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At In These Times, Sarah Jaffe writes The End of Jobs?

[...] The economy has improved only slightly. Unemployment remains high, and the jobs that do exist are often low-wage and part-time. Since 2011, we've seen not only Occupy but the rise of a movement of Walmart and fast-food workers demanding better wages and, often, more hours, so they can take home a full-time paycheck. A shorter hours movement has not materialized, nor has a meaningful jobs program, despite the promises of a bipartisan clutch of politicians. The minimum wage has risen in some states and cities, but workers are still struggling, and the long-term unemployed have seen their benefits cut off by a Congress that continues to squabble about whether or not they deserve to be able to pay bills.

Jobs have not yet ended or become obsolete. Yet, without question, they are changing. Research from Kelly Services (which, being a temporary agency, certainly has a vested interest in the subject) finds that 44 percent of workers in the U.S. classify themselves as “free agents.” According to the Freelancers Union, 42 million people are freelancers. The full-time job itself is only a fairly recent development in human history, spanning a couple hundred years or so, and the attendant expectation that a job be “good,” paying a living wage and providing healthcare and retirement benefits, with a union and some security, is a peculiar historical development of the New Deal era in the United States—an era that is almost without question over.

Power created that era—the power of organized workers in unions demanding better conditions. But the bosses, it's worth noting, never stopped trying to dismantle the deal. Since the Taft-Hartley Labor Management Relations Act of 1947, conservatives have been pushing to limit the power workers were granted by the NLRA in 1935, and the conversion of decent jobs into no-security temp gigs should rightly be seen in that context. The port truck drivers at Pacific 9 and elsewhere realize that despite the promises of freedom and liberation, they have more power when their relationship with the boss is explicit and when they can come together as a union.

We should carefully consider what comes next, whether that be high-end freelancers hopping from gig to gig, disdaining a full-time job, or more likely, the further fragmentation into piecework that we see happening in digital spaces like Amazon's Mechanical Turk, and the conversion of formerly full-time union jobs such as port trucking or auto manufacturing into low-security independent contracting or temp labor. Moshe Marvit wrote at The Nation of Amazon's human “crowdworkers” who perform the tiny tasks that are “helping to power the parts of the Internet that most of us take for granted” and who are paid a pittance for their work.

Technology is often blamed for displacing workers and eliminating jobs. Those doing the blaming are sometimes correct, as when supermarkets move to automatic checkout or ports move to automated cargo hauling. And yet the story of the Mechanical Turkers is a good cautionary tale for those who assume that all jobs are disappearing into the mechanical ether. One doesn't have to be a Luddite to point out that many jobs—including ones, like those done by Turkers, that we think are fully automated—are still being done by people, either because we don't have the technology to do them yet, or because those people remain cheaper than machines. Whether jobs are disappearing for good reasons—because they simply aren't socially necessary anymore—or because they are being fragmented, made temporary or shifted to freelancers, these are not processes that are happening outside of human control, but rather because of it. [...]


Blast from the Past. At Daily Kos on this date in 2011What do all Scandinavians, Belgians and the Dutch have that 52 million Americans don't? Health care:

That's the kind of headline that pisses off Republicans and their enablers. Comparing the good ol' USA with anything...ewwwwwww...European is barely short of treasonous. Of course, if they had an ounce of real pride in their country and compassion for their fellow Americans, they would be irked not by the headline but by its accuracy. What they have instead is an open spigot of cash from corporadoes keen on keeping a health-care system that costs more but delivers less than health-care systems in Europe and Canada.

During 2010, according to theCommonwealth Fund's Biennial Health Insurance Survey released last Tuesday, 52 million Americans—that's the total population of Sweden, Finland, Denmark, Norway, Belgium and the Netherlands—had no health insurance in all or part of the year. In 2001, the number was 38 million. That's a 35 percent increase in a decade when the U.S. population rose only 10 percent. Not only did all the people in those six countries have health coverage, each of their health-care systems were rated better than America's. Bottom line: They cost less, provide more, cover everybody.

Unsurprisingly, one of the main reasons the number of uninsured soared to this record high is because the deep recession that put millions out of a job took their health coverage along with it. Nearly three of five who lost their jobs also wound up uninsured. […]


Tweet of the Day:

We don't have broadcast journalism any more, we have televised obsessive compulsive disorders.
@billmon1



On today's Kagro in the Morning show, we begin by exploring the topic of how to stop talking about basketball brackets. Ten minutes later, we have come to no conclusion, and move on to McKay Coppins' look at the conservative book publishing racket, a favorite and long-running topic on the show. "Are You There God? It's Me, Hobby Lobby." The exciting conclusion of David Dayen's "Why the Justice Department Inspector General Report on Mortgage Fraud Matters." Justin Wolfers explains that "Most Americans Who Live Hand-to-Mouth Aren't Actually 'Poor.'" And Greg Sargent reminds us of "The real goal of all those anti-Obamacare ads."


High Impact Posts. Top Comments.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Bosnia, 2014 (9+ / 0-)

    Pay no attention to the upward redistribution of wealth!

    by ActivistGuy on Fri Mar 21, 2014 at 08:33:35 PM PDT

  •  How are you helping to build & expand communities? (7+ / 0-)

    Here's a diary I wrote about some local happenings tomorrow (Saturday the 22nd):

    It's a meetup run by the NAICOB (North American Indian Center of Boston)

    Supporting local communities

    Mettle Fatigue left a great, detailed comment in there. Pls check it out.

  •  Good night. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat, LinSea

    Tonight's diary:  Out of Arkansas

  •  Have a great weekend everyone! (5+ / 0-)

    “I would like to get rid of the homophobes, sexists, and racists in our audience. I know they're out there and it really bothers me.” ― Kurt Cobain

    by Jeff Y on Fri Mar 21, 2014 at 08:36:28 PM PDT

  •  I think before the 20th century almost everybody (13+ / 0-)

    had a full time job and a career for life, which was basically farmer or farm hand, often in the new worlds for oneself, previously as some kind of serf for a lord.

    It's why several of the framers expected the US to remain an agrarian economy.

    That's why manufacturing jobs started out with 12-14 hour 6 day work weeks; it was the same hours everyone knew from agriculture.

    Which is incidentally also why some few remaining hunter gatherers have been reported thinking the idea of going civilized was plain crazy.

    What comes next for workers?

    Let's see, the economy is running out of a need for workers, at just the same time the atmosphere is running out of ability to support civilization in the number of billions we've been growing.

    THAT is looming social Darwinism.

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Fri Mar 21, 2014 at 08:50:28 PM PDT

  •  Free Trade Wrecked Jobs in the U.S. (9+ / 0-)

    The reduction in unions and the move to service-based jobs is a consequence of our trade policy. Our national policy is to ship wealth-producing jobs overseas and hold down wages.

    If we expect to restore workers to power we have to reverse the free-trade movement. We need to insist on higher, uniform tariffs and on a meaningful international minimum wage. Until we do that, we will continue to see an erosion of wages and full-time jobs.

    This is not beyond our means. We just need to concentrate on it and make it the key economic issue.

    Or, we can figure out how to make our way in a third-world economy.

    •  It's true (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      LinSea

      Corporate profits don't see borders.  Cheap labor is cheap labor; manufacturing will move to it.  

      We need something besides the U of C School of Economics persuading us.

      The symbol for the Republican party shouldn't be an elephant -- it should be a unicorn.

      by Deadicated Marxist on Fri Mar 21, 2014 at 10:49:50 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  not so (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      LinSea, JeffW

      NAFTA wasn't written till 1992; WTO not until 1995.

      The corporados were already moving factories to Mexico and China in 1985.

      It was low wages in those countries that attracted them.

      If we expect to restore workers to power we have to reverse the free-trade movement. We need to insist on higher, uniform tariffs and on a meaningful international minimum wage. Until we do that, we will continue to see an erosion of wages and full-time jobs.
      You are at cross-purposes with yourself . . . .

      Without an international trade agreement, how do you plan on enforcing an international minimum wage?  Have each of the 170 or so national governments enforce it for us . . ?

      We need the international trade treaties.  THEY are the only method we have of forcing things like minimum wage laws, environmental regulations, workplace safety rules, product purity standards, onto ALL companies in ALL countries--all at once. And the only way those will get into the treaties is if we FORCE them in.

      Tariffs already failed. "Buy American" has already failed. Our own corporations won't even support them.

      The problem is not the existence of the international rule book--the problem is that we don't get to write the rules.

      THAT is what has to change.

      In the end, reality always wins.

      by Lenny Flank on Fri Mar 21, 2014 at 10:58:35 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Reagan (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        LinSea

        Eliminating union power is Reaganism--it succeeded evilly --better profits, lower wages.  Add off shoring capital and lowered tax rates for the 1%, and the future is bleak.  To realize a major political party considers this success, makes you realize how people can be convinced to vote against their self interest.

        Actions speak louder than petitions.

        by melvynny on Fri Mar 21, 2014 at 11:28:29 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  alas, Reagan didn't tell the corporados to move (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          jbsoul, melvynny, JeffW

          their factories to Mexico or China.  They did that all on their own.

          And the reason they did it was crashingly simple----they can pay people five bucks a day there.

          They didn't need Ronald Reagan to tell them that.

          Reagan and his policies shot the unions in the head---but corporate outsourcing had already put them on their knees before that.

          The unions could have prevented that by telling the companies "you can move your factory anyplace you want--but you damn well better be paying them a union wage under a union contract there--and if you don't, we're ALL going out on strike, them AND us."

          But alas, instead, the unions here treated the workers there as the enemy, and told the bosses "we'll give you whatever cutbacks you want--just don't move our plants away!!!" And the boss said "thanks", stuffed all those givebacks into his pocket--then moved the plant anyway.

          The unions here forgot what the word "solidarity" means.  Or at least what the word "whipsawing" means.

          There is only one way to effectively fight against whipsawing.  And the unions here didn't do it.Instead, they decided that the company was their friend.  And learned otherwise. The hard way.

          In the end, reality always wins.

          by Lenny Flank on Fri Mar 21, 2014 at 11:53:36 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  yes, but (0+ / 0-)

            Allowing corps to bank money--tax free--off shore played a large part in this story.  Few, if any, laptop computers, phones, or tablets are made in the US--and Apple, Microsoft, and friends, have huge untaxed money not "creating" jobs.

            Actions speak louder than petitions.

            by melvynny on Sat Mar 22, 2014 at 05:43:02 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  It's Easy to Enforce (0+ / 0-)

        We don't need an international trade agreement to enforce either tariffs or an international minimum wage. We just make the law say that in order to sell here you have to pay your employees at least a certain amount.

        The U.S. consumes about 20% of what the world produces. In order to sell to our markets companies will comply with our laws. It's a simple and as hard as that.

        Every other country that's pursued the free-trade route ended up screwing up their economy. Every country needs a certain level of tariff to encourage local production.

        The only thing that's failed is free trade. It has not produced any net jobs in the U.S. and it hasn't helped any industry increase production. It's a loser and we will continue to lose wealth until we reverse the policy.

        And, as you say, NAFTA came late to the game. The people who make money from this already started moving production out of the U.S. in the 1970s. We've seen a steady decline in wages and employment levels since then.

        So, what's "no so"? Everything I've said is true and indisputable. If you have any facts, bring them to the table.

        But he's a fact: The unemployment rate after 1979 has been almost a percentage point higher in the U.S. than it was before. If you compare the thirty years before 1979 with the thirty years after, unemployment was 0.9% higher. That's the year manufacturing peaked in the U.S. Moving wealth-producing jobs out of the country led to higher unemployment. This is just a plain fact. And, I assert, it's due to bad trade policy.

  •  Great post. BTW I've lost 7 pounds so far this (9+ / 0-)

    month.  I have a weigh in next Friday with my doctor, so I'm hoping I can keep this up.

    This is my worst time, as when it gets quite at this time of night I can hear all the snacks downstairs in the fridge calling my name. ... "HoundDaaaawwwwggggg!"

    "Seriously, Folks, WTH?" - ("What the Heck? "h/t Joan McCarter, Seriously, Florida. WTF?)

    by HoundDog on Fri Mar 21, 2014 at 09:04:49 PM PDT

  •  Tonight, Rachel went to the heart of the problem (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Jeff Y, LinSea

    like Robin Hood splitting the arrow. Must see TV!
    When the President of the United States says that getting voters off their couch wearing asses during mid-terms is the most important thing in the world, my heart sings.
    Where is DailyKos?

    After 65 years, the ONLY thing I know absolutely and positively about life is that the check is SUPPOSED to be in the mail. That's it. Nothing else. PERIOD.

    by franklyn on Fri Mar 21, 2014 at 09:05:53 PM PDT

    •  Author a diary... n/t (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Jeff Y, Aunt Pat, LinSea

      Float like a manhole cover, sting like a sash weight! Clean Coal Is A Clinker!

      by JeffW on Fri Mar 21, 2014 at 09:14:21 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  alas, it's easy to scold voters--not so easy to (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      LinSea, Superpole

      motivate them.

      Sadly, I don't have much hope for the Dems in the Congressional elections. Historically in the US, voter turnout is always low in the mid-term election years--and Dems always do badly when voter turnout is low (the GOP knows that too--which is why they are trying so hard to limit the number of people who CAN vote). If the Dems want to win in 2014, we need to inspire and motivate lots of people to get out and vote. And we're not. Scolding people to get their ass off the couch, isn't gonna get people to vote. Instead of giving people hope and inspiration and a reason to go vote, the Dems are giving them the same ole milquetoast and spinelessness and "embrace the suck" as always, and a reason to stay home. The Dems are about as exciting and inspiring as a bowl of week-old oatmeal. As usual, I'll hold my nose and vote for the ones who suck less. But I suspect most of the people here won't bother. Nobody around me--absolutely nobody--is excited about the election. Voter turnout will, I expect, be just as low as it always is in an off year. It will not be good for Dems. I think the Dems will definitely not take the House. They may very well lose the Senate.

      Sorry to be a downer.

      In the end, reality always wins.

      by Lenny Flank on Fri Mar 21, 2014 at 11:11:09 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  No problem about the downer. We all have it. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        LinSea, Calamity Jean

        The point of Rachel's piece and the president's thoughts was to maximize the qualitative. We can't match them with money; so, we must do a much better job with what we have.
        I hope you watch this and think it over deeply. I've ranted for so long that this and this alone is the key.

        After 65 years, the ONLY thing I know absolutely and positively about life is that the check is SUPPOSED to be in the mail. That's it. Nothing else. PERIOD.

        by franklyn on Fri Mar 21, 2014 at 11:19:32 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  well you're preaching to the choir here (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Calamity Jean, jbsoul

          Everyone here is gonna vote.  That's not the problem.

          The problem is how to get the NON-political junkies to vote. Telling them to get their ass off the couch, won't work.  Telling them "The Republicans will kill you if they win !!!!" for the twelth time in a row, won't work either. ACA is old news, wasn't the huge enthusiasm-winner we hoped it would be, and even our own candidates aren't even running on it.

          We need a good, easily-grasped, real reason for them to vote--and vote Dem.

          And we got none.

          Yes, the Goppers have only a 25% approval rating.  But we only have a 34% approval rating. When two-thirds of voters think we suck, they are not gonna rush out enthusiastically in record numbers to vote for us. And "we suck less", ain't gonna make them love us.

          In the end, reality always wins.

          by Lenny Flank on Sat Mar 22, 2014 at 12:33:57 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Here it is! (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            franklyn, Yo Bubba, jbsoul, JeffW
            We need a good, easily-grasped, real reason for them to vote--and vote Dem.
            Democratic House and Senate candidates need to say, over and over, "If elected (or re-elected), I will vote to raise the Federal minimum wage."  This issue is massively popular and really brings out the Democratic-leaning intermittent voter.  

            President Obama needs to say repeatedly, "The first bill I want Congress to send me in 2015 is an increase in the minimum wage."

            Then, and this is the hard part, they actually have to do it.  

            "My country, right or wrong; if right, to be kept right; and if wrong, to be set right." -- Sen Carl Schurz 1872

            by Calamity Jean on Sat Mar 22, 2014 at 01:17:46 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  alas, the Dem Party has always been pretty good at (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Superpole, Calamity Jean

              ignoring things that are pretty popular.

              That may have something to do with their 34% approval rating, and why nobody seems to be in any big hurry to rush out and vote for them.

              Just a guess . . . .

              In the end, reality always wins.

              by Lenny Flank on Sat Mar 22, 2014 at 01:22:54 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  Thanks Cal. (0+ / 0-)

              What I'm saying is that it is not which issue we focus on. It's how we focus. All issues are worth while, with some more immediately important and relevant. None more than getting out the vote.
              The overwhelming importance of  inspiration is paramount.
              Ever want to see a movie that the trailer didn't inspire you to see?
              Inspiration is the key. Imagination will seduce and will aide boots on the ground, which we have in spades.
              Political ads must go Hollywood in their seduction. That is the quality that, hopefully, will override the Koch quantity.

              After 65 years, the ONLY thing I know absolutely and positively about life is that the check is SUPPOSED to be in the mail. That's it. Nothing else. PERIOD.

              by franklyn on Sat Mar 22, 2014 at 02:12:47 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  A Min Wage Increase for Federal Workers (0+ / 0-)

              yes, no problem with that.

              we'll see if the House will pass (obviously NOT this year) even a feeble increase to $10.10.

              doubtful since the massive QSR lobby is already working against it.

              "We are beyond law, which is not unusual for an empire; unfortunately, we are also beyond common sense." Gore Vidal

              by Superpole on Sat Mar 22, 2014 at 06:33:22 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  I'm sorry I wasn't clear. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                JeffW
                A Min Wage Increase for Federal Workers
                An increase for Federal workers can be done with an executive order.  What I meant was an increase in the minimum wage for everyone in the country.  I specified "Federal" because some states have their own minimum wage laws that are different (usually higher) than the national minimum.  
                we'll see if the House will pass (obviously NOT this year) even a feeble increase to $10.10.
                The House will pass a minimum wage increase in 2015 IF there are enough (non Blue Dog) Democrats in it.   AND the way to get enough Democrats into the House (and Senate) is to have both incumbents and challengers campaign on raising the minimum wage.

                "My country, right or wrong; if right, to be kept right; and if wrong, to be set right." -- Sen Carl Schurz 1872

                by Calamity Jean on Sat Mar 22, 2014 at 12:03:27 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  AGREED (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Calamity Jean
                  AND the way to get enough Democrats into the House (and Senate) is to have both incumbents and challengers campaign on raising the minimum wage.
                  How many democrats in congress are doing this right now?

                  BTW, you realize if the democrats can't even get a weak increase to $10.10 an hour, that this is an EPIC fail for the democratic party, right?

                  "We are beyond law, which is not unusual for an empire; unfortunately, we are also beyond common sense." Gore Vidal

                  by Superpole on Sun Mar 23, 2014 at 05:32:28 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  They damned well better start! (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    JeffW
                    How many democrats in congress are doing this right now?
                    BTW, you realize if the democrats can't even get a weak increase to $10.10 an hour, that this is an EPIC fail for the democratic party, right?
                    It would be an epic fail for the entire nation.  So the Democrats better get to work on it.

                    "My country, right or wrong; if right, to be kept right; and if wrong, to be set right." -- Sen Carl Schurz 1872

                    by Calamity Jean on Sun Mar 23, 2014 at 04:03:26 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

  •  Interesting article, MB (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat, LinSea

    I've been a Turker for close to a decade now - I Turk for camera equipment, books, and just fun stuff - and it's interesting that the author dismisses the pay as 'a pittance'.  

    I suppose that's true if you sit at your computer doing penny tasks. It's also true that if you don't know what to look for you'll end up making a dollar or two an hour, which is totally sweatshop labor.

    It's certainly not a full-time job, or even a part-time one (for me, at least. Some people do make a living from it). But it's easy to do and good if you want to put an hour or two into it a day and have some extra cash if there's something you're saving for. Over the years I've made thousands of dollars Turking and picked up some nice camera equipment along the way and I don't spend a lot of time doing it.  

    Amazon isn't very good at policing it (if they do at all, really) and some crooked requesters pop up now and again.  Prepare to be burned a few times until you can figure out what isn't legit.  But it's a nice avenue to just pick up some quick pocket cash.

    If a free society cannot help the many who are poor, it cannot save the few who are rich." - John F. Kennedy

    by Dem Beans on Fri Mar 21, 2014 at 09:33:36 PM PDT

  •  OT in the OT - Good vibes sought (9+ / 0-)

    Good vibes, positive energy, prayers, whatever you got to throw at us, is accepted.  Mr, d had what is hopefully his last chemo yesterday - first day of spring - I hope that's a sign.  PET scan on the 28th and meeting with our awesome oncologist April 1st (irony alert - she does have a good sense of humor) to hear the results.  

    Whatever good you can throw at us - please do!

    -6.25 -5.3 If I ever leave this world alive The madness that you feel will soon subside...

    by dansk47 on Fri Mar 21, 2014 at 10:07:17 PM PDT

  •  Lowe's giving $23 million to Habitat (8+ / 0-)
  •  Unions for independant workers & Turks or.. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LinSea, Yo Bubba, jbsoul

    ..collective bargaining in some form is crucial imo.

    Having more leisure time will only happen if the pay is good, and we the workers have control over labor, not the Oligarchs.

    A shorter hours movement has not materialized, nor has a meaningful jobs program,
    [...]

    Since the Taft-Hartley Labor Management Relations Act of 1947, conservatives have been pushing to limit the power workers were granted by the NLRA in 1935, and the conversion of decent jobs into no-security temp gigs should rightly be seen in that context.

    Here is a write up on taxes for Turkers, with various tax strategies for workers Moneymaking Basics: US taxes and Mechanical Turkers  

    The $20,000/200-transaction threshold

    Requesters (whether individual or corporate) are concerned about that $600 mark, but Amazon Payments has a different threshold at which they must report. They must file a form with the IRS (and here again, you get a copy too—it’s the 1099K form) when they process at least 200 individual transactions for you during the year, if the total of all those transactions is $20,000 or more.
    It seems to me that the non-working elite that control capital and have always fought  to have taxes paid by "the little people" will prolly work to make sure that the small time worker doesn't get the kind of tax strategies (loopholes) that the 1%ers receive (not to mention outright payouts in subsidies and/or interest free loans).

    Another very strong reason for unions.

    Also too health care. I'm researching health care costs of single payer versus the 1000's of for profit insurance regime that the US has as a system. It works out that every person is paying at least twice as much for health care with relatively poor results.

    There are hundreds, if not thousands, of insurance companies in the U.S. This system has considerable administrative overhead, far greater than in nationalized, single-payer systems, such as Canada's. An oft-cited study by Harvard Medical School and the Canadian Institute for Health Information determined that some 31% of U.S. health care dollars, or more than $1,000 per person per year, went to health care administrative costs, nearly double the administrative overhead in Canada, on a percentage basis.

     - emphasis added

    And that's not counting how much lower the cost would be if we had single payers and 100% of people were a part of the system; each contributing and receiving
     
    The U.S. pays twice as much as Canada yet lags behind other wealthy nations in such measures as infant mortality and life expectancy. Currently, the U.S. has a higher infant mortality rate than most of the world's industrialized nations.[nb 1][20] In the United States life expectancy is 42nd in the world, after some other industrialized nations, lagging the other nations of the G5 (Japan, France, Germany, U.K., U.S.) and just after Chile (35th) and Cuba (37th).[21]
    And with unions workers should be making a some minimum % of the profits guaranteed that would work out to be a 20 hour work week (if desired) but still plenty to afford what is now considered wealthy; every person deserves to be wealthy that works.

    We are a wealth country - we should all be wealthy. Voting for progressive modern thinking Dems will start that process now

    That my Dairy thoughts for a second "What every republican worker should know - a list - 2"

    Thx MB

  •  Does anybody really know what time it is? (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Eric Nelson, Knucklehead, eeff

    Dance lightly upon the Earth, Sing her songs with wild abandon, Smile upon all forms of Life ...and be well.

    by LinSea on Fri Mar 21, 2014 at 11:36:27 PM PDT

  •  the bad news--I'm not feeling so great and can't (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jbsoul, JeffW

    sleep.

    The good news, once I do fall asleep, I'll likely stay asleep for most of the day tomorrow. And hopefully feel better when I wake up.

    Being sick sucks. Being sick for months, REALLY sucks.

    (sigh)

    In the end, reality always wins.

    by Lenny Flank on Sat Mar 22, 2014 at 12:36:32 AM PDT

  •  Power did not lead to the New Deal Era. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Superpole, JeffW

    Fear that the workers were organizing to take over the system, and abolish capitalism led the powers that be to realize that they either answered the worker's demands, or they'd hang. It was not workers politely asking, or even demanding just a better deal. It was a a clear threat to the entire capitalist system and its wealthy elite that forced them to give workers a fairer share of the wealth those workers produced.

    That is why liberalism is a death sentence for the working class. Liberals want to make the system a little better, while the wise radical realizes you can't fix a broken society, you have to create a working society from the ground up. Workers need to quit asking for a better deal, and just take it, by force if necessary.

    Workers of the world, unite! You have nothing to lose but your shackles. It is by the picket line and direct action that true freedom will be won, not by electing people who promise to screw us less than the other guy.

    by rhonan on Sat Mar 22, 2014 at 01:20:43 AM PDT

  •  NOT Sure Just Why This is ROCKET SCIENCE... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW

    at this point there is only one answer to get us out of the ditch:

    A Massive, twenty-five year long, minimum $2.5 Trillion dollar government investment in infrastructure. New smart electrical grid, most (all?) of the west coast powered by solar/wind, coast to coast high speed rail on dedicated rail lines, and so forth.

    for every $1 Billion invested in infrastructure, 50,000 jobs are created.

    failure to get this plan in place means FAIL for our nation. investment from the private sector is just not happening. if congress thinks that is going to happen, they're more ignorant than I thought.

    "We are beyond law, which is not unusual for an empire; unfortunately, we are also beyond common sense." Gore Vidal

    by Superpole on Sat Mar 22, 2014 at 06:28:47 AM PDT

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