Skip to main content

The sexism and sexual harassment episodes that have plagued philosophy departments in recent months has in some circles been reduced to an argument about whether monism, traditionalism, and degendered abstract logic is to be dismissed in favor of academic approaches that favor pluralism, progressivism, constructivism, and the recognition of gender in determining what kinds of things are to count as knowledge. The author doesn't buy this divide--nor does he think this is an ultimate either/or situation--and blames these episodes of ill behavior among philosophers as owing to the philosophers themselves and the materialist culture of corporate academia which keeps these unsavory people employed.

"As we are learning with these recent sexism and sexual harassment incidents, the utter ethically bankrupt nature of American philosophy departments is perhaps the symptom of a university system that is willing to sacrifice its academic mission for the almighty dollar. "

from "The Failing American University: Of Philandering Philosophers and Sexual Misconduct" by Harvey Whitney in Dissident Voice

http://dissidentvoice.org/...

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  Sometimes (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    rduran

    "some circles" produce complete incoherence.  Like perhaps these.

    Best Scientist Ever Predicts Bacon Will Be Element 119 On The Periodic Table

    by dov12348 on Tue Mar 25, 2014 at 09:23:09 AM PDT

  •  Rhetorical overkill (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    rduran

    disables the argument.

    "the utter ethically bankrupt nature of American philosophy departments"
    Is it the nature of philosophy departments that's ethically bankrupt? He seems to be arguing that it's the bad apples who are. Thinkers should be especially attentive to language. I'll pass on this magnitude of self-contradictory sloppiness.

    And detecting capitalist tendencies in the university system is pretty unremarkable. I'm underwhelmed.

    Dick Cheney 2/14/10: "I was a big supporter of waterboarding"

    by Bob Love on Tue Mar 25, 2014 at 09:32:06 AM PDT

    •  Just a note from a philosophy student from way (4+ / 0-)

      back, early 1970s: sexism and sexual harassment in philosophy departments is far from new. I would say it is not limited to philosophy departments but extends to all disciplines, including all science departments, English departments, etc.

      Why?

      Because sexism is so very alive and well across the board in this country, and others.

  •  comment from Love (0+ / 0-)

    "Is it the nature of philosophy departments that's ethically bankrupt? He seems to be arguing that it's the bad apples who are. Thinkers should be especially attentive to language. I'll pass on this magnitude of self-contradictory sloppiness.
    And detecting capitalist tendencies in the university system is pretty unremarkable. I'm underwhelmed."

    If one spends time pondering the philosophical foundations of ethics (searching for some sort of abstract criteria that will ground ethics) instead of looking squarely at the emotive endorsements of the community for certain types of behavior and such community's emotive disapproval of other behaviors, then it seems to me that the search for such an abstract ground for ethics is not only irrelevant but harmful. Abstract rationality can be used to justify anything. If Whitney is making that point, then I wholeheartedly agree with him.

    So what is useful in looking at the materialism of universities as a cause for these types of incidents? It may not be all of that insightful but it may be accurate analysis. As time has proven over and over again, universities will permit ill behavior among faculty towards students as long as they don't have a lawsuit to address.

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site