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White adults are the single largest racial or ethnic group in #ACA coverage gap in the South http://t.co/... http://t.co/...
@KaiserFamFound
Erik Wemple:
As we wrote in this space yesterday, those [Cliven Bundy] comments placed [Sean] Hannity in a bind, considering that he’d used his program to popularize Bundy’s fight against the Bureau of Land Management over his tendency to allow his cattle to graze on public lands. According to the feds, Bundy owes about $1 million in grazing fees and penalties and the like. No stranger to outrage, Hannity deployed a little bit of it in responding to Bundy’s musings about the conditions of the “Negro”: “All right, allow me to make myself abundantly clear. I believe those comments are downright racist. They are repugnant. They are bigoted. And it’s beyond disturbing. I find those comments to be deplorable, and I think it’s extremely unfortunate that Cliven Bundy holds those views.”

A good start. The next logical move would have been to repudiate his own coverage of Bundy. But that was too far a walk for Hannity.

Roll Call:
A bipartisan overhaul of immigration, considered dead in the water just a few weeks ago, is not only alive, according to the House Republican leading efforts to broker a deal — it’s gaining steam.

Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart, R-Fla., told CQ Roll Call that pro-rewrite calls earlier this week from two Illinois Republicans, Reps. Adam Kinzinger and Aaron Schock, recent comments from Speaker John A. Boehner, combined with a rash of immigration rallies and protests across the nation in recent days, are indications that momentum has shifted back to those hoping to implement an overhaul of the nation’s immigration laws this year.

Diaz-Balart, a major player in ongoing efforts to produce a bill that could balance Republican demands for border security with Democratic calls for legal status for the undocumented, said a solution is closer than ever.

“I think we finally have the policy right,” he said in a phone interview. “I think we have figured out a way to secure, to have border and interior security, holding the administration accountable for the enforcement … forcing the administration to enforce the law whether they want to or not. And I think we figured out a way to deal with the folks that are here in a way that is fair — fair, by the way, to those in the legal system … who are doing everything legally, and also deals with the folks that are here in a way that is fair and reasonable. And adheres, strictly adheres, to the rule of law.

“So I think we finally have the policy right. And what we’re finding is more and more people out there as they’re seeing it, different aspects of the policy, are starting to say, ‘Hey, that is something that makes sense.’”

Diaz-Balart said he thinks they’re close to a deal that can pass both chambers.

More politics and policy below the fold.

Rep. Michael Grimm is expected to be indicted by the U.S. attorney in New York, per @politico
@gzornick
Attorney for Rep Grimm, who threatened to break reporter "in half like a boy," accuses govt of "strong arm tactics". http://t.co/...
@JohnJHarwood
Obama won #NY11 by 52 - 47 (guessing some people are curious right now) h/t @DKElections http://t.co/...
@aaron_strauss
APHA:
Even though millions of Americans are joining the ranks of the insured and gaining access to affordable health care, access to oral health care is still expected to lag, especially among adults. Under the health reform law, pediatric dental coverage is considered an essential benefit that must be offered within the state and federal health insurance marketplaces. However, adult dental coverage is not an essential benefit. And depending on the state, pediatric coverage could be a mixed bag as well.
Adrianna McIntyre:
What dental care can teach us about coverage expansions

A simple prediction about the Affordable Care Act’s impact on health care access might go something like this: we have too few primary care providers and expanding coverage is going to cause a spike in demand that those providers can’t meet. Doctors will either refuse to see Medicaid patients or will do so at the expense of the privately insured, who will see longer wait times. Ergo facto, access will suffer. The outlook is bleak.

Well, maybe. But a new NBER working paper from Tom Buchmueller, Sarah Miller, and Marko Vujicic serves as an important reminder: supply-side effects matter, too. That is, providers can change the way they practice to accommodate new demand, but the studies on provider behavior are much scarcer than demand-side (patient behavior) literature.

Sean Trende:
At the end of the day, “Bridgegate” is a bad fact for [Chris] Christie. It will certainly feature in 30-second ads.  It also effectively sucks up all of the governor’s “free time,” freezing his campaign in place and preventing him from laying the sort of groundwork that Rand Paul and Jeb Bush are putting in place.

But these are really just two of many problems, ranging from his relative liberalism on some key issues to his weight to his “Jersey” demeanor, which really will matter somewhat in the Midwest. But no candidate comes to an election with a perfect resume -- certainly not Bill Clinton, certainly not George W. Bush, and certainly not Barack Obama (if I’d said in early 2006 that John McCain would be the GOP nominee and Obama the Democratic one, most analysts would have predicted a GOP win).

Medicaid expansion + Common Core + reduced "electability" make Christie longshot even if Bridgegate abates. http://t.co/...
@ed_kilgore
Jonathan Cohn:
Here’s a sign that the politics of Obamacare are changing: The president is using the law to troll his political adversaries.

Last week, when Obama announced that signups for open enrollment had exceeded 8 million, he declared, “the repeal debate is and should be over. The ACA is working and I know the same people don’t want us spending the next two-and-a-half years fighting the settled political debates of the last five years.” Republicans and their allies were apoplectic. Sean Spicer, spokesman for the Republican National Committee, promised that Obamacare “is still the number one, number two and number three issue going into this election.” It's the same way they reacted the last time Obama said something similar—in early April, when signups climbed past 7 million. “No way, Mr. President,” Bill Kristol responded in the Weekly Standard. “We do not accept, we do not acquiesce in, this deplorable piece of legislation. The debate is not over.”

In one sense, Obama is quite obviously correct. Repealing the Affordable Care Act is no longer a viable political option. Too many people already count on it for insurance. Too many people now expect that insurers will sell them coverage, no matter what their pre-existing conditions, and rely on federal subsidies to offset the cost. Even House Speaker John Boehner just admitted the cause was futile—although it remains to be seen whether he’ll walk away from those remarks, as he quickly did after making similar statements following the 2012 presidential election.

But there is also a sense in which Obama is wrong and the conservatives are right. For all of the hyperbole about plan cancellations and rate shock, there are plenty of people who really are paying higher premiums — or had to relinquish coverage they liked. Some new problems with the law will come up, even as the old ones fade away. This is the single most important piece of legislation in a generation—and the fundamental questions, about priorities and the proper role of government, are timeless. Of course the debate will continue. It should.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Charles M. Blow responds to Cliven Bundy (16+ / 0-)

    I examine his must-read NY Times column in this post which I invite you to read

    "Don't ask what the world needs. Ask what makes you come alive and go do it, because what the world needs is more people who have come alive." - Howard Thurman

    by teacherken on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 04:37:21 AM PDT

    •  The Right Wing's Favorite Taker. (11+ / 0-)

      Picture this scenario: The tenant in a furnished apartment is caught jumping on the sofa by the landlord downstairs, so the landlord orders the tenant to stop abusing the furniture. The tenant stops paying rent, so the landlord tries to evict the tenant.

      Would the crowd that applauds Bundy feel the same way about this tenant? If they had bothered to look at this situation, they would have seen him as a freeloader--a "taker" in their parlance. If they were consistent when they formed their first impression, they would not be backpedaling when he committed the sin of being Too Obvious when he started spouting off about his racist ideology.

      Freedom's just another word for not enough to eat. --Paul Krugman's characterization of conservative attitudes.

      by Judge Moonbox on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 06:04:57 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I still contend that "this" year... (12+ / 0-)

    ...means the Lame Duck session.

    The Establishment cannot afford to deflate enthusiasm with a very large segment of their base voters by "surrendering" and agreeing to "amnesty" before November.

    Change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability, but comes through continuous struggle. --Martin Luther King Jr.

    by Egalitare on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 04:41:55 AM PDT

    •  First we secure the border(s) by building a moat (6+ / 0-)

      and filling it with alligators....with frikkin lasers!

      •  $40 billion and a 20,000 man new 'army' (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        skillet, tb mare

        Are the last figures I remember from the immigration 'deal', demanded by the fiscally responsible, small government Republicans. How does the anti-government, anti-spending fervor whipped up by FOX deal with that?

        Rand Rick Ted Huck Scott / Republican power ON! / Five watt light bulb glows - haiku by Bill IPM

        by Fordmandalay on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 06:18:33 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Two part answer: a) they don't care and (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Fordmandalay, thomask, Sparky McGruff

          b) we are already spending ridiculously too much on southern border security to prevent brown skinned people come here and work hard.

          This, like every other issue we wring our hands about, has nothing to do with rationality and everything to do with lizard-brain rejection of the unfamiliar.

          We were in southern Arizona last year and these gigantic iron fences are staggeringly enormous constructions that boggle the mind. The huge f***ing fleets of SUV's sitting in immigration/border patrols parking lots (you can't really get close) is amazing. Hundreds or thousands are parked waiting for deployment with well-paid officers, one presumes. Amazing waste that they nominally should deplore.

          Republicans and conservatives just don't care.

          What stronger breast-plate than a heart untainted! Thrice is he arm'd, that hath his quarrel just; And he but naked, though lock'd up in steel, Whose conscience with injustice is corrupted. Henry VI Part II Act 3 Scene 2

          by TerryDarc on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 08:32:53 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  true but what can change that calculation? (6+ / 0-)

      1. realization that this year is easier than next year
      2. realization it screws them in too many states for future prez runs
      3. Prez candidates like Jeb or Christie asking for it (for their own needs)

      "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

      by Greg Dworkin on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 04:50:34 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  None of those considerations show up on Mark (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        bufffan20, Aunt Pat

        Levin's radar.

        •  Levin is a "leftist Republican" now, (7+ / 0-)

          didn't you know?
          A comment at World Nut Daily's column on Allen West commenting on Bundy's "not racist!!" remarks:

          I'm praying THE PEOPLE stick with him. THAT is the key. Leftist republicans Hannity, Beck, Oreilly, Levin, etc, WERE NEVER WITH HIM, as they support UNCONSTITUTIONAL Central Government (BIG FED), and Bundy supports State sovereignty by Constitutional definition. That's why you NEVER hear the Clearchannel/FOX guys talk about State nullification. These Bundy comments are the PERFECT EXCUSE for those guys to walk away from him, and CLAIM it was for "racist" comments (and not the REAL REASON - his demands for State sovereignty).
          I love the "state sovereignty by Constitutional definition".
          The Supremacy Clause is the provision in Article Six, Clause 2 of the U.S. Constitution that establishes the U.S. Constitution, federal statutes, and U.S. treaties as "the supreme law of the land". It provides that these are the highest form of law in the U.S. legal system, and mandates that all state judges must follow federal law when a conflict arises between federal law and either the state constitution or state law of any state.

          Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

          by skohayes on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 05:02:46 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Hoping they ask Bundy about Obamacare (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            skohayes, offgrid

            That should seal the deal. Get that old fart to blathering about takers, moochers, Negroes, sheriff's supremacy, federal government doesn't exist, blablabla...

            Bundy has done us a service by being a deadbeat and BLM officials did just the right thing by stepping back. Well done, gentlemen and gentleladies!

            What stronger breast-plate than a heart untainted! Thrice is he arm'd, that hath his quarrel just; And he but naked, though lock'd up in steel, Whose conscience with injustice is corrupted. Henry VI Part II Act 3 Scene 2

            by TerryDarc on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 08:36:30 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  I'm sure that was seriously considered... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ratcityreprobate

        ...before Primary/nomination season started for this election cycle. IMHO the "early window of opportunity" closed back in February.

        Change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability, but comes through continuous struggle. --Martin Luther King Jr.

        by Egalitare on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 05:10:55 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  4. Filing deadlines have passed (0+ / 0-)

        so House candidates no longer have to worry about a challenge from the right.

    •  Or rather (0+ / 0-)

      theyre waiting til after the election to give everyone the finger yet again who believes in 'reasonable' Republicans.
      Not to woo Hispanics but to suppress their turnout for Dems in Nov by not pissing them off yet again until after the exection.
      Nothing will get accomplished on immigration reform. Nothing.
      Just a lot of pols lying their asses off on TV.

    •  Very narrow window. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      cocinero

      The way that could happen would be if in June-July, after the primary filing date is over, Boehner would secretly get a majority of Republicans to sign off on to some immigration plan. They would then get some Democrats like Gutierrez on board, and release their legalization/amnesty bills, pushing them through the House Judiciary Committee the same week and bringing them to the floor right after that. They don't want to release bills now because opposition would build up quickly, and GOP supporters could get primary challengers, like Renee Ellmers who is getting primaried for expressing support for immigration (primary date May 6).

      If they don't do it this year, they have the lame duck left (complicated enough if Louisiana/Maine hold up Senate control) or next year, when the Republican primary season would be in full swing (and a conservative candidate would push the entire field to the right). The other issue would be Chuck Grassley as Judiciary Committee Chairman, which would make any reform very difficult (Grassley, along with Sessions, is hostile to any immigration, legal and illegal alike).

      It will still be difficult to get immigration reform done this year. Getting it through would require House leadership to find majority Republican support for bills that would include legalization. At the same time, the bills would need to go far enough to get significant Democratic support in the House and Senate alike. Both requirements would be very hard to meet in a polarized, dysfunctional Congress.

    •  It works both ways though. Failure to pass reform (0+ / 0-)

      ...again also fires up our base-or should. It might also help registration efforts like the one here in Texas.

      The politicians may be bought, and the system corrupt, but it is our duty to fix these things.

      by sebastianguy99 on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 10:30:01 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Politics over Principle....sometimes happens when (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    a2nite, skohayes, Stude Dude

    you want to get elected to a political office....

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/...

    •  Oops. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      skillet, Stude Dude

      Bad move, Senator.
      On the other hand, I'm encouraged that the right wants someone standing up there in front of the American public and telling them you want to ban abortion, and repeal Row v. Wade if you become president.

      Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

      by skohayes on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 05:07:32 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  another from Jonathan Cohn (6+ / 0-)

    http://www.newrepublic.com/...

    Maybe Those Obamacare Plan Cancellations Weren't As Bad As You've Heard

    "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

    by Greg Dworkin on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 04:51:32 AM PDT

    •  Excellent Article (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Stude Dude, TerryDarc

      But way too complex of a concept for FOX viewers to absorb, so don't count on Barrasso et al to change their disingenuous pitch on "lost policies due to Obamacare".

      "One of the more serious temptations which stifles boldness and zeal is a defeatism which turns us into querulous and disillusioned pessimists, sourpusses." ― Pope Francis

      by GoodGod on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 05:04:17 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Grimm (R-NY) believes in climate change (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Stude Dude, skillet

    A week before being indicted for campaign finance fraud, but a crack in the armor, nonetheless.

    MICHAEL GRIMM: After speaking with Bob Inglis, it made me do some of my own research, you know, I looked at some of the stuff that he sent over, my staff looked at. But the mass majority of respected scientists say that it’s conclusive, the evidence is clear. So I don't think the jury is out.
    CHRIS HAYES: The basic story of -- we’re putting carbon in the atmosphere, the planet’s getting warmer, that’s gonna make the sea levels rise -- like, the basic story of that, you pretty much agree with, right?
    MICHAEL GRIMM: Sure, I mean there’s no question that, um, you know, the oceans have risen, right? And the climate change part is, is a real part of it. The problem that we're gonna have right now -- there's no oxygen left in the room in Washington for another big debate, that’s the reality.
    Grimm's comments to Hayes come just four years after he said at a candidate debate that "the jury is obviously still out" in response to a question about whether he believed climate change is "real."
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/...

    Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

    by skohayes on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 05:09:55 AM PDT

  •  Still, it would be nice to have more discussion (5+ / 0-)

    about the high rate of unemployment in minority communities. What the hell are we doing about that?

    We're fools whether we dance or not, so we might as well dance.

    by PowWowPollock on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 05:10:28 AM PDT

  •  Boehner is drinking again (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skillet, a2nite, tobendaro, Patango
    Boehner to Dems: 'Where are the jobs?'
    So imagine what we could do if the powers-that-be in Washington changed course?
    http://thehill.com/...

    Imagine if the president was a Teabagger and did everything we told him to do?

    Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

    by skohayes on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 05:18:57 AM PDT

  •  . (14+ / 0-)

    Be the change you want to see in the world. -Gandhi

    by DRo on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 05:28:23 AM PDT

    •  LOL, good one! n/t (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      skillet, DRo, Aunt Pat, I love OCD

      Your beliefs don't make you a better person. Your behavior does.

      by skohayes on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 05:29:56 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Schizophrenia in the defense of wacko ideology is (5+ / 0-)

      no vice! It is as natural to the wacko as rooting in garbage is to a hog. It is what they do.

      Milbank in "Bundy saga reveals the risk of cozying up to extremists" probably has it nailed down fairly tightly:

      The anti-government strain of thought that Bundy advanced has been intertwined with racist and anti-Semitic views over several decades. Not all people who resist the authority of the federal government are motivated by race, of course, and not all racists are anti-government. But there is a long symbiosis between the two.
      and
      In general terms, Bundy’s notion of state supremacy — “I don’t recognize the United States government as even existing” — is a variant of states’-rights claims that go back to the Civil War and were revived in the segregationists’ opposition to civil rights laws. Because the federal government has been the protector of minority rights, states’ rights have long been used to justify discrimination.

      Specifically, the Southern Poverty Law Center, which tracks anti-government and hate groups, says that Bundy’s sentiments align closely with those of the “Posse Comitatus” movement, founded by William Potter Gale in the 1970s. That movement based its anti-tax position — and its belief in the primacy of county and state authority over the federal government — on a belief that the levers of national power were controlled by Jewish bankers. “Most of the ideas that bolster positions like Cliven’s that the federal government doesn’t exist come from Posse Comitatus ideology,” the SPLC’s Ryan Lenz argues. And that ideology is rooted in bigotry.

      Indeed, "Not all people who resist the authority of the federal government are motivated by race, of course, and not all racists are anti-government" but if your are looking for shit a good place to look is in the privy pit.

      The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

      by pelagicray on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 06:06:08 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Rachel did a nice piece on Bundy (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        red moon dog, pelagicray, oslyn7

        Showing the birth in 1878 and continued life of the posse comitatus/states rights movement in the US. Bundy fit right in down to accepting only the sheriff's authority.

        Then she derided Hannity's acceptance of Bundy part 1 (evil fed. govt. trying to steal my land and harm my livelihood) but then being surprised by the racist nature of Bundy part 2. It's what they've always been and what the PC's supporters have always done: racism is part and parcel with the PC.

        What stronger breast-plate than a heart untainted! Thrice is he arm'd, that hath his quarrel just; And he but naked, though lock'd up in steel, Whose conscience with injustice is corrupted. Henry VI Part II Act 3 Scene 2

        by TerryDarc on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 08:49:05 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Race is the point of origin (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        pelagicray

        in nearly all opposition to progressive ideas.  It may wax or wane as the primary motivator, but it is always present.  It has driven the debate since we were a colony, and it drives much of the debate today.

        Until we face and address the fact, it is always about race.

  •  Boner can stop whining & do his job or just (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat

    stop whining.

    He's a such a big crybaby.

    nosotros no somos estúpidos

    by a2nite on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 05:29:10 AM PDT

  •  Doktor Dworkin...I gotta ask...do you prescribe (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skohayes, DRo, Aunt Pat, TerryDarc

    neck pine tar for your patients?.....If that pitcher had a note from his doktor.....nt

    ;-)

  •  I don't believe immigration reform happens (5+ / 0-)

    House Republicans will never vote for a bill that offers "illegals" amnesty. (And without real amnesty for millions it's not addressing the problem.)

    If what he is saying is remotely true, this "immigration reform" bill will be a Frankenstein monster that accomplishes nothing but waste and terror amongst America's Latino population.

    forcing the administration to enforce the law whether they want to or not
    I don't think such a thing would pass the Senate, but they passed the Patriot Act so, you know, it's hard to set the stupid-bar low enough.

    I think we've seen this game before (last year, in fact). The lobbyists talk about a secret bill that no one has seen because it doesn't exist, yet.

    To the Republicans they talk in generalities about enforcement and beefing up armaments. To the Democrats they talk in generalities about amnesty, easing restrictions and keeping families together. And they think they'll smash those two conflicting ideals together like an atom bomb.

    As soon as it goes from being vague ideas whispered in back rooms to words on a page, it dies the death of Caesar.

  •  "...even if Bridgegate abates." (5+ / 0-)

    It won't. Like the original "gate," it has become a convenient verbal bucket in which to toss any new revelation of vindictiveness and abuse of power by the chief exec.

    It's all "Bridgegate" now. And it's here to stay.

    I live under the bridge to the 21st Century.

    by Crashing Vor on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 05:45:07 AM PDT

  •  Think they are dreaming. Unless the Great Orange (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skillet, TerryDarc

    One introduces the bill without a majority of Republicans supporting it I just don't see it happening.

  •  Bundy (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aunt Pat

    Often, the problem with a poorly behaved school child is the teacher who doesn't know the right reaction.  In this case, the Obama administration should have gone to a judge to "freeze" Bundy's assets for payments due.  It's all about the money, react appropriately.

    Actions speak louder than petitions.

    by melvynny on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 05:56:31 AM PDT

    •  You will probably find Bundy is not quite that (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      a2nite

      dumb and follows a lot of the right wing nutters in keeping his assets out of "institutional" systems that can be easily frozen. These are modern versions of the "don't trust gobermint or damn banks" under the mattress types.

      My guess is his assets are pretty much in line with Islamic terrorists, hidden, moving in unorthodox ways. My opinion is that they and he should be treated in exactly the same way.

      The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

      by pelagicray on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 06:20:48 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  save face (0+ / 0-)

        I don't agree with your take, but, even if true, he is a businessman, he does get paid through legal channels, he can be punished this way.  Also, Obama wouldn't look like a loser to this loser.

        Actions speak louder than petitions.

        by melvynny on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 07:17:10 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  ACA (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    I love OCD, TerryDarc, Patango

    The thing about Obamacare is that more and more people will be signing up every year, such as my one employee and me, now fully covered (without subsidies) for the first time since starting my company in 2006. The premiums were lower and the deductible much lower than when I checked into insurance about three years ago. The other price driver will be the fact that more insurance companies will join the exchanges as consumers find the exchanges such a convenient way to compare pricing and plans.

  •  Interesting renewable energy battle bit in (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Patango, TerryDarc

    "A battle is looming over renewable energy, and fossil fuel interests are losing" which ties in with another recent article and comment I made here.

    The measures, which have been introduced in about 18 states, lie at the heart of an effort to expand to the state level the battle over fossil fuel and renewable energy. The new rules would trim or abolish climate mandates — including those that require utilities to use solar and wind energy, as well as proposed Environmental Protection Agency rules that would reduce carbon emissions from power plants.

    But the campaign — despite its backing from powerful groups such as Americans for Prosperity — has run into a surprising roadblock: the growing political clout of renewable-energy interests, even in rock-ribbed Republican states such as Kansas.

    So,  here we have the Koch cabal conspiracy and ALEC at work again and there may be resistance. As that earlier article, directly aimed at the Koch "baggage" in their sponsorship of right wing causes, mentions:
    Solar panels throughout red states of the South and Southwest have become this century’s version of the satellite dish. In the late 1970s, rural and then suburban households who couldn’t get cable or were tired of paying its monopoly started setting up satellite dishes instead.  This was about more than the thrill of getting television where it had been too fuzzy or expensive before: This was an act of freedom. You were beating a system that was rigged against you. Today, another way to beat the system is to take on big utilities and their monopoly prices by putting some solar panels on your roof or in your yard. Not only do your energy bills go down, but the utility company buys the extra power you generate. No wonder anti-establishment conservatives (and liberals, for that matter) absolutely love their solar panels.  They are a deeply powerful and personal badge of defiance and independence.
    Well, we can hope some sanity prevails!

    The only foes that threaten America are the enemies at home, and those are ignorance, superstition, and incompetence. [Elbert Hubbard]

    by pelagicray on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 06:31:45 AM PDT

  •  Thanks for today's APR, Greg! (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Bernie68, Patango, TerryDarc, Greg Dworkin

    Now that I've read it and had some coffee, my day can begin.

    Feel quite hopeful that the Rethugs can't run on ACA.  Also, there was an encouraging article in my local rag, The WaPo, this morning to the effect that even in Koch-bought Kansas, The Brothers are encountering resistance to their "fossil fuels only" strategy. People who are making money off renewable energy wind farms like receiving those checks.

    "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

    by Diana in NoVa on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 06:36:17 AM PDT

  •  Cover Me Dept (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Patango, TerryDarc

    According to Jonathan Cohn:

    "For all of the hyperbole about plan cancellations there are plenty of people who had to relinquish coverage they liked."

    I would like to meet the person who, when push comes to shove, would prefer a policy subject to sudden "discovery" of a pre-existing condition, rescission, and coverage limits. Because if he or she was self-insured, that's what they had.

    "There is no room for injustice anywhere in the American mansion." Lyndon Johnson

    by pkgoode on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 06:40:39 AM PDT

    •  It's possible that people with crap-insurance (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Patango

      and are now getting ACA ok'd insurance ARE paying more. But it's apples and oranges: better coverage, decent coverage costs more.

      I would also be willing to believe that many opponents to ACA are on Medicare so they don't give a s**t how much someone else pays or anything else. Just keep your govt. hands off my Medicare.

      What stronger breast-plate than a heart untainted! Thrice is he arm'd, that hath his quarrel just; And he but naked, though lock'd up in steel, Whose conscience with injustice is corrupted. Henry VI Part II Act 3 Scene 2

      by TerryDarc on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 09:01:09 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Hannity is desparately trying to repaint his (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    a2nite, tb mare, TerryDarc, Patango

    wagon after hitching it to "awunderin' star". Still, when his audience is essentially a batch of people whose political philosophy is based on inchoate feelings of failure, rationalization, and scapegoating, into one mass blob of mean spiritedness, hatred, frustration, and rebellion, his tenuous reasoning will still make sense to his fans.

  •  Cohn's shoddy language (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Patango

    "Plenty of people paying higher premiums"

    Maybe. It's necessary to make some distinctions--distinctions that are longer than a sound bite.

    First, as in many things ACA, it's necessary to distinguish between effects of the law, and normal insurance trends.

    How many of these people would be paying more if there was no ACA?

    How many would be cancelled without ACA? There's a historically large insurance churn.

    It's also important to distinguish between winners and losers.

    Most "cancelled" policies in the individual market were instantly converted to ACA compliant policies.

    Clear winners were those paying either the same or less for better coverage.

    Some paid more for more. Are these winners or losers?

    The smallest group--and actual losers--are those paying more for the same or less.

    As I said, this is hard to put in a sound bite.

    •  And the mountain (0+ / 0-)

      of facts that confirm that people on those JUNK plans got screwed if they ever tried to make a claim on them , I am so sick of hearing people trying to legitimize those plans . you can buy a cheap bronze plan thru the ACA that only covers catastrophic , but it will give you actual coverage , unlike the old scam plans

      And I'll go with Obama on this one , the debate is over , so piss off GOP

      Beer Drinkers & Hell Raisers

      by Patango on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 09:40:37 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Speaking to opening graph (0+ / 0-)
    Blocking health care for 500,000 people is huge plus in GOP primary

    “Thom Tillis has a proven record of fighting against Obamacare. Tillis stopped Obamacare’s Medicaid expansion cold. It’s not happening in North Carolina, and it’s because of Thom Tillis.”

    The expected GOP Senate nominee for North Carolina is boasting, in effect, that he is the sole reason 500,000 people in the state he would represent will not get health coverage under the Medicaid expansion. This quote comes from a radio ad Tillis ran this week in the GOP Senate primary.

    WaPo

    How many voters in N Carolina are in that coverage gap or on the Medicaid ?

    Beer Drinkers & Hell Raisers

    by Patango on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 09:33:43 AM PDT

    •  319K in the coverage gap (0+ / 0-)

      http://kff.org/...

      168K are eligible for Medicaid, but NC has not expanded (hence the 319K above).
      513K are eligible for tax credits/subsidies
      344K are ineligible (employer based insurance, etc)
      249K are undocumented and ineligble

      "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

      by Greg Dworkin on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 10:16:15 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  ... (0+ / 0-)

      "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

      by Greg Dworkin on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 10:19:15 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  WOW , Thanks Greg (0+ / 0-)

        I realize hard core gop are not going to change their vote , but I would imagine people directly effected by these HC issues are going to think twice before they pull the lever for a clown like Tillis

        I mean , the choice of having healthcare , or just having a load mouth like that in office , that is basically your 2 choices  , is it worth it gop voters ?

        It would be great to see some of these big mouth republicans get rolled on the ACA issue come Nov

        Beer Drinkers & Hell Raisers

        by Patango on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 11:11:24 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  anybody else have their breath taken away (0+ / 0-)

    by Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart, (R-FL) saying

    And I think we figured out a way to deal with the folks that are here in a way that is fair — fair, by the way, to those in the legal system … who are doing everything legally, and also deals with the folks that are here in a way that is fair and reasonable. And adheres, strictly adheres, to the rule of law.
    of course, to be strictly fair, that was about immigration, not about armed 'defenders' of the right to illegally graze on our public lands.

    There is no worse enemy of God and Man than zeal armed with power and guided by a feeble intellect... --William James

    by oslyn7 on Sat Apr 26, 2014 at 10:38:31 AM PDT

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