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Cosmos TV series
Taken from slightly left of center in the theater of the Hayden Planetarium. Click image for more info
Anti-science propaganda has found a home on the Right. But no one is immune to conspiracy claims, especially when it's their worst fears that are being exploited. The anti-vaccine racket is just such a denizen, one that does not lay neatly across the traditional ideological axis. Progressive leaning victims may tend to suspect Big Pharma whereas conservative leaning ones may be more likely to blame the government. But politically, it's an equal opportunity deal. This wouldn't be the first time it has claimed someone we like and admire:
Anti-vaccination is contagious. It’s a giant case of the Panic Virus. As social creatures, we still learn a lot from our friends. I know a lot of our personal family choices were based on observing what our friends did and how it worked out for them. Mayim [Bialik] decided to investigate Attachment Parenting when she saw her friends doing it, and I’m willing to bet she started to hesitate about vaccines based on the opinions of her friends, too.
Stay tuned. I'll have an essay on the anti-vaccine phenomenon and some of the pseudoscience behind it tomorrow on Sunday Kos.
  • Sunday Sunday Sunday, tomorrow, one day only! ... Of course it has to be on that network:
    More than 30 years since the original series, Cosmos will once again find its way into people’s homes, this time led by Neil deGrasse Tyson. The new series—called Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey—premieres this Sunday, March 9, at 9:00pm ET/PT on FOX.
  • It's always nice to see religious beliefs about nature coming down on the side of working class patients and common sense when it comes to the failed War on Some Drugstm.
  • There was a time, not that long ago, when it was unknown if there was a single planet orbiting a star outside of our own solar system. We now know many stars have planets, billions in our galaxy alone, that there are planets wondering loose untethered to a star, and that even exotic objects like supernova remnants and brown dwarfs probably have them. And the most common stars in the universe, modest red and yellow dwarfs, are teeming with new worlds:
    The research also suggests that habitable-zone super-Earth planets, where liquid water could exist and therefore make them possible candidates to support life, orbit around at least a quarter of the red dwarfs in the Sun’s own neighborhood.

Originally posted to Daily Kos on Sat Mar 08, 2014 at 06:00 AM PST.

Also republished by SciTech.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Cosmos on Fox (25+ / 0-)

    ....if only it were on Fox News- the epicenter of scientific ignorance, but then watching it after Hannity would create mental whiplash.

    If cats could blog, they wouldn't

    by crystal eyes on Sat Mar 08, 2014 at 06:11:36 AM PST

  •  alas, it's not just the anti-vaxxers (16+ / 0-)

    As comments and diaries at DKos demonstrate, there is a sizable contingent of anti-nuke and anti-GMO folks here who don't have a basic grasp of the science involved, and who make nonsensical arguments that are nothing more than ideological tinfoil-hat conspiracy kookery (and I say that as someone who is both anti-nuke and anti-GMO).

    The lack of basic education in the US, and the astounding level of scientific illiteracy, does not bode well for our future. And sadly it extends to all points of the political spectrum.

    In the end, reality always wins.

    by Lenny Flank on Sat Mar 08, 2014 at 06:11:51 AM PST

    •  add (6+ / 0-)

      Add the bias against high voltage electric transmission lines--seems to be more hysteria than science.

      Actions speak louder than petitions.

      by melvynny on Sat Mar 08, 2014 at 06:23:46 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  high voltage electric lines are (8+ / 0-)

        wasteful and inefficient because of the power they lose in transmission over distances--one reason why I've always favored decentralized power generation at the point of use rather than the centralized-production model favored by the electricity corporations. But yes, the putative "health effects" from electric power lines seem to be imaginary.

        In the end, reality always wins.

        by Lenny Flank on Sat Mar 08, 2014 at 06:38:20 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  I do have a theory (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        SlightKC, RiveroftheWest

        based on nothing but speculation that high power voltage lines are one of the things that cause some people to think they see ghosts or feel a presence (excluding out all of the folks who have other, internal issues, which admittedly is a large percentage).

        I wonder if the magnetic field associated with high voltage lines causes folks to believe they feel a presence or even see something that really isn't there.

        I'm thinking of that magnetic "brain cap" experiment done by someone where they could induce a feeling of presence and even visual hallucinations by the application of a strong magnetic field to the brain.

        Probably a dumb theory though.

        •  I find that intriguing... (0+ / 0-)

          especially the last experiment you mentioned.  Do you have any links I could check into?  If not, it's okay... I can always "duck, duck, go" and search for myself.  Just would make it easier and quicker for jump links, too...

    •  Just found and ordered (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Aunt Pat, bdizz, palantir, whaddaya

      Dumbth by Steve Allen from one of my local library systems.  At least it will make me feel a bit better having read it.

      Maybe.

      Die Gedanken Sind Frei--Hans Litten (Thoughts are free--Hans Litten)

      by Powered Grace on Sat Mar 08, 2014 at 06:24:39 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  I think there is a giant (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      whaddaya, RiveroftheWest

      mistrust in pharmaceuticals and pharmaceutical companies.  

      I will not vote for Hillary. What we need is a Democrat in the White House.

      by dkmich on Sat Mar 08, 2014 at 07:22:45 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  as there should be (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        auapplemac, palantir, whaddaya, Al in NY

        But that's the beauty of science--nobody has to take ANYBODY'S word for ANYTHING.  If anyone doubts the radiation-level figures given by TEPCO, or the testing data for vaccines given by Pfizer, or the CO2 concentration levels given by NOAA, anyone, at any time, can go and make those same measurements for himself--and no power on the planet can stop him.

        That's why all CT kookery that depends on "science hiding the data !!!" is a priori nonsense. Anyone can go measure the data, any time they want to. Nobody can stop them.

        But the real problem with "distrust of pharma, or nukes, or Monsanto, or whoever" is that it seems to lead inevitably to what we are seeing more and more of at DKos--everyone who disagrees with the ideologues about anything is immediately and summarily dismissed as a "paid shill" for whoever their favorite distrusted enemy happens to be. I myself have been waved off by CT nutters as a paid shill for the nuclear industry (I worked for GREENPEACE, for fucksakes) and for the oil drillers (I worked with PIRG to oppose all oil drilling off the Florida coast) and for Monsanto (I worked for GREENPEACE, for fucksakes) and for the NSA /FBI (I have a fucking FBI file myself) blah blah blah yadda yadda yadda etc etc etc.

        It's idiotic and stupid, and makes us all look like Red State morans. It's nothing more than a way for anti-science ideologues with soundproof heads to shut down anyone who disagrees with them without any need to answer (or even listen to) anything they say.

        Such idiotic arm-waving should not be tolerated by anyone on any side of any issue.  And I'm getting awfully fucking tired of seeing it.

        In the end, reality always wins.

        by Lenny Flank on Sat Mar 08, 2014 at 07:39:18 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  You make a couple of great points. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          RiveroftheWest

          Scientifically untutored zealots against nuclear utility reactors and GMO's do no favors to their causes with their stridency and closed mindedness. Anyone who makes a charge of sock puppetry or the like, an extraordinary claim, should back it with extraordinary proof, or the discredit is on them.

          That said, shrill cries, from those actually living in scientifically unfounded personal fear of US West Coast Fukushima radiation contamination, take nothing away from the fact that Fukushima is an unprecedented disaster with far reaching consequences, particularly to the Japanese, but also their immediate neighbors. Those shrill cries take nothing away from the very legitimate criticisms of TEPCO and its management of the crisis, etc.  

          The legitimate concerns with GMO's are more nuanced, and aren't only scientific, but economic in basis. But, likewise, the shrill, unfounded objections of some take nothing away from the legitimate concerns of others.

          Except in one way. Sometimes those shrill cries cause some to turn a deaf ear even to better informed and more reasonable objections from other quarters. To that extent, the reasoned voices on both sides of nuclear power and GMO issues both stand opposed to the shrill criers.  

          "The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy; that is, the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness." John Kenneth Galbraith

          by LeftOfYou on Sat Mar 08, 2014 at 10:29:39 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I don't recall anyone saying that Fukushima was (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            RiveroftheWest
            That said, shrill cries, from those actually living in scientifically unfounded personal fear of US West Coast Fukushima radiation contamination, take nothing away from the fact that Fukushima is an unprecedented disaster with far reaching consequences, particularly to the Japanese, but also their immediate neighbors. Those shrill cries take nothing away from the very legitimate criticisms of TEPCO and its management of the crisis, etc.  
            a picnic, or that TEPCO are innocent angels.
            The legitimate concerns with GMO's are more nuanced, and aren't only scientific, but economic in basis.
            On that I absolutely agree--my gripe with GMOs lies in the imperious way that Monsanto uses them to crush its competition and turn large portions of the agrarian sector into its utterly dependent vassals.

            But that is an economic and social issue, not a scientific one. Most of the anti-GMO "science" arguments--everything from the idiotic "pig study" to the idea that eating genes causes cancer--are idiotic horsecrap that shouldn't fool a fifth-grader.

            To that extent, the reasoned voices on both sides of nuclear power and GMO issues both stand opposed to the shrill criers.  
            Then we should SAY SO, out loud, more often.  Instead, too many of us here follow Ronald Reagan's 11th Commandment, and never speak ill of people on our own side no matter how fucking nutty they are.

            We can see where that got us . . . .

            In the end, reality always wins.

            by Lenny Flank on Sat Mar 08, 2014 at 10:43:19 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

        •  Taking our own measurements (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          RiveroftheWest

          is extremely difficult in many areas.  The equipment necessary is prohibitively expensive and takes real expertise to use.  IMHO, time is better spent learning which are reliable sources of information, and learning something about your chosen topic before you become an "expert" on the subject.

    •  And for-profiteering charters are only going to (5+ / 0-)

      worsen the situation.

      The lack of basic education in the US, and the astounding level of scientific illiteracy, does not bode well for our future
      Like every other privatization-of-government-function scheme, they will, and do, cut out everything that is not of some consequence to their bottom line.

      I don't mean to push-back on STEM, but that's only one hemisphere of a well rounded human. Engage in a little conversation with the Tea crowd or Paulites and you quickly discover the flat side left by not cramming more civics and American/world history into those pliable skulls.

      21st Century America: The distracted, superficial perception of a virtual reality. Gettov Milawn

      by geez53 on Sat Mar 08, 2014 at 07:24:59 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Cosmos on FOX is ironic (6+ / 0-)

    I hope it doesn't send Neil deGrasse Tyson the way of the dodo...

    have to wonder if there will be walk-in cross-over cast members from the rest of the network's lineup visiting each episode, ala Talk Soup

    Righteousness is a wide path. Self-righteousness is a bullhorn and a blindfold.

    by Murphoney on Sat Mar 08, 2014 at 06:23:46 AM PST

    •  Same network as The Simpsons ... (8+ / 0-)

      ... and other "subversive" cartoons.

      The new Cosmos is also written by the core of the same team that wrote the original Cosmos series.

      The irony is unmistakable though. If Faux News starts attacking Murdock's primetime cash cow, I'll be surprised to say the least. Although here in Utah, local wards of the you-know-what church attacked the original every single week. My co-workers parroted what they'd heard from their patriarchs throughout the run.

      Millions of us – the majority – must come together to insist that President Obama and the Democrats stand up and fight for the things we sent them there to do ... Michael Moore

      by MT Spaces on Sat Mar 08, 2014 at 07:00:04 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Neil is OK but (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      whaddaya

      He's no Derrick Pitts. I'm still waiting for that cage match Derrick promised on Colbert in 2009!

    •  It's not just Fox though. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      RiveroftheWest

      It's going to be simultaneously broadcast on the National Geographic Channel. The first episode is going to be on every Fox affiliated channel, even on Fox Sports 1 and 2, according to the ads I've seen throughout the week.

  •  stupid question? (9+ / 0-)
    The research also suggests that habitable-zone super-Earth planets, where liquid water could exist and therefore make them possible candidates to support life, orbit around at least a quarter of the red dwarfs in the Sun’s own neighborhood.
    Isn't it possible some life form could exist without liquid water?

    Actions speak louder than petitions.

    by melvynny on Sat Mar 08, 2014 at 06:27:04 AM PST

  •  Billyuns and Billyuns.....n/t (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JML9999, Aunt Pat, whaddaya, FarWestGirl
  •  How I miss Carl Sagan & other science popularizers (12+ / 0-)

    like Isaac Asimov. Even tho Sagan's TV persona was all too easy to satirize.
    Theres just noone like them nowadays in any medium. They helped make me what I am. Well, the best parts anyway. Id be someone different without them.

    Hope the new retread isnt just IMAX-style eye candy for twitchy tweeners. Kids can see enough splosions and CGI at the movies.

  •  I don't think planet B is gonna be any (5+ / 0-)

    help when we don't even want to increase our technological research and development even in this time of climatic threats not even to mitigate what we have wrought.

    Maybe some evolutionary humanoid?

    ALL of our institutions have been hollowed out by the greed ethos. There are none left with heart intact or souls for that matter. So the zombie is all around us - me

    by glitterscale on Sat Mar 08, 2014 at 06:36:29 AM PST

  •  The ORIGINAL Series is on NATGEO (9+ / 0-)

    Starting at 1200 today Eastern, the original Cosmos is on with 7 episodes today (Sat) and 6 tomorrow (or vice-versa). I have my DVD all set to capture the original plus the 1st installment of the new series.

    I was working at JPL when Sagan was filming the series at KCET (in LA) which coincided with the Voyager encounters with Jupiter. Had the chance to share an elevator with him on occasion and have an autographed copy of his book.

    I hope the new one is as good.

  •  Incomprehensable (4+ / 0-)

    I often wonder why I read so much about how some scientists associate planets far, far away with being "inhabitable" only if they have water.  

    With billions (possibly trillions) of planets in the universe, I wonder if the possibility of life existing in an environment without water or even oxygen.  Seems kind of simple-minded to me.  But, I am not a scientist.  

    Sure seems possible to me, though.

    •  The First Life on Earth Was Not O2 Based (4+ / 0-)

      From Scientific American

      During the Archean eon, more primitive microbes lived the real old-fashioned way: anaerobically. These ancient organisms—and their "extremophile" descendants today—thrived in the absence of oxygen, relying on sulfate for their energy needs.

    •  There are limits imposed by chemistry but (4+ / 0-)

      theoretically you could have life based on ammonia, there are still bacteria on Earth that consume Sulfur and not Oxygen, etc but water for a number of reasons (it's the Universe's most common chemical compound, we know it "work" for life, ice is lighter than liquid water, its a "polar" molecule, etc) is still seen as the best indicator.

      -1.63/ -1.49 "Speaking truth to power" (with snark of course)! Follow on Twitter @dopper0189

      by dopper0189 on Sat Mar 08, 2014 at 07:17:51 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Considering how diverse "life" is on this planet (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        dopper0189, whaddaya

        it would be foolish to expect "life" to be what we O2 breathers are.

        There are anaerobes living at impossible pressures at hot vents in the ocean.

        There are anaerobes living at impossibly high altitudes in mountains (such as the weird little critters living in a hot pot at the summit of Mt. Shasta).

        We can recognize "life" when it is not an O2 breather. It is harder for us to recognize anything not based on H2O since everything living on earth is H2O based. Is it possible H2O isn't needed for "life"?

        I would love to travel to other worlds to see what actually exists.

        I reject your reality and substitute my own - Adam Savage

        by woolibaar on Sat Mar 08, 2014 at 09:44:40 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  it may not need to be water, but life requires (7+ / 0-)

      liquids. The components that make up a self-replicating molecule--whatever they are and however they replicate--need some sort of medium that they can move within, get close to each other, and interact with each other. Liquid is best for that--air may be possible but would present a lot of problems; solids are unsuitable.

      Of all the known liquids, water is best--more things dissolve in it than any other liquid, and it remains liquid at a more suitable range of temperature than any other. It is of course possible for life to exist based on some other liquid like methane, but water seems, for purely chemical reasons, best-suited for life processes.

      That's why the motto for finding ET life is "follow the water".

      In the end, reality always wins.

      by Lenny Flank on Sat Mar 08, 2014 at 07:20:13 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  How have vaccinations changed over time? (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ZenTrainer, whaddaya, RiveroftheWest

    Just curious.  If I vaccinated a child in 1966, how would it compare to vaccinating a child in 2014?  Dosage, type, ingredients, time frame.   IF everything is the same, it would seem to make worrying over vaccinations blatantly ridiculous.   I think they've removed mercury and increased the types and time frame for vaccines.    

    I will not vote for Hillary. What we need is a Democrat in the White House.

    by dkmich on Sat Mar 08, 2014 at 07:21:08 AM PST

  •  missing Carl Sagan (7+ / 0-)

    Ah how I miss the original series, and miss the man Carl Sagan.

    His ability to make poetry out of science (ok, with a little bit of corny shtick, admittedly) was a beautiful thing to behold.

    The world is a dangerous place to live; not because of the people who are evil, but because of the people who don't do anything about it. - Albert Einstein

    by ERdoc in PA on Sat Mar 08, 2014 at 07:22:31 AM PST

  •  Science? On Fox News? Someone surely MUST (3+ / 0-)

    BE KIDDING!

  •  The new 'Cosmos' program ... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Lily O Lady, whaddaya

    ... is on Fox?! ... uh oh.

    •  Yep. And FOX ran promos on NPR so that (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      whaddaya

      makes FOX a corporate sponsor of NPR. I find that disquieting.

      "The object of persecution is persecution. The object of torture is torture. The object of power is power. Now do you begin to understand me?" ~Orwell, "1984"

      by Lily O Lady on Sat Mar 08, 2014 at 08:45:23 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  I was... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    whaddaya, RiveroftheWest

    enthralled by the original Cosmos when it aired back when I was eleven.

    This one seems like it will be simultaneously nostalgic and groundbreaking...a grand combination if ever there was one.

    "It's almost as if we're watching Mitt Romney on Safari in his own country." -- Jonathan Capeheart

    by JackND on Sat Mar 08, 2014 at 08:42:03 AM PST

  •  New Cosmos on Fox network makes sense. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    whaddaya, FarWestGirl, RiveroftheWest

    If the article in Smithsonian is correct then the $ behind the new show is from "Family Guy" creator Seth MacFarlane.  He is quoted as saying that "most science on TV is 'fluff' and that 'That is a symptom of the bizarre fear of science that's taken hold.'

  •  Ah, Cosmos (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    FarWestGirl, RiveroftheWest

    Cosmos ran on PBS. It also came out in a beautiful, hardback book, a big one, almost like a coffee table book.  It had stunning full page images that the televisions and computers of that day simply couldn't display clearly.

    When the local PBS station offered the book as a premium for a sixty or hundred twenty dollar membership, we jumped at it. It is, these many years later, one of the most used, worn and falling apart books in our considerable home library.

    "The modern conservative is engaged in one of man's oldest exercises in moral philosophy; that is, the search for a superior moral justification for selfishness." John Kenneth Galbraith

    by LeftOfYou on Sat Mar 08, 2014 at 10:03:10 AM PST

  •  can also be viewed on the National Geographic... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    FarWestGirl, RiveroftheWest

    ...Channel, if you have it.  i'd much prefer to watch on that channel than FOX.  i was willing to pass up watching it if it meant being on FOX.  yes, i understand that the FOX network is not FOX "News" but the money is all going into the same pot.  i won't support it.

    maybe someone will now politely pop my bubble here and tell me that NatGeo is owned by FOX.  i don't know.  i hope not.

    I'm a blue drop in a red bucket.

    by blue drop on Sat Mar 08, 2014 at 10:26:30 AM PST

  •  The problem is so many people think they can (3+ / 0-)

    read an article or two on the internet and suddenly they're an expert.

    Too many people with opinions and too few people with informed opinions.

    Just look at the increasing number of people who believe the moon landings were a hoax because of something they saw on the internet.

  •  I don't understand (3+ / 0-)

    how do you get a Ph.d in neuroscience, which I have to assume involves a ton of biology and a basic understanding of disease propagation, and not believe/understand vaccination?

    I agree with the author of the linked article that the other things she practices with her kids (which I think scientifically baseless) are harmless and thus fall under her right as a parent to raise her children.

    But her practice of those things combined with the anti-vaccination thing suggests to me she has a whole lot of "I think the world should work this way therefore I'm going to believe the world actually does work this way in spite of evidence to the contrary" going on in her head.

    And yeah, she's interesting and clearly highly intelligent (MENSA level IIRC) so it's all the more disappointing and perplexing.

    •  It baffles me (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      FarWestGirl, RiveroftheWest

      I guess people will believe what they want to believe. Most of the anti-vaccination crowd I personally know have a libertarian bent to their philosophy. It is alarming that there are liberals jumping on the bandwagon.

      People who don't vaccinate their children are putting everyone at risk. If enough people don't vaccinate their children, we lose herd immunity and now their children, other children and the most vulnerable are susceptible to diseases that we have effectively cured. You are already starting to see this is certain communities where these ideas have taken root. Whooping cough outbreaks, measles outbreaks and now a new polio-like disease has emerged. This trend is based in ignorance, selfishness, and is quite alarming. People just don't understand that if we allow these diseases to re-enter our society they will mutate and become a big problem for everyone.

  •  Please don't disount (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    FarWestGirl, RiveroftheWest

    the fears of parents who want only the best for their children. Having someone stick a needle in your baby's thigh and inject something you don't fully understand is scary.

    I had my children vaccinated, but finding good information on the vaccines was difficult and the way the doctors handled my fears was abysmal. We don't become blithering idiots when we become parents, but we are often, too frequently, treated that way, patted on the head and told that anyone but us knows what's best for our children, when what we're asking for is education.

    The shots in the cocktail of vaccs has grown (even more now for older kids), and it's difficult to keep up.

    I understand the frustration over ill-informed views and the decline in science literacy, but I believe its more effective to educate than to demean. Even here at the DK where we're free to rant--but all part of the same community.

    Same goes for fears over all the other issues noted in this thread.

  •  I saw a leak of the new Cosmos (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    zbob, FarWestGirl, RiveroftheWest

    This cannot be coming at a more important time in our history. A time where large chunks of the population are rejecting and even vilifying climate science. A time where parents are creating a perfect storm by not vaccinating their children based on their irrational fears. A time where science textbooks are being infiltrated by religious zealots and their pseudoscience. These people are holding us back, and the only way to fight them is to educate them.

    It is 2014 and I have liberal friends that believe in astrology. Something is very wrong with this picture.

    Unfortunately, Neil didn't quite captivate me the way Carl did. Don't get me wrong, the first episode of the new series was good, and Neil deGrasse Tyson is a badass. I'm starting to realize Carl Sagan was a once-in-a-lifetime figure, though, and now he's dead.

    I think the decision to run this on fox was intentional, and it just might work. It exposes these ideas to a demographic that desperately needs to be expanding their minds beyond reality TV.

    •  It Just Struck Me, Having Read Your Post (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      FarWestGirl, RiveroftheWest

      and one above about Carl's voice being both comforting and inspiring.

      Carl was a science priest. He made us believe and accept just like a religious figure. [OK -- with a degree in astronomy, I was already predisposed to agree with him.]

      You're right -- Carl was probably a once in a lifetime figure.

      •  I go back to the Cosmos time and again (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        zbob, FarWestGirl, RiveroftheWest

        On days when I have lost all hope in humanity, Carl washes away my cynicism and bathes me in a vision of what humanity can become.

        You are right. Nature is my church, and Carl Sagan is my priest. Some are alarmed that science is replacing God, but to me, science is merely an experimentally sound way of understanding God and ourselves - a way that doesn't rely on magic and lies. Feel free to replace God with any construct you wish to explain the majesty and coherence of the universe.

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