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What, you were expecting a diary about how horrible the US is?  Sorry to disappoint you.

This is modern Russia for you.  I have to give the Russians credit; they have managed to make China look like a paragon of freedom during the 2008 games (which China no more deserved than Russia did).

Numerous reports have come out since before the Olympics about Russia's unprecedented security measures and suppression of opposition figures.  Let's review some of what has happened recently at the Sochi Olympics (this is merely three examples - to cover everything would take more time than there are hours in the day).  Follow me below the orange trail of blood.

In no particular order,

1) Pussy Riot, the anti-Putin protest collective, was brutally attacked for protesting by Cossack security forces (the best word that I can use to describe them is paramilitary or militia).  BBC has a video but please be mindful, as it is even more violent than I would have expected and could be triggering.  I'm not sure how the video made it safely to the internet, but Cossack security forces are widely considered to be petty thugs; perhaps they didn't even realize that they were being filmed

2) Vladimir Luxuria, a transgender activist and former member of the Italian parliament, was arrested for holding up a sign that said "Gay is OK," despite having a ticket for an event and despite her status as a comparative VIP (the name is not an accident; her family comes from a long line of Italian communists, and she represented Italy's Communist Party in the parliament, I believe; news reports indicate that she self-identifies with feminine pronouns).  Apparently, after security forces realized just who they had arrested, they released her after several hours; no record of the arrest have been found just yet, perhaps in a clumsy attempt to avoid diplomatic backlash with Italy and the EU.

3) David Khakim was sentenced to 30 hours of labor for holding a one-person protest (the only kind "allowed" in Russia without a permit) in the designated protest area.  I haven't been able to find much English-language information about this one yet; apparently, compared to the other, more serious, violations, which one is comparatively mundane.

Think about what has happened at the Winter Olympics so far the next time you cite Russia Today, an English-language mouthpiece for the Putin government.  The US undoubtedly has a ways to go when it comes to living up to our Bill of Rights, but I have to wonder how Edward Snowden sleeps at night, knowing that he's allowed himself to be a propaganda tool for a country where these things kinds of things are de rigeur.

If you're watching the Olympics, consider stopping; the Russian government does not remotely deserve for these games to be successful.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (6+ / 0-)

    "The first drawback of anger is that it destroys your inner peace; the second is that it distorts your view of reality. If you come to understand that anger is really unhelpful, you can begin to distance yourself from anger." - The Dalai Lama

    by auron renouille on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 04:14:12 PM PST

  •  you said: (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Silvia Nightshade
    the Russian government does not remotely deserve for these games to be successful.
    Vladimir Putin in Russia is significantly less skilled at the executive decisions necessary for successful hosting of an Olympics event than Mitt Romney was in Utah.
  •  I don't blame you... (9+ / 0-)
    but I have to wonder how Edward Snowden sleeps at night, knowing that he's allowed himself to be a propaganda tool for a country where these things kinds of things are de rigeur.
    ...for wondering how he sleeps at night.

    Because you apparently have no understanding of how or why he's there.

    Here's a hint:

    Somebody revoked his passport when he landed at a Russian airport for a one-night layover, en route to Ecuador.

    In other words, he was effectively trapped there.

    Great way to distract from the rest of your diary, by the way.




    Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. ~ Garcia

    by DeadHead on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 05:46:26 PM PST

  •  The first line of this diary is pretty funny (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    FG, Chi
    What, you were expecting a diary about how horrible the US is?  Sorry to disappoint you.
    I remember during the height of the Iraq war, a story on the tv news announced that The US Army found a torture site in DIRKADIRKADIRK. My first question was"I wonder if it's one of ours?"

    “He talks a lot and he's not very bright. And that's a combination I like in Republicans.” James Carville

    by Mokislab on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 06:05:44 PM PST

    •  it's funny... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      jan4insight

      because many around here seem to crave stories that have the potential to demonize Obama...a trend that seemed to begin right around the time Edward Snowden became a household name.

      "It's almost as if we're watching Mitt Romney on Safari in his own country." -- Jonathan Capeheart

      by JackND on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 06:25:59 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  This was Bush era (0+ / 0-)

        Ahh, the good ole days. Snowden was the toothpaste Obama couldn't get back in the tube. I don't hold it against the O man.

        “He talks a lot and he's not very bright. And that's a combination I like in Republicans.” James Carville

        by Mokislab on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 06:32:40 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  considering that many around here were, (0+ / 0-)

          in JackND's careful usage, seeming to crave stories that have the potential to demonize Obama back around 2008, i find his Ah-HAH to be a bit ... silly.

          To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

          by UntimelyRippd on Thu Feb 20, 2014 at 05:55:04 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  hmm. (0+ / 0-)

        strange how snowden's name just popped up again (after the non sequitur reference in the diary), even though the behavior of russian security forces at sochi has nothing at all to do with him.

        strange how anyone would try to connect the concept of "police whipping protestors" to criticism of obama, as if bho commanded municipal or state police forces.

        strange how the diary's rhetorical stance implies that folks around here point to putin's russia as a shining beacon or something.

        strange, strange, strange.

        To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

        by UntimelyRippd on Thu Feb 20, 2014 at 05:51:42 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Pussy Riot got whipped? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mokislab

    Somewhere, someplace, someone is making a joke about being "pussy whipped."

    "Stupid just can't keep its mouth shut." -- SweetAuntFanny's grandmother.

    by Dbug on Wed Feb 19, 2014 at 08:37:44 PM PST

  •  Beware, this is coming to a country near you soon. (0+ / 0-)
    •  Well, you'll be arrested in the Wisconsin Capitol (0+ / 0-)

      for holding up a sign saying "I like cake", so I'm a bit puzzled about why the diarist thinks the Luxuria case reflects some particularly egregious level of security-state violence.

      To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

      by UntimelyRippd on Thu Feb 20, 2014 at 05:57:36 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

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