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Matt Wuerker
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Originally posted to Comics on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 02:50 PM PST.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Thanks. nt (6+ / 0-)

    A true craftsman will meticulously construct the apparatus of his own demise.

    by onionjim on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 03:08:28 PM PST

  •  Herblock worthy! (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    rbird, corvo, gzodik, chimene

    It always seems impossible until its done. -Nelson Mandela

    by chuckvw on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 03:10:42 PM PST

  •  False equivalence. (10+ / 0-)

    It's one thing to have influence, it's another to have influence by way of guns over an unwilling state.  It's the difference between  allies and conquered vassals.  Or are we really going to put the US/Canada relationship, with the world's longest demilitarized border, in the same boat as Russia/Ukraine?

    The dossier on my DKos activities during the Bush administration will be presented on February 3, 2014, with an appendix consisting an adjudication, dated "a long time ago", that I am Wrong.

    by Inland on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 03:14:11 PM PST

    •  I dunno--let's count the number of countries (17+ / 0-)

      Russia has invaded and compare it to the number of countries the US has . . . . . . . . .

      Naturally, WE always have a good reason for it--kinda like, ya know, Rome . . . . .

      I find it funny how empires ALWAYS manage to convince themselves that they are acting only defensively with the very best of motives, as they invade one country after another.

      In the end, reality always wins.

      by Lenny Flank on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 03:16:46 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Okay, we've invaded Canada. How's that working? (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        bluezen, Ian Reifowitz

        True fact, the US has invaded Canada, and Germany, and  Japan.  They are vassal states of the US, right?  Phillipines, we own that place.  Italy, under our jackboot. Right?  

        Strangely, they don't think so.  

        Did someone forget to tell them?  Or do they maybe have have a better idea of what an "empire" entails?

        The dossier on my DKos activities during the Bush administration will be presented on February 3, 2014, with an appendix consisting an adjudication, dated "a long time ago", that I am Wrong.

        by Inland on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 03:25:41 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  how many vassal states does Putin have, again . .? (5+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          gzodik, chuckvw, RabbleON, Alhambra, debris54

          Heck, how many countries outside the USSR did the USSR rule directly . . . ?

          PS--you may want to mention all the tinhorn dictators we propped up over the decades who were torturing their own people. Ya know--the ones who when we said "shit", asked "what color?"

          In the end, reality always wins.

          by Lenny Flank on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 03:42:14 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  Uh...we did invade Canada... (5+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          corvo, MarkC, gzodik, chuckvw, debris54

          ...three times.

          The second and third times were admittedly just big gangs of drunken Irishmen. The Mounties rounded them up and sent them home.

          However, our behavior in the late 19th Century, part of how we ended up with the Philippines until...1947?...was a form of empire building. We turned away from that path, mostly by accident, but this war on terror thing? It's beginning to look somewhat imperial in tone and reach.

          The Soviet Union broke up in 1991. Even if that asshole Putin didn't have dreams of empire, Russia would probably still want the Crimea back. It's a bureaucratic accident from the 1950s that the Crimea is part of the Ukraine anyway. There are major Russian military bases there. The population is around 60% Russian I think, whereas in the rest of the Ukraine, ethnic Russians make up only 17%. Lastly, the Crimea is deep inside Russian history. That borders might be in flux here is no surprise at all.

          If the current leader of Russia weren't a glorified crime lord, this might not be the crisis that it has become. I can easily imagine a democratic Russian leader negotiating with Ukraine for the return of Crimea.

          Join Essa in a revolt against the gods. Continue the fight, Causality.

          by rbird on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 03:59:49 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Oops (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            corvo, debris54

            I misremembered the Fenian Raids. There were five of them.

            And we invaded Canada in a formal way twice, in 1775 and 1812. I only remembered the 1812 event.

            So we invaded Canada not three times, but seven times!!

            The last Fenian raid was a joke, but still...SEVEN TIMES!!

            Join Essa in a revolt against the gods. Continue the fight, Causality.

            by rbird on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 05:14:29 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

        •  wow, what missinfo (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          chuckvw, corvo, Eikyu Saha, skyounkin

          really? Why don't we go over to Okinawa Japan and ask them if they still want the US base there? South Korea too.
          It's true, Reality DOES have a Liberal bias.
          You need to update your knowledge pal.

        •  Canada? Really? (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          debris54

          To compare the US sphere of influence with the USSR, you would have to include South America.  Aijaz Ahmad has written on this extensively.  See his article "Whose century? Whose millenium?" One might also note the long line of political assassinations sponsored by the US.  Just this morning, reading reactions to a New York Times review of Joshua Oppenheimer's new film about the 1965 coup in Indonesia, I was reminded that the CIA had provided a kill list to Suharto's forces, including the names of about 10,000 suspected communists.  And lo, those ten thousand were killed, along with many more on America's military dime.  But of course, the US is just so warm and cuddly.  Russia bad.  

        •  Or Iceland (0+ / 0-)

          Which is more associated with Denmark.
          And then there is Greenland, which also is a Denmark possession.
          Oh wait, we invaded and control Denmark too, right?

          Now, South America? I'll buy that one, the banana wars and all. Somalia is our mess.
          But, the map overreached by one hell of a lot, as it ignores treaty requirements for US forces being there.
          Or should we now throw away the rule of law and our Constitution, which makes ratified treaties a law?

          •  Seems too many taking unnecessary offense (0+ / 0-)

            over a piece of satire that accurately displays American hubris and hypocrisy. Is it because the truth hurts?

            How does the map overreach when the cartoon is talking about spheres of influence? Treaties or not, it seems to me most of what the map depicts are considered by the U.S. to be our spheres of influence. People also seem to be over-analyzing this political cartoon, forgetting that the medium often uses exaggerations to convey a larger point.

            I'm certainly no fan of Putin, and think the Crimean troops should have been left in their barracks. Ukraine didn't need the likes of its last leader, and would be better off having closer ties to the EU. But I also think all other nations should resist meddling in Ukrainian affairs, as it may well only lead to more fracturing of that nation.

    •  It would depend on the nature of the threat. NATO (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      rbird, Subterranean, corvo, gzodik, Alhambra

      has been steadily expanding eastward in contravention of assurances provided to Russia by the West when the Soviets withdrew from eastern Europe.

      The oil and gas pipelines through Ukraine, the warm water port of Crimea, the large population of Russo-Ukrainians, the historical relationship of the two countries, the nature of the overthrow of the elected president all combine to make mockery of the simplistic, self righteous hypocracy of the U.S. and its allies in this matter.

      The frog jumped/ into the old pond/ plop! (Basho)

      by Wolf10 on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 03:35:34 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  oh really? (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      gzodik, chuckvw, DeadHead, Alhambra
      It's one thing to have influence, it's another to have influence by way of guns over an unwilling state.
      Sounds like our standard MO to me.

      Dogs from the street can have all the desirable qualities that one could want from pet dogs. Most adopted stray dogs are usually humble and exceptionally faithful to their owners as if they are grateful for this kindness. -- H.M. Bhumibol Adulyadej

      by corvo on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 04:19:33 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Canada? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      corvo, Alhambra

      Are you not remembering Kuwait and Iraq and Afghanistan? It wasn't that long we kept or made them vassal territories for the benefit of our oil companies.

      And that is not counting the measures short of invasion the US used to keep South America friendly to our banana companies.

      "Stare at the monster: remark/ How difficult it is to define just what/ Amounts to monstrosity in that/ Very ordinary appearance." - Ted Hughes

      by MarkC on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 04:28:26 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  gee ... that's a BIG term for you (0+ / 0-)

      ... isn't it? ... did you you learn that from your mom? ... AmeriKa is vile, hated, now, around the world .. do you have ANY idea? .... 'guns over an unvilling state ' ... hmm ... gee ... you are indeed quite out of it ... perfectly indicative of the typical AmeriKan.  

    •  Power comes in many forms (0+ / 0-)

      The US (along with Great Britain and the EU) has been projecting "soft power" into the Southern Caucuses and the western frontier of the Russian Federation since collapse of the SU in 1991 - e.g. to gain access and control over the oil resources of the Caspian at Baku; e.g. expanding NATO (instead of dissolving it, mission accomplished) into the former SSRs of Eastern Europe.

      There is no question that Putin's move is a violation of international law and a very dangerous provocation.  But let's not pretend that his action occurred in a vacuum: it did not.  

  •  If "Sphere of Influence" is something any (9+ / 0-)

    nation can claim just by being a nation this cartoon is accurate.

    If, however, you need actual power to have a sphere of influence then this cartoon is inaccurate, because aside from aging nuclear warheads Russia has little power.

    Further, being a great power with spheres of influence requires more than just a military. It requires diplomats and economic strength, and Russia's diplomats have sucked since the Czars.

    If Russia can't maintain a sphere of influence without shoving troops across the border of a nation whose territorial integrity Russia has pledged to guarantee, Russia doesn't deserve to have one.

    Purity is for primaries; in the general, our worst are better than their best.

    by blue aardvark on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 03:14:51 PM PST

    •  I minded of how our spherical influence (6+ / 0-)

      was applied in Central and South America. How I remember the diplomacy. They're still digging up the mass graves.

      It always seems impossible until its done. -Nelson Mandela

      by chuckvw on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 03:27:43 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Shhhh! (6+ / 0-)

        Imperial egos are easily bruised. Mentioning all those corpses is just plain insensitive to the feelings of Real Americans.

        Besides, a history of raging violence doesn't mean these countries aren't free now, right?

        I mean, we wouldn't do anything like assisting a coup against an elected government, or demand other countries force the landing of a head of state's plane so we could search it, would we?

        And corpses? I have to question your patriotic attitude.

      •  Supporting my point (0+ / 0-)

        We, as a great power, outsourced our killing to other people, because we had other tools available than just invading. The invasions (Panama, Grenada) were carried out by incompetents for domestic political reasons.

        Purity is for primaries; in the general, our worst are better than their best.

        by blue aardvark on Fri Mar 07, 2014 at 05:55:55 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  With respect (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Terry S

          that doesn't strike me as much of a point.

          What you're saying is that there's no such thing as a great power and never has been... certainly not the U.S., which has committed in my lifetime greater atrocities (several brutal invasions) as an organized state than any other on the planet.

          If using subversion, drones and mercenaries is a marker for greatness, greatness isn't all it's cracked up to be.

          All that being said, have a good weekend.

          It always seems impossible until its done. -Nelson Mandela

          by chuckvw on Fri Mar 07, 2014 at 10:06:37 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Not quite what I meant (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            chuckvw

            I meant that great power status has to be earned.

            No one speaks of France as being within Monaco's sphere of influence. For that matter, no one speaks of France as being within Germany's sphere of influence.

            But someone might speak of North Korea as being within China's sphere of influence, or perhaps Vietnam. And then there's Tibet.

            I do not make any moral judgement about who deserves to have a sphere of influence. Morally, I'd argue that "great power" is a 19th century paradigm and that everyone ought to abandon this whole sphere of influence thing - Russia, China, the United States, and anyone else (Iran? India? Brazil?) you might care to nominate.

            In terms of naked power, Russia has largely fallen from the ranks of great powers. In terms of naked power, they are left with only the most blunt tools wielded crudely.

            If Russia wants to have a sphere of influence, Russia needs to raise her game diplomatically, economically, and nasty-dark-operations-wise. They are a wannabe great power, and they're embarrassing the nations that really can claim that title by being so blatant about things.

            Purity is for primaries; in the general, our worst are better than their best.

            by blue aardvark on Fri Mar 07, 2014 at 10:20:43 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

    •  Power is relative (0+ / 0-)

      Compared to the US, Russia is relatively weak. The comparison, however, is to States on the borders of Russia.

      The cartoon actually underlines the power differential between the US and Russia. The US interests are presented as global, whereas Russia's are shown as being along its borders.

      Nothing human is alien to me.

      by WB Reeves on Fri Mar 07, 2014 at 01:35:04 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Mostly it requires money. n/t (0+ / 0-)
  •  Uh oh. The cartoon patrol has arrived. nt (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Johnathan Ivan, Wolf10, corvo

    “In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.” Terry Pratchett

    by 420 forever on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 03:16:26 PM PST

  •  Russia isn't just asserting (6+ / 0-)

    a sphere of influence in Ukraine. They're annexing part of Ukraine. There's a difference.

    If a hypothetical US president responded to hypothetical major social upheaval in Mexico by sending troops into Baja California and then staging a 'referendum', under US military supervision, for the Baja Californians to decide whether they wanted to be part of the (richer) US or (poorer, unstable) Mexico, we'd be furious. And rightly so. So why are so many people here falling all over themselves to defend Putin's Russia on this matter?

    •  Because Crimea has been part of (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      chuckvw, Wolf10, rbird, corvo, gzodik

           Russia/Soviet Union continuously since 1783.

      The free market is not the solution, the free market is the problem.

      by Azazello on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 03:22:01 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  You could say the same thing (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Inland, Azazello, bluezen, Ian Reifowitz

        about most of eastern Ukraine, or the Baltic states, or most of the Central Asian countries. Does that mean Russia has the right to annex all of them as well?

        Besides, Russia signed a treaty in 1994 promising to respect the territorial sovereignty of Ukraine. This is a violation of that treaty, plain and simple.

        •  The difference in Crimea is the port, (5+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Wolf10, rbird, corvo, gzodik, chuckvw

          the naval base. For them it really is about national security. Since this whole thing started I've seen analogies with the Anschluss and the annexation of Sudetenland in 1938, the invasion of Poland in '39, hypothetical US invasions of Cuba and Baja CA and Israeli settlements in Palestine. Why can't people just take it for what it is, why all the whacky analogies ?

          The free market is not the solution, the free market is the problem.

          by Azazello on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 03:33:35 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  "For them it really is about national security." (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Azazello, Wolf10, bluezen, btfsilence

            I don't think that's a great argument. There are a lot of nations with much more pressing national security interests outside their territory (Israel comes to mind), and we don't like it when they invade/annex/occupy other countries in pursuit of those interests.

          •  By that argument, the US would be fine in your eye (0+ / 0-)

            if it invaded Cuba, because we have a port there for the last hundred years.

            A person's character is measured by how they treat everyone. Not just your pet group.

            by Tempus Figits on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 05:24:10 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Well, if Cuba had originally been American (0+ / 0-)

              and given by a Cuban-born American president to Cuba in 1954, and majority-populated by Americans all this time, I guess I could see your point . . .

              Dogs from the street can have all the desirable qualities that one could want from pet dogs. Most adopted stray dogs are usually humble and exceptionally faithful to their owners as if they are grateful for this kindness. -- H.M. Bhumibol Adulyadej

              by corvo on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 05:34:16 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

            •  which isn't to say that Crimea (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              WB Reeves

              necessarily ought to belong to Russia.  Maybe, maybe not -- it's hardly our decision anyway.  It's just to say that your parallel with Cuba is, well, less than convincing.

              Dogs from the street can have all the desirable qualities that one could want from pet dogs. Most adopted stray dogs are usually humble and exceptionally faithful to their owners as if they are grateful for this kindness. -- H.M. Bhumibol Adulyadej

              by corvo on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 05:43:39 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

      •  And the SU put in a lot of sweat equity (7+ / 0-)

        by doing the hard work of cleansing the Crimea of Tartars and resettling Russians there.

        Just saying.

        The dossier on my DKos activities during the Bush administration will be presented on February 3, 2014, with an appendix consisting an adjudication, dated "a long time ago", that I am Wrong.

        by Inland on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 03:28:29 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  No it hasn't. (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Azazello, bluezen, btfsilence

        It was transferred to the Ukrainian SSR in 1954, and has been part of Ukraine ever since the Soviet Union collapsed. And don't forget about the Tatars who were expelled from there by Stalin.

      •  Crimea became part of independent Ukraine in (0+ / 0-)

        1991 when the Soviet Socialist Republic broke up.  Since then it has not been part of Russia.  It is an autonomous republic, which means it has its own constitution and government, but it is still part of Ukraine.  I don't know what that means in terms of taxes and public services.

    •  Exactly. The comic is vastly exaggerated. (4+ / 0-)

      The U.S. (like any other country) would like to have favorable relations with other countries. When a neighbor of Russia turns against Putin, there is an outright invasion and illegal annexation of parts of the country. Totally different, incomparable cases.

    •  more disinfo (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      gzodik, corvo

      and that part happened to have belonged to Russia about 60 years ago when the idiot Kruschev gave it to Ukraine because they never thought USSR might fall one. day.
      And talking about annexing, USA and EU did the same with Kosovo. So why EU and USA can do it but Russia can't?
      Speaking of Texas and New Mexico and California those parts were part of Mexico long ago. If Mexico wants them back, will USA give them back?
      You need to update your knowledge base pal.

      •  well, if you follow putin's "logic," mexico DOES (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        DiesIrae, meinoregon

        have the right to take texas, nm, & california back -- & claim it had to do so to "protect" spanish speaking people there.

        The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy; that is, the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness. ~ J.K. Galbraith

        by bluezen on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 04:38:26 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  it reminds me of the Cold War, when every (8+ / 0-)

    Russian who looked at a map provoked the US to declare "that area is VITAL to our national interests !!!!"

    Oddly enough, it seemed that no area all was NOT "vital to our national interests".

     

    In the end, reality always wins.

    by Lenny Flank on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 03:18:23 PM PST

    •  Well, that's true. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Johnathan Ivan, rbird, chuckvw

      Any place a profit can be taken.

    •  Partly this was due to the nature of the Cold War (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      corvo, btfsilence, WakeUpNeo, WB Reeves

      It was a war of prestige more than of strategy. I hate to use the argument "both sides do it," but yeah, both sides did it. Some Soviet decisions in who to support were based not on sound strategy, but on how much prestige it might bring to the Soviets. Same for us.  If it sounds like a dumbass game, it is.

      We are so goddamn lucky we didn't blow ourselves up...lucky beyond belief, like drawing four cards and ending up with a royal flush lucky, that's how lucky the human race was during the Cold War.

      Join Essa in a revolt against the gods. Continue the fight, Causality.

      by rbird on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 04:23:05 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Yeah yeah yeah (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jiffypop, btfsilence, bluezen

    we've been bad. Don't worry Ukraine, you'll love your new/old/new overlords! We haven't got the moral authority to say anything..yeah.

    I think I've seen one 'toon by this artist that I liked. maybe. Probably not.

    And daddy won't you take me back to Muhlenberg County Down by the Green River where Paradise lay. Well, I'm sorry my son, but you're too late in asking Mister Peabody's coal train has hauled it away. John Prine

    by high uintas on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 03:25:05 PM PST

  •  So of course... (6+ / 0-)

    my Ron Paul friend views the situation thusly.

    Right now the Russians literally have the power to tank the US empire overnight if they wanted to and said they would if the US places sanctions on them. And what does this idiotic government and even more idiotic president here do? Places sanctions on them. This isn't some small country flexing its muscles at the US government. The Russians, who have the full support of the Chinese, can and will economically destroy the US dollar. And it will not be Obama and his group of mass murdering idiots that feel the pain from the economic warfare. It will be us. As you can see, while the majority of the world wants peace, a small group of psychopaths that call themselves "politicians" are taking the entire world into another unnecessary war. The days of US world hegemony ended in 2014.

    ...

    Unlike the US, it seems like the Russians and Chinese are kinda sorta sick of killing hundreds and millions of people. The US government is still into that though. So it's pretty fascinating to see that the strongest empire in history can be toppled overnight without a shot fired.

    Always the U.S.'s fault, and obviously not Russia's at all.
  •  Um...no. (5+ / 0-)

    Sorry, I know liberals don't like going to war but Putin really is a thug. That doesn't make what we did okay (especially in Iraq) but it's obvious Putin's just trying to bring back the old Soviet Union.

  •  It does show that (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    corvo, MarkC, gzodik, chuckvw, MrJayTee

    the US military has bases and weaponry all over the world. We have already jumped into wars of choice. So there goes our moral authority to criticize Putin. Thanks, GWB!

    A true craftsman will meticulously construct the apparatus of his own demise.

    by onionjim on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 03:35:17 PM PST

  •  But...but...that isn't American! Or patriotic! (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    bananapouch1, MarkC, Ian Reifowitz

    Even though I oppose Russian troops being used in Ukraine, think the pro-Russian faction is responsible for most of the repression and brutality, and believe Ukraine didn't need the likes of Viktor Yanukovych, this cartoon sums up the hubris and hypocrisy nicely.

    What it appears we have is both sides contributing to the fractioning of Ukraine and fighting over the scraps. Just today, the Crimean parliament voted to join Russia, even though illegal under International Law.

  •  Two wrong doesn't make a right. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    btfsilence

    For one, I really dislike US continuous involvement in other country's affair, whether militarily or covertly.
    The only reason I would support any sort of involvement if there's a genocide happening.

    •  You can't compare these two "wrongs". (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Ian Reifowitz, btfsilence, bluezen

      The U.S. has in the past meddled to some extent in other countries affairs. At the same time, this comes nowhere near to Russia's long record of oppressing and bullying its neighboring nations. Putin doesn't even regard Ukraine as a sovereign nation (think of how it would be like if the U.S. thought that Canada and Mexico were part of its territory, and used economic/energy pressure to keep the governments in line. )

      Russia has expanded westwards, often with horrific brutality, many times in the past. Late 19th century, post WWI, 1939-1940, post WWII and right now.

  •  Awesome toon n/t (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Subterranean, corvo, gzodik

    The 1% are Purists: They only support Candidates that Deliver Results They Can Bank On. Don't they know they should compromise? /sarcasm

    by Johnathan Ivan on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 03:40:11 PM PST

    •  kinda surprised it got published on this site. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Johnathan Ivan

      Maybe we could all do a Rall on Wuerker?

      (*sigh*)

      Dogs from the street can have all the desirable qualities that one could want from pet dogs. Most adopted stray dogs are usually humble and exceptionally faithful to their owners as if they are grateful for this kindness. -- H.M. Bhumibol Adulyadej

      by corvo on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 04:22:49 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Thanks, fucking brilliant! (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    MarkC, gzodik, corvo, onionjim

    Don't listen to the naysayers, they just see the world in black and white.  Russia BAD, USA RULES!  

    "When I was an alien, cultures weren't opinions" ~ Kurt Cobain, Territorial Pissings

    by Subterranean on Thu Mar 06, 2014 at 04:13:18 PM PST

  •  This is what I take from the cartoon (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Terry S

    There is a lot of hollowness to many of the protestations of Kerry, Obama, and the rest. Hollow because we do put tanks, soldiers, cruise missiles, and drones into sovereign nations. We are still, now, today, doing that.

  •  The U.S. considers most of the world within its... (0+ / 0-)

    "Sphere of Influence."

    In 1823 America announced the "Monroe Doctrine."

    In 1846-48 we declared war on Mexico and annexed close to half of their national territory.

    After the Spanish American War in 1898 we took  control of the Philippines and Puerto Rico (which we still have) and made Cuba a protectorate.

    In 1902 Roosevelt bought the French claim to Panama Canal (area was under Columbian control.)  In 1903 we backed a Panamanian insurrection against Columbia in order to build the Panama Canal.  In 1904 we took formal control of the Canal Zone from the Panamanians and completed the Panama Canal in 1914.

    In 1904 the “Roosevelt Corollary” to the Monroe Doctrine was announced.  The US would exercise “police power” in Latin America to insure justice.  Under Taft “dollar diplomacy” saw large US investments in Latin America.

    US troops were sent into Nicaragua in 1909 to aid a revolt fostered by US mining interests.

    In 1915 Wilson sent US Marines to Haiti which the US military controlled until 1934.

    In 1916 US Marines were sent to the Dominican Republic when the nation refused to cede control of it’s finances to US bankers.

    In 1917 the US intervened in Cuba maintaining control until 1922.

    In Mexico intervened in the Mexican civil war and sent General Pershing to lead an unsuccessful punitive expedition against Pancho Villa in 1916-17.

    In 1917 we sent troops into Russia to support the “White Russians” against the “Red Bolshevists”

    I won't even get into Reagan's antics in Central America in the 1980's and Bush/Bush II invasions.

  •  I think this is a great cartoon. (0+ / 0-)

    Weurker is one of the best political cartoonist working today. People love him when they agree and hate him when they don't.

    Nothing human is alien to me.

    by WB Reeves on Fri Mar 07, 2014 at 01:51:50 PM PST

  •  Looking at this from Putin's viewpoint (0+ / 0-)

    you realize that in the days of the USSR, Mother Russia had two layers of protection against invasion from the west.  The outer ring was the Warsaw Pact countries such as Hungary, Poland, Romania and East Germany.  The inner ring consisted of the non-Russian SR's like Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Georgia and Armenia.  SR's like Belarus and the Ukraine, with their large numbers of ethnic Russians, were considered parts of Russia, at least by the Kremlin.  Now, most of the Warsaw Pact countries belong to NATO, and hence are under American influence.  So far, Putin is not trying even to regain control of the Baltic states, just salvage the traditionally-Russian part of the Ukraine.

    An imperfect analogy to the Ukraine might be Quebec province in Canada.  Lots of Quebecois have French as their native language, and separatism comes up for discussion regularly, but independence would make as little economic sense for Quebec as it does for the Ukraine.  BTW, hardly anyone anywhere else in Canada speaks French unless they learned it in school so as to get a government job.  And most Quebecois can speak some English, just as most Ukrainians can speak some Russian.

    I sympathize with the pro-democracy forces in the Ukraine, but unless they can persuade their countrymen to accept paying several times as much for natural gas as they do now, the Russians will always have them in thrall, just as the oil companies hold us Yankees in thrall because we won't accept $15-a-gallon gasoline.

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