Wacky Jackie!

          by HoosierD42 on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 10:26:39 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Given that you've been following court appointees (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            MichaelNY

            for the better part of almost two years, and updating us on this topic, can you give a couple of reasons why you think her?

            24 Burkean Post Modern Gay Democrat; NM-2 (Raised), TX-20 (B.A. & M.A. in Political Science), TX-17 (Home); 08/12 PVIs

            by wwmiv on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 10:35:31 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Presidents like to elevate their own judges (5+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Taget, James Allen, MichaelNY, lordpet8, askew

              People that they know to be "in their corner". George H. W. Bush appointed both Souter and Thomas to their original Circuit Court posts before he elevated them to the Supreme Court. Dubya put Roberts on the D.C. Circuit in 2003 before he put him on the SCOTUS in 2005.

              Obama appointed Nguyen to the Central District of California in 2009, and then elevated her to the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in 2012. He's obviously fast-tracking her. Plus, she's young for a judge (48 or 49, exact date unknown), and knows law enforcement (she was an AUSA in the C.D. Cal. for 7 years). She checks a lot of boxes.

              26, Practical Progressive Democratic Socialist (-9.38, -8.51), Gay, IN-02 - Defeat Wacky Jackie!

              by HoosierD42 on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 03:05:00 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Obama also appointed his own Solicitor General (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                MichaelNY, askew

                to the Court. And Robert Wilkins, now a D.C. Circuit Court judge, was originally appointed to the District Court for D.C. by Obama. There's a long history of Presidents playing favorites with their judicial appointments.

                26, Practical Progressive Democratic Socialist (-9.38, -8.51), Gay, IN-02 - Defeat Wacky Jackie!

                by HoosierD42 on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 03:10:50 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

              •  From what you tell me, she's probably too green (0+ / 0-)

                to be nominated under the conditions that Republicans will present. Obama's previous two SCOTUS picks were very longstanding judges with high profile tenures. Nguyen is a newbie. He's shown a propensity for preferring people who can create some kind of consensus on the back of their length of service.

                If he's going to pick a newbie, I'm inclined to believe he'll pick Srinivisan, who is widely respected across the D.C. political spectrum.

                However, that's all assuming that Obama will get another pick. I'm inclined to believe there won't be another vacancy during Obama's presidency.

                24 Burkean Post Modern Gay Democrat; NM-2 (Raised), TX-20 (B.A. & M.A. in Political Science), TX-17 (Home); 08/12 PVIs

                by wwmiv on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 03:11:24 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

          •  My guess would actually be (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            MichaelNY

            Sri Srinivasan of the DC Circuit.  Partly because he was confirmed by a 97-0 vote in 2013, I think Obama would think he would be harder to block.  But I suspect that the Rs would still try.  

            Racism, misogyny, and homophobia should NOT be protected by the Constitution.

            by TeaBaggersAreRacists on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 03:50:44 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Nguyen was confirmed 97-0 to C.D. Cal. (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              MichaelNY, askew

              And 91-3 to the 9th Circuit (Lee, Toomey and Vitter against). Republicans would have the same problems blocking her as Srinivasan, by that metric.

              26, Practical Progressive Democratic Socialist (-9.38, -8.51), Gay, IN-02 - Defeat Wacky Jackie!

              by HoosierD42 on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 04:12:53 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

      •  Meant to say exceed Brandeis tenure as the (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        MichaelNY, lordpet8

        longest serving Jewish justice. The longest serving justice record held by FDR appointee William Douglas of 36 years, 209 days will probably not be broken for quite some time as justices face such a strong incentive to retire under same party presidents now. Incidentally Douglas was replaced by John Paul Stevens who was nominated by Ford but drifted solidly into the liberal camp and served a 3rd longest 34 and a half years until being replaced by Sotomayor. If Scalia makes it to early 2023 (god forbid...) he'd become the longest serving justice.

      •  I don't think there's any politics behind (5+ / 0-)

        Ginsburg's decision-making on when to retire. She simply likes the job and wants to continue working. And she may be one of the people for whom continuing to work is what enables her to continue to live.

        Formerly Pan on Swing State Project

        by MichaelNY on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 10:44:32 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Stop being such a concern troll (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      LordMike, MetroGnome

      Obama will never pick a Thomas-esque nominee for the Supreme Court. Why do you even think he'll appoint someone like that???!!! He'll pick a moderate Dem justice for whatever vacancy opens up. A justice that he had already appointed to circuit courts.

      NY-9/NJ-10; Russians can give you arms but only the United States can give you a solution. -- Anwar Sadat

      by BKGyptian89 on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 06:35:28 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  The Senate does not choose the appointee (4+ / 0-)

      the president does and no way will he pick a conservative.

      “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

      by KingofSpades on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 07:18:03 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Ginsburg has been very forceful (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY, bythesea

      About her health and not wanting to be pushed out. She feels like she can still be a voice on the Court and far be it from any of us to tell her otherwise.

      26, Practical Progressive Democratic Socialist (-9.38, -8.51), Gay, IN-02 - Defeat Wacky Jackie!

      by HoosierD42 on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 10:24:03 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  So Let's Focus on Keeping The Senate in 2014 (8+ / 0-)

      as opposed to worrying about a lot of things we cannot control (such as individual justices retiring).

  •  Interested in WA-4 (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    James Allen, MichaelNY

    As has been reported in today's live digest, state Sen. Janea Holmquist Newbry has entered the race already. She already has a chairperson for her exploratory committee. In an odd move she has also announced she is "removing her name" from the WA state Senate Majority Caucus's website due to it's passage for instate tuition for illegal immigrants....though she is remaining a member? I don't know what good she thinks that will do her but ok....

    Newbry has been known to have high ambition since being elected to the state House at age 25, and her running was really expected. I think she could be someone you will see make it to through the primary. I've got to think she knew this was coming to already be in this position 24 hours after the seat opened up.

    Age 26, conservative Republican, Washington State's Third District.

    by KyleinWA on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 06:15:22 PM PST

  •  UAW lose... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    MichaelNY

    Union busting wins again...  I wonder by how much.

    GODSPEED TO THE WISCONSIN FOURTEEN!

    by LordMike on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 07:03:06 PM PST

    •  Lost by 100 votes... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY

      There may be another election, since Corker illegally interfered with the election.

      GODSPEED TO THE WISCONSIN FOURTEEN!

      by LordMike on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 07:04:30 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  He did? (0+ / 0-)

        What's the likelihood of that?

        “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

        by KingofSpades on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 07:05:36 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  I meant to say (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          LordMike, MichaelNY

          He did get involved illegally?

          Are they seriously talking about holding another vote if that checks out, this time adhering to the rules and laws?

          “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

          by KingofSpades on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 07:11:45 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  From what I heard, today (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            LordMike, MichaelNY

            The only way the UAW would have another shot at a vote is if the company had interfered with workers.  Congressman and Senators are granted a huge amount of leeway.

            •  That would appear to be true (4+ / 0-)

              But I'd like to see them test it before the NLRB anyway.

              "When dealing with terrorism, civil and human rights are not applicable." Egyptian military spokesman.

              by Paleo on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 07:37:52 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Actually they may have a case (3+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                LordMike, MetroGnome, MichaelNY

                A couple of labor law experts believe so.

                http://mobile.reuters.com/...

                http://www.tennessean.com/...

                "When dealing with terrorism, civil and human rights are not applicable." Egyptian military spokesman.

                by Paleo on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 07:42:39 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

              •  Yeah (3+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Midwesterners, LordMike, MichaelNY

                I want them to take the case to them, anyway.  Sure wouldn't hurt to try.  I'm really frustrated about this, if only because of the narrative this will create.  It seems the anti-union forces really ramped up in the last week and were able to flip some votes, as the union had already gotten over 50% with card checks, last year.  

                The funny thing about this is that this wasn't even a vote on whether to have a traiditional union, but a German-style workers council.  If not even that form of watered down unionization can sell in the South, well...

                I guess I'm just glad King didn't stick his neck out too far in the closing days.  This is a sucky way for him to go out, though.  This will be a set-back, no doubt, but I hope they keep up their campaign in Mississippi.  The UAW really has no other choice but to keep fighting.

                •  When will we see results in MS? (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  MichaelNY

                  Wasn't there also talk of them trying to unionize in AL and SC at the Merdcedes and BMW plants?

                  "Once, at a formal dinner, when [a rich] guest complained about the cost of welfare programs for the poor, Buffett replied tartly, 'I'm a lot more concerned about welfare for the rich.'"--from a book on Warren Buffett

                  by bjssp on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 07:14:22 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  No idea (2+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    MichaelNY, bjssp

                    Lest people forget, the UAW was down in Chattanooga for at least two years before they were able to bring about this vote.  Organizing takes both time and money, and with the UAW also involved in political campaigns, this stuff doesn't happen over night.

    •  You can't bust a union that did not form (0+ / 0-)

      Still, TN unionization rate has gradually increased over the decade.

      “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

      by KingofSpades on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 07:04:39 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Busting would constitute (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        MichaelNY

        what they they did to the miners in Matewan after they voted to unionize.

        “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

        by KingofSpades on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 07:11:03 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Not surprising... (5+ / 0-)

      Many of these people in the South have been taught as a child to hate unions and told that any job no matter how crappy the pay and benefits is acceptable. It's sad an entire region of the county is complacent with working slave wages and abuse by corporations.

      •  The lousy weather didn't help, either... n/t (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        MichaelNY

        GODSPEED TO THE WISCONSIN FOURTEEN!

        by LordMike on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 07:56:02 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  How bad? (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          LordMike

          How bad was the weather?  Unless it was enough to get people to call in sick, I don't know how this would effect a union election in a significant way.  The reason they hold it over multiple days is because people have to come in for their shifts.  I'd argue the weather ranks way down on the list of concerns for this type of election short of something catastrophic.

          My reading of this tells me that it was the interference of TN elected officials in the waning days of the campaign is what ultimately doomed this.  They told just enough bold-faced lies (and I really wish VW would have been more forceful in defending themselves) and sowed just enough confusion with those lies to cause just enough drama to pull in the fence straddlers.

          I really do want there to be some kind of consequences for Corker's odious actions in particular.  Aside from investigating him for the interference, I'd like to see VW legally try to make him retract his obvious false statements, but that ain't ever going to happen.  They may have slightly been in favor of this worker's council, but it's not as if they are so pro-worker as to make anyone pay for this.  Corker's actions were so beyond the pale.  I do hope VW decides to invest in other more civilized paces when they want to do an expansion, here.  Whether you're mostly pro union or anti union, you kind of have to admit that the actions of the TN government were so over the top, that this kind of drama isn't good for business.

    •  Pretty Much Everybody Thought The UAW Would Win... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      LordMike, askew

      ....this one.  The UAW was never gonna get a more perfect situation than this one in the South.  If they can't win this one, it's incredibly hard to see how they win any of them.

    •  UAW of vote: 'we're not leaving Chattanooga' (6+ / 0-)

      Tonight, from he Freep:

      CHATTANOOGA, TENN. — UAW leaders on Friday said they will review all of their legal options and consider challenging the results of a devastating defeat in an election for union representation at Volkswagen’s plant in Chattanooga, Tenn.

      Workers at the German automakers plant voted against the UAW in a three-day election that ended Friday in a margin of 712-626.

      UAW President Bob King sharply criticized Tennessee politicians who he said scared workers away from voting in favor of union representation. Going into the election, the UAW thought it had support from a majority of the more than 1,500 workers who had an opportunity to vote.

      That support began to decline in recent days, mostly because of news conferences held by the state’s political leaders who warned that a vote in favor of the UAW would make the state less attractive to other manufacturers and could jeopardize Volkswagen’s plans to expand its factory there.

      ...

      Dennis Williams, who is secretary-treasurer of the UAW and the union’s nominee for president, said sometimes it takes more than one try to successfully organize a company.

      “We’re not leaving Chattanooga,” said Williams, who likely will be elected to a four-year term as president in June. “It took seven years to organize Ford, and I will be around for at least another five.”

  •  From Comment on Kentucky this weekend (6+ / 0-)

    Panel: Guest Host Bill Bryant of WKYT in Lexington, Tom Loftus of the Courier-Journal, Sam Youngman of the Herald Leader, Nick Storm from cn2

    Explosions and Sink Holes- A giant sink hole opened up in Bowling Green and swallowed up several corvettes at the museum. Then, a natural gas pipeline exploded in Adair County. This brings up more opposition to the Blue Grass Pipeline. Legislation is in the works to prevent the companies wanting the pipeline to have eminent domain. Opposition is strongest around Bardstown.

    Legislature- Constitutional amendments stall. Not much action on limiting regulations from the governor, expanded gaming, and eliminating the office of State Treasurer are going nowhere fast. There could be some support for a local option sales tax. Louisville and Lexington are pushing this. The statewide smoking ban has some legs according to Tom Loftus. It has passed a House Committee, and will go the floor for a vote. However, it may die in the GOP Senate. Speaker Greg Stumbo (D-Prestonburg) has a bill to target wealthy candidates, to allow increased contribution limits to challengers who face self-funders. This is clearly targeted at likely GOP 2015 Gov candidate Hal Heiner. It will likely not go anywhere. Sam Youngman has Heiner may be willing to spend up to $5 million of his own money.

    Senate Race- Nick Storm reports that answered questions before a business group that he opposed the minimum wage increase (no surprise), Grimes is strongly pushing the issue, and the latest Bluegrass Poll shows it very popular. Sam Youngman then talks about Matt Bevin signing a letter supporting the 2008 bailout. He then discusses Mitch's vote for cloture on the debt ceiling vote. Bevin and Tea party groups have hit Mitch hard on it. Nick Storm thinks Mitch's vote may be a sign of him looking past Bevin and to the general election. Tom Loftus thinks Mitch may be worried about the gridlock image.

    Gay Marriage- Judge John Heyburn of Louisville ordered Kentucky to recognize same sex marriages performed in other states. He is a GOP appointee and recommended by Mitch. Conservative groups have hit him hard for that. Gov. Beshear said he is reviewing the decision to see if he will appeal it. Most pols in Kentucky have been pretty quiet on the issue so far.

    "So there's a time for silence, and there's a time for waiting your turn. But if you know how you feel, and you so clearly know what you need to say, you'll know it. I don't think you should wait. I think you should speak now." -Taylor Swift

    by SouthernINDem on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 07:23:03 PM PST

    •  What is Grimes current strategy? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY

      Is she saving up for a big general election rollout, but until then is deflecting Mitch's attacks?

      “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

      by KingofSpades on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 07:28:20 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Maybe I wrote this race off too early... (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Midwesterners, MichaelNY, madmojo

        With all these polls I'm seeing it's looking more and more like a tossup rather than a Lean R race that a lot of people are thinking. Always felt that McConnell would pull out in the end because he always has no matter how strong the challenger. I wish we had Alison back in 2008 when the environment was much more favorable to us.

        •  Ditto, or Luallen. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          MichaelNY

          He has the unique problem of being just as unpopular in KY as Obama and it seems like it's having the effect of weakening his attacks against her.

          “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

          by KingofSpades on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 07:42:26 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  One of our users (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Midwesterners, MichaelNY

            GradyDem was in eastern KY shortly before she had a rally in Prestonburg (where Speaker Stumbo's district is) and the people were aflutter with excitement.

            If she can cut this to a TV ad, she has an extremely powerful message: http://youtu.be/...

            “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

            by KingofSpades on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 07:46:04 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  Had Luallen run in 2008 (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            MichaelNY

            Mitch would have been out of a job, and I suspect that GOP Senate obstruction would have been far less effective.  Mitch has unfortunately been quite effective as an obstructionist, something that another R wouldn't have been so.  

            Racism, misogyny, and homophobia should NOT be protected by the Constitution.

            by TeaBaggersAreRacists on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 08:34:42 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

      •  Is medical marijuana popular in KY? (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        PassionateJus, MichaelNY

        I feel like she should jump on that issue and maybe win over a few younger voters in the process. She has been running a good populist campaign I hope she really touts Kynect and how successful its been. I'm pretty sure there are plenty of good stories to make ads out of.

      •  She hasn't suffered from a dearth of attention (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        MichaelNY, James Allen

        Our lesser-known candidates in more under-the-radar races -- I'm thinking particularly of Rep. Gary Peters and Secy. Natalie Tennant -- are still hurting for lack of name rec, but Secy. Grimes gets a ton of free press courtesy of her opponent being the Senate minority leader. Michelle Nunn gets free press, too, because Georgia is such a politically interesting state this decade and she has a famous name (ditto Jason Carter).

        Pragmatic progressive. Oregonian, Cascadian, and American. Keeper of the DKE glossary.

        by SaoMagnifico on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 01:07:55 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Whoa, that sinkhole happened in KY? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY

      What a shame, but at least nobody was hurt.

      “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

      by KingofSpades on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 07:37:01 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  PA-SEN 2016: Sestak already building infastructure (5+ / 0-)

    Earliest campaign ever? He seems determined for a rematch but the question is will the primary be clear for him? There are a lot ambitious Dems in PA and there has been talk of AG Kathleen Kane thinking of running.

  •  We must not keep saying we could lose the Senate (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    PassionateJus, Danny Ricci

    I'm a realist through and through--and am painfully aware of the millions and millions of dollars that the Kochs & Company are spending in all the important Senate races whether they be North Carolina, Michigan, Louisiana or elsewhere. But every time we talk out loud here or anywhere else and say that our chances for retaining the Senate are 50-50 at best, we make the Repugnicans gloat and gloat and empower them more and more.

    We Democrats and Progressives have to do whatever it takes to counter the Repug media blitz and get out OUR vote.  There is still time! We must contribute and volunteer our dollars and hours to counteract the bottomless pit of Corporate $$ and propaganda.

  •  FL-Lt. Gov (0+ / 0-)

    Does anyone know when Crist will announce his running mate this year? Scott has finally appointed a new Lt. Governor, and I'm just wondering what Crist's timetable is.

    On that note, does anyone have any idea who it will be? I remember seeing an article a while back (from a link in a DKE diary, I believe) suggesting Val Demings and Dan Gelber, but I'm curious if there are alternatives.

  •  Exhaustive article on Christie's large web (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    GloFish, PassionateJus, pademocrat

    and how it is dragging him down: http://www.newrepublic.com/...

    I just started reading it.  Very well-researched.

    “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

    by KingofSpades on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 09:36:51 PM PST

    •  To be honest (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Minnesota Mike

      I'm getting a little tired of the Christie story now, he's suffered enough to the point to which whatever path he had to getting the GOP nom has been shut off. I feel comfortable enough to say he surely the will never be President let alone be his party's nominee. What needed to be done has been done, and that is what would had been his presidential run has been capped off at the knees.

      NY-9/NJ-10; Russians can give you arms but only the United States can give you a solution. -- Anwar Sadat

      by BKGyptian89 on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 10:28:48 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Well, I would like some accountability (12+ / 0-)

        from his office for once.

        “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

        by KingofSpades on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 10:30:09 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Yeah (0+ / 0-)

          What goes around comes around.

          NY-9/NJ-10; Russians can give you arms but only the United States can give you a solution. -- Anwar Sadat

          by BKGyptian89 on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 10:32:51 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  For me, as a resident (5+ / 0-)

          It's not just about the political aspects, but to make his administration pay for making corruption worse despite making it a cornerstone of his campaign to do the complete opposite.

          “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

          by KingofSpades on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 10:33:07 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  This was the guy who helped lead the sting ops (6+ / 0-)

            called "Operation Bid Rig" to uncover and punish all sorts of corrupt developer and contract dealings going on across the state.  He almost indicted George Norcross (IIRC), but was overruled by the Governor.  In 2009, his past of fighting corruption were what explained his early huge leads in polling and he made it a big part of his campaign.  

            And now, to see him sink into the muck and indulge in the full mess of the corrupt patronage system as well as adding on to it a culture of retribution-based politics, it sickens me.  He deserves the current environment and then some.  Lately, he's been trying to bar his cabinet officials from testifying before committee in some BS rule they made up on the fly despite pledging to be cooperative.  He must be dragged through the muck of his own corruption and filth.  It's good for us and it's ultimately good for him.

            “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

            by KingofSpades on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 12:15:28 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

      •  The guy should be impeached, removed (0+ / 0-)

        and replaced by a Democrat in the special election.

        Racism, misogyny, and homophobia should NOT be protected by the Constitution.

        by TeaBaggersAreRacists on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 03:53:22 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Suffered Enough? I Completely Disagree (5+ / 0-)

        If he broke any laws he needs to be impeached and thrown in jail.

        •  Oh no don't get me wrong (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          KingofSpades

          suffered enough meaning his what would have his presidential campaign has suffered enough to the point where he will never ever be President. I'm quite enjoying this. I never considered him my Governor anyways. I always hoped that a scandal happened on his watch that could take him down. And I hope he did brake the law and there's evidence that showed he knew about the GWB closing while there were happening and/or he illegally held up Sandy aid for political favor. Hopefully one or both of those shoe drops so his career will be over.

          NY-9/NJ-10; Russians can give you arms but only the United States can give you a solution. -- Anwar Sadat

          by BKGyptian89 on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 08:08:34 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  I am very tired of the Christie story (0+ / 0-)

        Don't get me wrong I think Christie and his team are dicks and deserve the political blow back they are getting but enough is enough. This was a stupid dick move but it's not Watergate and if the left continues to treat it as if it was it will backfire IMO.

        Vote Democratic. We're not perfect-but they're NUTS! - Barney Frank

        by Minnesota Mike on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 02:37:21 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  I see too many parallels to Watergate (6+ / 0-)

          which was initially about little more than trying to spy on the DNC.  Haldeman and Ehrlichman took the fall for it as the paper trail went back to them, not Nixon, but it was not enough.  It escalated because of wide-scale cover-up and illegal obstruction of justice and destruction of evidence.

          Like Watergate's set-up, Christie was so obsessed with winning big, he had his underlings intimidate, spy, and sabotage the opposition.

          To illegally obstruct interstate traffic, including emergency services for fabricated reasons is the crime.  The cover-up and culture that created this scenario is the Watergate parallel.

          Democrats running the investigation are not treating it like a witch hunt, though, and are merely subpoenaing those in the know, but are being rebuffed in complete contrast to Christie's pledge for complete cooperation.

          “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

          by KingofSpades on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 02:46:13 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  The crime of Watergate was tiny (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            MichaelNY, MetroGnome

            if Nixon had a mea culpa moment like Kennedy and the Bay of Pigs invasion failure, he would have gotten off with a few months of negative press.

            “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

            by KingofSpades on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 02:54:35 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  I completely agree (8+ / 0-)

              Iran-Contra was a much more serious crime, though I now believe Reagan himself actually was already suffering from Alzheimer's and probably really didn't understand what people ostensibly working for him were doing.

              The basic similarity between Nixon and Christie is that they weren't satisfied with getting a landslide fair and square and were both very talented politicians who destroyed their careers through a very foolish hubris.

              Formerly Pan on Swing State Project

              by MichaelNY on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 03:01:48 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Iran-Contra (0+ / 0-)

                Was two separate initiatives, either of which on its own could have been defensible, but which together were highly problematic, especially as that linkage involved money laundering, embezzlement, etc

                On one side you had a real effort to imitate Kissinger and Nixon's trip to China with Iran, with the National Security Adviser actually visiting Tehran - it wasn't just about weapons, though that overshadowed the former as the NSC staff allowed themselves to be led on by Iranian officials who mainly wanted those.

                On the other you had an effort to keep the Contras in existence after Congress cut off funding by asking the Saudis for a favor. Had the 1984 policy of having the Saudis do it on their own been continued it would have been fine, but something had the brilliant idea of funding this through the Iran initiative.

    •  Christie is done; focus should be on Walker (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY, Zack from the SFV, WisJohn

      He's just as dangerous as Christie just look at 'Walker-Obama' voters.

      •  I'm looking at them (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        MichaelNY, KingofSpades, itskevin

        and I can guarantee there were far fewer than Christie-Obama voters.  Walker is a pretty good candidate in my opinion, but he's not Christie (pre-scandal).

        21, CA-18 (home), CA-13 (school)
        politicohen.com
        Idiosyncratic, pro-establishment. Liberal, not progressive. For the poor, the children, the planet, and the rule of law.
        UC Berkeley; I think I'm in the conservative half of this city.

        by jncca on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 07:44:11 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Agreed (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          MichaelNY, sacman701, Chachy, WisJohn

          Hell, I probably would've voted for Walker in the recall just because it's absolutely inappropriate to use the recall process every time you disagree with someone's policies. It's a waste of time and money, and I'm glad it was put to rest.

          That said, his initial election was nothing spectacular. He won by six points in a state that's hardly much better for Republicans than a swing state, and he did it in the absolute worst environment for Democrats since 1994. There are very few "Obama-Walker" voters, especially given that the 2012 Presidential election featured ~700k more voters than either the recall or the 2010 election. Those who carried the state for us in 2012 Pres were the ones who stayed home during the 2010 and 2012 Gov election.

          In a Pres matchup, I have little doubt that HRC would wipe the floor with him.

          TX-17 (Bill Flores-R), TX Sen-14 (Kirk Watson-D), TX HD-50 (Celia Israel-D)

          by Le Champignon on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 08:39:43 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Even if I disagreed with the recall (4+ / 0-)

            (which I'm still conflicted on), I would have still voted for Barrett. Because voting for Walker means signing off on his agenda.

            26, Practical Progressive Democratic Socialist (-9.38, -8.51), Gay, IN-02 - Defeat Wacky Jackie!

            by HoosierD42 on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 02:15:11 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  good post (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            MichaelNY

            Walker has yet to demonstrate that he has any crossover appeal (and given his rhetoric, policies, and personality it's hard to see why he would have much). Rather, I think the recall election showed that disgust with the recall process has crossover appeal.

            SSP poster. 44, CA-6, -0.25/-3.90

            by sacman701 on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 10:13:53 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  Wasn't the issue with Walker's recall (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            gabjoh

            that virtually nothing was mentioned about Act 10 during the election, thus depriving lots of people with a chance to have a say before having it sprung on them?

            "Once, at a formal dinner, when [a rich] guest complained about the cost of welfare programs for the poor, Buffett replied tartly, 'I'm a lot more concerned about welfare for the rich.'"--from a book on Warren Buffett

            by bjssp on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 10:49:52 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  Recall. (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            MichaelNY, James Allen, bjssp

            I agree, recalls should really only be used for malfeasance in office. However, what happened in Wisconsin in early 2011 required one, and it really was a once-in-a-lifetime event. There was just so much tension and divisions, and people felt like the legislation would hurt them so much, and feelings were so high (I had to console one of my high school teachers, she was so worked up about all of it) that all the commotion, I believe, would have led to utter chaos had something like the recalls not happened. Unlike Ohio, WI doesn't have the 'People's Veto', so the recalls were the only really semi-immediate way for opponents of Gov. Walker to fight back.

            In retrospect, were the recalls a waste of time and money? I'd say yes (and I singed the petitions and voted for Barrett). Was it necessary at the time? Yes. Definitely.

            Gay farm boy, 21, who hit the city to go to college, WI-03 (home, voting), WI-02 (college), -5.12, -1.74, "No tears. Remember the laughter, stories and good times we shared."- My dad (1959-2013).

            by WisJohn on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 05:27:15 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Interesting point of view (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Zack from the SFV, WisJohn

              I'd tend to think that, since the recall failed, it shouldn't have been attempted, but it didn't occur to me that there could have been uncontrollable chaos if the anger of many hadn't been put to an unsuccessful vote.

              Formerly Pan on Swing State Project

              by MichaelNY on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 05:33:33 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Those votes should have been for legislature (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                WisJohn, MichaelNY

                as we successfully took the senate for a while because of recalls. I think the worst part of the recall happening was that it had a strong deterrent effect on any top tier challengers like Ron Kind, Tom Nelson, or even Barrett himself from running in 2014. That and Walker got to spent like $40 million improving his image and that money wouldn't have flowed in this early had the recall not happened.

                The recalls looked like a good idea throughout early and mid 2011, but it should have seemed clear to the party and to a lesser extent activists that by the end of the year that it was not going to go well.

                Now I disagree that voters supporting Walker in the recall in and of itself strengthened him as the polling strongly supported the notion that the median voter opposed the recall itself rather than supported Walker, but I still think we're in a worse position than if we didn't attempt it.

              •  Maybe I am overstating the chaos a bit. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                MichaelNY

                But my point remains. The recall was the only way to retaliate against the law and Governor himself. So we tried it. We lost. Most people moved on.

                Gay farm boy, 21, who hit the city to go to college, WI-03 (home, voting), WI-02 (college), -5.12, -1.74, "No tears. Remember the laughter, stories and good times we shared."- My dad (1959-2013).

                by WisJohn on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 05:47:36 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

            •  If I recall, the unions in WI gave in to the (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              James Allen, WisJohn

              cuts and everything, so it wasn't as if they were being unreasonable and demanding huge raises while times were tough. Is that right? If so, I suspect that that really incensed a lot of them. That, and the fact that many first responders were exempt.

              "Once, at a formal dinner, when [a rich] guest complained about the cost of welfare programs for the poor, Buffett replied tartly, 'I'm a lot more concerned about welfare for the rich.'"--from a book on Warren Buffett

              by bjssp on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 07:35:04 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Yes, the unions were more than willing (3+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                James Allen, MichaelNY, WisJohn

                To make deep sacrifices. Walker just wanted to strip their rights. When the Wisconsin 14 fled the state to prevent a quorum on budgetary matters, the Fitz brothers just stripped out the budget parts and passed the collective bargaining ban anyway.

                26, Practical Progressive Democratic Socialist (-9.38, -8.51), Gay, IN-02 - Defeat Wacky Jackie!

                by HoosierD42 on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 09:07:32 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

  •  These Governor races are very important (7+ / 0-)

    With these vulnerable GOP governors up for re-election, that's where our success will be this year. In places like PA, FL, ME and MI. And plus you always want to have a Democratic Governor in place just in case a Senate vacancy emerges. What if something happens to Kirk, Toomey, Collins, Rubio or Ayotte, and they happen to die in office or something. We surely want it to be a Democrat filling that vacancy and not a Republican. So I'm very optimistic on the Gov races this year.

    NY-9/NJ-10; Russians can give you arms but only the United States can give you a solution. -- Anwar Sadat

    by BKGyptian89 on Fri Feb 14, 2014 at 09:48:04 PM PST

  •  Gov. Bullock says no "backroom deal"... (11+ / 0-)

    On the Baucus/Walsh appointments. Story here.

    “He wanted to weigh in on who I should choose and this was before it was even public,” Bullock said of Reid. “And I said it was none of your damn business.”

    Bullock would not say whether Reid suggested a replacement for Baucus, telling reporters to reach out to the majority leader’s camp for confirmation. A Reid spokesperson declined comment.

    But Bullock did further outline his message to Reid in that December call.

    “I said, ‘You know what. Stay out of my decision-making. This is a decision I make and no one else. This is one of those decisions that voters have entrusted me with,’” Bullock continued.

    Considering Sen. Reid got his way, I don't think he minded at all if that's actually how the conversation went down. Also, nice assist by Bullock in providing some political cover for Sen. Walsh.

    Pragmatic progressive. Oregonian, Cascadian, and American. Keeper of the DKE glossary.

    by SaoMagnifico on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 01:00:39 AM PST

    •  I'm feeling positive about this one. (4+ / 0-)

      Democrats have shown they can compete effectively in the state, and Walsh seems like a good a candidate as any. If he's got good people behind him and is willing to work at it, I see no reason why he shouldn't be able to at least make Daines fight like a dog to win. In fact, the only reason I'd see this being hopeless is if 2014 is like a 1994/2010 year, just worse.

      "Once, at a formal dinner, when [a rich] guest complained about the cost of welfare programs for the poor, Buffett replied tartly, 'I'm a lot more concerned about welfare for the rich.'"--from a book on Warren Buffett

      by bjssp on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 07:19:17 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  More Votes for Millionaires than for Middle Class? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    PassionateJus, MichaelNY

    I don't remember seeing anyone else comment on Tom Perkin's suggestion that millionaires get more votes than everyone else.

    If you don't remember, this is the douche who claimed that we are on our way to Kristallnacht with all of this criticism of the One Percent. He was defended by the WSJ editorial page, where his comments first appeared, but easily disavowed by his old firm, Kleiner, Perkins, Caufield and Byers, which went to  great lengths to say he's no longer affiliated. Sadly, this isn't the only time something so damn stupid has been said. A few years ago, private equity guy Steve Schwarzman said that the proposed tax increases under the Obama administration were like when Hitler invaded Poland.

    Well anyway, earlier this week, because apparently he has no shame, he said that only taxpayers should vote, and if you pay more in taxes, you should get more votes. He claims he was being provocative, but really, what a dumbfuck. Among other things, if you think taxes here are too progressive, go to another country. Seriously, aside from maybe Singapore or maybe one of the Scandinavian countries, and probably not even then, you most likely won't find a better deal than you are getting here. And if you're paying 75 percent of your income/wealth in taxes, you need to find a new group of financial professionals.

    I kind of like LOLGOP's suggestion of drafting only these rich and nobody else to fight wars, as it would do wonders for world peace.

    "Once, at a formal dinner, when [a rich] guest complained about the cost of welfare programs for the poor, Buffett replied tartly, 'I'm a lot more concerned about welfare for the rich.'"--from a book on Warren Buffett

    by bjssp on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 08:01:32 AM PST

    •  If Perkin's suggestion was actually enacted (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      LordMike, PassionateJus

      and we gave out votes based on what percentage of your income you paid in taxes, he wouldn't even get that many votes. The poor pay far more of their income proportionally in taxes than the rich, and any of the bailed-out companies would get negative votes. Even if we went with "one tax dollar equals one vote", the rich would still probably get less votes.

      So his idea is stupid to begin with, and horrible class warfare to boot.

      I'm honestly surprised that Warren Buffet didn't end up like these morons.

      Leftist Mormon in Utah, Born in Washington State, live in UT-04 (Matheson).

      by Gygaxian on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 08:39:34 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I don't get your last sentence. (0+ / 0-)

        Please explain.

        To be honest, I'm not sure he was entirely serious with this statement, but it's going to be news no matter what.

        "Once, at a formal dinner, when [a rich] guest complained about the cost of welfare programs for the poor, Buffett replied tartly, 'I'm a lot more concerned about welfare for the rich.'"--from a book on Warren Buffett

        by bjssp on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 08:42:08 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  His idea was each $ in likely filed taxes = 1 vote (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          LordMike

          but everyone pays some sort of tax whether it's income, sales, property, etc. Anyway, what Gygaxian was saying is that wealthier people, particularly those whose money comes from investments rather than salary, pay a much lower tax rate. So if we weighted votes by the proportion of your income you pay in taxes, poor and lower middle class people would get more votes per capita than the rich.

          •  Right, but (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            MichaelNY

            what does Buffett have to do with it? He's saying he's surprised he didn't "end up" like this. Does he mean he's surprised his wealth hasn't corrupted him or made his mind very greedy or something?

            "Once, at a formal dinner, when [a rich] guest complained about the cost of welfare programs for the poor, Buffett replied tartly, 'I'm a lot more concerned about welfare for the rich.'"--from a book on Warren Buffett

            by bjssp on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 09:06:00 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

        •  I saw your Warren Buffet quote and was reminded (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          MichaelNY

          that Buffet is not a raging sociopath like Perkins.

          Leftist Mormon in Utah, Born in Washington State, live in UT-04 (Matheson).

          by Gygaxian on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 11:24:52 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I suspect it's because Buffett (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Gygaxian, KingofSpades

            came from the Great Depression, because his background wasn't materialistic and that continued into the time when he had kids, and because he was never in it to spend the money, but just to watch it grow and learn how to make it grow even more. It's funny you say that, too, because the Lowenstein book describes his switch to the Democratic Party, right around the time of his father's death. It was mostly due to civil rights, and he said that he wasn't even sure his father was wrong on a lot of other stuff, presumably economic stuff. Maybe he's become slightly more of an economic liberal over time, or maybe he's just looking at tax increases on the rich more as a budgetary/accounting thing, but I don't think he was ever much of a populist.

            "Once, at a formal dinner, when [a rich] guest complained about the cost of welfare programs for the poor, Buffett replied tartly, 'I'm a lot more concerned about welfare for the rich.'"--from a book on Warren Buffett

            by bjssp on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 11:02:35 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

    •  there was a crazy oilman fifty years ago by the (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY

      name of Harold Hunt who wanted votes "weighed" based on how much money they made.

  •  OT: any Chicago fans on here? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    MichaelNY

    There is no music thread of DK so i thought I'd post it here.

    What do you think would have happened if Terry Kath hadn't blown his brains out? Would he have quit the group, stayed, maybe OD'd?

    Its worth noting that they had already started producing "crap" as early as Chicago V so its not like they instantly turned to shit when Kath died. Maybe he realized that "If You Leave Me Now" would make more money than "I'm A Man".

    •  I'm a huge fan of Chicago (0+ / 0-)

      and I like most of their songs, both 70s and 80s. I have a bunch of Chicago playlists on my computer that I listen to frequently.

      (-8.38, -4.72), CT-02 (home), ME-01 (college) "The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few, or the one." -Spock

      by ProudNewEnglander on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 09:29:00 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  my wife really likes them (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY

      She only listens to the stuff that goes up to about 1978, though.

      On the liner notes of one of the CDs the guys in the horn section talk about how they were hating life in the 80s when they were putting out songs with no horns even though they were making money hand over fist.

      I suspect that if Kath had lived the group would have punted just like they did without him, but they would have had a few more songs on every album with more guitar and especially more wah-wah.

      SSP poster. 44, CA-6, -0.25/-3.90

      by sacman701 on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 12:30:45 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  I loved Chicago's early stuff (0+ / 0-)

      Saturday in the Park, 25 or 6 to 4, Does Anyone Really Know What Time it is, etc.

      Who knows what would have happened? I do think it had a really adverse effect on the quality of the music they put out.

      Formerly Pan on Swing State Project

      by MichaelNY on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 01:09:03 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  My mom is a huge fan (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY

      So that's trickled down to me. Like MichaelNY, I prefer the early jazz fusion Chicago to the Cetera-dominated one.

      26, Practical Progressive Democratic Socialist (-9.38, -8.51), Gay, IN-02 - Defeat Wacky Jackie!

      by HoosierD42 on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 02:18:54 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  I'm drawing some maps of Ohio's (0+ / 0-)

    state legislative districts, and I was wondering if the requirement of nesting three state House districts in one state Senate district is in the state Constitution, or if it's just a tradition that could be ignored. It would be much easier to draw good Democratic gerrymanders if that requirement didn't exist (and the Reps could have drawn a better gerrymander themselves if not for the requirement).

    (-8.38, -4.72), CT-02 (home), ME-01 (college) "The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few, or the one." -Spock

    by ProudNewEnglander on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 09:27:55 AM PST

  •  committee assignments (0+ / 0-)

    anyone know why Luis Gutierrez hasn't tried to get on the judiciary committee? He's not a lawyer, but he has said before that his only allegiance is to the immigrant community (or something along those lines) and judiciary deals the most with immigration related to issues

    Maybe when he first came to congress and when he was given an assignment, he wasn't as interested in the issue

  •  Interested: House, Sen, and Gov races in KS (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    KingofSpades

    Kansas is a Republican state, but it only recently turned ultra-conservative. With the way the legislature has been acting, it's very possible we could see a lot of moderate Republicans jump ship to the Democrats just to overthrow the nutjobs. Prior to 2010 there was a coalition government running the show to keep the nuts out of power, but, well, 2010 ended that.

    Our candidate in KS-03 is a solid get, former state Senator and former lt gov nominee Kelly Kultala. She appears to have been another victim of gerrymandering after 2010, losing reelection in 2012 by a couple percentage points. Still, it's an uphill climb in an R+5 district, and she's facing incumbent Kevin Yoder. Yoder ran against a no-name Libertarian in 2012 and didn't even get 70% of the vote. He could be vulnerable, but an incumbent's an incumbent, and I don't think this seat will flip unless my theory on a Democratic national mood turns out to be true in November.

    We've a some-dudeish guy for Senate in Kansas, which is unfortunate, as Pat Roberts is dogged by his disconnect to voters and a Tea Party primary challenger, Milton Wolf, backed by the Madison Project. I don't expect the Kansas Senate race to become competitive for us, but as Pat Roberts is an old-school conservative, it'd be best if he beats his primary challenger. Wolf is of the same vein of crazies who seem to sprout from the medical profession and decide they hate everything about government, poor people, and minorities. With a suitably large backlash against the extreme legislature in Kansas, and with a much better get than Chad Taylor, we could at least make a race out of the seat. Again, Kansas is almost certainly not going to elect a Democratic Senator, but making a hail mary pass for the seat would help to build up the dormant Democratic Party in the state.

    For Governor, everyone who reads DKE knows about Sam Brownback's unpopularity. Kansas isn't averse to Democratic governors, and Paul Davis is without a doubt our best possible candidate. As usual, I'm more bullish on his prospects for winning than most around here, but even with a good environment for Democrats, it'll be difficult to overcome the Republican lean of the state. Still, I think this is a better pickup opportunity for us than OH or WI Gov, and I'd rate it Lean-R at present.

    TX-17 (Bill Flores-R), TX Sen-14 (Kirk Watson-D), TX HD-50 (Celia Israel-D)

    by Le Champignon on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 10:07:45 AM PST

  •  IA-SEN: Bob Vander Plaats wont run (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    MichaelNY, James Allen

    Too bad. Still no worried about Dems winning here. But Vander Plaats as the nominee(or forcing a convention) would have helped us.

    link.

  •  Groupon: Don't Know Much About History... (10+ / 0-)

    I personally blame Obama for this lack of presidential knowledge on the part of Groupon, via Political Wire:

    According to a press release, Groupon apparently thinks Alexander Hamilton was President of the United States.

    "Starting tomorrow, Groupon will be kicking off Presidents Day weekend by giving customers 10 dollars off 40 dollars when they purchase a deal for any local business. The $10 bill, as everyone knows, features President Alexander Hamilton -- undeniably one of our greatest presidents and most widely recognized for establishing the country's financial system."

    Also, Benghazi!

    "Once, at a formal dinner, when [a rich] guest complained about the cost of welfare programs for the poor, Buffett replied tartly, 'I'm a lot more concerned about welfare for the rich.'"--from a book on Warren Buffett

    by bjssp on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 10:58:52 AM PST

  •  LA-Sen: Didn't realize Landrieu now chairs (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jj32, MichaelNY, James Allen

    the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee: http://www.washingtonpost.com/...

    What do you think she will do with this for her benefit?

    “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

    by KingofSpades on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 12:08:19 PM PST

  •  I started watching Season 1 of "House of Cards" (0+ / 0-)

    Reminds me a lot of Othello.

    “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

    by KingofSpades on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 12:08:51 PM PST

    •  Not Richard III? (0+ / 0-)

      "Go Forth in Love and Peace" --Be Kind to Dogs -- And Vote Democratic" --Dying words of Senator Thomas Eagleton, 2007

      by BlueSasha on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 12:50:53 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Did you ever see the British version? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      James Allen, KingofSpades

      I was watching Maddow Friday night night, and she was talking about how you have to watching the British version you watch the US version. Because you can't go back because it won't be as intriguing. It's like "drinking milk before orange juice" is how she put it as.

      I now watching the second series To Play The King.

      NY-9/NJ-10; Russians can give you arms but only the United States can give you a solution. -- Anwar Sadat

      by BKGyptian89 on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 06:17:46 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  A political angle on the Senate debt ceiling vote (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jj32, ehstronghold, MichaelNY

    Ted Cruz demanding a 60-vote margin forced Republicans to cross over to vote for cloture when they would not vote for it in a simple majority vote: http://www.washingtonpost.com/...

    “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

    by KingofSpades on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 12:22:05 PM PST

  •  Here's a fun open thread hypothetical for you (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    KingofSpades

    what if Democratic voters turned out like they did in 2012 but Republicans dropped off like they normally would in a midterm. I think it goes without saying that there would be a Democratic wave, but what exactly would that bring us?

    Assuming we got decent candidates in places like South Carolina, I could see us limiting our losses in the senate to just SD and WV though maybe even winning the latter, and then gaining KY, GA, both SC seats, possibly MS, and maybe even NE, KS, or TX. I bet Collins still holds on though with a >60% approval rating among Ds. That would give us 60 seats (assuming Travis Childers runs)

    For governors I could see us holding everything we have and gaining PA, ME, MI, FL for sure, along with OH, WI, GA, SC, NM, AZ, IA, and maybe even AK, NE, KS, TX, and NV depending on candidates.

    The biggest improvement might be the house since we'd lose just NC-07 and UT-04 and take it back with CA-10, CA-21, CA-25, CA-31, NV-03, CO-03, CO-06, NM-02, MT-AL, NE-02, IA-03, IA-04, MN-02, IL-13, MI-01, MI-07, MI-11, IN-02, KY-06, OH-06, OH-14, WV-02, AR-02, FL-02, FL-13, VA-10, VA-02, PA-06, PA-08, NJ-03, NY-11, NY-19, and NY-23. That's a net gain of +31.
    We also might possibly win even WA-08, CA-39, KS-03, AR-01, AR-04, SC-01, SC-05, SC-07, GA-01, FL-10, FL-07, FL-15, FL-16, FL-25, FL-27, NC-02, NC-06, NC-07, NC-09, NC-11, NC-13, VA-01, VA-04, VA-05, VA-07, MN-03, WI-01, WI-07, WI-08, MI-03, MI-06, IN-08, IN-09, OH-01, OH-02, OH-03, OH-04, OH-07, OH-15, OH-16, WV-01, PA-07, PA-15, NJ-02, NJ-05, NJ-07, NJ-11, NY-02, NY-22, and NY-27 or more depending on candidates, which would bring the net gain up to +50.

    For state legislatures I'd venture we take the WA-senate, get supermajorities in the OR-lege, possibly take part of the AK-lege, take the AZ-lege, get supermajorities in the NV-lege, maybe break the OK, KS, and NE supermajorities, possibly take the MT-lege, possibly win a MN-house supermajority, take the IA-house, break the MO-lege supermajorities, take the AR-lege, break the GA-lege supermajorities, possibly take the FL-house & break sen supermajority, possibly take the SC-sen, possibly take the NC-lege, come close to taking the KY-sen, take the WI-lege, take the MI-lege, perhaps take the OH-house & break their supermajorities, take the PA-lege, take the NY-sen, get supermajorities in the CT-lege, take the NH-sen & possibly get supermajorities, possibly get supermajorities in ME.

    That would leave us with effective legislative control in HI, WA, OR, CA, NV, AZ, NM, CO, AR, IA, MN, WI, IL, MI, WV, MD, DE, PA, NY, CT, RI, MA, VT, NH, ME, and possibly MT, KY, and even SC with likely divided government in MT, MO, OH, KY, VA, FL, GA, SC, NJ, and possibly AK, TX, KS, and NE.

    Of course the opposite, where Republicans turn out at presidential levels and Democrats at midterm levels would essentially wipe us out everywhere.

    I could see us losing SD, WV, MT, AR, AK, LA, NC for sure, along with probably IA, MI. NH, CO, NM, MN, and maybe even OR would be tough too. That brings Republicans up to at least 54 seats.

    For governor we'd certainly lose AR and IL, probably fail to gain FL and maybe ME but still pick up PA, lose CO and CT and have a tough time holding MN and MA and maybe OR.

    In the house we would almost certainly lose: UT-04, NC-07, CA-07, CA-26, CA-36, CA-52, AZ-01, AZ-02, AZ-09, TX-23, IL-10, IL-17, GA-12, FL-26, WV-03, NY-21, NY-18, NY-01, MA-06, NH-01, ME-02 while failing to pick up CA-31, CO-06, IA-03, FL-02, FL-13, and NJ-03 for a net loss of -21.
    Additionally we might lose WA-01, CA-03, CA-09, CA-16, CA-24, CA-41, NV-04, IA-01, GA-02, FL-18, NY-04, NY-24, CT-05, and NH-02 for an extra -14.

    In state legislatures I could see us outright losing the WA-senate and WA-house, the OR-lege, our CA-supermajorities, the NV-sen, the CO-lege, the NM-house, the IA-sen, the MN-house, our IL-lege supermajorities, the KY-house, the WV-lege, our MD-lege supermajorities, our DE-lege supermajorities & maybe even a chamber or both, outright losing the NY-sen, losing our NY-assembly majority, losing our VT-lege supermajorities, losing the NH-house, losing the ME-lege, Rs gaining supermajorities in AK, MT, AZ, TX, WI, MI-house, SC, FL-house, and NH.

    That would leave us with effective Dem governments in just HI, CA, MD, DE, RI, MA, and VT, divided govt in WA, OR, NV, NM, MN, IL, VA, NJ, NY, NH and Rep governments everywhere else, including almost all of the south, midwest, and west.

  •  NC-Sen: AFP downgrades their ad quality (0+ / 0-)

    by rotating in this silly thematic ad: http://youtu.be/...

    Who made this ad, Captain Hook?

    “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

    by KingofSpades on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 12:39:04 PM PST

  •  CA-33: Another Dem announces (0+ / 0-)
    Matt Miller, former Clinton White House aide, KCRW radio host, frequent television commentator and WashingtonPost.com columnist, is ready to embark on his first political race. Miller is probably best known for hosting a weekly political talk show on KCRW called “Left, Right & Center.”
    http://www.latimes.com/...

    http://www.dailybreeze.com/...

    http://www.mattmillerforcongress.com/

    All the problems we face in the United States today can be traced to an unenlightened immigration policy on the part of the American Indian. -- Pat Paulsen

    by tommypaine on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 01:51:19 PM PST

  •  Hungarian political parties and Facebook (4+ / 0-)

    Last week I wrote here about how the elections I'm following most now are the ones that will take place here in Hungary in early April.

    The campaign's off, and started on a typical bitter note. The first salvo, last month, came from the right - not from a political party, but from a large, nominally independent non-parliamentary organization that's close to the governing Fidesz party. They had the city plastered full of posters/billboards prominently featuring former Prime Minister Gyurcsany (of "we lied morning, noon and night" speech fame), alongside former prime minister Bajnai and Socialist Party leader Mesterhazy, as well as a disgraced local Socialist who was sent off for corruption and ... a clown.

    They all hold up their name, prisoner-style, and the poster's text says "They Don't Deserve Another Chance". It's actually Mesterhazy, the chap on the left, who is leading the opposition alliance, but Gyurcsany makes for a more effective boogeyman and, hey, putting Mesterhazy, Bajnai and Gyurcsany on the top 3 spots of the opposition coalition's electoral list practically invited potshots like this. And I gotta say ... it's a pretty effective ad. It got a grim nod even from me. The addition of Miklos Hagyo, the disgraced corrupt politician, is poetic license on the part of the ad designers though - in reality he plays no role in the opposition.

    On another note, I was curious about which Hungarian political party is most successful in building an online following on Facebook, which is an all the more important medium for rallying and cultivating support nowadays since the broadcast media largely favour the governing Fidesz. So I went and found out ...

    Spoiler: it's the far right Jobbik party. (Chart 1; Chart 2). But they're not the only ones who do well, and it's interesting to see who does weakly as well. Plus, it turns out there are a ton of Hungarian parties - no fewer than sixty of them have a Facebook presence. I wrote a whole explanatory blog post about it.

  •  abgin's alert (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    CF of Aus

    After the last fundraising reports there is enough info to introduce my alert. This time only the first race is LeD in my ratings, while the rest is a Toss-Up. In the bolded races, the Republicans lead the total fundraising.

    NV-ST: K Wallin

    FL-Gov: C Crist
    FL-LG: ? (with FL-Gov)
    OH-ST: C Pillich
    CA-21: A Renteria
    WI-AG: ?
    ME-02: ?
    AR-Sen: M Pryor
    MI-Sen: G Peters
    CA-52: S Peters
    IL-Gov: P Quinn
    IL-LG: P Vallas (with IL-Gov)
    NV-LG: L Flores
    NC-Sen: K Hagan
    AZ-SS: T Goddard
    IA-SS: B Anderson
    CO-ST: E Markey
    AR-AG: N Steel

    Between the offices in Democratic hands at the begin of the cycle that would be worse than these, there are not suprises: AR-SA, AR-ST, AR-Gov, NC-07, UT-04, MT-Sen, SD-Sen and WV-Sen.

    Between the offices in Republican hands at the begin of the cycle that would be better than these, there is a little surprise: VA-Gov, VA-LG, VA-AG, WI-ST, IL-ST, PA-Gov, PA-LG, CA-31, CO-SS, CO-AG, SC-SE, FL-13 and ME-Gov, plus the majorities in WA-StS and NY-StS.

  •  NV-SEN 2012: Imagine if we had won... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    betelgeux, lordpet8, WisJohn

    I keep thinking how better off we would be if we had won this race. We would've had a 56-44 majority and the Rs would've had to pick up seven seats instead of six. I think we would have been in a much more solid position to hold the Senate with NV but I can only dwell and ask what if...

  •  MIGOP: Mitt Romney's Niece elected to RNC (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    MichaelNY

    Mitt Romney's niece, Ronna Romney McDaniel, was elected an RNC chairwoman at an MI GOP state committee meeting, today, to replace outgoing chairwoman Terri Lynn Land, who resigned to run for Senate and seperate herself from criticism she ws coordinating her Senate campaign with her GOP connections:

    EAST LANSING — Michigan Republicans stressed party unity Saturday as they elected a niece of 2012 Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney to represent them on the Republican National Committee.

    Ronna Romney McDaniel, who defeated two other candidates on the first ballot, will replace Terri Lynn Land, who stepped down recently from the unpaid post to focus on her race for the U.S. Senate. McDaniel joins Dave Agema, who is defying requests from party leaders to resign his post, as one of two Michigan representatives on the RNC.

    The establishment was able to rally over the past week or so to thwart the tea party's campaign to capture this seat, which would have meant two extremists representing Michigan at the RNC.  Though, it'd be pretty hard to call McDaniel as moderate.  Her only criticism of Agema is basically that he's inartful articulating the party's views.
    •  Is she the same Ronna Romney (0+ / 0-)

      that got destroyed in a Senate race in Michigan a while back?

      •  No (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ProgMD, KingofSpades, MichaelNY

        That Ronna Romney is Ronna Romney McDaniel's mother, who is Mitt Romney's brother Scott's ex-wife.  

        Post-George Romney's seem to have a mostly hard time in politics in this state.  George's wife had an unsucessful senate run.  George's son G. Scott ran for MI AG and lost in the primary, and the guy that won it lost to Jennifer Granholm.  Ronna Romney ran for Senate in '94 (losing narrowly in the primary to Spence Abraham), and then ran again in '96 in which she won the primary, but was crushed by Carl Levin.

        G. Scott was the only one who has been somewhat successful having been appointed to the Michigan State University Board of Trustees in 2000, and then winning a full term that year, but who was defeated by Dianne Byrum (who almost defeated Congressman Mike Rogers) in 2008.

  •  MN Gov (15+ / 0-)

    http://www.startribune.com/...

    In a new Star Tribune poll (conducted by Mason Dixon) Mark Dayton has a 58-29 approval/disapproval . President Obama is has a 43-50 approval/disapproval.  So far that is all the Star Trib has posted but I have to guess there will be more coming (They normally drag out their poll releases over several days).

    Very Strong numbers for Dayton.

    Vote Democratic. We're not perfect-but they're NUTS! - Barney Frank

    by Minnesota Mike on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 08:20:06 PM PST

  •  What if (2+ / 2-)
    Recommended by:
    ChadmanFL, TeaBaggersAreRacists
    Hidden by:
    MetroGnome, Seph Tanner

    So I always wondered what if Mark Kirk hadn't survive his health scare he had and died in office, who you think Pat Quinn would had appointed?

    Unfortunately for we weren't able to get that seat right back, cause Kirk survived. But I think most likely Quinn would had picked Madigan. Cause she was positioning her self for a gubernatorial run at the time. That would had been a smart move for Quinn to take his strongest possible opponent out the way.

    NY-9/NJ-10; Russians can give you arms but only the United States can give you a solution. -- Anwar Sadat

    by BKGyptian89 on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 08:28:37 PM PST

  •  FL-13: Smart move by Sink? (7+ / 0-)

    I say yes. No reason to show a nationally televised debate for a special congressional election. You have reasonable lead in the polls right now. Keep this race as localized as possible.

    http://www.tampabay.com/...

    NY-9/NJ-10; Russians can give you arms but only the United States can give you a solution. -- Anwar Sadat

    by BKGyptian89 on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 09:16:33 PM PST

    •  I say yes just after reading this... (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY, MetroGnome, pademocrat
      The Clearwater Regional Chamber of Commerce was thrilled when NBC News asked to televise its Feb. 25 debate with candidates in Pinellas County's closely watched congressional race.
      The fact that the COC is behind the debate tells me enough to know Sink is making the right move.

      Intelligence agencies keep things secret because they often violate the rule of law or of good behavior. -Julian Assange-

      by ChadmanFL on Sat Feb 15, 2014 at 11:12:34 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  No reason to nationalize this (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY, KingTag

      There is absolutely no reason to nationalize this.  The Repulicans want this to be a national race - though, they should be careful what they wish for, because this could as easily end in embarrassment for them as it could sink.  Sink needs to keep this local.

      •  Well Sink herself accepted nationalizing it (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        MichaelNY, lordpet8

        Her ads and her allies' ads include messaging on high-profile national issues, like health care and social security.

        The race is nationalized, period.

        And she's still in it.

        The best-case for us is to win even after it gets nationalized, and right now Sink is poised to pull it off, though I disagree with the comment above that she has a clear lead in the polls.  I don't know that we've seen any truly reliable polling to say that.  I saw only a glib and vague hint in one story that reported that private polling on both sides shows it "closer" than a poll showing a bigger Sink lead.  But I'm not sure that reporting was precise, it's possible that really both sides show their own candidate leading.

        45, male, Indian-American, married and proud father of a girl and 2 boys, Democrat, VA-10

        by DCCyclone on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 06:54:58 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Ugh, I had a dream about this election (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY

      We were on the brink of losing because of some dirty tricks Jolly was trying to pull.

      Pragmatic progressive. Oregonian, Cascadian, and American. Keeper of the DKE glossary.

      by SaoMagnifico on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 11:11:05 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  TX-Sen (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    James Allen

    Celinda Lake, in an interview with Taegan Goddard on the Politicalwire site, said the following (some of this might be slightly paraphrased):

    "The Democrats are going to need a surprise win. Look at the Texas Senate race."

    Can you think of any good reason why she said this? If there's any surprise, I think Kansas, providing that Pat Roberts is not defeated in the primary, is a lot more likely than Texas, simply because people would have a non-partisan reason to punish the guy. Even with a good Democratic candidate, that contest would be Likely-R at best, and more likely, just a Race To Watch, but I can't see how Texas wouldn't be Safe-R all the way from now till Election Day.

    By the way, Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report also was interviewed on that site, and she talked up Michelle Nunn and discussed demographic change in Georgia as favoring the Democrats.

    Formerly Pan on Swing State Project

    by MichaelNY on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 01:46:38 AM PST

    •  Do Democrats even have a candidate for TX-Sen? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY

      So far, according to Wikipedia, these are the declared candidates:

      David Alameel, businessman and candidate for Texas's 33rd congressional district in 2012[30]
      Michael Fjetland, businessman, Independent candidate for Texas's 22nd congressional district in 2004 and Republican candidate in 2006[31]
      HyeTae "Harry" Kim, physician[30]
      Kesha Rogers, Worldwide LaRouche Youth Movement activist and nominee for Texas's 22nd congressional district in 2010 and 2012[32]
      Maxey Scherr, attorney[33]

      So, yeah...

      I really don't know what to think. Wins in KY or GA wouldn't surprise me, but in the other races, like KS or MS, we don't have candidates. It's still only February, so it's possible we can get up to speed quickly. But we can't wait too much longer, I think.

      Anyway, which interview are you referring to?

      "Once, at a formal dinner, when [a rich] guest complained about the cost of welfare programs for the poor, Buffett replied tartly, 'I'm a lot more concerned about welfare for the rich.'"--from a book on Warren Buffett

      by bjssp on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 07:05:12 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Possibly (0+ / 0-)

      because of BGTX and their voter registration drives? Texans don't typically split their tickets any more, so any new Democrats will likely vote Democrat up and down the ballot. But given that we have an army of Some Dudes, including one particularly vile Some Dude (David Alameel), I don't see the Senate Minority Whip being dethroned this election even in a miracle wave.

      If we get a surprise win, it'll be in WV or MT. Nothing ultra surprising like TX or OK or MS - just surprising enough.

      TX-17 (Bill Flores-R), TX Sen-14 (Kirk Watson-D), TX HD-50 (Celia Israel-D)

      by Le Champignon on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 08:04:22 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  the particularly vile candidate is Kesha Rogers. (5+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        sacman701, gabjoh, jncca, ProgMD, ehstronghold

        Alameel at most is a bit sketchy.

        ...better the occasional faults of a government that lives in a spirit of charity, than the consistent omissions of a government frozen in the ice of its own indifference. -FDR, 1936

        by James Allen on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 09:08:20 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Maybe Sadler, again? (0+ / 0-)

          At the very least, we should find someone who can merely not embarrass us. Given the size of the state and that as recently as 10 years ago we held more offices than we do now, there's got to be someone who'd do that--if nobody wants to actually work for it.

          "Once, at a formal dinner, when [a rich] guest complained about the cost of welfare programs for the poor, Buffett replied tartly, 'I'm a lot more concerned about welfare for the rich.'"--from a book on Warren Buffett

          by bjssp on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 09:15:08 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I like Maxey Scherr (0+ / 0-)

            She seems like a decent person, but again, she's a some-chick without a lot of money. Cornyn will swat her like a fly, unfortunately, just like he would any other Democrat in this state.

            TX-17 (Bill Flores-R), TX Sen-14 (Kirk Watson-D), TX HD-50 (Celia Israel-D)

            by Le Champignon on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 09:52:39 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  I'm eager to hear more from CL on this. (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Le Champignon, MichaelNY

              I'm curious to see what makes her so optimistic on Texas, even under particular circumstances.

              But really, most importantly, let's avoid another Alvin Greene/Mark Clayton situation.

              "Once, at a formal dinner, when [a rich] guest complained about the cost of welfare programs for the poor, Buffett replied tartly, 'I'm a lot more concerned about welfare for the rich.'"--from a book on Warren Buffett

              by bjssp on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 10:01:24 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

  •  Interested in Utah legislative elections (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    KingofSpades

    (couldn't sleep, so decided to post here, apologies if it's a bit stream-of-thought or disjointed, it's around  6:30 here)

    I've kind of lost interest in the UT-04 race, since Doug Owens has very little chance at winning (and judging from some of the stances on his campaign site, he may be trying to place himself to the right of Matheson socially). Though it's a shame he's facing Mia Love, I think he'd have a chance against one of the generic legislators who like to randomly run for Congress.

    But in any case, I'm far more interested in the state legislative elections. The biggest question here is whether the Romneygeddon had that much of an impact, or if it was just a bit of re-aligning. If it was the Romneygeddon and the voting trend from that continues, then the Utah Dems are doomed even more than we already are. There will be several state house and at least one state senate race that we'll lose.

    But if the midterm proves better for us than 2012 despite being a midterm (or if the drive to register 40,000 new people works in our favor), then I'd like to see how that all shakes out, and if we'd lose or gain seats. I'm interested to see if we can oust any GOP incumbents.

    Additionally, given the total lack of info about most Dem legislative candidates, I'd like to know who the candidates are, and what they're about, and so forth. It was difficult to get any info in 2012, so I hope it isn't that difficult in 2014.

    Leftist Mormon in Utah, Born in Washington State, live in UT-04 (Matheson).

    by Gygaxian on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 05:26:11 AM PST

  •  House of Cards S2E3 (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sulthernao, lordpet8

    The quorum call scene used actual Senators names for the beginning of the call after the Vice President walks in to preside (Brown, Burr, Cantwell) and the end of the call (Whitehouse, Wicker, Wyden).

    They know their audience.

    24 Burkean Post Modern Gay Democrat; NM-2 (Raised), TX-20 (B.A. & M.A. in Political Science), TX-17 (Home); 08/12 PVIs

    by wwmiv on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 05:32:49 AM PST

    •  Senators' (0+ / 0-)

      24 Burkean Post Modern Gay Democrat; NM-2 (Raised), TX-20 (B.A. & M.A. in Political Science), TX-17 (Home); 08/12 PVIs

      by wwmiv on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 05:34:12 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Possible spoiler... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      sulthernao

      That deal they were working on seems...kind of unrealistic, no?

      "Once, at a formal dinner, when [a rich] guest complained about the cost of welfare programs for the poor, Buffett replied tartly, 'I'm a lot more concerned about welfare for the rich.'"--from a book on Warren Buffett

      by bjssp on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 09:08:55 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yeah - it just seems to give Republicans (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        sulthernao

        everything they want in exchange for nothing.

        27, originally OK-1, currently NY-10. Former swingnut.

        by okiedem on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 10:25:26 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Hey it wouldn't be a mass-appeal show if (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          okiedem, sulthernao

          it didn't pretend social security is in crisis! I also recall the West Wing having a deal made between the parties on that subject.

          •  What was BS about that (0+ / 0-)

            was that the deal wasn't anything couldn't agree to. On that show, the deal was some small adjustments here and there to basic SS, plus an add on private account, something like a universal 401K/IRA. Most Democrats don't like SS cuts, but at the same time, it's a problem of basic arithmetic, so more money needs to come in or less needs to come out. (I guess you could arguably put productivity and immigration into a separate category, but I don't.) In the end, a compromise that does a little bit of both would probably be acceptable to most in Congress. But the add on accounts? Virtually nobody objects to that, especially if it's voluntary. And hell, if you polled Democrats, I'd bet lots of money you'd find broad support for redistribution in the form of tax credits or something to get people started--far more than you'd find on the Republican side.

            So yeah, that ticked me off.

            "Once, at a formal dinner, when [a rich] guest complained about the cost of welfare programs for the poor, Buffett replied tartly, 'I'm a lot more concerned about welfare for the rich.'"--from a book on Warren Buffett

            by bjssp on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 10:54:31 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

        •  I know it's not a policy show, but (0+ / 0-)

          as someone pointed out, FU seems to have no opinions. Nor do many of the other characters. It's all backroom dealing and careerism. That's not surprising, as I am sure that's quite common, but without some sort of moral value center, it rings far too hollow.

          Actually, it wouldn't even piss me off as much if they went into the policy a little more just to make sense of it. A little more context. Take the collective bargaining thing from last year with the teacher's strike. A liberal congressman says to FU that his actions eviscerated the unions. Wait a minute: that went through?!?! No way would that not lead to anything but a meltdown throughout the party, so I can't think a sitting Democratic president would allow that to happen.

          "Once, at a formal dinner, when [a rich] guest complained about the cost of welfare programs for the poor, Buffett replied tartly, 'I'm a lot more concerned about welfare for the rich.'"--from a book on Warren Buffett

          by bjssp on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 10:58:23 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  HI Sen Dem primary: Hanabusa 48 Schatz 40 (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Setsuna Mudo, MichaelNY, abgin, askew

    "When dealing with terrorism, civil and human rights are not applicable." Egyptian military spokesman.

    by Paleo on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 06:20:30 AM PST

  •  MD Gov Dem primary: Brown 35 Gansler 14 (7+ / 0-)

    "When dealing with terrorism, civil and human rights are not applicable." Egyptian military spokesman.

    by Paleo on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 06:25:36 AM PST

  •  Jobs Agenda for Democrats (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    MichaelNY

    So I was trying to find the interview with Celinda Lake MichaelNY was referring to above, and I came across a part where she said that her research has shown people are sympathetic to the inequality message from Democrats, but that they are most concerned about jobs. (Not sure if she's talking about all people or just those who aren't Republicans, but still.) She said the best part of the SOTU speech was when President Obama spoke about jobs.

    Maybe I've missed something, but I feel like we aren't talking about this as much. Direct action appears impossible, but is a simple agenda really too much to ask for? Is it too soon to talk about this? Do others feel it would be ineffective?

    I know I've said this before, but I really think a two or three-step approach (payroll tax cut, infrastructure spending/bank, and perhaps state aid) is something that is easy for voters to remember and easy for all Democrats to campaign on. So why aren't we doing it?

    "Once, at a formal dinner, when [a rich] guest complained about the cost of welfare programs for the poor, Buffett replied tartly, 'I'm a lot more concerned about welfare for the rich.'"--from a book on Warren Buffett

    by bjssp on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 07:09:30 AM PST

    •  The real problem (0+ / 0-)

      is that the Republicans block all possibility of a jobs program, but apparently, if Democrats blame that on the Republicans, the fear is that voters won't listen and will just blame whoever is supposedly in power. I'm not sure how incumbents get voters to pay attention to a jobs program when the voters are likely to say: "You're in office now. Why haven't you gotten this done?"

      Formerly Pan on Swing State Project

      by MichaelNY on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 12:07:04 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  If we bring up a jobs program now, (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        MichaelNY

        and keep bringing it up every goddamn second until the last votes are being cast, the Republicans can block, block, block, but they will need to answer for it. We need to pounding them on this. Have it mentioned every day in the briefing room, and have Obama give an address to the nation to draw attention to it, if need be. Stuff like that.

        "Once, at a formal dinner, when [a rich] guest complained about the cost of welfare programs for the poor, Buffett replied tartly, 'I'm a lot more concerned about welfare for the rich.'"--from a book on Warren Buffett

        by bjssp on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 07:40:25 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  I agree (0+ / 0-)

          But I'm not sure the American people are intelligent enough to understand why the president can't just do it by himself.

          Formerly Pan on Swing State Project

          by MichaelNY on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 07:48:34 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Then he needs to tell them, repeatedly. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            MichaelNY

            As has been the case many times, we have the truth on our side. I'm not saying it's going to work, but I don't see many other options besides ducking for cover.

            "Once, at a formal dinner, when [a rich] guest complained about the cost of welfare programs for the poor, Buffett replied tartly, 'I'm a lot more concerned about welfare for the rich.'"--from a book on Warren Buffett

            by bjssp on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 07:57:22 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  And if Obama doesn't have the credibility, (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              MichaelNY

              we have plenty of other people that can help. Let's get HRC, BC, and Gabby Giffords, among others, to help make the case.

              "Once, at a formal dinner, when [a rich] guest complained about the cost of welfare programs for the poor, Buffett replied tartly, 'I'm a lot more concerned about welfare for the rich.'"--from a book on Warren Buffett

              by bjssp on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 07:59:43 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  I've often read people saying (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                LordMike

                that that kind of thing is usually (with the obvious exception of Truman's campaign against the "Do-Nothing Congress") perceived by the voters as whining. Can someone please comment on that? It may be all they've got, though, other than what we hope are continued improvements to the economy, in spite of the Republicans.

                Formerly Pan on Swing State Project

                by MichaelNY on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 08:56:58 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

  •  CEA Head Jason Furman Roomed with Matt Damon (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DCCyclone, Christopher Walker

    while at Harvard. He hung out with Ben Affleck, too. He can also juggle.

    How do ya like them apples?

    Seriously now, there's a lot of nice information in this article. I'm glad we have such a capable nerd in the administration.

    "Once, at a formal dinner, when [a rich] guest complained about the cost of welfare programs for the poor, Buffett replied tartly, 'I'm a lot more concerned about welfare for the rich.'"--from a book on Warren Buffett

    by bjssp on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 09:48:34 AM PST

  •  Conservative pollsters (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sulthernao, MichaelNY, KingTag

    What is up with all these low-quality conservative pollsters running around?

    The EPIC-MRA poll showing Land at +3, Snyder at +8, and HRC at only +4 in Michigan is absurd. The voter demographics were 41% D, 37% R - in Michigan. They have Obama at 24% net disapproval - in Michigan. A state Obama won by nearly 10%.

    I just honestly don't get it. It's one thing to drive a narrative, but that didn't work in the 2012 elections. Narratives are only good for turning a close race into a win. If you spin a narrative that just doesn't jive with reality, all you're doing is misleading donors whose money could be better spent on winnable races - not trying to elect a Republican Senator in Michigan.

    But by all means, please proceed, Republican pollsters.

    TX-17 (Bill Flores-R), TX Sen-14 (Kirk Watson-D), TX HD-50 (Celia Israel-D)

    by Le Champignon on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 11:30:47 AM PST

    •  Crappy pollsters skew GOP by accident (4+ / 0-)

      Old people and White people are both far more likely to answer the phone.

      21, CA-18 (home), CA-13 (school)
      politicohen.com
      Idiosyncratic, pro-establishment. Liberal, not progressive. For the poor, the children, the planet, and the rule of law.
      UC Berkeley; I think I'm in the conservative half of this city.

      by jncca on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 12:47:47 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Not by accident, by deliberate incompetence (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        abgin

        I think the point you were making is they are not trying to present a Republican favoring narrative.  They just suck at polling.

        All the problems we face in the United States today can be traced to an unenlightened immigration policy on the part of the American Indian. -- Pat Paulsen

        by tommypaine on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 01:13:24 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  It probably depends on the pollster (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          tommypaine, LordMike, MichaelNY

          Gravis is probably on purpose; others might not be.

          21, CA-18 (home), CA-13 (school)
          politicohen.com
          Idiosyncratic, pro-establishment. Liberal, not progressive. For the poor, the children, the planet, and the rule of law.
          UC Berkeley; I think I'm in the conservative half of this city.

          by jncca on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 02:16:53 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  Public polling in Michigan always seems to skew (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MichaelNY

      Republican.

      "When dealing with terrorism, civil and human rights are not applicable." Egyptian military spokesman.

      by Paleo on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 01:43:32 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  The media reports on them regardless (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        MichaelNY

        It becomes conventional wisdom when these junk polls are the only ones polling what else does the media have? They only report the numbers there's no analysis they could give a shit about their track record either.  People like voting for winners if they think someone is consistently winning even in bogus polls they'll want to vote for them.

        •  The fact the polls skew Republican (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          MichaelNY

          Means we know the actual results are more favorable to Democrats thus no impact from conventional wisdom.

          "What do you mean "conspiracy"? Does that mean it's someone's imaginings and that the actual polls hovered right around the result?" - petral

          by conspiracy on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 03:13:06 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  Just finished the second season of House of Cards (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lordpet8, Jacob1145

    Riveting. I recommend it to everyone even if you aren't into politics.

  •  TX-32: This Week in Loser Speak (7+ / 0-)

    Tea Party chieftain Katrina Pierson arguing why she'll topple Pete Sessions in next month's primary:

    “We have the district. We're not really worried about how much money he spends on TV — we're ahead of him with yard signs, volunteers,” she told The Hill. “You don't have to match these guys dollar for dollar or even ten to one.”
    Luckily for Pierson, Sessions does not have a 10 to one cash-on-hand edge over her. He has a 25 to one lead.

    Contributing Editor, Daily Kos Elections. 24, male, CA-18 (home and voting there), LA-02 (resident).

    by Jeff Singer on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 02:40:05 PM PST

  •  Here's an even worse NC-Senate GOP gerrymander (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JacobNC, WisJohn

     photo NCLegislatureGOPImprovedGerrymanderStateViewSMALL_zps5baf9487.png

    Detailed data and larger map here

    Republicans already took a narrow 1% popular vote loss and turned it into a 33-17 supermajority advantage in the chamber, but they could have been more aggressive and pushed that to 34-16 by heavily targeting the 25th between Fayetteville and Charlotte. This map also shores up all of their vulnerable districts from just a little bit to several points in some cases. The least Republican district that Democrats would need to win for a 26-24 majority is an imposing 7% more Republican than the state and just to break the supermajority they'd need to win everything up to 5% more Republican than the state. Meanwhile there's only one seat Dems hold that is remotely vulnerable in a favorable GOP environment, the 22nd north of Durham that voted for Obama by 7% but is more Dem downballot.

    This map probably goes 30-20 Republican in 2014 while I'm guessing right now under the real map we could pick up 5 seats and barely break their veto-proof majority.

  •  Howey: Indiana St. Sen Delph (R-Carmel)to make big (4+ / 0-)

    announcement tomorrow morning. Howey is speculating it is either to announce he will challenge Sen. President David Long (R-Ft. Wayne), or he will leave the GOP caucus. He is apparently under fire for breaching the confidentiality of the GOP caucus meeting on HJR-3. He earlier was in a full blown meltdown on twitter. He would still run as a Republican in the fall, but I could see establishment Republicans getting someone to file as an independent to get rid of Delph and keep the seat red, but it voted only narrowly for Romney in 2012 and for Obama in 2008, so Delph could be vulnerable in 2014.

    http://howeypolitics.com/...

    "So there's a time for silence, and there's a time for waiting your turn. But if you know how you feel, and you so clearly know what you need to say, you'll know it. I don't think you should wait. I think you should speak now." -Taylor Swift

    by SouthernINDem on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 04:12:42 PM PST

  •  MI Sen/Gov: Good HuffPo piece on shitty polling (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LordMike, GradyDem

    Coming out of that state.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/...

    NY-9/NJ-10; Russians can give you arms but only the United States can give you a solution. -- Anwar Sadat

    by BKGyptian89 on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 06:47:34 PM PST

  •  Drew a non-partisan state senate map of Indiana (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    MichaelNY, HoosierD42

    I might do a diary when I have time, but to summarize, I got 22 seats that voted for Obama in 2008, plus a few narrow McCain seats that would vote for a moderate Republican or maybe a Democrat under the right circumstances. I was able to create fairly safe Democratic seats in Fort Wayne and Lafayette, places where Democrats hold no seats at all.

    27, Male, CA-26, DK Elections Black Caucus Chair.

    by DrPhillips on Sun Feb 16, 2014 at 08:38:05 PM PST

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