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  • Today's comic by Tom Tomorrow is The one rich guy:
    Cartoon by Tom Tomorrow - The one rich guy
  • What you missed on Sunday Kos ...
  • History on the verge of being made in South Carolina:
    "A record seven African-American candidates are running for statewide office in 2014. Some could be eliminated in June's primary elections, but it appears at least three black candidates will make it to November's general election," The State reports.

    "South Carolina also is assured to elect its first African-American candidate in a statewide race since Reconstruction in one U.S. Senate race, where all three of the announced candidates are black."

  • Mother Jones provides a state-by-state map of non-medical vaccine exemptions:
    It's easy to find bad information about the safety of vaccines on the internet. That's, well, the internet. But what's scarier is that in many states, parents who buy into those myths can easily opt out of immunizing their children. In some cases, it's no harder than checking a box on a school form saying that vaccines are against their "personal beliefs."
  • Snake sends snake-handling pastor to his reward:
    Kentucky Pastor Jamie Coots was found dead in his home at about 10 p.m. Saturday after a snake allegedly bit Coots while he was handling the animal in his Middlesboro church, Full Gospel Tabernacle in Jesus Name.

    Sharpe said Coots went home before emergency workers got to the church. Officials then went to his house and urged Coots to get medical care, but he refused. About an hour later they said he died.

    Last year, he had pleaded guilty to violating Tennessee's exotic animals law and surrendered his vipers.
  • Here's a video of a white-knuckle landing of a Boeing 767 in the wind:The plane gave its landing gear a rough workout as it touched down.
  • Right-wing Breitbart.com opening operations in London and Texas:
    “We look at London and Texas as two fronts in our current cultural and political war,” Breitbart News Executive Chairman Stephen K. Bannon said in a statement Sunday night. “There is a growing global anti-establishment revolt against the permanent political class at home, and the global elites that influence them, which impacts everyone from Lubbock to London. Breitbart News is determined to be the platform that reports on this movement every day in every region.”
    The organization is also eying Egypt, Israel, Florida and, what they no doubt view as a foreign nation, California.
  • Open the base door, HAL. Sorry, Dave. Build your own base. This one is ours:
    We like autonomous robots because they can do the things we can't or don't want to do. Justin Werfel, a researcher at Harvard University, calls it the "Three Ds—dirty, dangerous, and dull." And, these intelligent bots can get work done in places we aren't able to go—like other planets.

    Werfel is part of a team of Harvard engineers designing an autonomous robot construction crew that can build structures without any human intervention or supervision. The latest research, published today in Science magazine, shows off the artificially intelligent bots building towers, pyramids, and staircases. It's the first step to putting robot swarms to work in hard-to-reach places like disaster zones, under the sea, or in outer space.

    "We envision sending robots off to do their task and sending astronauts along only after a shelter is completed," study author Kirstin Petersen told me.

  • On today's Kagro in the Morning show, Greg Dworkin rounds up some wacky news, including the death of a snake handling preacher (by snake bite, of course) and a little discussion of the Michael Dunn trial and the vagaries of fire-at-will laws.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tom Tomorrow was particularly good today. (7+ / 0-)

    Still plugging the new anti-McConnell ad

    The direct link to video and de rigeur “Watch the new ad” diary

    I live under the bridge to the 21st Century.

    by Crashing Vor on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 12:04:13 PM PST

  •  I nominate Coots for a Darwin Award. n/t (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Ellid, belinda ridgewood

    "Drudge: soundslike sludge, islike sewage."
    (-7.25, -6.72)

    by gougef on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 12:04:29 PM PST

    •  I think you have to die BEFORE you breed to win (0+ / 0-)

      the Darwin award... to take your genes out of the pool.

      Happy little moron, Lucky little man.
      I wish I was a moron, MY GOD, Perhaps I am!
      —Spike Milligan

      by polecat on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 12:07:51 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Feel Sorry For Him (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      happymisanthropy

      I'm reading a lot of ex-cult memoirs in search of the answer to the question 'why are people like that?' The answer emerging is that group influence is very strong. Now add to that religion and the ego boost of celebrity. How many celebs can we think of who crashed and burned?
      Snake handling goes back generations before reality TV, but I hope this sad outcome will cause reputable outlets like National Geographic to think twice about getting ratings off people putting their lives in danger.

      •  Group influence (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ColoTim

        plus a desire to belong -- which is why cults often recruit on college campuses, where you have young people far from home, often for the first time, away from family and well-known friends.

        There's only one rule that I know of, babies -- goddammit, you've got to be kind. -- Kurt Vonnegut

        by Cali Scribe on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 01:24:46 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Plus a literal reading of the Christian Testament (0+ / 0-)

        There is a passage that says true believers will "take up serpents" and won't be harmed because of the strength of their faith.
        The dangers of literalism--the serpents in question might have been a metaphor for something obvious to readers at the time the passage was written.
        Or it might have been a copying mistake or mistranslation.
        Biblical literalism is a dead end, sometimes literally.

  •  So is it worse... (5+ / 0-)

    that Jamie Coots believed his nonsense or that National Geographic has sunk so far that it thinks he's a legitimate and worthwhile subject for a series?

  •  So I went dumpster diving today (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    MTmofo, here4tehbeer, annieli

    So I did dumpster-diving today. I went to our bin (I live in a condo complex) and someone had thrown an entire carton of 24 cans of knock-off Spaghetti-Os in it! That’s a horrible waste and I couldn’t just let them be thrown out, and fortunately they were on top of other stuff they were throwing out (I guess someone’s moving) so I lifted ‘em. Hey, free food is free food.

    spaghett

    And I put a little sombrero on a can for the photo because I think everything looks better wearing a little sombrero.

    "When does the greed stop, we ask the other side? That's the question and that's the issue." - Senator Ted Kennedy

    by Fordmandalay on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 12:14:12 PM PST

  •  Snakes on an Astral Plane (6+ / 0-)
    Kentucky Pastor Jamie Coots was found dead in his home at about 10 p.m. Saturday after a snake allegedly bit Coots while he was handling the animal in his Middlesboro church, Full Gospel Tabernacle in Jesus Name.
    Sharpe said Coots went home before emergency workers got to the church. Officials then went to his house and urged Coots to get medical care, but he refused. About an hour later they said he died.

    Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "I’m not the strapping young Muslim socialist that I used to be" - Barack Obama 04/27/2013 (@eState4Column5).

    by annieli on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 12:17:55 PM PST

  •  The Eurotrash face of Breitbart (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    enhydra lutris

    “We look at London and Texas as two fronts in our current cultural and political war,” Breitbart News Executive Chairman Stephen K. Bannon said in a statement Sunday night. “There is a growing global anti-establishment revolt against the permanent political class at home, and the global elites that influence them, which impacts everyone from Lubbock to London. Breitbart News is determined to be the platform that reports on this movement every day in every region.”

    Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "I’m not the strapping young Muslim socialist that I used to be" - Barack Obama 04/27/2013 (@eState4Column5).

    by annieli on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 12:24:02 PM PST

  •  Snake bite kills pastor (6+ / 0-)

    Saw this story on last nights local news. What really amazes me is the response from some local officials and a cable station that featured this guy. Apparently, all of them admired the good pastors "faith". I'm getting pretty sick and tired of establishment types expressing admiration for every nut-jobs dumb ass faith...

  •  Snake Salvation (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Ellid

    I watched that show with a mixture of fascination and creep-out.  IIRC, the guy's pastor father died from a snake bite too.  

    So yeah, as to the Darwin Award, he had about 5 kids, iirc.  And collected welfare, spent his cash feeding his snakes.  

    It's good news for the snakes, tho, who died after a months in captivity.

    •  Hopefully the kids decide (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ColoTim, jbsoul

      not to follow him into the pulpit. My condolences to them -- it's hard growing up without a dad, even one with a few screws loose religiously.

      There's only one rule that I know of, babies -- goddammit, you've got to be kind. -- Kurt Vonnegut

      by Cali Scribe on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 01:28:37 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  The best part about Big Bart expanding their (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ColoTim, happymisanthropy

    "news network" into more markets is the opportunity for even better Saturday afternoon wingnut trash picking.

    And what, you ask, will this "news network" be focusing on? According to the NYTimes:

    In London, Breitbart News Network hopes to support a nascent European Tea Party before parliamentary elections in May. In Texas, it is eager to combat an emerging “Turn Texas Blue” movement intended to improve the standing of the Democratic Party. “We look at London and Texas as two fronts in our current cultural and political war,” Mr. Bannon said.
    Sounds like quite the journalistic endeavor there.  

    --

    If ignorance is bliss, you'd think Republicans would be much happier.

    by here4tehbeer on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 12:40:48 PM PST

  •  In case you missed it (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Ellid, Meteor Blades

    "If Wall Street paid a tax on every “game” they run, we would get enough revenue to run the government on." ~ Will Rogers

    by Lefty Coaster on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 12:41:52 PM PST

  •  Good luck with those robot built shelters. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ColoTim, JeffW, happymisanthropy

    Astronauts are going to land on Mars, walk into their newly constructed domiciles, sit back on the couch, take off their helmets, and then realize that the robot construction workers decided the oxygen generation systems were unnecessary for their purpose.

    Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right.

    by darthstar on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 12:42:43 PM PST

  •  Airlines should fly B-52s :-) (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ColoTim, MTmofo, sow hat, Meteor Blades

    Crosswind landing ? Pfaahhh, easy, peasy ... if you're flying the BUFF, that is.

    Just turn the knob to crab the landing gear. It's right there on the aisle stand, just aft of the throttles (all eight of them throttles, thank you very much) and the flaps.

    Yep, on a B-52, you can turn the landing gear +/-20° off axis for take-off and landing. The plane lands sideways respective to the runway, but its nose straight in the wind.

    The most amazing thing is that it works beautifully.

    A good clip of a crabbed landing by a B-52H.

    Another one, a bit blurry but shot in the axis of the runway. Spectacular.

    Of course, it must be said that, crosswinds or not,  all take-offs and landings on B-52 are ... interesting.

    Take-offs and landings on B-52 are VERY interesting.

    The plane can't rotate. A B-52 shall never be rotated.

    If a B-52 is rotated on landing, it bounces, then it porpoises, then, occasionally, it breaks apart...

    I deal in facts. My friends are few but fast.

    by Farugia on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 12:47:40 PM PST

  •  For once, I agree 100% with Antonin Scalia - (0+ / 0-)

    With the Decision Points Theater, the George W. Bush Presidential Library becomes the very first Presidential Library to feature a Fiction Section.

    by Its the Supreme Court Stupid on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 12:48:11 PM PST

  •  Vaccinations and "Herd" Immunity (0+ / 0-)

     It seems that, in the early 90's, unbeknownst to the US, there was a diphtheria epidemic in Magadan, Siberia.  Over 30,000 people died, in the middle of the winter.  They were stacking them in the streets because the ground was frozen. While limited vaccinations were available, the needle supply was short and the blood products were not "clean", so you had to choose between HIV or diphtheria. We had a once a week air link with the city at the time.  Non one in the US knew.  We were lucky, we dodged that particular epidemic.

    But, pertussis (whooping cough) which is in a combined vaccine with diphtheria is on the rise, which means so is the risk of diphtheria.  And our vaccine coverage in the "herd" is down too.  Don't believe me?  Spring break is only a month away......and I'll bet there is a measles outbreak about then too.

    For link fanatics. http://www.cdc.gov/...

    http://www.cdc.gov/...

    ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

    by Arianna Editrix on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 12:50:26 PM PST

    •  Pertussis vaccine wears off (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      happymisanthropy

      and until recently, adults were given only the diptheria-tetanus portion of the combined vaccine. So many people who were vaccinated have lost their immunity to pertussis, through no fault of their own but because the doctors didn't know enough. So I would think an increase in pertussis doesn't necessarily herald an increase in diptheria as well.

      Your point about epidemics elsewhere in the world that can easily travel to the US is well taken.

      •  True (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        koosah

        But the outbreaks in the last year of pertussis were, as I heard it, in children and some died.

        ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

        by Arianna Editrix on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 02:44:37 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  I had a teaching colleague with asthma (0+ / 0-)

          She wasn't boostered for pertussis.
          She caught pertussis from a student whose parents had refused him vaccination because they thought it was unsafe (as I recall they used a "religious" exemption to get him enrolled in school).
          She almost died. Spent an awfully long time in the hospital and really wasn't the same afterward.

          Just as a matter of interest, Dr. Oz's wife is a vaccination denier. Unfortunately he refuses to speak out publicly in favor of vaccination because he doesn't want to contradict her (as reported a while back in a profile of Dr. Oz in The New Yorker).

    •  UC Berkeley (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      hnichols, Arianna Editrix, TRsCousin

      has a Measles outbreak on its hands right now, thanks to an unvaccinated student traveling abroad.  How in heck did a student manage to enroll in a university without up-to-date vaccines?

      My background has left me with zero patience for people who don't vaccinate.  I don't care what your reason is, you're putting yourself and the people around you in danger.  If your God or your even-less-rational "personal beliefs" don't include preventive medicine, then clearly you shouldn't be receiving any kind of modern medical help; most of these people are flaming hypocrites in this regard.  And not vaccinating your kids is child abuse.

      "Education is the key to unlock the golden door of freedom." -- G.W.Carver

      by northbronx on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 01:51:42 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  College students are notorious (0+ / 1-)
        Recommended by:
        Hidden by:
        jes2

        For not being up to date on vaccines.  Parents seem to forget about the "schedule" once kids are in high school.  Also, for the community I work with anything beyond the basics for small children is out of reach..or was before ACA...or still is in states that didn't expand Medicaid.  As for the child abuse stance..I'm with you, but I wish they'd just not breed in the first place.

        ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

        by Arianna Editrix on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 02:47:09 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  HR for ? please? n/t (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          roadbear

          ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

          by Arianna Editrix on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 04:23:16 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Your last sentence was offensive. (0+ / 0-)

            Keep it civil without the insults:

            As for the child abuse stance..I'm with you, but I wish they'd just not breed in the first place.
            •  Okay (0+ / 0-)

              Sorry you feel that way, but I have had, in my life, to help carry the load of abused, neglected, undereducated, uneducated, children.  And jingoism and "fun facts" when relating to children's health and education make me a bit of a cynic when it comes to "modern parenting".

              ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

              by Arianna Editrix on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 09:58:26 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Okay (0+ / 0-)

                And, what about the parent that loses his young daughter to a vaccination? Do you feel he should be mocked in these discussions with a "child abuse" comment?

                If you feel I make a statement that you feel is in error, then disagree and explain why you do not agree with my logic. I appreciate the dialogue. But, I believe we are both progressives and name calling should not be part of a discussion.

                •  Not sure how this got to this place (0+ / 0-)

                  I believe the original poster of the comparison was saying that NOT getting your child vaccinated is akin to child abuse.  I see it more along the lines of neglect and endangerment.  If a child dies due to a vaccine, it is a tragedy for that family and loved ones.  If a child dies due to being unvaccinated, that is a preventable tragedy that also has put that child's family, their friends, their neighbors and any other unprotected person those people come into contact with in that community.

                  From 1980 to 2010, 55 cases of diphtheria were reported to CDC’s National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System. The majority of cases (77%) were among persons 15 years of age or older. Four of the five fatal cases occurred among unvaccinated children; the fifth fatal case was in a 75-year-old male returning to the United States from a country with endemic disease.[5,6] Although few cases of respiratory diphtheria have been reported in the United States in the past 2 decades, enhanced surveillance in a previously endemic-disease area—a Northern Plains Indian community—has shown ongoing circulation of toxigenic C. diphtheriae.[8] Similarly, endemic circulation of toxigenic C. diphtheriae strains has also persisted in some communities in Canada.[9]
                  emphasis mine
                  So, since the bacterium is endemic in areas within the US and Canada and in 2010, there were, out of the hundreds of thousands of ALL types of vaccines given only 181 verifiable injuries of any kind, logic dictates that the vaccine is less likely to kill a child than the disease is, so vaccinating is the logical thing to do unless there is a medical reason not to do so.  I perceive this as a problem America needs to grapple with head on i.e. It is not always about "me, me, me" in fact, it's most often not about a single person, it's about the greater good of our communities and country.

                  ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

                  by Arianna Editrix on Tue Feb 18, 2014 at 01:15:21 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

      •  Measles (0+ / 0-)

        "Zero patience" is never a good thing.

        Most cases of measles usually pass within a week with few complications. If you had the measles as a child then you have immunity. If not, then you are as likely to be a carrier as a young non-vaccinated child, assuming you have not had a blood test verifying your immunity.

        I have a lot of concerns with the MMR vaccine. These three diseases are very rare in this country and are fairly minor illnesses to children. The odds of your kid getting any of these three diseases are pretty darn low in the U.S.

        However, the odds of a child receiving a side effect from this vaccine is about 1 in 20. In most cases, they will be somewhat like the actual disease (just miserable for a week.) In other reported cases, they have seen Stevens-Johnson syndrome, seizures, deafness, Guillain-Barre syndrome, encephalitis, and even death.

        I would argue that using your logic, vaccinating your child knowing that any of these outcomes could occur (and the knowledge that the actual diseases are generally not harmful or extremely rare in this country) would constitute a form of "child abuse." Your words, not mine.

        I think it is a choice of each parent to make for their child considering the consequences for each option you choose.

        •  As a retired nurse (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Meteor Blades, koosah, TRsCousin

          And someone who's educated on the perils and possibilities of vaccination v. disease, I cannot encourage this sort of "thought process".  Have you seen a child cough themselves to death?  Watched them suffocate? Dealt with the blindness or heart disease left by measles?  Yes, educate, but not with fallacious "facts".

          ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

          by Arianna Editrix on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 04:19:21 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Where are the "fallacious" facts? (0+ / 0-)

            There are two concerns for a parent. The danger of measles and the danger of side effects from the vaccine. Both are very real and both are documented.

            It is not like the argument of going into a tiger cage or not going into one. I wish this was an easy decision with no fear on vaccine safety, but that is simply not true. And, a parent must deal with either choice.

            So, assuming you are a retired nurse, then what are your thoughts of making MMR mandatory for any adults that have not had measles in their lifetime (that can be tested via a blood test) or have not had a booster shot in a ten year period? Or, is it easier just dealing with children, since they have little say in the matter?

            •  My youngest is college age (0+ / 0-)

              And since I am ID, I get vaccines all the time and he got his boosters before he left, despite having a "fainting fear" of needles.  He's gotten all his vaccines as have my other kids because of the risk of Me getting sick along with them.  This year, H1N1 is killing healthy adults, not curmudgeons like me, but when he saw that, he went and got his shot for himself this time as he's over 21 and I've no control over him.  He read the pamphlet, looked at the death rate in our area and went and bought and paid for his own shot.  I did ask him why and he said, "I work with the public, I go to school with people my age, this crap is killing people my age.  Yeah, there are risks but it's better than dead!"

              ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

              by Arianna Editrix on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 10:04:45 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  You probably mean pneumonia and the flu... (0+ / 0-)

                The wild numbers of deaths from influenza are due to the fact that MMWR and NCHS both combine influenza deaths with pneumonia deaths. For example in 2005, it was estimated that 36,000 died from the flu or pneumonia.

                However, one study that was done by the American Lung Association showed that deaths from the flu averaged about 1,500 people per year. Over 90% of the flu deaths are aged over 65 or older. The data further showed that there had been fewer than 100 deaths reported each year for people under the age of 35 attributed to the flu. This analysis looked at the past 25 years (paper was published in 2004.)

                Even during a bad flu season, (2003-4) less than 153 total deaths were attributed to the flu for children younger than 17 across 40 states.

                If your son is in college, then the flu is not killing very many people his age. He is much more likely to die texting (around 3,000 teens die from that) rather than the flu.

                I paraphrased this data from the reports I have along with the book by Dr. Sears (FAAP).

                •  In STL, in January (0+ / 0-)

                  More than 80 deaths, not counting the miscarriage of the baby whose mother later died of H1N1.  Most were young, healthy adults.  Over 1000 positive H1N1 tests at only 3 local hospitals.  I do know the difference between influenza and pneumonia.

                  ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

                  by Arianna Editrix on Tue Feb 18, 2014 at 01:21:07 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

        •  The reason the odds are low is because of... (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          koosah, roadbear

          ...vaccinations.

          In 1962, there were 503,282 cases with 432 deaths. First vaccine introduced in 1963.

          Half a century later, in 2013: 187 cases.

          Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

          by Meteor Blades on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 04:26:53 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Measles (0+ / 0-)

            I would argue to some degree that better nutrition and public health measures (not vaccines) were more effective in the decline of infectious diseases. (That was based on what the CDC thought a few years back.)

            Half a century later, we are not as malnourished and poverty stricken as a great deal of Americans were in 1963. A better question is how much of an impact The Great Society had on our health as a nation.

            I would also point out that the measles vaccine is not providing 100% efficacy and likely wears off in a timeframe ranging from 2 to 10 years.

            A better question to ask is why we are not making mandatory vaccinations for the adults in our population that have not had a vaccine within a decade or have not had the measles, which guarantees a lifetime of immunity? (I think we know the answer to that question.)

    •  Diphtheria (0+ / 0-)

      Diphtheria is a treatable disease, with an anti-toxin and antibiotics. Most of the other diseases we vaccinate for, do not have cures.  

      I think it is wrong to use the word "herd" in reference to vaccines. Unlike getting the disease and having lifetime immunity, vaccines wear off over varying time intervals.

      I would probably argue that it makes more sense to keep plenty of antitoxin around for diphtheria, especially in large urban areas rather than depending on whether the older population continues to have vaccinations at the correct intervals.

      Plus, the argument that you are worried about a few children opting out on this vaccine is minor compared to the number of adults who likely have not received any booster shots for Diphtheria.

      The Pentacel combo vaccine contains over 1.5 milligrams (1,500 micrograms) of aluminum, which is the highest amount of this heavy metal of all vaccines (by a great deal.)

      •  Yes, but knowing YOUR child has diphtheria (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        koosah

        and finding a doctor who can diagnose it in time for treatment is a crap shoot.  And there aren't a "few children" not protected anymore.  Read the article and find facts about herd immunity and why it's important to all of us. Yes, there are risks, vaccinations have side effects that may adversely affect YOUR child, but NOT vaccinating just puts you and your child and EVERYONE you meet at risk

        ~Arianna_Editrix-- I willingly accept Cassandra’s fate, To speak the truth, altho’ believ’d too late

        by Arianna Editrix on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 04:22:04 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Or, if you have Diphtheria (0+ / 0-)

          Herd immunity does not exist in our community for Diphtheria, since virtually the entire U.S. population has not ever had it. I had my DTP vaccine many decades ago, so I likely do not have any protection from Diphtheria (along with many other adults.)

          When was your last tDaP shot? (This vaccine does not contain the full doses of Diphtheria as DTaP, due to the reactions to adults, so there are many questions regarding its length of protection.)

          You bring up a good point on "risk." It is a tough question to ask yourself whether you should err on the side of "your child" or "society." It is an excellent ethics question, but I think it is the responsibility of each individual to decide what is best for their child.

          The risk equation (society vs. culture) as I see it:

          1) It is basically non-existent in this country.
          2) The immunity with a vaccine is temporary.
          3) Adults are more likely to acquire this disease due to their overseas traveling.
          4) Side effects can be as serious as the disease itself.
          5) A child has the weakest immune system and I see the logic in vaccinating for tDaP later in life.

  •  AWZMness (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    koosah

    I hope you good folks watched The Walking Dead last night, best episode of the season.

    •  Glenn as robocop? n/t (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      koosah, dclawyer06

      Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

      by Meteor Blades on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 04:28:12 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Tyrese + Carol = Most Awkward Hug of 2014. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Meteor Blades, dclawyer06

        Hands down.  No competition I can see.  

        Somebody told me that you had a boyfriend who looked a girlfriend that I had in February of last year.

        by koosah on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 04:30:10 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Prediction: (0+ / 0-)

          Bob Sookey is going to become the new spiritual anchor for the group. First we had the wonderful Dale, then Herschel. And now its Sookey who has, at least twice, called out others for belittling those who tried to remain "human" post-zombie apocalypse.

          Oh, and he and Tyrese's sister have a thang goin on.

      •  OMG, MB watches the Walking Dead? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        koosah

        It was great stuff. And the scene with Tyrese (won't give any spoilers). That was sublime.

        Harrowing, unsettling, touching.

        •  I think the writers of The Walking Dead took your (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          dclawyer06

          sig line to heart. And then some.  

          Mr. koosah and I just started watching less than a month ago.  Watched the first three seasons in a couple of weekends.  What else to do in the bad weather and getting over the flu?  

          Sigh.  Now we are caught up to real time and we must wait an ENTIRE WEEK between episodes!!  ! !  We'll probably need therapy to make it over summer.  LOL.  

          Somebody told me that you had a boyfriend who looked a girlfriend that I had in February of last year.

          by koosah on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 05:13:55 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  We have to get better at GOTV. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ColoTim

    Another reminder of the Dem GOTV failure in last week's San Diego mayor's election:


    Please help to fight hunger in the U.S. by making a donation to Feeding America.

    by MJB on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 01:14:26 PM PST

  •  Someone what gun-related diary fodder?? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    roadbear

    I can't do a diary in my current circumstances, but I'd really like to see this story get some visibility on DKos.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/...

    The team followed the consequences of the State of Missouri repealing its permit-to-purchase handgun law in 2007.

    The law had required purchasers to be vetted by the local sheriff and to receive a licence before buying a gun.

    Reporting soon in the Journal of Urban Health, the researchers will say that the repeal resulted in an immediate spike in gun violence and murders.

    The study links the abandonment of the background check to an additional 60 or so murders occurring per year in Missouri between 2008 and 2012.

    "The death penalty is never about the criminal. They've already done their worst. The question is always "will we join them"?" - jlynne

    by Hopeful Skeptic on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 02:18:10 PM PST

  •  It's snowing again in Chicago... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sow hat, koosah

    ...and I just got back from running a couple of errands. I'll warm up, then I have to go out and shovel.

    I am soooo sick of winter...

    Float like a manhole cover, sting like a sash weight! Clean Coal Is A Clinker!

    by JeffW on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 02:23:32 PM PST

  •  snake handling (0+ / 0-)

    I wonder how the government was able to get around the establishment of religion principle.

    It does seem to be extreme but not as extreme as abortion clinic bombers.

    "I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness," Allen Ginsberg

    by Hermenutic on Mon Feb 17, 2014 at 02:49:20 PM PST

  •  So the good Reverend Coots' last (0+ / 0-)

    thought on this earth was the sudden and unfortunate realization that maybe his God chose not to save him after all.  The two extremes of absolute faith and absolute stupidity meeting in one man.

    Who's next?  

  •  Seems there is a 800+ foot Asteroid passing Earth (0+ / 0-)

    tonight and well I have made comments on how much could be built with one around that size if it was say 30% Iron-Nickel in space but tonight I got to wondering how much it would cost to launch that volume of water into space so at 800 feet if it was a sphere that would (if my math is correct )at $10,000 a pound for each pound of water it would be near 167.5 Trillion Dollars.So there is near 17 Billion pounds of water in a 800+ foot sphere if as I said my math is correct and that times 10,000 is 170 Trillion,so when they say it would cost to much to capture even one Asteroid just think how much it would cost to launch the same amount of stuff into Space.

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