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It was Tuesday, October 1, and the federal government had partially shut down as a result of a budget impasse. The U.S. Census Bureau and Education Department websites were out of commission, leaving the students in [Professor Rachel Slocum's] introductory geography class without access to data for an assignment.

"Hi everyone," she wrote to the 18 students in the online course. "Some of the data gathering assignment will be impossible to complete until the Republican/Tea Party controlled House of Representatives agrees to fund the government."

By lunchtime the next day, Slocum found herself the recipient of a deluge of nasty emails, not from her students but a network of conservative organizations.
Dottie Sandusky, Jerry Sandusky’s wife of 37 years, maintains that her husband is innocent of the charges of child sex abuse that resulted in his imprisonment.[...]

She believes the victims' financial gain was at play.

“I think it was, they were manipulated, and they saw money,’’ she said. “Once lawyers came into the case, they said there was money.”

As part of trade talks, the European Union wants to ban the use of European names like Parmesan, feta and Gorgonzola on cheese made in the United States.

The argument is that the American-made cheeses are shadows of the original European varieties and cut into sales and identity of the European cheeses. The Europeans say Parmesan should only come from Parma, Italy, not those familiar green cylinders that American companies sell. Feta should only be from Greece, even though feta isn’t a place. The EU argues it “is so closely connected to Greece as to be identified as an inherently Greek product.”

One bill would triple the mandatory waiting period for abortion, forcing women to wait 72 hours before proceeding with the legal medical procedure. Another would require the state’s lone abortion clinic to undergo four inspections every year.

But those are hardly the only abortion restrictions up before the legislature. According to the Guttmacher Institute, Missouri has introduced more anti-abortion bills than nearly every other state in the country so far this year.

According to new figures from the American Public Transportation Association (APTA), more people rode public transit in 2013 than they have in almost six decades. Americans rode buses, subways, trains, and lightrail 10.7 million times in 2013—the most trips since 1956. Yes, that even beats the $4 gas days of 2008!

The APTA boasts that while driving was up 0.3 percent last year, public transit use grew 1.1 percent.

  • On today's Kagro in the Morning show, more on the escalating CIA/Senate war, FL-13 and the Fernghazi freak-out, with both Joan McCarter and Greg Dworkin. Plus the latest polling from WSJ/NBC and Bloomberg.

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Comment Preferences

  •  You Won't Find Me Arguing Against Nations (16+ / 0-)

    protecting their markets and laborers. Even if I have to pay for extra letters to call it Parmesan STYLE Cheese.

    We have computers, we can do nuance. Trade doesn't have to be either-or.

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:03:55 PM PDT

    •  I completely agree. American corporatists have (4+ / 0-)

      lashed out against anything that tags onto their brands like it was the end of the world.

      I want to say it amazes me how US corporate interests whine about things they do without thinking, but then I remember that's their business model: monopolize your profits by regulating the shit out of your competitors and Freedom Frying regulation on yourself.

    •  I have no problem with the geographic rule (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Ellid, LihTox, Res Ipsa Loquitor

      but the feta argument is absolutely bonkers.  If they want to put Feta into a treaty, hamburger goes in too since it is associated with American culture.  Let Quick and European fast food concerns  deal with that fallout.

      I'll always be...King of Bain...I'll always be...King of Bain

      by AZphilosopher on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:24:00 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Think of the pizzas! (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        AZphilosopher, kyril, wintergreen8694

        Tuscan-style Pisa-like Genuine-style with Mozarella style Pepperoni-like toppings.

        ". . .as singularly embarrassing a public address as any allegedly sentient primate ever has delivered." - Charles P. Pierce

        by Rikon Snow on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:28:23 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Feta is one thing (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Dave in Northridge, Debby

        It is not from a specific region of Greece.  And as a Greek- American, I grew up eating feta, and I love it.  But it is not like "Parmesan," which originally came from a specific region in Italy.  (And, to tell you the truth, I think that Bulgarian feta is really excellent, although don't tell my Greek relatives that.)
        On the other hand, when we talk about extra-virgin olive oil from specific regions in Greece, that is entirely different.  If you are buying Kalamata olive oil, or Kolymvari olive oil, or Koroneiki olive oil, or Laconiko olive oil, etc, etc, you are talking about a totally different thing.  They are different (at least, to olive oil connoisseurs, and I am one), and until now, at least, they have been protected.
        Now there is a plan to allow olive oils blended with cheaper vegetable oils to be sold in Greece, and elsewhere.  This proposal is supposedly going to "modernize" the Greek economy.  Which certainly could use some modernization, but not this way.
        Would the French allow their appellation d'origine contrôlée (AOC) wines or cheeses to be adulterated and degraded this way?  
        I think not.  And the Greeks would make a big mistake to allow one of their major exports to be similarly degraded.
        Okay, okay, I'll get off my soapbox now.   ;-)

        "We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid." -Benjamin Franklin

        by Zorba the Greek on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 02:57:11 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Agreed. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        AZphilosopher

        The associated with Greece argument is a bridge too far.  I am an intellectual property lawyer who generally feels we allow overly strong intellectual property rights here in the US.  But I am very much in favor of the geographic appellation system as I think it is important to to promote foodsheds.   Protecting that IP furthers the promotion of quality products that are real food - not factory crap.  I like shopping local foodsheds for the most part, but there are a few products like a good Peccorino Romano that are wonderful imported luxuries.  

        If we do not maintain Justice, Justice will not maintain us. -Sir Francis Bacon.

        by Res Ipsa Loquitor on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 06:25:49 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  it's a consumer protection issue (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Debby

      using names of origin to describe "style" is on some level deceptive, and there's precedent.  Champagne can't mean California Sparkling Wine.  

      Even within Parmasean properly labeled, there's a difference in style, so you have to look for a DOP label.

      Difficult, difficult, lemon difficult.

      by Loge on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:26:18 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Re: Parmesan "Style" Cheese (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Res Ipsa Loquitor, JeffW, Caipirinha

      I've taken to describing the stuff that comes in those green cylinders as: Parmesan Style "Cheese". (And using the air quotes for emphasis.)

      We now get a chunk of the real stuff and grate it by hand rather than use that cheese-like powder that comes in a shaker. Even my (sometimes) labor-averse daughters would rather have the real thing -- even if they have to get out the grater and do a little work -- than use the convenient pseudo-cheese.

    •  I totally agree with the EU. American-made (0+ / 0-)

      cheese is total crap because we are forced to pasteurize all dairy products here.  That's why our cheese has so much less flavor and remains a pale shadow of the authentic stuff.

  •  BREAKING - (5+ / 0-)

         AZ Gov. Jan Brewer announces retirement ☛ AZ Daily Star

    The free market is not the solution, the free market is the problem.

    by Azazello on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:05:12 PM PDT

  •  $4 gas days of 2008? We pay that now in Seattle (0+ / 0-)

    Come visit some time.

    Take the fight to them. Don't let them bring it to you. - Harry S Truman

    by jgoodfri on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:05:36 PM PDT

  •  The makers of those green cylinders (11+ / 0-)

    should be required to label what is really inside.

    Sawdust.

    I stand in solidarity with actual cheese.

    "He is Joe McCarthy, he is bad news ... I hope Mr. Cruz does not have a nice weekend." - Chris Matthews

    by lotac on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:09:32 PM PDT

    •  Yes, 'cellulose' is the second ingredient (7+ / 0-)

      and it tastes like it, too.   I just don't get how Kraft is allowed to say "100% Parmesan" on the label when it's at least several percent sawdust.   Our advertising laws are useless.

      "The extinction of the human race will come from its inability to EMOTIONALLY comprehend the exponential function." -- Edward Teller

      by lgmcp on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:15:16 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Not big fan of /anything/ Kraft (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        lgmcp, Dave in Northridge, JeffW

        I did some work for those people many years ago. You would be disgusted at what's in many of the recipes. I'm betting that many of those ingredients have since been found to be very bad for humans (one I know is) so, hopefully, they're no longer in those products but I still avoid their products like the plague.

        •  Eating sawdust is pretty harmless (0+ / 0-)

          in moderation.  Better than some kind of powdered plastic to "prevent caking"!   Which I wouldn't put it past them ...

          "The extinction of the human race will come from its inability to EMOTIONALLY comprehend the exponential function." -- Edward Teller

          by lgmcp on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 03:36:40 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  insult to sawdust. n/t (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      kyril, JeffW

      Difficult, difficult, lemon difficult.

      by Loge on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:27:15 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Lordy, you beat me to that one (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      kyril

      "Sort-of-cheese flavored sawdust", to be fair.

    •  True, (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Res Ipsa Loquitor

      but there is some quite delicious American-made Parmesan cheese. I wouldn't want to force real American cheese makers to adopt a naming schema that implies that their product is somehow not 'real'.

      I feel like "Parmesan-style cheese" would be associated with other dairy foods with weird and evasive names like "processed cheese product."

      "Let’s just move on, treat everybody with firmness, fairness, dignity, compassion and respect. Let’s be Marines." - Sgt. Maj Michael Barrett on DADT repeal

      by kyril on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 01:16:16 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Very true. (0+ / 0-)

        I have had some great American  sheep's milk hard cheeses.  I think the distinction we are looking for here is that between cheese, and cheese-food (which is not even what cheese eats).  Anybody who is making a good  sheep's milk hard cheese will be better off describing it for their potential customers rather than slapping a Parmesan-style label on it.  

        Anybody who is using hydrogenated oils or anti-caking agents should be required to call their product cheese-like food.    

        If we do not maintain Justice, Justice will not maintain us. -Sir Francis Bacon.

        by Res Ipsa Loquitor on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 06:36:17 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  I have no problem with Cheesy Censors (8+ / 0-)

    In order to be called Bourbon whiskey, it has to come from specific counties in Kentucky, and contain minimum percentages of grain in the bill.

    These types of naming restrictions are very common in Europe, especially for wine and cheese.

    It's a respectable tradition that lets you know that the product you're buying is coming from a region that takes pride in its manufacture.

    If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.

    by cultjake on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:10:57 PM PDT

    •  Exactly. (3+ / 0-)

      Here in Italy, such regional products--and there are thousands of them--are called "Di Origine Controllata" (DOC), or "Controlled by Origin", and "Di Origine Protetta" (DOP), "Of Protected Origin".  

      I've always thought that Parmigiano Reggiano would have a losing battle against "Parmesan" because the latter has been in existence for so long in the U.S. And they really are two totally different species, competing in two different markets. No way is the average customer going to pay $20/lb for parmigiano.  Even in Italy not everyone can afford it.  Parmigiano has a poorer cousin, Grana Padano, which I find to be just about as good.  

      Actually, I think that Italy faces more competition from Argentina, which attempts to produce a cheese in wheel form that does replicate Parmigiano Reggiano.

  •  UK lost one of its most powerful labor leaders (0+ / 0-)
  •  The US guided missile destroyer USS Textron (0+ / 0-)

    is in Constanta, Romania on as part of a long-scheduled Black Sea tour

    to improve interoperability between the United States and her regional Allies in a continuing effort to promote peace and stability in the Black Sea region
    .

    Play chess for the Kossacks on Chess.com. Join the site, then the group at http://www.chess.com/groups/view/kossacks.

    by rhutcheson on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:12:52 PM PDT

  •  Can we throw Dottie in prison, too? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Miggles

    Idiot.

    And yeah, if you've ever used imported Romano or Parmesan, it even smells better. It costs more, but for certain dishes, it's worth it.

    How about I believe in the unlucky ones?

    by BenderRodriguez on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:13:59 PM PDT

    •  Denial ain't just a river in Egypt (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      BenderRodriguez

      Asiago cheese makes a decent substitute for Parmesan; I like the tubs that have it already shredded because shredding cheese is a PITA plus it's ready for quick grab and go. (I use it mostly when I make Caesar salad at home -- no substitute for the real thing.)

      There's only one rule that I know of, babies -- goddammit, you've got to be kind. -- Kurt Vonnegut

      by Cali Scribe on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:18:15 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  10.7 million times? (0+ / 0-)

    "Americans rode buses, subways, trains, and lightrail 10.7 million times in 2013"

    Well that link doesn't work first of all.

    And, heck, there were 1,654,582,265 NYC subway rides in 2012, so I seriously call into question the 10.7 million figure nationwide. Unless that was a DAILY figure. And if that's true then 40% percent of those rides occur in NYC alone.

    •  Found the piece (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Ellid

      on USA Today -- they cite the same 10.7 million figure. But at the APTA site, they have 10.7 billion -- which makes way more sense considering the NYC numbers alone, not to mention other large cities such as San Francisco and Chicago which also have a large percentage of regular transit riders (we never drive in San Francisco if we can possibly help it; we usually park in Millbrae and take either BART or Caltrain). Probably a typo -- but pretty significant.

      There's only one rule that I know of, babies -- goddammit, you've got to be kind. -- Kurt Vonnegut

      by Cali Scribe on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:27:14 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I almost never drive in Boston (0+ / 0-)

        I drive to Alewife or Riverside, park in the garage, and take the T into the city.  And I NEVER drive into Manhattan.  Amtrak all the way, baby.

        This isn't freedom. This is fear - Captain America

        by Ellid on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:41:17 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Probably the equivalent (0+ / 0-)

          of parking at Millbrae -- Caltrain is a more direct shot into SF, especially if we're going to AT&T Park which is our usual destination, but BART gives more flexibility especially after the game.

          There's only one rule that I know of, babies -- goddammit, you've got to be kind. -- Kurt Vonnegut

          by Cali Scribe on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 01:53:42 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Bored on a boring day. (0+ / 0-)

    I uploaded this thingie to Thingiverse.

    I also uploaded a ten or so weeks into a year long attempt to keep a sketchbook to Vapidshare (Warning! Warning! Zaftig wonders!) It's here....

    "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

    by Stude Dude on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:16:20 PM PDT

  •  Please help, if you can. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    greenbird


    Succeeding Together


    Please Help Women Make Viral Video About Grassroots Movement

    KuangSi2A group of single mothers in the Democratic Republic of the Congo are working together to change their lives, their neighborhoods, and their country. This is grassroots at its best.

    They want to make a music video with famous Congolese musicians Innoss'B and Maisha Soul. If this video gets made, the message will ring across Democratic Republic of the Congo. The musicians have volunteered their time and studio for writing, recording, and filming the video with the women at Succeeding Together. They only need money for gas to run a generator to provide electricity to their studio for the time they need to work.

    Read more about the project here and here

    If you could donate $5 or $10 to this Kickstarter project, together we can help them help others. If you can't -- could you please spread the word?

    This is the Kickstarter link. $$$ Donate here to support the video! $$$
    As of this writing, we've collected $1386 of $2000 minimum overheard costs needed to start the project. The Kickstarter expires tomorrow, March 13, at 4:00p PDT. If the minimum isn't met, the project loses all of the funds.

    "Broccoli could take down a government. Broccoli is revolutionary." --Kris Carr

    by rb137 on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:16:21 PM PDT

    •  I do appreciate having ATM fatigue here... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      greenbird

      We are broadcasting this promotion internationally -- not just here at Daily Kos. If you can't help, that's okay. If you know someone who can, please share.

      I think it's hard to appreciate how much help this video will lend to the community-based, grassroots movements in Eastern Congo. The people want to spread their movement across the country.

      Thanks.

      "Broccoli could take down a government. Broccoli is revolutionary." --Kris Carr

      by rb137 on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:20:56 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Nice that transit is being used more, but use (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Gooserock, rb137

    is still very low.

    If you factor in population growth, transit trips in 2013 were only half of the 1956 use.

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:16:26 PM PDT

  •  HB! (7+ / 0-)

    I live under the bridge to the 21st Century.

    by Crashing Vor on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:19:50 PM PDT

  •  first they take our Sparkling Wine, then Fois-Gras (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    rb137

    the EU can have my Pecorino Romano when they pry it from my cold stinky fingers

    As part of trade talks, the European Union wants to ban the use of European names like Parmesan, feta and Gorgonzola on cheese made in the United States.

    Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "I’m not the strapping young Muslim socialist that I used to be" - Barack Obama 04/27/2013 (@eState4Column5).

    by annieli on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:22:57 PM PDT

  •  Didn't HR Have Jerry Sandusky's Back All The Way? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    rb137, Calamity Jean

    Seriously, doesn't every sexual harassment scandal, environmental crime, large scale industrial accident,  hospital scandal. financial fraud, and pedophile ring have the full cooperation of Human Resources?  They work tirelessly to protect the criminal while smearing and firing anyone who dares to complain.  Indeed, time and again we see people like Sandusky gain a sort of aura of invincibility as HR  becomes the enabler in organizations that become models of the dysfunctional abusive family.  Anyone who even hints that all is not well will be subject to relentless ad hominem attacks about how they aren't "nice" or else the accusation will be taken from handy prepared check lists of charges to be used against employees.

    We see how these people-oriented positions (priests, counselors, teachers, cops) are often the hunting grounds of the worst sorts of abusers but why has this never been examined in HR? Isn't that exactly the sort of postion that would attract the very worst people?

    Men are so necessarily mad, that not to be mad would amount to another form of madness. -Pascal

    by bernardpliers on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:29:20 PM PDT

    •  It's a fair point. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      bernardpliers, Calamity Jean

      HR probably sees its primary objective as keeping the enterprise it represents from getting sued. Enabling keeps them out of court more often than protecting folks from the perpetrators...

      "Broccoli could take down a government. Broccoli is revolutionary." --Kris Carr

      by rb137 on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:33:18 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I think Mrs. Sandusky is in deep denial. (0+ / 0-)

    "Onward through the fog!" - Oat Willie

    by rocksout on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:29:29 PM PDT

    •  She's hurt and angry. Very human, very (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Debby

      Sad.

      ". . .as singularly embarrassing a public address as any allegedly sentient primate ever has delivered." - Charles P. Pierce

      by Rikon Snow on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:31:24 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  The victims saw money...because lawyers can (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      rocksout

      sue random people for money even if they didn't do anything.  

      It doesn't matter if they saw money or not. There had to be a crime, the victims received money FOR that crime.

      "Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities" Voltaire.

      by JWK on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 02:00:16 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  whatdaya expect from a University that (0+ / 0-)

    shares its name with a profane Québécois term for self-pleasuring

    Right-wing group goes after professor for email to students:

    Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "I’m not the strapping young Muslim socialist that I used to be" - Barack Obama 04/27/2013 (@eState4Column5).

    by annieli on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:32:09 PM PDT

  •  I Can't Have Parmesan on My (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    rb137

    German style ground beef sandwich???

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:32:17 PM PDT

  •  Professor Slocum Story (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sow hat, Theodore J Pickle

    Alas, the link in the diary costs money to read.

    Here is a Wisconsin State Journal story that everybody can read.

    More amusing still, here is the Wonkette snark-a-thon about the situation.

    As through this world I've wandered,
    I've seen lots of funny men;
    Some will rob you with a six-gun,
    Some with a fountain pen.
    -- Woody Guthrie

    by Senor Unoball on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:44:52 PM PDT

  •  Fernghazi Freakout!!! (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Debby

    Gotta love that president. To me, in the one short segment, Barack Obama showed more intelligence and more class than GWB could ever possibly have shown.

    The RW hair-on-fire about Between The Ferns is absolute proof what a bunch of flaming a**holes they are, classless, stupid and narrow minded.

    Go BHO!

    What stronger breast-plate than a heart untainted! Thrice is he arm'd, that hath his quarrel just; And he but naked, though lock'd up in steel, Whose conscience with injustice is corrupted. Henry VI Part II Act 3 Scene 2

    by TerryDarc on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 12:52:42 PM PDT

  •  Link to article on rise in use of public transit (0+ / 0-)

    Somehow the link in the diary was broken.  There's not much more substance to the story at the original source, but for those who want to read the original NYT story, it's here.  

    Shirley Chisholm was right. Our Republic is in deep trouble.

    by Big River Bandido on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 01:40:42 PM PDT

    •  At least the NYT had the right numbers (0+ / 0-)

      The USA Today report (and apparently the Grist piece that the diarist relied upon) had ridership in the millions, not billions. Pretty significant error if you ask me, and I wish it would be corrected in the diary. (I linked to the actual APTA press release in a couple of comments.)

      There's only one rule that I know of, babies -- goddammit, you've got to be kind. -- Kurt Vonnegut

      by Cali Scribe on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 01:47:38 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Europeans see those product names differently (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Caipirinha

    Much more based in geography, rather than in a style of product.  And Americans try to appropriate those geographic names and attach them to a style.
    My favorite examples are in wine
    I remember long ago buying red jug wine labeled "burgundy".  Well, Burgundy is not a type of grape or a style of wine, it's a place where wine is made - there are white Burgundies, Red Burgundies and sparkling burgundies.  But here in the US you can still find it some in box wines with that label - which is totally meaningless.
    Here's another: Do you prefer Chablis or Chardonnay?  Trick question:  Chardonnay is a type of grape.  Chablis is a place where wine is made - using Chardonnay grapes.

    "Wouldn't you rather vote for what you want and not get it than vote for what you don't want - and get it?" Eugene Debs. "Le courage, c'est de chercher la verité et de la dire" Jean Jaures

    by Chico David RN on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 01:44:43 PM PDT

  •  There is another Planet close to Earth that humans (0+ / 0-)

    can Colonize and unlike Mars and The Moon where the low Gravity will prove very bad for Colonist it has almost the same Gravity as Earth and it's of course Venus and here is the beginning of the way to live there with this method of using a blimp-like floating aircraft to explore Venus http://news.yahoo.com/...

  •  Parmesan is not an Italian name for a cheese (0+ / 0-)

    "As part of trade talks, the European Union wants to ban the use of European names like Parmesan, feta and Gorgonzola on cheese made in the United States."

    In fact, Parmesan is an English word, derived from the Italian "Parmigiano," true, but a different word. The name of the cheese in Italy is Parmigiano or Parmigiano reggiano. Thus, it should not be a violation to call an American cheese Parmesan. Let the real Italian version be called Parmigiano, which it already is if it really comes from Italy.

    •  That brings us to The Mouse That Roared (0+ / 0-)

      (book and Peter Sellers movie) where the trade dispute was between the prized product of the Duchy of Grand Fenwick, namely Pinot Grand Fenwick, and the American knockoff, Pinot Grand Enwick.

      Back off, man. I'm a logician.—GOPBusters™

      by Mokurai on Wed Mar 12, 2014 at 07:19:40 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

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