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At Common Dreams, Naomi Klein writes The climate crisis has such bad timing, confronting it not only requires a new economy but a new way of thinking:

One of the most disturbing ways that climate change is already playing out is through what ecologists call “mismatch” or “mistiming.” This is the process whereby warming causes animals to fall out of step with a critical food source, particularly at breeding times, when a failure to find enough food can lead to rapid population losses.

The migration patterns of many songbird species, for instance, have evolved over millennia so that eggs hatch precisely when food sources such as caterpillars are at their most abundant, providing parents with ample nourishment for their hungry young. But because spring now often arrives early, the caterpillars are hatching earlier too, which means that in some areas they are less plentiful when the chicks hatch, threatening a number of health and fertility impacts. Similarly, in West Greenland, caribou are arriving at their calving grounds only to find themselves out of sync with the forage plants they have relied on for thousands of years, now growing earlier thanks to rising temperatures. That is leaving female caribou with less energy for lactation, reproduction and feeding their young, a mismatch that has been linked to sharp decreases in calf births and survival rates.

Naomi Klein
Scientists are studying cases of climate-related mistiming among dozens of species, from Arctic terns to pied flycatchers. But there is one important species they are missing—us. Homo sapiens. We too are suffering from a terrible case of climate-related mistiming, albeit in a cultural-historical, rather than a biological, sense. Our problem is that the climate crisis hatched in our laps at a moment in history when political and social conditions were uniquely hostile to a problem of this nature and magnitude—that moment being the tail end of the go-go ’80s, the blastoff point for the crusade to spread deregulated capitalism around the world. Climate change is a collective problem demanding collective action the likes of which humanity has never actually accomplished. Yet it entered mainstream consciousness in the midst of an ideological war being waged on the very idea of the collective sphere.

This deeply unfortunate mistiming has created all sorts of barriers to our ability to respond effectively to this crisis. It has meant that corporate power was ascendant at the very moment when we needed to exert unprecedented controls over corporate behavior in order to protect life on earth. It has meant that regulation was a dirty word just when we needed those powers most. It has meant that we are ruled by a class of politicians who know only how to dismantle and starve public institutions, just when they most need to be fortified and reimagined. And it has meant that we are saddled with an apparatus of “free trade” deals that tie the hands of policy-makers just when they need maximum flexibility to achieve a massive energy transition.

Confronting these various structural barriers to the next economy is the critical work of any serious climate movement. But it’s not the only task at hand. We also have to confront how the mismatch between climate change and market domination has created barriers within our very selves, making it harder to look at this most pressing of humanitarian crises with anything more than furtive, terrified glances. Because of the way our daily lives have been altered by both market and technological triumphalism, we lack many of the observational tools necessary to convince ourselves that climate change is real—let alone the confidence to believe that a different way of living is possible.

And little wonder: just when we needed to gather, our public sphere was disintegrating; just when we needed to consume less, consumerism took over virtually every aspect of our lives; just when we needed to slow down and notice, we sped up; and just when we needed longer time horizons, we were able to see only the immediate present.
This is our climate change mismatch, and it affects not just our species, but potentially every other species on the planet as well.

The good news is that, unlike reindeer and songbirds, we humans are blessed with the capacity for advanced reasoning and therefore the ability to adapt more deliberately—to change old patterns of behavior with remarkable speed. If the ideas that rule our culture are stopping us from saving ourselves, then it is within our power to change those ideas. But before that can happen, we first need to understand the nature of our personal climate mismatch. […]


Blast from the Past. At Daily Kos on this date in 2009Happy Earth Day, National Parks!

This is a very happy Earth Day for this national parks geek. The $750 million stimulus funding that is being applied to the parks has been announced.

A brief overview of some of the project was included in this report in USATODAY:


More than 750 projects in 48 states are expected to create 30,000 to 40,000 jobs starting this summer. That includes 15,000 jobs in a proposed 21st Century Youth Conservation Corps....

The stimulus funds won't clear the National Park Service's $9 billion maintenance backlog, says spokesman David Barna, but they will pay for long-deferred projects at many iconic sites. […]

And there are going to be solar panels in 26 national parks, trail repair in many, a new wastewater treatment plan in Yellowstone--the list of 800 projects [pdf] is full of important park infrastructure projects to help mitigate the damage done from years of deferred maintenance. That all help makes up, a little bit, for the news that the wilderness is going wireless.

The new investment, and the news from my friend Joel Connelly that Ken Burns has a new documentary on the national parks previewing in September


Tweet of the Day:

Possible Arak compromise seen bolstering confidence in #Iran talks: http://t.co/...
@lrozen



On today's Kagro in the Morning show, the Aereo case came before the Supreme Court today, and it poses fascinating questions  about technology, copyright law, and even economic inequality, in a way. Matt Taibbi's got another book out about that, specifically how the rich never seem to get punished for any wrongdoing. Speaking of which: more about what might be next for labor after the UAW drops its NLRB appeal, followed by TomDispatch.com's "7 horrific crimes that aren’t crimes any more for America’s most powerful." Oklahoma gimmetarians prohibit localities from changing the minimum wage (with ALEC's help), as Florida gimmetarians did for gun laws.


High Impact Posts. Top Comments.

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Comment Preferences

  •  1,015,288 registered users on dKos now. (23+ / 0-)

    Here are the 10 newest registered users on dKos.  Hope to see their comments and diaries here soon!  (If they're not spammers.)

    Rich Strachan
    Matthew5532rdo5
    Al Carroll  (user #1,015,280)
    Noah9875zku7
    Daniel6925dre5
    William0617sqn0 (user #1,015,283: spammer)
    Daniel1085psu6
    William0840ybc9
    David2604csi7
    collinsrichard01 (user #1,015,287: spammer)


    And since our society is obsessed with numbers that end in a lot of zeros as milestones, here's a special shoutout to users:
    #1,015,000: PolaCt (already banned)
    #1,015,100: terinwa
    #1,015,200: Noah3051bdz0

    We've added 359 more users in the last 24 hours.  There's definitely been a recent increase in spammers in the last couple weeks.


    And for your Diary Rescue music pleasure, here's Kodaline's "All I Want".

  •  Say what?!?! (11+ / 0-)

    Maybe this was diaried before, but it's the first time I've read this:

    I.R.S. Gave Bonuses to Workers Owing Back Taxes

    It's really only one graf, so I'll just quote the first portion:

    The Internal Revenue Service has paid more than $2.8 million in bonuses to employees with recent disciplinary problems, including $1 million to workers who owed back taxes, a government investigator said Tuesday. More than 2,800 workers got bonuses despite facing a disciplinary action in the previous year, including 1,150 who owed back taxes, said a report by J. Russell George, the Treasury inspector general for tax administration.
    Do read the rest.

    sigh

    "Suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a member of Congress Chris Christie. But I repeat myself." ~ Mark Twain, (with a twist) ;o)

    by Terre on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 08:40:03 PM PDT

  •  The fair balance you share in your writing MB is (8+ / 0-)

    truly thing of beauty, & most appreciated. Thanks kindly for all years of efforts.

    The spice must flow, or sprinkled.if doing rub.

    by jwinIL14 on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 08:42:12 PM PDT

  •  MSNBC: Earth Day vs. climate deniers (10+ / 0-)

    Chris talked about climate change, Keystone XL, and just what the hell happened to the GOP on this topic, with Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-NY), Dan Dicker, Josh Fox, and Christine Todd Whitman.  Ed talked with Aldo Seone and Julia Trigg.

    Chris looked at the Supreme Court's ruling on affirmative action with Ted Shaw, Jelani Cobb, and Halley Potter.  Ari Melber, still filling in for Lawrence, talked with Geoffrey Stone and Sam Stein.

    Rachel looked at the recent attacks by the GOP on defense lawyers in general with Neal Katyal, and then had a special two-part interview with Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA).

    And in disturbing news, VICE's Simon Ostrovsky has been kidnapped by pro-Russian forces in eastern Ukraine, who didn't like his reporting.

    Chris also noted that Cliven Bundy's been lying about his ranch history.

    Ari also talked marijuana with Nia-Malika Henderson and Ryan Grim.  He discussed Bob Dole's response to Ted Cruz with ex-Rep. Steve LaTourette (R-OH) and Josh Barro.  He talked with Steve Clemons about the overall situation in Ukraine.  He had on Jessica Valenti to talk about the right-wing's latest disgusting attack on Chelsea Clinton's pregnancy.

    Ed covered the FL-19 special election to replace Trey Radel (R), and the huge amounts of money that were poured in to it, with Marc Caputo and Mitch Ceasar.  He updated us on the bad trade deal known as TPP with Lori Wallach.  Ed also mocked Pat Robertson for his latest ploy in saying Armageddon was upon us, and looked at the Michigan Senate race and how Terri Lynn Land (R) claims there's no "war on women" because she's a woman, talking with Terry O'Neill.

    •  Big strings of videos like that makes this page (5+ / 0-)

      load extra buttered popcorn slow for poor few of us stuck with Windows XP.

      The spice must flow, or sprinkled.if doing rub.

      by jwinIL14 on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 08:51:43 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I know, I know. (5+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        JML9999, nellgwen, jwinIL14, Lying eyes, begone

        I try to only embed videos of the key important stories of the day.  All of these seemed pretty important given what happened today.  The least important would be the Warren interview, but she's a true rock star here, so I'd be remiss if I didn't include them.  :-\

        •  Hey BK sincere no worries, not ragging on ya' pal. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          high uintas

          BIll Gates maybe? - lol
          Markos, in person, harped on me to abandon WinME so DK4 would work.
          Pretty good advice.

          The spice must flow, or sprinkled.if doing rub.

          by jwinIL14 on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 09:15:09 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  It does the same to me (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            jwinIL14

            but I want BK to be able to still share his choices. They are good ones.

            Some humans ain't human some people ain't kind. They lie through their teeth with their head up their behind. You open up their hearts and here's what you'll find - Some humans ain't human some people ain't kind. John Prine

            by high uintas on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 09:36:17 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  You're so right, and regret my slow load whine. (0+ / 0-)

              Lot's of effort sharing all that, & better response shoulda' been appreciation.

              The spice must flow, or sprinkled in a rub.

              by jwinIL14 on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 10:15:29 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  (non-snark - 'I stand corrected') ... humbly (0+ / 0-)

                The spice must flow, or sprinkled in a rub.

                by jwinIL14 on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 10:19:59 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  it's not your OS. (2+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  dinotrac, JeffW

                  i ran WinXP till last year? 2012 ? w/no loading issues.

                  you need a newer box, from a component builder.
                  and if you have one, single, valuable thing on your HD, you better upgrade soon.

                  hope you can manage to run Win7 -- newer i don't know but have heard gnashing aplenty.

                  TRAILHEAD of accountability for Bush-2 Crimes? -- Addington's Perpwalk.

                  by greenbird on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 11:18:54 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                •  You aren't correct, btw (0+ / 0-)

                  you are in the right, IMO.

                  Some humans ain't human some people ain't kind. They lie through their teeth with their head up their behind. You open up their hearts and here's what you'll find - Some humans ain't human some people ain't kind. John Prine

                  by high uintas on Wed Apr 23, 2014 at 07:16:19 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                •  Corrected!!!! (0+ / 0-)

                  I meant corrected!!! fuckme, damn.

                  Some humans ain't human some people ain't kind. They lie through their teeth with their head up their behind. You open up their hearts and here's what you'll find - Some humans ain't human some people ain't kind. John Prine

                  by high uintas on Wed Apr 23, 2014 at 07:17:21 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

              •  jwinIL14 (0+ / 0-)

                I wasn't in any way calling you a whiner, I know you appreciate it, I do too. But. I got locked out of the diary shortly after posting that because if my internet connection and the age of my 'puter.

                We have been here before with BK, he was admonished by MB for overdoing it and hogging the thread. He needs to respect people like us and find ways to share, that was what I was inelegantly trying to say.

                I suggested a way that he could do it, I hope he considers because people like us deserve to be able to open the Night Owl and have fun, too! hu

                Some humans ain't human some people ain't kind. They lie through their teeth with their head up their behind. You open up their hearts and here's what you'll find - Some humans ain't human some people ain't kind. John Prine

                by high uintas on Wed Apr 23, 2014 at 07:15:44 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

        •  BK (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Eric Nelson

          It has to take time to embed those videos, what about giving some background to highlight the links so that there aren't that many embeds?

          I'm trying to figure out a solution that is good for everyone.

          I'm thinking something along the lines of

          Senator Elizabeth Warren talked about her new book link right here today on Rachel's show.

          VICE's reporter Simon Ostrovsky is being Detained  in Ukraine.

          Bold indicating a link.

          People will click on links. I'm assuming that you are afraid people won't see them? You can draw attention to them in about the same time it takes to embed them all, IMO>

          Some humans ain't human some people ain't kind. They lie through their teeth with their head up their behind. You open up their hearts and here's what you'll find - Some humans ain't human some people ain't kind. John Prine

          by high uintas on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 09:35:29 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  I'm running XP, and it does (0+ / 0-)

        not load slow. Maybe some other problem?

        Only thing more infuriating than an ignorant man is one who tries to make others ignorant for his own gain. Crashing Vor

        by emmasnacker on Wed Apr 23, 2014 at 02:47:31 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Speaking of Bundy (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Aunt Pat, nellgwen, Jeff Y, high uintas

      Are you ready for BUNDYFEST!!

      A month long music festival, 24 hours a day for an entire month! Right across the highway from Bundy's ranch.

      I'm looking forward to it for sure.

      No War but Class War

      by AoT on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 08:59:13 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Happy Krauthammer Day! (5+ / 0-)

    :(

    Eleven years ago today, we got Krauthammered. Never forget.

    http://thinkprogress.org/...

    “I would like to get rid of the homophobes, sexists, and racists in our audience. I know they're out there and it really bothers me.” ― Kurt Cobain

    by Jeff Y on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 08:42:45 PM PDT

  •  I like this guy. (5+ / 0-)

    I subscribe to his channel.
    And yes he has a cat.
    The cat adopted him on Christmas Eve and Steve and his wife took him in and gave him breakfast.

    Well I'm just a tree, but if I were you I'd listen to your GHOST FRIEND! Howard-Big Bang Theory

    by nellgwen on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 08:43:19 PM PDT

  •  Earth Day: Sumatran Tigers (11+ / 0-)
    The Smithsonian National Zoo is marking Earth Day Tuesday with a unique effort promoting one of its most endangered—and most powerful—animals, enlisting the help of 400 “influencers” to raise public awareness about the 400 Sumatran tigers left in the wild.

    Alaskan indie-rock band Portugal the Man created a previously unreleased song titled “Sumatran Tiger,” which the zoo distributed on 400 custom polycarbonate records to 400 individuals across the country. The special records will degrade after a limited number of plays, putting the onus on the 400 recipients to digitize and “breed” the record if the song is to survive in the wild.

    Washingtonian.

    Song.

    Sumatran Tiger photo Unknown-5_zps176f4ec6.jpeg

    Be sure you put your feet in the right place; then stand firm. ~ Abraham Lincoln

    by noweasels on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 08:44:57 PM PDT

  •  It's Vastly More Mismatched Than She Thinks. (6+ / 0-)

    Our species and our traditional cultures brought us to the technological revolution because we and our systems evolved over a million years and more to be adaptable to both opportunity and deprivation, surplus and scarcity.

    Climate change is nothing more than scarcity, in this case the absence of waste capacity, and even that kind of scarcity is not unknown in human history.

    Both humans and our cultures are rich in rewards for restraint, for declining to act, which is an essential 50% of the motivations required to thrive in a variable world.

    Our problem today is that all our governing systems of the technological revolution have developed over the past thousand years in conditions almost exclusively of surplus, as new worlds unexploited by technological society were conquered and new means of further exploiting old worlds were developed.

    Now that we hit the scarcity of climate change, we're a thousand years beyond our memory and experience of how to cope with hard limits. Most important, none of our major systems, our advanced conceptions of rights and duties, nor our major societal forces is evolved for limitation.

    There is no way to prevent catastrophic collapse working within this system.

    And scientists: more than anyone on earth, this point needs to be grasped by YOU.

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 08:48:06 PM PDT

    •  A deep study and meditation on what we know of (3+ / 0-)

      self-sustaining island economies would be a good start as we re-envision an ecologically balanced urban presence.

      The labor of a human being is not a commodity or article of commerce. Clayton Act, Section 6.

      by Ignacio Magaloni on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 08:54:01 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Crap. Just typed out a long comment and got so (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Arfeeto, Words In Action

      depressed that I deleted it.

      Let's just say the basic theme:

      1.  Have to act decisively now
      2.  Ain't gonna happen
      3.  Wouldn't make things a whole lot better in our lifetimes if we did.

      Sigh.

      LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

      by dinotrac on Wed Apr 23, 2014 at 12:22:09 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Ironically, a surplus brought about by CC (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Words In Action
      Our problem today is that all our governing systems of the technological revolution have developed over the past thousand years in conditions almost exclusively of surplus
      Actually, the human race has thrived for the past 11,000 years, ever since the end of the Younger Dryas marked the end of the Ice Ages and the beginning of the "warm earth" cycle.
      Good example is a plant kept in a closet with no windows, getting watered maybe twice a month, then moved out into a temperate outside environment with plenty of sunlight, water and nutrients. Two completely different existences.
      So look at it this way: 11,000 years ago, climate change moved a sickly plant called humans out of a dark closet. Now, climate change is going to put it back into one.

      Ash-sha'b yurid isqat an-nizam!

      by fourthcornerman on Wed Apr 23, 2014 at 01:14:34 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Apparently Digby of Hulabaloo has won an award (11+ / 0-)

    The Twitt-o-sphere is a twitter.

    I want 1 less Tiny Coffin, Why Don't You? Support The President's Gun Violence Plan.

    by JML9999 on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 08:49:35 PM PDT

  •  Charred Earth Day here in Phoenix (11+ / 0-)

    Its already full summer here, with temps hovering at and over 100 for about 2 weeks, and no end in sight. Spring came and went already and doesn't seem to be coming back anytime soon - this heat doesn't usually kick in until late May/early June. We're going to be totally screwed by July.

    Here at Casa de Mandalay I already instructed my valet to ready my Olympic swimming pool so that I may cool off from the heat, and swim some laps;

    pooltime

     Ah the life of a 1%er!

    Rand Rick Ted Huck Scott / Republican power ON! / Five watt light bulb glows - haiku by Bill IPM

    by Fordmandalay on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 08:53:37 PM PDT

  •  Maybe old news NBC brought in a shrink to (8+ / 0-)

    analyze David Gregory's inner circle.

    http://digbysblog.blogspot.com/...

    Last year, the network undertook an unusual assessment of the 43-year-old journalist, commissioning a psychological consultant to interview his friends and even his wife. The idea, according to a network spokeswoman, Meghan Pianta, was “to get perspective and insight from people who know him best.” But the research project struck some at NBC as odd, given that Gregory has been employed there for nearly 20 years.

    I want 1 less Tiny Coffin, Why Don't You? Support The President's Gun Violence Plan.

    by JML9999 on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 08:55:53 PM PDT

  •  Voter suppression where you'd least expect it. (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Jeff Y, high uintas, marina, JeffW

    And this time, it hits close to home because it's here at UCLA.

    For the last seven years the undergraduate student government election voting period has run from Monday through Thursday of election week.

    But this year’s Undergraduate Students Association Council Election Board Chair Anthony Padilla opted to veer away from precedent. The new voting period would clip Monday out completely, instead running from just 9 a.m. Tuesday to 5 p.m. Thursday of sixth week.

    USAC already struggles with student engagement and voter turnout, and the Election Board should be focusing on what it can do to increase participation, not potentially detract from it.

    The shortened period is also arguably a violation of the Election Board’s own code. The governing document of the Election Board mandates that voting must span a minimum of “three full days.”

    Padilla interprets this to mean business days, but precedent indicates otherwise. Past Election Boards interpreted it as three full, 24-hour days, not business days.

    ....

    The reason for the change, according to Padilla, is to give students time on the Monday of election week to reflect on the information they’ve received about the candidates before voting.

    But with the Meet the Candidates event two weeks prior to the election, the student group endorsement hearing the week prior and the candidates’ debate the Saturday prior, students have plenty of time to digest information about the candidates and ballot initiatives before sixth week.

    Why keep all students from voting Monday for the sake of an unknowable number who might want more time to think about their decisions? Further, if students don’t feel ready to vote come Monday, it’s their prerogative to wait until they are. They have until Thursday of that week to do so.

    As far as I can tell, there's no monetary savings, as all voting is done online through a website only registered UCLA students can access.

    The undercurrent here is that every year there's allegations of voter fraud in the form of "block voting", when fraternities may or may not pressure their members to vote at the computer with their brothers standing behind them to ensure they vote for the slate the Greek system endorsed after their Monday group dinners.  Have these been proven?  No.  But I don't see how eliminating Monday voting would do anything to prevent that from happening.  There's no reason the same pressure (if it happens) couldn't be applied on Tuesday, Wednesday, etc.

  •  10 Years (The Unending Costs of War) (7+ / 0-)
    The wiry, dark-haired financial planner sitting across his office conference table has lugged around heart-tugging guilt for a decade. I am a good man. I am a God-fearing man who served and loves his country, wife and young daughters. But I, Steven Elliott, may have shot another man dead.

    Not just any man; an American sports star who evolved into a cultural icon.

    (snip)

    Ten years ago -- several minutes before 7 on the evening of April 22 – (Pat) Tillman, the square-jawed former NFL safety, was killed instantly by three bullets to the forehead. Sayed Farhad, an allied Afghan soldier standing 10 feet off Tillman's left shoulder, was killed by an initial burst of fire. Bryan O'Neal, a freshly minted Ranger curled up near a foot-high slab of rock in front of Tillman, somehow survived, later walking down a hill traumatized and covered in Tillman's warm blood.

    (snip)

    A decade later, the guilt and mental anguish from the most horrific of events resonate not just with Elliott and the shooters, but also with O'Neal, who stumbled away physically unscathed, yet tormented that a bright, pro athlete -- a perceived better man -- wasn't so lucky. Conflicts may forever linger over how events unfolded that April evening, but the gut-wrenching stories of the shooters, the survivors, and the Tillmans remain intertwined.

    Enduring Guilt ESPN
    Pat Tillman photo Unknown-18_zps89206fb4.jpeg

    Pat Tillman (November 6, 1976 – April 22, 2004)

    IGTNT Never Forgotten 10 Years April 2004
    Remembering also, Sayed Farhad

    Be sure you put your feet in the right place; then stand firm. ~ Abraham Lincoln

    by noweasels on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 08:57:49 PM PDT

  •  DJ Bri Wi covers Snoop Dogg (5+ / 0-)

    “I would like to get rid of the homophobes, sexists, and racists in our audience. I know they're out there and it really bothers me.” ― Kurt Cobain

    by Jeff Y on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 08:58:02 PM PDT

  •  MYNYPD Hashtag fail (5+ / 0-)

    I want 1 less Tiny Coffin, Why Don't You? Support The President's Gun Violence Plan.

    by JML9999 on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 08:59:47 PM PDT

  •  unregulated capitalism vs collective sphere.. (7+ / 0-)

    ..spot on.

    And explains the latest Koch bros. revival of the "collectivism" scare tactic that the Ayn Randians "objectivists" used before.

     Only it's complete bullshit from the right. The Petrochemical corporations are the most profitable in the history of the world.

    It is amazing to me what huge sums of money can do in the wrong hands, that people can actually argue that regulation is hurting their profits and is un-American and evil socialism and be believed.

    When what these extraction polluters are doing is akin to a crazy neighbor who tests a nuclear bomb next door; not only getting away with it, but has the republican half of the country (for the most part that is) believing them to be righteous. Even there are millions of 'canary in the coal mines' dying as the alarm going off

     Amazing and frightening when I think of it. Especially as this is happening to protect the polluters:

    It has meant that we are ruled by a class of politicians who know only how to dismantle and starve public institutions, just when they most need to be fortified and reimagined.
    Even Dems - TPP -  

    So yes we need to be fast, efficient and noisy with a place to stand - our public space to address out grievances

    Thx MB

    •  Justice Sotomayor exposes Roberts 'facile notion' (10+ / 0-)

      .. that:  

      “the way to stop discrimination on the basis of race is to stop discriminating on the basis of race”

      -    John Roberts | 2007

      Justice Sotomayor dissent:
      "The Constitution does not protect racial minorities from political defeat," she wrote. "But neither does it give the majority free rein to erect selective barriers against racial minorities." Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg joined the dissent.
      Justice Sotomayor gets down to business on Roberts and his BS:
      In a 6-2 ruling Justice Sotomayor dissent from the bench:
      “The stark reality is that race still matters. The way to stop discrimination on the basis of race is to speak openly and candidly on the subject of race, and to apply the constitution with eyes open to the unfortunate effects of centuries of racial discrimination..

      ..we ought not sit back and wish away, rather than confront, the racial inequality that exists in our society. It is this view that works harm, by perpetuating the facile notion that what makes race matter is acknowledging the simple truth that race does still matter.”

      Iow’s; merely acknowledging bias does not create it.

      Kudos to Justice Sonja Maria Sotomayor for taking apart this 7 year long “facile notion” that Roberts has gotten away with for far too long. Though this Michigan ruling is another in a string of bad rulings from Roberts, he will lose and his legacy – imo – will be marked by an almost glib arrogance and unconcern for people and their day to day realities.
       Roberts reasoning seems to be that these issues should be decided at the ballot box yet he previously gutted the protection of the Voting Rights Act making voting even more difficult for minorities to do just that in states controlled by republicans enacting Jim Crow voting laws. That is what will be remembered – his legacy

      NYT: Supreme Court Upholds Michigan Affirmative Action Ban

      WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court on Tuesday upheld a Michigan constitutional amendment that bans affirmative action in admissions to the states public universities, in a fractured decision that revealed deep divisions among the justices over what role the government should play in protecting racial and ethnic minorities.
      The 6-to-2 ruling effectively endorsed similar measures in seven other states and may encourage additional measures banning the use of race in admissions. States that forbid affirmative action in admissions decisions, like Texas, Florida and California, as well as Michigan, have seen a significant drop in the enrollment of black and Hispanic students in their most selective colleges and universities.
      How Minorities Have Fared in States With Affirmative Action Bans
       In states that have banned affirmative action in college admissions, prominent public universities have tended to enroll fewer black and Hispanic freshmen.

      •  Well, Gods forbid (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Greenfinches, Eric Nelson, JeffW

        that Roberts and his allies on the Court would look to developing a more just nation.

        "A more perfect union" seems to have escaped their comprehension, or maybe their definition of "perfect", like all of their legal interpretations, is outside of what we've commonly accepted to mean as "rational".

    •  Mistiming is a misnomer in this case, (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Eric Nelson, JeffW

      because it implies that environmental breakdown and the rise of our current social culture are coincidental.

      Our problem is that the climate crisis hatched in our laps at a moment in history when political and social conditions were uniquely hostile to a problem of this nature and magnitude—that moment being the tail end of the go-go ’80s, the blastoff point for the crusade to spread deregulated capitalism around the world.
      There were lots of environmental initiatives in the '70s, and they were popular with most Americans. The John Birch Society (Fred Koch, founding member) saw further regulations being a brake to their ability to run their companies as they saw fit. The meme of United Nations driven collectivism and concurrent "loss of freedom" was very much on the lips of the Birchers who were the type of people who financed Reagan's run for governor and then parlayed his success in California into a presidential campaign.
      The Right have turned us into the kind of country that is hostile to collective action by design, through careful marketing and lately through co-opting the education system. They knew their way of doing business would come under increasing scrutiny and chose to subvert that process through a soft, but genuine revolution.

      "The 'Middle' is a crowded place - that is where the effective power is - the extreme right and left might annoy governments, but the middle terrifies them." Johnny Linehan

      by northsylvania on Wed Apr 23, 2014 at 05:26:58 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yep: that so-called "conservative movement".. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        JeffW, northsylvania

        ..can be traced back to the '70's.
         The Powell memorandum marks a point in time when corporations were designing the blueprint to dominate democracy and there were environmentalists who were active at the time fighting back.

        My take is that, yes, while it is true that the Birchers, assaults on collective bargaining, pseudo conservatism masking corporate greed; the lot to them, were around as well as many environmentalists fighting back, Naomi Klein was targeting the Reagan era as a time when that blueprint became exponentially more real as Reagans popularity grew.

        This:

        The Right have turned us into the kind of country that is hostile to collective action by design, through careful marketing and lately through co-opting the education system. They knew their way of doing business would come under increasing scrutiny and chose to subvert that process through a soft, but genuine revolution.

         - emphasis

        .. nails it.
        It's what spawned the Powell memo and pretty much what it was about. A piece of propaganda couched as a warning to corporations that people are turning against the abuses of corporations and that corporations must organize. That organizing lead to an anti-communism - anti collectivism -anti union etc. meme. With reverberations of the "Red Scare" that Reagan incorporated into his Heritage Foundation, CATO Institute spawned  "Reagan Doctrine"

        Yes, big money had lots of irons in the fire going way back.

  •  Spring arrived pretty late this year, Naomi (0+ / 0-)
    Scientists are studying cases of climate-related mistiming among dozens of species, from Arctic terns to pied flycatchers. But there is one important species they are missing—us. Homo sapiens. We too are suffering from a terrible case of climate-related mistiming, albeit in a cultural-historical, rather than a biological, sense.
    What idiotic drivel.  Naomi evidently has too much time on her hands.

    But in only a few paragraphs she reveals her true nature:

    Confronting these various structural barriers to the next economy is the critical work of any serious climate movement.
    Ahh.. the "next economy"..  ever the hope of the hopeless..  We are never given the details of what this "next economy" should be, or how exactly it will work..  but it will, of course!, be better than capitalism.. post-capitalism, I believe is the vague term meaning.. not-this-evil-capitalistic-stuff.. but "something better"!

    Get back to me when you have a plan, Naomi..  a workable one.. and please supply some details.  Songbirds and caterpillars are waiting for the answer!

  •  I'm about half way finished ... (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat, JML9999, Jeff Y, marina, JeffW

    with building my Ark. I don't plan on bringing two of every kind aboard for the ride; just my dog, a couple of laying hens, and a duckbill platypus (anything that freaky deserves to live on).


    I envy people who are made of money. I've always wanted to take a ride inside of a vending machine.

    by glb3 on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 09:08:13 PM PDT

  •  This mistiming is built into he way we are (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    marina

    evolving.  When you look at the whole system, the notion that corporate power has become

    ascendant at the very moment when we needed to exert unprecedented controls over corporate behavior in order to protect life on earth. It has meant that regulation was a dirty word just when we needed those powers most. It has meant that we are ruled by a class of politicians who know only how to dismantle and starve public institutions, just when they most need to be fortified and reimagined. And it has meant that we are saddled with an apparatus of “free trade” deals that tie the hands of policy-makers just when they need maximum flexibility to achieve a massive energy transition.
     is the natural course of the capitalist system.  It is not sustainable and relies on growth.  It is fueled by technology and therefore science.   The science has been selected to feed it not to live in harmony with nature.  The religious notions of creation and the fall have made nature dirty and part of the fall.  It all works together and is self empowered.  It feeds on all we create with our minds and destroys anything that threatens it.  It is a complex, self organizing system of the worst kind.

    An idea is not responsible for who happens to be carrying it at the moment. It stands or falls on its own merits.

    by don mikulecky on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 09:09:03 PM PDT

  •  Dear Governor Daugaard, (7+ / 0-)

    Hey I've been having an uncomfortable twinge and also an uncomfortable pressure under my right ribcage for about a month now. I am left uninsured because you refuse to expand medicaid. I went to my doctor, Dr. Google Search and came up with a couple of possibilities....liver cancer or gallbladder problems. Can I come to your house and have you help me with my diagnosis and possibly some kind of medical procedure. I'd hurry up and die quickly, but then my children would be parentless, since my husband died quickly on the side of the road this past summer.  thanks.

  •  Just watched the PBS show "A Fierce Green Fire" (6+ / 0-)

    about the history of the modern environmental movement. I thought it odd they never explained the program's title. It's from Aldo Leopold, of course, and there's another documentary with a similar title about him: Green Fire.

    I was happy to see McKibben and Vandana Shiva in the PBS show, as well as the focus on environmental justice. I sometimes teach McKibben's The End of Nature, and students invariably say something like, "You mean this guy was saying this in 1989?!" Then I assign a chapter from George Perkins Marsh's Man and Nature, from 1864. Yeah, we've known for a long time.

    stay together / learn the flowers / go light - Gary Snyder

    by Mother Mags on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 09:13:01 PM PDT

  •  Earth Day: Mule Deer (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JML9999, Eric Nelson, marina, eeff

    Please read ban nock's terrific diary about the only recently discovered migration of Mule Deer.

    Terrific video included!

    Thank you, ban nock!

    Be sure you put your feet in the right place; then stand firm. ~ Abraham Lincoln

    by noweasels on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 09:18:22 PM PDT

  •  . how to comment . (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Eric Nelson, nellgwen, dinotrac, marina

    The townsfolk believed the mosque was safe.

    ... "Piles and piles" of bodies were left behind after the shootings, said Toby Lanzer, the top U.N. aid official in South Sudan. Many were in the mosque. Others were in the hospital. Still more littered the streets. The violence appears to have been incited in part by calls on the radio for revenge attacks, including rapes.

    The attack, which targeted members of certain ethnic groups, was a disturbing echo of what happened two decades ago in another country in eastern Africa: Rwanda is marking the 20th anniversary this month of a genocide that [snip] also saw orders to kill broadcast over the radio ...

    TRAILHEAD of accountability for Bush-2 Crimes? -- Addington's Perpwalk.

    by greenbird on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 09:36:34 PM PDT

  •  who can take this meaty lateral pass ? (0+ / 0-)

    because it's way over my pay grade.

    and i'd like it to get sharp, smart eyes. lots of 'em.

    TRAILHEAD of accountability for Bush-2 Crimes? -- Addington's Perpwalk.

    by greenbird on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 10:00:53 PM PDT

  •  "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance" (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW, nellgwen

    No, it's not OT...for the news of the week, believe it or not...

    Jimmy Stewart sees a fresh unpublished copy of tomorrow's headlines in the Western town. It reads:

    "Cattlemen Fight Statehood"

    Bundy is STILL fighting it. Couldn't believe my eyes.

    "I feel a lot safer already."--Emil Sitka

    by DaddyO on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 10:01:19 PM PDT

    •  Just OT--why the "gate"? (0+ / 0-)

      Why does every scandal nowadays have to end in "gate"? Are we not inventive enough to think of new pejoratives?

      Watergate was its own scandal. Let's think of new semantics that really capture the crimes involved.

  •  climate change views among business leaders (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    marina

    http://www.economistinsights.com/...

    Emerging economies are particularly vulnerable to climate change, a point highlighted in the IPCC report. This may explain why, in our survey, emerging-market business leaders (from Africa, Asia, the Middle East and Latin America) are far more insistent on action to combat climate change than their peers in Europe and North America. The degree of divergence between rich and developing-world attitudes is striking, and suggests a significant degree of scepticism remains among developed-world businesses that climate change is a priority global issue.

    I'm a Vietnam Era vet. I'm also an Erma Bombeck Era vet. When cussing me out and calling me names please indicate which vet you would like to respond to your world changing thoughts.

    by Just Bob on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 10:51:56 PM PDT

  •  * ? could it be TRUE ? * (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    nellgwen

    that if i post this charming bit of sadness here, it will be virtually ignored? ah, but at least i will have made a comment url to copy and link back to, whenever i feel the need, because of melancholy, innit.

    it's not very long, and is quite nice. i don't remember how i got it ... whoever may be responsible, please self-identify, and accept my gentle sober thanks.

    soon it will be "that day" again.
    i surely hope this gets at least one view.
    (i'm not concerned with any comments.)

    TRAILHEAD of accountability for Bush-2 Crimes? -- Addington's Perpwalk.

    by greenbird on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 11:05:34 PM PDT

  •  Klein's silver lining (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    marina, JeffW
    The good news is that, unlike reindeer and songbirds, we humans are blessed with the capacity for advanced reasoning and therefore the ability to adapt more deliberately—to change old patterns of behavior with remarkable speed.
    Here's the problem. We didn't use our advanced reasoning when we hunted out most of the big game by 10,000 years ago. More recently, we didn't use our advanced reasoning to protect groundwater resources on which we base much of our agriculture in drier areas. India has 130 million rural residents that basically have to hope for rain or surface water at this point, as they've drained the resource. In California's Central valley the rate of groundwater depletion is currently around 10 cubic kilometers a year. Unless we use our ability to quantify our greed and stupidity, we're fucked.
  •  inter-generational planetary time bomb (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    marina, JeffW

    don't blame me- I protested bush and cheney and I was shamed into recycling a few years ago by my daughter.

    I don't own guns and I don't vote republican now get off my lawn and let me cower behind sitcoms and junk food.

    My wife's lowered the thermostat...I pay taxes to the police state...I ride the metro now get off my lawn.

    I voted for "change" twice...isn't that good enough? I silently winced when they cracked down on that Occupy stuff...I'm willing to legalize pot...

    I don't question global warming...I marched to prosecute war criminals...I contributed to Snowden's defense fund...

    I gave up my clearance and got a job outside of the military industrial complex...I've coached my kids on the dire times in front of us...I've tightened my belt...I've weaned myself from cable news....

    what else do you guys want from me and my ilk?

  •  Our Last Lunch (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW

    A really nicely done diary just went onto the Community Spotlight called, Our Last Lunch

    Check it out - it's quite good

    Il est dangereux d’avoir raison dans des choses où des hommes accrédités ont tort. - Voltaire
    Don't trust anyone over 84414 - BentLiberal

    by BentLiberal on Tue Apr 22, 2014 at 11:53:32 PM PDT

  •  How to fight back: Spain 2014 (0+ / 0-)

    17-minute video:

    Pay no attention to the upward redistribution of wealth!

    by ActivistGuy on Wed Apr 23, 2014 at 12:00:25 AM PDT

  •  Rising Star of Florida GOP busted for DUI (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    marina, JeffW
    Rep. Dane Eagle, 30, was caught driving erratically and speeding in Tallahassee, Florida, early Monday morning.
    The arresting officer reported that Eagle smelled of alcohol and stumbled, but lawmaker insisted he was 'good to get home'. Arresting officer said he smelled alcohol on Eagle's breath and his eyes were bloodshot, but the state representative denied drinking.

    Rep. Eagle sponsored a bill last month requiring all public officers to undergo mandatory drug tests.

    Greg Eagle, lawmaker's father, pleaded guilty last year to fraud charges

    A typical Republican Florida family. Dad commits fraud and son is a boozer that wants mandatory drug tests.

    Source for more...

    "We are a Plutocracy, we ought to face it. We need, desperately, to find new ways to hear independent voices & points of view" Ramsey Clark, U.S. Attorney General.

    by Mr SeeMore on Wed Apr 23, 2014 at 01:13:45 AM PDT

  •  I hope Cornyn pays well (0+ / 0-)

    I love seeing his ads here, bravely telling us he fights voter fraud in Texas, and he is for concealed carry..........

    Can't imagine that he will get many votes from DK readers, even RKBA, but his money is still good!  May he continue to waste it!

  •  RE: Naomi Klein (0+ / 0-)

    This very bad timing are, IMO, the kind of events that trigger evolution. And there is some science that supports that thought.

    Some WILL survive...but by reducing the population of those of us who roam our Mother's surface, She may be able to rest and recover from our parasitic ways.

    And the strongest, most adaptable and intelligent of each species will survive. Those who cannot change, will not continue. It is Mother's way.

    And no, I DO NOT think Humankind will become extinct...we are adaptable and smart. Some of us will learn once more how to live WITH our Mother and all of Her Children.

    "Growth for the sake of growth is the ideology of the cancer cell." ~ Edward Abbey

    by SaraBeth on Wed Apr 23, 2014 at 04:05:18 AM PDT

  •  This is a very speciest comment (0+ / 0-)

    The good news is that, unlike reindeer and songbirds, we humans are blessed with the capacity for advanced reasoning and therefore the ability to adapt more deliberately

    Songbirds and reindeer can do advanced reasoning just fine, what they lack (similar to cats) is opposable thumbs.

    •  I'm experiencing this "mistiming" too (0+ / 0-)

      Spring came so late to my part of western PA, that the golf courses are a month behind where they ought to be in mid April.  By this time most years, the aeration is done, the greens are rolling fast and smooth, and the weather is short sleeves.

      Alas, the course just turned green last week.  It's 45 degrees today.  Aeration holes will be visible in May, and you can't make a putt over 4 feet without a little luck.  And don't even get me started on the wind and rain.

      This climate change thing sucks!

  •  democracy stopped working (0+ / 0-)
    Our problem is that the climate crisis hatched in our laps at a moment in history when political and social conditions were uniquely hostile to a problem of this nature and magnitude—that moment being the tail end of the go-go ’80s, the blastoff point for the crusade to spread deregulated capitalism around the world. Climate change is a collective problem demanding collective action the likes of which humanity has never actually accomplished. Yet it entered mainstream consciousness in the midst of an ideological war being waged on the very idea of the collective sphere.
    the deregulation and corporatism and lack of legislated adjustments are problem of not having a healthy democracy.

    the talk radio monopoly, the most effective tool the right has used to flame the ideological war and short circuit democratic feedback mechanism necessary to debate and solve real problems has gone largely unchallenged the last 25 years.

    This is a list of 76 universities for Rush Limbaugh that endorse global warming denial, racism, sexism, and GOP lies by broadcasting sports on over 170 Limbaugh radio stations.

    by certainot on Wed Apr 23, 2014 at 06:04:00 AM PDT

  •  She's right, but she's whistling in the wind. (0+ / 0-)

    Ms. Klein is indisputably correct in her assertion that the climate crises is occurring at precisely the wrong time in human development.  One would hope that her  compelling message would awaken all to the looming catastrophe of global warming.  Yet it will not.  The most powerful forces on earth—ignorance and greed—will ensure that we, the current human inhabitants, will fail to meaningfully amend our ways and address the eventuality of our own extinction.  We will fail to reduce—even slow—the growth of corporate power and overreach.  We will fail to increase regulation over industry.  We will fail to elect political representatives whose concern extends beyond their own enrichment.  In short, we will fail ourselves.

  •  Best hope for earth/humankind is (0+ / 0-)

    a global pandemic that "culls the herd" of humanity by, say, 1/3, thereby drastically reducing resource demand.
    Turning up the heat a few more degrees might be just the kick needed to get the party started.

    •  Yeah, but who gets culled? (0+ / 0-)

      If this were to happen now, the culling would be mostly in Africa, South America, Southeast Asia, and the northern poor.  In other words, black, brown, and yellow people would make up your 1/3.

      That may not bother some, but it's worth considering.  The Powers that Be couldn't care less about global warming or climate change, because it isn't going to occur like that movie "the Day After Tomorrow".  It's going to be slow and gradual, and imminently survivable if you've got a little money.  In other words, none of the Powers that Be are in any danger, so go ahead and let climate change do that culling.

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