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President Barack Obama discusses Ukraine during a meeting with members of his National Security Staff in the Oval Office, Feb. 28, 2014.
Democrats have the advantage over Republicans when it comes to the issues and the question of which party would help women and the middle class, a new Washington Post/ABC poll finds. But that's a piece of good news surrounded by bad news. The poll finds President Barack Obama with his lowest approval rating to date, at 41 percent, and:
Among registered voters, 45 percent intend to vote for the Democratic candidate in House elections this fall, and 44 percent for the Republican candidate. Based on past elections, that close margin is troubling news for Democrats. Shortly before they lost control of the House in 2010, Democrats held a five-point advantage on this question.

Another measure of voting intentions came when people were asked whether they thought it was more important to have Democrats in charge in Congress to help support Obama’s policies or Republicans in charge to act as a check on the president’s policies. On this, 53 percent of voters say Republicans and 39 percent say Democrats. That is almost identical to the results of the same question when it was asked in September 2010, two months before the GOP landslide.

The House situation has gotten worse since 2010 due to extensive Republican gerrymandering in the wake of that landslide. Democrats would need to win the popular vote by a significant margin to retake the House. And right now, despite the party's lead on the issues, it looks like the intensity isn't there among Democratic voters.

The other piece of good news, of course, is that we have six months to turn this around. Six months for Obamacare to show that it works by saving lives and keeping people out of medical bankruptcy. Six months for Republicans to nominate awful candidates and run their mouths about rape. A poll six months out is a warning sign, not the final word.

Originally posted to Laura Clawson on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 06:34 AM PDT.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Will we see bold proposals... (30+ / 0-)

    or more of the same triangulation from the Democratic party? It isn't like they'll actually get to vote on anything in Congress that matters between now and election day. The whole situation is pathetic and stupid.

    I sing praises in the church of nonsense, but in my heart I'm still an atheist, demanding sense of all things.

    by jbou on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 06:45:21 AM PDT

  •  Cilizza is doing a dance for joy in his column-- (8+ / 0-)

    He's trumpeting the "Democrats are DOOMED! DOOMED I say" meme.

    "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White -6.00, -5.18

    by zenbassoon on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 06:45:22 AM PDT

  •  Thanks for including the following... (23+ / 0-)
    The other piece of good news, of course, is that we have six months to turn this around.
    At this point: less polls and more action/activism.

    "If one would give me six lines written by the hand of the most honest man, I would find something in them to have him hanged." - 17th-century French clergyman and statesman Cardinal Richelieu.

    by markthshark on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 06:54:59 AM PDT

  •  They've got to be more populist (31+ / 0-)

    They need to stop talking about public-private partnerships with Wall Street and major corporations. They need to offer actual policy ideas that actually benefits us instead of tinkering around the edges, and run boldly on them like this idea of universal pre-k and increasing child care assistance affordability for working parents.

    http://www.americanprogress.org/...

    •  They need to do stuff like giving 20 million folk (9+ / 0-)

      access to healthcare.... I doubt this poll would be favorable to Democrats if they cured every single disease known to man....

    •  Little chance of that happening. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      La Gitane, salmo, TJ

      I think the best thing, at least nationally, is to ignore the issues and just run against Republicans on social issues. That seems to be the only thing national Dems can seem to do convincingly.

      •  Little chance because nobody really pushes them (13+ / 0-)

        talk about "tinkering around the edges". Social issues are great, but they have little to do with "putting food on the table".

         If Dems want to convince anyone, the first thing they have to do is stop giving up. That won't win shit.

        This all started with "what the Republicans did to language".

        by lunachickie on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 07:27:19 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I agree. But lets look at the reality... (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Lenny Flank, Noodles

          the reality is Dems arent going to run against the people paying for the campaigns. And that aint people with no money. Sucks, but its true.

          And it is also true that social issues do move Dem voters to the polls. Since most dont expect economic help from either party, sadly.

          •  I think BBB is mostly correct (7+ / 0-)

            Whether we like it or not, elections are decided on culture-war issues because those are the only issues that the parties are allowed to disagree on. Despite the Dem lip service to economics, the brutal reality is that both parties are now owned by the same people who pay the bills, and the neoliberal economic agenda now owns both parties (so does the neocon national-security agenda, but we don't care about that at the moment since we haven't invaded anybody this week)--any actual disagreements are minor, don't effect anyone with power, and probably won't get passed anyway.

            So all we are left with is culture-war issues. Alas, the problem here is that "the other side sucks more than we do!!!" has never been a workable longterm strategy for winning elections, and it is already playing itself out.  It has not motivated voters in off-years in the past, and it won't now, either.

            Elections in the US are now viewed by most people, correctly, as a farce. We have two parties neither of which do jackshit for any of the economic issues that actually effect people (because both parties share the same economic framework), because of which both parties have approval ratings similar to Charlie Manson's, running against reach other while both financed by the same 1% of the population.

            It's no wonder most voters stay home.

            It is not a sustainable situation. Democracy itself is impossible when "elections" consist merely of two parties which everyone hates, with the same agenda, financed by the same people, who only run on issues that don't harm anyone in power.

            In the end, reality always wins.

            by Lenny Flank on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 08:53:14 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  That is the divide among the elites. So, (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Lenny Flank, Noodles

              since the parties are run  by them, the priorities of the elites are the priorities of their parties.

              •  again, I agree (0+ / 0-)

                The only way to break that is with a party (either a reformed version of an existing party or an entirely new party) which is not beholden to the moneybags who finance elections. That, alas, is impossible under our current system of government and elections.

                Which means the system itself has to change first.  And since it cannot change from the inside, it must be changed from the outside.

                In the end, reality always wins.

                by Lenny Flank on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 10:38:11 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  Yeah, let's just reinvent the wheel (0+ / 0-)

                  See my other comment for a more practical solution. We're on the inside and provide no pressure whatsoever to make campaign reform an issue. Because despite as obvious of a necessity as it is we never bring it up.

                  •  we're not on the inside (0+ / 0-)

                    Our own party doesn't give a flying fuck what we think.

                    If we WERE on the inside, our problem would have solved itself.

                    In the end, reality always wins.

                    by Lenny Flank on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 12:10:59 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  All the more reason to PUSH HARDER n/t (0+ / 0-)

                      This all started with "what the Republicans did to language".

                      by lunachickie on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 02:15:04 PM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                    •  Problems don't solve themselves. (0+ / 0-)

                      What in the world makes you think you'd have more influence standing outside shaking your fist at them? Since when has politics been an easy-breezy thing for insiders to accomplish? Politics is all about struggling to compromise.

                      Why aren't people here insisting on campaign reform while they are getting out the vote? At this time campaign reform isn't an issue on their radar because we don't insist on it. We put zero pressure on politicians to defend the pay to play system.

                      •  please feel free to explain how we can (0+ / 0-)

                        push from the inside when we are not on the inside . . . . . .

                        Then feel free to explain how we GET to the inside without pushing from the outside.

                        In the end, reality always wins.

                        by Lenny Flank on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 04:32:47 PM PDT

                        [ Parent ]

                      •  I have no idea what you mean by 'inside' (0+ / 0-)

                        I'm not sure what you're expecting or referring to or if it's a real thing. As I mentioned in this reply to lunachickie in this comments section, activists have plenty of influence on the party as in a couple examples I gave to her regarding some on this very website.

                        And if you haven't seen changes in the Democratic party over the last 7 or 8 years or so, including extensive media coverage regarding equal pay and opportunity, the 1% and plutocracy, a sea change in attitudes to gay marriage, racial bigots like Bundy and Sterling being handed their asses, you haven't been paying attention. Smacking down the Third Way which is no longer much of an influence to reckon with is another long term consequence we've helped bring about.

                        It may be a struggle but progressives and our arguments are indeed making headway and you undercut our efforts acting as if we haven't done shit. That's simply not true. Or as if we can't make campaign reform as much of an issue to be faced by America as the ones above which I listed.

          •  Then the whole thing is POINTLESS, isn't it? (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            quill
            Dems arent going to run against the people paying for the campaigns.
            Ridiculous that we'd tell anyone to sit back and accept this because "it sucks".

             

            This all started with "what the Republicans did to language".

            by lunachickie on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 09:10:45 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Well, only if things like civil rights, womens (0+ / 0-)

              rights, and LGBT equality dont count for much. They do in my book. The two parties are quite different on social issues.

              •  Yes, they are, but most people (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                slinkerwink

                are more concerned with the economy and their future. Take a look around you.

                And can we just stop going to that place where we're compelled to Pick One? It's a ridiculous metric to add to the discussion about Dems Having A Lot of Work to Do If They Want To WIN.

                They're both important, bbb, we all know that. Good grief...
                 

                This all started with "what the Republicans did to language".

                by lunachickie on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 09:43:21 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

              •  Is the mushy middle really interested in these (0+ / 0-)

                enough to motivate they to vote D.

                Or are their main interests a general "feeling" about the parties? Who will help them get/keep a job that pays a decent wage? Who will protect them in the new cold war? Who is stronger?

                Most people are swayed by kitchen table policies. It comes down to who is the most clever at selling their point of view - pulling the right emotional strings.

                It’s the Supreme Court, stupid! Followed by: It's always the Supreme Court! Progressives will win only when we convince a majority that they, too, are Progressive.

                by auapplemac on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 11:06:50 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

            •  yes, but it's logically consistent (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              lunachickie

              IF you are only allowed to promote solutions that help the existing Democrats win in the short term.

              AND the current flock of elected Democrats and leadership are mostly cowards and centrist conservatives.

              THEN the only path available is to work with what they're willing to do, which means bold populist programs, while certainly likely winning, are nevertheless off the table.

              There may be more useful options available when the IF statement above is corrected.

              I'd add that this isn't a dig at BBB, since I think he's playing the Devils advocate here.

              "Tell the truth and run." -- Yugoslav proverb

              by quill on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 09:46:19 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  It gets old (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                quill
                playing the Devils advocate  
                I am beyond weary of those who insist on endless  "devil's advocacy" when discussing the fucking obvious.

                This all started with "what the Republicans did to language".

                by lunachickie on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 09:47:52 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  actually I agree (3+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  lunachickie, slinkerwink, bryduck

                  The Carlin kerfuffle got me to listen to some of his monologs again, and, besides being amazed at how 100% right he was,  I've become more convinced than ever that this pragmatic cynicism thing (hold your nose and vote anyway, don't let the good be the enemy of the mediocre, etc) just isn't working. Too many people are simply too disgusted to buy that crap anymore. Instead we really need, on this site and elsewhere in the progressive community, to channel the outrage that already exists and demand that either our Democratic politicians start giving us what we need, or we're not going to vote for the cocksuckers.

                  "Tell the truth and run." -- Yugoslav proverb

                  by quill on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 10:09:15 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Yup (2+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    quill, bryduck
                    besides being amazed at how 100% right (Carlin) was,  I've become more convinced than ever that this pragmatic cynicism thing (hold your nose and vote anyway, don't let the good be the enemy of the mediocre, etc) just isn't working. Too many people are simply too disgusted to buy that crap anymore.
                    Agreed. We no longer have time for such nonsense. We've got to start running like Democrats and pushing actual Democratic policy from the left.

                    This all started with "what the Republicans did to language".

                    by lunachickie on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 10:12:36 AM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

          •  Because we don't demand campaign reform endlessly (0+ / 0-)

            We don't make it an issue they and the GOP and the media confront daily. We must be OK with pay to play politics because we never make it an issue. No talk about running for office on a level playing field. No demand for a short campaign season rather than taking time off to raise money instead of governing. No proposals to remove money from the hands of politicians and limiting what the parties can spend.

            So why should they change if we give them a pass every day? Who cares? Evidently most of us don't.

            •  Plenty of us care (0+ / 0-)

              we're just not rich enough.

              So we have got to do a lot more than GOTV. A lot more.  

              This all started with "what the Republicans did to language".

              by lunachickie on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 02:16:50 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Not enough. Campaign reform is rarely pushed here (0+ / 0-)

                I know you care but I never see a push to make it an issue to Democratic leadership or candidates. I could probably list 20 issues which get more attention regularly on this site.

                And my point is it doesn't take money as much as dogged persistence to know how all in Congress and running for other offices are on record regarding their stance in the issue. Simply to make them and Republicans defend the system we have. They don't need to defend it, we don't care enough to make it an issue. Unlike 20 other common issues they are on record about one way or the other.

                And they should respond to those who do GOTV for them. What other issue could be more closely tied to that very function? We could keep asking them as are actually getting out the vote. What would be a more opportune time?

                •  Heh (0+ / 0-)
                  I could probably list 20 issues which get more attention regularly on this site.
                  Well yeah, but I wasn't talking about "here"--if your remarks were referencing subject matter IRT "this site" only, my apologies.

                  This all started with "what the Republicans did to language".

                  by lunachickie on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 08:17:56 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Just using DKos as an example (0+ / 0-)

                    This is certainly a well known progressive site which is populated with some people who hav spearheaded some results through activism. An example would be David Waldman who has been recognized as being someone who helped inspire and lead the charge which brought about an unexpected change in he filibuster rules on administrative nominees. Others, using this blog, helped get Howard Dean the chairmanship of the DNC. I'd expect to see regular blogging about reform and public funding with teeth and such here if anywhere.

                    But this lack of focus of even making reform an issue politicians must deal with is endemic throughout the liberal community and Democratic activists in general. I would think progressives would be leading the charge if anyone would.

                    •  Last time I looked (0+ / 0-)

                      not every POV on this website was "progressive", so we would really do well to try not to mis-appropriate that adjective around here.

                      I would think that anyone posting here understood that much...

                      This all started with "what the Republicans did to language".

                      by lunachickie on Wed Apr 30, 2014 at 10:29:09 AM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

    •  Except that there have never been major (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      reginahny, mmacdDE, Choco8, auapplemac

      economic expansions of the sort that created millions of jobs and raised the standard of living for people that didn't involve public-private partnerships. We need to stop waiting for another CCC or WPA as it ain't gonna happen any time soon because the political juice just isn't there. There is no path back to prosperity that doesn't involve partnering with corporations and Wall St. We're just deluding ourselves if we deny this reality and wasting precious time and resources. OWS was nice but it offered no actual solutions.

      Now, such partnerships must be well-regulated and overseen--which HAS happened in the past--of course. But, again, they are absolutely unavoidable in today's political, and campaign finance law and economic climate.

      "Reagan's dead, and he was a lousy president" -- Keith Olbermann 4/22/09

      by kovie on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 07:28:01 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Btw I'm not saying that this means more (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        mmacdDE, La Gitane, Arfeeto

        charter schools or vouchers. I'm talking about infrastructure projects mainly, e.g. roads, bridges, HSR, green energy, electric cars, etc. Education should remain a public function. Hopefully health care will too someday. But the stuff on which profit is not immoral should be a mixed model IMO.

        "Reagan's dead, and he was a lousy president" -- Keith Olbermann 4/22/09

        by kovie on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 07:29:59 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I understand the phrase differently (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Choco8, unfangus, La Gitane, NoMoreLies

          Hiring private contractors to do work on roads and bridges is not the same thing as the "public-private partnerships" of recent years in which "commissions" stacked with corporate executives are formed and given significant input into public policy.

          There may not be a path back to prosperity that does not "involve" corporations, but I've seen no recent evidence to suggest that a path largely laid out by corporations in "partnership" with the government will lead back to prosperity. The path to prosperity, I think, can only come from regulation of deleterious business practices and using public policy to create incentives that are beneficial and not perverse.

          “Republicans...think American standard of living is a fine thing--so long as it doesn't spread to all the people... And they admire of Government of the United States so much that they would like to buy it.” Harry S. Truman

          by fenway49 on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 08:18:19 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Depends on who's driving the partnership (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            fenway49

            If it's the private sector, either directly or through pols it controls, then that's a no-go IMO as it's a setup for corruption and abuse a la the past 30 years e.g. charter schools. But if it's the public sector, and genuinely so, a la the Erie Canal and wind/solar farms and such, then I think it's a winner.

            "Reagan's dead, and he was a lousy president" -- Keith Olbermann 4/22/09

            by kovie on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 09:59:15 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Right (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              kovie

              We have no disagreement on that. I think the trend's been too much toward the private sector driving the partnership.

              “Republicans...think American standard of living is a fine thing--so long as it doesn't spread to all the people... And they admire of Government of the United States so much that they would like to buy it.” Harry S. Truman

              by fenway49 on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 11:27:25 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

      •  Until "THE People" demand a CCC or WPA or whatever (0+ / 0-)

        "THE People" are mainly complacent or ignorant of certain facts. You had to be living under that proverbial rock not to know that 8,000,000 signed up for ObamaCare. Apparently that rock is rather large.

        Just look at these charts:

        http://www.huffingtonpost.com/...

        It’s the Supreme Court, stupid! Followed by: It's always the Supreme Court! Progressives will win only when we convince a majority that they, too, are Progressive.

        by auapplemac on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 11:14:17 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  The "people" didn't really demand (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          bryduck, AlexDrew

          what ended up as the ACA, and actually complained about it initially, but are coming to like it as they actually get and use it. Sadly, democracy isn't really botton-up, but usually top-down, at least in terms of broad demand. Whether politicians or activists, it's usually a small group of people who drive reform.

          I'd love for there to be another CCC or WPA, but I don't see it happening soon, and even if it did, it wouldn't remove the need for P-P's as well. We need both.

          "Reagan's dead, and he was a lousy president" -- Keith Olbermann 4/22/09

          by kovie on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 12:04:04 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  With some of the ACA plans having very high (0+ / 0-)

            deductibles, it seems that these policies are just another form of catastrophe insurance. The positive is that they do cover certain annual preventative exams.

            I just wonder how people with these policies will feel when they realize they have to dig into their pockets for as much as $5,000 before they are really covered for everyday medical problems.

            It’s the Supreme Court, stupid! Followed by: It's always the Supreme Court! Progressives will win only when we convince a majority that they, too, are Progressive.

            by auapplemac on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 12:12:55 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I guess they were designed (0+ / 0-)

              for the very young and/or healthy, the better-off, and in states with the Medicaid expansion the very poor. Everyone else is probably not paying that much less in total insurance and health care costs--but at least they now have the ability to get coverage, which many didn't have previously.

              Plus, there are situations where it makes sense to have a high deductible plan, if you're pretty healthy and just want preventive plus catastrophic. Why payer for a lower deductible if if won't save you money? Such plans are probably bad for people who have moderate health issues but not major ones.

              "Reagan's dead, and he was a lousy president" -- Keith Olbermann 4/22/09

              by kovie on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 01:36:37 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  But weren't those policies referred to as junk (0+ / 0-)

                plans just a short while ago on this very site?

                It’s the Supreme Court, stupid! Followed by: It's always the Supreme Court! Progressives will win only when we convince a majority that they, too, are Progressive.

                by auapplemac on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 05:38:11 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  There's junk, and there's some peoples' (0+ / 0-)

                  idea of junk. There's a place for relatively low-priced preventive/catastrophic plans, if you're fairly healthy and don't really need the in-between coverage, but could afford the deductible if something unforeseen happened.

                  "Reagan's dead, and he was a lousy president" -- Keith Olbermann 4/22/09

                  by kovie on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 05:56:31 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

    •  They also have to break through the media (5+ / 0-)

      narrative and the "MTP inpenetrable wall of Republican pols and pundits".

      I think pols at this phase reflect semi-informed, distracted opinions, and the Dems are going to have to find a way to penetrate with each voter.

      You can't make this stuff up.

      by David54 on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 07:28:12 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  That would the logical thing to do Slinkerwink, (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      smiley7, brooklynbadboy, NoMoreLies

      but unfortunately, the Democrats also are beholden to the interests that benefit only themselves, and that isn't representing the commons anymore.  The Democratic party has, I am afraid to say, have become the "Republican Party Lite" brand these days.  

      Legislating for the majority of Americans who are suffering more now than before is all but a campaign slogan with nothing behind them.  I too agree with you, but unfortunately, there isn't a Democrat with any guts to say and do what needs to be said and done, with the exception of but a few, like Sanders (Independent) and Warren.  The Democratic Party won't go near those two out of fear of stepping on the toes of the real puppet masters:  Their "money honey's".

      What we need, as a certain Bonnie Tyler song asked for, is a hero.

      None on the horizon that I can see.......

      “My soul is from elsewhere, I'm sure of that, and I intend to end up there." - Rumi

      by LamontCranston on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 07:53:57 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  They need to keep decriminalizing weed (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      smiley7

      N/T

      I love president Obama!!!

      by freakofsociety on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 07:56:31 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I plump for the platform once again... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      slinkerwink

      1. A minimum wage of $15/hour.

      2. A 20% increase in Social Security payments.

      3. Ending the cap on FICA so that rich pay less as a percentage than do the poor.  This also means that corporations will have to shell the FICA matching taxes for their inflated salaried.

      4. End deductibles, co-pays, and balance billing on all health insurance.  Make the legal squabble be between big healthcare and big insurers or big providers and big government.

      5. Pay the troops and cut the procurement and phony wars.

      6. Fund the VA at the level to deal with the issues that our veterans are having after 12 years of continuous war and torture-tolerant command.

      7. Fix every dangerous bridge in one year.

      There is not a state in the union or a Congressional District in which there is not a majority for these positions, gerrymander or not, media trash campaigns or not.  The problem is that in a lot of states the folks know that Republicans won't do these things and are beginning that the Democrats won't do them either.

      Democratic silence so far seems to prove them out.

      50 states, 210 media market, 435 Congressional Districts, 3080 counties, 192,480 precincts

      by TarheelDem on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 10:37:08 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Reality vs. Fantasy (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        auapplemac
        There is not a state in the union or a Congressional District in which there is not a majority for these positions, gerrymander or not, media trash campaigns or not.
        That claim is ridiculous.

        There are many congressional districts where few of these positions would be supported by the majority of voters. If you had only included #6, your statement might have been nearly true (but I'm sure that there would still be some districts where even #6 wouldn't garner a majority).

        If you really believe that the country is so uniformly in agreement with your views, you should consider diversifying your social contacts and reading material. Without understanding that others have different views than yours, it's nearly impossible to contribute to substantive change.

        •  I'm so sorry (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          slinkerwink

          ...that progressive strongholds have an animus against veterans who have been abused by their government.

          It's very interesting about those "different views".  It wasn't more than five years ago that most all of those were mainstream views in most Congressional Districts.  I don't believe anyone has really testing any of these items as just policy items without the heat of partisanship.

          I fear that we have become so cynical there really is no hope for the US but complete collapse, most likely as a result of global climate change although the resurgence of Victoria Nuland threatens nuclear annihilation once again.

          At any rate instead of being so cowardly, it would be an interesting exercise for Democrats to give this platform a try.  Mark Begich after all has crawled out from under the rock that Democrats from red states had been hiding under and seems to find the Alaskan sunshine beneficial.

          50 states, 210 media market, 435 Congressional Districts, 3080 counties, 192,480 precincts

          by TarheelDem on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 11:27:35 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Interesting how Republicans are viewed so (15+ / 0-)

    favorably to even put their chances on par with Democrats, after they obstructed the entire nation, fought against every popular initiative that the majority of people in this country are for, and even shut down the government to boot.

    Meanwhile, President Obama must be doing something horrible to get the lowest approval ratings, right? Well, let's see, the economy is improving and he just gave 20 million people access to healthcare. These polls, just like the ones which predicted he would lose in 2012 are not based in reality....

    •  So, the polls are skewed? No. But, (8+ / 0-)

      there is validity in this part of your analysis:

      Well, let's see, the economy is improving and he just gave 20 million people access to healthcare.
      I dont think there are any polls anywhere that shows a majority of voters think the economy is good enough to go to the polls over, BUT those 20 million with healthcare is a hard fact. Thats certainly something Democrats can work with and the President has offered the right path on how Dems ought to run. Some are starting to listen, so thats a good sign.

      But no, youre quite wrong on the polls saying Obama would lose in 2012. Even most of the admittedly crappy media polls had him winning through most of the year.

      •  Well, let's look at the evidence, the polls: (8+ / 0-)

        Considering how President Obama trounced Mitt Romney in 2012, here is Gallup in October of 2012:

        Mitt Romney has taken a six-point lead over President Obama in the latest Gallup national tracking poll -- his biggest lead to date and the first time he has led outside the margin of error.
        The latest seven-day tracking poll of likely voters shows Romney at 51 percent and Obama at 45 percent, up from 50-46 on Tuesday and 49-47 on Monday.

        And here is the Washington Post Poll in October:

        Following the very successful Democratic Convention, this is the Washington Post Poll's close presidential race in October:

        Last week’s Democratic National Convention helped President Obama improve his standing against Republican Mitt Romney, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll, but did little to reduce voter concern about his handling of the economy.

        The survey shows that the race remains close among likely voters, with Obama at 49 percent and Romney at 48 percent, virtually unchanged from a poll taken just before the conventions.

        Here is the Washington Post poll once again leading up to the elections:
        On the eve of their first presidential debate, President Obama leads or is at parity with Mitt Romney on virtually every major issue and attribute in what remains a competitive general election, according to a new Washington Post-ABC News poll.
        How did the President actually do in the 2012 election???
        Barack Obama is the first president in more than five decades to win at least 51 percent of the national popular vote twice, according to a revised vote count in New York eight weeks after the Nov. 6 election.

        State election officials submitted a final tally on Dec. 31 that added about 400,000 votes, most of them from provisional ballots in the Democratic stronghold of New York City that were counted late in part because of complications caused by Hurricane Sandy.

        The president nationally won 65.9 million votes -- or 51.1 percent -- against Republican challenger Mitt Romney, who took 60.9 million votes and 47.2 percent of the total cast, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

        Oh, the polls must have been right....

        I won't even mention the tons of Fox News/Republican polls.....

        •  The Gallup tracking poll (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          La Gitane, LI Mike, auapplemac

          of the national popular vote was the one outlier that continually had Romney up. The article you linked specifically says: "Gallup continues to show a better picture for Romney than most other pollsters." But you've chosen an article from Obama's low point even in that poll: the polling cited was all after the awful first debate and before the turnaround second debate, which took place on the evening before your link was posted.

          It's true that the national vote polls generally showed a neck-and-neck race that state-by-state polling didn't justify, but people were pointing it out at the time.

          “Republicans...think American standard of living is a fine thing--so long as it doesn't spread to all the people... And they admire of Government of the United States so much that they would like to buy it.” Harry S. Truman

          by fenway49 on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 08:26:56 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  um...each Wapo poll you cited has Obama ahead... (0+ / 0-)

          Soooo. Lol.

          As for Gallup, they had a big dustup on how wrong their methodology was, which theyve since adjusted.

          I suppose your standard for accuracy is beleive nothing that doesent nail it dead on (the Rand poll just about did), but polls rarely nail numbers dead on. They do tell you about general trends, however. Thats why the best thing is to just merge the public polls and look at the trendline. So, here it is for you to review:

          http://www.pollingreport.com/...

          http://polltracker.talkingpointsmemo.com/...

          As you can see, Romney was rarely ahead all year. Hardly fits your narrative of 'they all said he would lose'

          •  I just love empirical evidence! Let me also point (0+ / 0-)

            out that the poll I cited had Romney tied with the President and they were reported by the media as a virtual tie when allowing for the Washington Post's error rate of plus or minus 4 percentage points.

            Nothing more to add....

            •  Thats not saying lose. That says tied. (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              bryduck

              Maybe you thing tie=lose, but I dont get that. And if you say MOE, well then he could also be winning too.

              Youre not making any sense.

              I think you conflate polling data, which all year generally showed a  close race with Obama slightly ahead, with pundits who did indeed interpret those numbers as losing. As apparently you do too.

              But....errr....the data speaks for itself. Obama was never losing that election in most of the major polls all year. And a few were as close to accurate as you can get excepting private campaign polling which is much better.

              •  Do I need to illustrate the President's margin of (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                destiny1

                victory again? I don't think so.... Was Gallup wrong? Was the Washington Post wrong?

                As the man once said: America, you be the judge....

                •  Do you even understand what polling is? (4+ / 0-)

                  Its a snapshot in time, that is all. Many snapshots show trends, like a bunch of drawings together create animation. Polls that have candidates in a close race, but ahead, almost always turn out to be close races. The polls showed tight margins for Obama in all the key swing states. Obama won by tight margins in all those states but one. His national margin was not piled up in those states, but in big blue states where the campaign wasnt even contested. He got a surplus 2 million votes in New York alone. Everywhere the election was hotly contested was close. The polls predicted a win by 3 in Ohio, he won by 3. Predicted 3 in Virginia, he won by 4. Predicted a tie in Florida, he won by less than a point.

                  The facts are good enough. We dont need to get vapors.

      •  20 million is a highly dubious number (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Ezekiel in Exile, TJ, splintersawry, WillR

        it is not a "fact".

        It is a very high end estimate...  Charles Gaba puts it somewhere between 13 and 20 million.  That's one helluva margin of error.

        New Medicaid due to ACA is only 3.8 million according to his spreadsheet.

        And, of the exchange sign-ups, no one knows how many of those already had insurance that were cancelled and were forced to buy new ACA approved insurance plans.  And we have no idea what the satisfaction/dissatisfaction rate is among those who had to purchase new plans.

        20 million positive ACA beneficiaries is a dream number..

        And even if it were a positive for Dems, opinion of ACA in the poll still went down!

    •  No these polls are exactly the same as 2010 (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Cadillac64, Ezekiel in Exile

      not 2012.

      and, FYI.. the economy is not improving.

      Demographics Democrats count on are faring the worst in this economy.  African American youth are 25% unemployed.. young adults overall - UE rate is 12.2, which  just went up last month.

      and last, President Obama is not on the ballot.

      •  As if the African American youth numbers have not (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        mmacdDE, METAL TREK, destiny1

        been higher. During the teeth of the recession in 2011:

        The unemployment rate for black Americans spiked to a shocking 16.7% in August, up from 15.9% the previous month. It's now the highest it has been during Barack Obama's presidency, up from the previous record of 16.5% in March and April 2010.

        The unemployment rate for black males rose a whole percentage point to 18%. Even more staggeringly, the black youth unemployment rate in August was 46.5%, up from 39.2% in July.

        In terms of your statement that the economy is not improving.... We are still coming out of the train wreck which is the George W. Bush induced Great Recession, and we have a lot further to go. But coming from an economy that was hemorrhaging 700,000 jobs a month to where we have it today, you actually believe the economy hasn't improved.... I am at a loss....
        •  For most Americans, it hasn't improved (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Cadillac64, auapplemac, bryduck

          since the "end" of the recession.

          Yes, things were worse at the height of the recession.  But, the recession ended 4 years ago.  The jobs have simply not come back.

          10 million people permanently dropped out of the workforce.  We have the lowest workforce participation rate in 40 years!

          We have barely added enough jobs each month to simply keep up with population growth.

          Tens of millions of Americans are still underwater on their mortgages - at least the ones who were able to keep their homes.

          GDP growth rate was an anemic 2.6%.  That's not growth, it's stagnation.

          I am at a loss as well.. that anyone with these facts at hand could think the economy was improving!

        •  Well, I think what hes saying is that (4+ / 0-)

          25% black youth unemployment is better than 50%, but isnt going to be a flag waving celebration likely to turn out voters to the polls. In other words, yes the economy is improving. No, its not good enough to go out and vote.

          •  Well, I thought black voters turned out mightily (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            destiny1

            to reelect Barack Obama in 2012. Also Hispanic voters. Because you see, unlike some Democrats, these voters realized that Barack Obama, who had rescued the economy from the train wreck he inherited, would do a lot more for them, for example allow them to receive access to healthcare, than Mitt Romney or any other Republican. They are smart voters!

            •  What part of 'Obama isnt on the ballot' do you not (7+ / 0-)

              comprehend? This is not 2012. This is a midterm election, not a presidential campaign.

              Look, we already went through this with you folks in 2010. Do I need to pull out your eerily similar quotes then?

              Lets stay in the realm of reality. We know we need to turn out the voters who tune out when the high volume of a presidential election is turned down to the low decibel of a midterm. This isnt 2012, so we need something other than presidential politics to wake our folks up.

              •  McAuliffe won with these same voters in Virgina (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                breathe67

                You can't have it both ways, you can't argue that the economy hasn't improved under Obama and therefore Black voters won't turn out for Obama, when black people did turn out in huge numbers for Obama, and then conveniently switch to this is a midterm election, and therefore Obama isn't on the ballot so his voters won't turn out... Dual arguments here.

                The President was not on the ballot in Virginia but his  voters turned out to help put McAuliffe over the top.

                One of the big questions of the next few years of politics is whether Democrats can replicate the “Obama model” of minority turnout without the presence of Obama on the ballot. If the Virginia gubernatorial election was a test case, then the early answer is a clear “yes.”
                I tell you what...Democrats can do this again, during the midterms, but they sure as hell won't do it with messages like Obama didn't improve the economy, which is patently false.....
                •  I absolutely agree. (6+ / 0-)

                  We need to turn out our voters. Virginia in 2012: Obama, 1.9 million, Romney 1.8 million votes. Virginia in 2013: McAuliffe, 1.06 million votes, Cooch, 1.01 million votes.

                  Democratic turnout dropped by 900,000 votes. GOP dropped 800,000.

                  Lets not pretend that polls mean nothing and that off year elections are no different than presidential ones. Thats delusional and stupid. Turnout will drop this year, for sure. Especially among our folks. But if we can minize that, we can win. But lets keep it in the realm of reality: we arent going to re duplicate a presidential turnout in a midterm.

    •  ABC/Wapo had Romney winning or tied (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      NedSparks, mmacdDE, katesmom, destiny1, doroma

      in the last two weeks of the election.

    •  Someone, please, give me hope! (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      smiley7, LI Mike, NedSparks
      Interesting how Republicans are viewed so
      favorably to even put their chances on par with Democrats . . .
      You say "interesting"; I say "frightening."  What hope remains in a society when so many are inclined to vote against their interests and their childrens'?  
  •  This Poll Is An Outlier (9+ / 0-)

    They have President Obama down with non whites since January??

    Approval/Disapproval among Whites
    January 34-62
    March 35-62
    April 32-61

    Approval/Disapproval Non-Whites
    January 70-26
    March 68-28
    April 61-34*** Outlier

    The affiliation for the polling is:

    D - 32%
    R - 21%
    I - 38%

    Doesn't meet the smell test.  At least to me.

    "Don't Let Them Catch You With Your Eyes Closed"

    by rssrai on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 07:00:41 AM PDT

  •  Wonder why... (9+ / 0-)

    Maybe the WH and way too many Congressional Democrats should stop supporting Republican policies.

    "Lets show the rascals what Citizens United really means."

    by smiley7 on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 07:01:32 AM PDT

    •  You do realize (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JJ In Illinois, LI Mike, doroma

      that the Keystone pipeline, which Obama  has delayed on and most Democrats do not support, is supported by over 60 percent of the American public?

      You have the right to your own opinions, but not your own facts.

      by trumanesque on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 07:21:23 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Speaking of Republican policies... (9+ / 0-)
        the Keystone pipeline

        This all started with "what the Republicans did to language".

        by lunachickie on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 07:28:53 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Yes, and you do realize that given the choice (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Jazzenterprises, LI Mike, wishingwell

        between a "Democrat in name only and a Republican, people will vote for the Republican every time. "

        "Lets show the rascals what Citizens United really means."

        by smiley7 on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 07:29:59 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  The Corporate Propaganda has been successful (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Cadillac64, NoMoreLies, smiley7
        The onslaught of PR salvos urging construction of the new Keystone north also include euphemistic sounding front groups, such as "Energy Citizens: Because Energy is Our Way of Life."  According to the Center for Media and Democracy's Sourcewatch, "Energy Citizens is a front group backed by the American Petroleum Institute, the main trade group and lobbying arm of the oil industry, to fight climate change legislation currently working its way through Congress."

        In response to the massive protest and acts of civil disobedience at the weekend protests at the White House, Reuters quotes a pro-Keystone spokesperson:

        "Today's protest represents a fringe minority of people against any use of fossil fuels," said Matt Dempsey of Oil Sands Fact Check. "This extreme position is well outside the American mainstream. Even President Obama says we need an "all of the above" approach to energy. As a result, today's protest does little but expose the extreme nature of these last remaining Keystone XL opponents."

        What a load of hooey. All the more reason to mobilize and oppose.

        No thanks to this Shit Sandwich...I've had enough from this admin.

        •  What is the AFL-CIO a front group for? (0+ / 0-)

          Other Labor Organizations?

          http://www.washingtonpost.com/...

          •  I think Trumka (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            LI Mike, smiley7

            is completely wrong about this.

            In an interview this week, AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka said members of his labor federation back the project. “We think that anything that’s going to create jobs, help the country and do it in an environmentally sound way ought to be done,” he said.
            It can't be done in an environmentally sound way. Period.
            His statement is almost as weaselly as Obama's:
            President Obama said in June that he would sign off on the proposal only if it “does not significantly exacerbate the climate problem.”
            So it's alright if it exacerbates it...a little bit? Really?

            Neither Trumka or Obama don't get it. They really don't.

            ...

            "But a deeper look at the report finds that the Keystone pipeline would not be without impact: depending on assumptions, State's final EIS concludes that, if built, the 830,000 barrel per day pipeline could cause an extra 1.3 million to 27.4 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions each year. That's the equivalent of putting an extra 250,000 to 5.5 million cars on the road, estimates the Washington Post's Brad Plumer. That's more than enough carbon to give climate advocates ammunition in the debate as well.

            "The report concluded that in a scenario where we take climate change seriously and regulate climate pollution, this pipeline will indeed have a ‘significant impact’ on climate change," said a statement from Bill McKibben, founder of 350.org, the environmental organization that has spearheaded opposition to the pipeline. "So now we’ll find out if that’s the world Barack Obama and John Kerry want. This report gives President Obama everything he needs in order to block this project."

        •  I get it (0+ / 0-)

          Whenever my side loses a public polling argument, it's because the other side cheated and the people are sheep. Or in other words, everyone who disagrees with you is an idiot.

          You have the right to your own opinions, but not your own facts. "I never did give anybody hell. I just told the truth and they thought it was hell."- Truman

          by trumanesque on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 11:03:55 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Things feel better than this to me... (11+ / 0-)

    I sense an  increasing satisfaction with the ACA and the President that isn't reflected in this poll.

    The President, and some of the Senate candidates seem more aggressive...attacking opponents on their opposition to Obamacare. I get the sense they see the opportunity here as well.

    This poll feels like a lagging indicator! No hard evidence to justify  that really, just observations of behavior in our candidates...a sort of cockiness(in the good sense) that wasn't there a couple of months ago!

  •  Democrats have started backing the ACA (5+ / 0-)

    and minimum wage increases.  We'll have to see how that builds.

    "Harass us, because we really do pay attention. Look at who's on the ballot, and vote for the candidate you agree with the most. The next time, you get better choices." - Barney Frank

    by anonevent on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 07:07:25 AM PDT

  •  The Ds lead the Rs in this poll (17+ / 0-)

    on the main matchup and on most of the important issues. Obama's numbers could be better, and he needs to work on that. The Tea Party had a great deal of momentum in 2010. That has fizzled. To me, the Ds have a lot of upside to work with, especially if they ask the question "What are the Rs going to do for you?" The answer: Take away your healthcare and keep your pay low.

  •  Laura - (12+ / 0-)

    You are the only front-pager who consistently focuses on economic issues. Yeah, I know it's your bailiwick. But with so many Americans young and old, men and women, of all races facing unemployment, underemployment, starvation wages - one can hardly be surprised at the lack on motivation on the part of the Dem base.

    Yes, racism remains entrenched throughout American society - and sexism and homophobia. And yes, there are major environmental issues facing the U.S. and the world. But when people are living out of their cars or worried they soon may be doing so, then these other issues pale.

    I do not believe that the Obama administration or congressional Dems have done remotely enough to address those on the margins. And if the Democrats do not do this - then many Dem voters may come to the conclusion, "Why bother?"

  •  Problem in the Ukraine and half the people want (5+ / 0-)

    Obama to go to war and the other half wants him to not get involved at all.

    Obama's approval rating: 0%

    I know I'm oversimplifying but I think there is this problem with "Obama" polls.
    That is, "Exactly why are you down on Obama, now, and why weren't you in 2012."
    People seem to be fickle from one month to the other.

    But, yes, there's work to be done. Turnout. Turnout. Turnout. Turnout. Turnout. Turnout.

    You can't make this stuff up.

    by David54 on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 07:20:20 AM PDT

  •  The ACA is an anchor on the Democrats (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JJ In Illinois

    all reputable polling shows a consistent majority in opposition.

    http://www.pollingreport.com/...

    You have the right to your own opinions, but not your own facts.

    by trumanesque on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 07:22:25 AM PDT

  •  It's gotten to be a cliche (12+ / 0-)

    But I still think that Yeats said it best:

    The best lack all conviction, while the worst
    Are full of passionate intensity
    When Dem "voters" say "Meh, I need to buy some overpriced quinoa and kale at Whole Food that day and anyway my vote doesn't matter plus I gave $25 to Obama in 2008", and Repub voters say "You betcha I'm a gunna vote so that Kenyan Muslim commie don't take away from FreeDumb! guns yeeha!", then yes, we do have a problem. And no, you're not a liberal if you don't vote.

    Vote or just STFU and go away. This is how we lose: lazyass selfish apathy.

    "Reagan's dead, and he was a lousy president" -- Keith Olbermann 4/22/09

    by kovie on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 07:23:52 AM PDT

    •  Pretty much (4+ / 0-)

      I have serious problems with the neoliberal wing of the Democratic Party and I am dissatisfied with the Obama Administration on a host of issues...but I'm voting a solid Democratic Blue ticket this November.

      You cannot punish Obama for his perceived sins by hurting Democrats. He doesn't care, he's set for life no matter what happens in November. This is true of all second-term presidents. But by staying at home on election day, you can fuck up your own life royally. By thinking you'll punish Obama by not voting, you'll fuck up your local and state governments and well as congress.

      If you have a problem with a particular candidate, don't vote for that candidate, but show up and vote for the rest of them.

      Show up and vote Blue.

      Join Essa in a revolt against the gods. Continue the fight, Causality.

      by rbird on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 08:19:19 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I think it's easier to be motivated by anger (0+ / 0-)

      than by satisfaction.

    •  A different way to interpret this: (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      LI Mike, kovie

      The Republicans give their base reasons to vote for Republican candidates (as abhorrent as they are).

      The Democratic Party seemingly bases it's election strategy almost entirely on the Republicans being scary. That just doesn't get traction with people living paycheck-to-paycheck.

      Lots of people would turn out and vote Democrat if only that had a reason to other than "The Republicans are worse".

       

      •  I don't disagree (0+ / 0-)

        A mix of fear and more positive incentive wouldn't hurt. I've stopped reading political email because it's almost all based on fear of the evil Repubs, even from Warren and Sanders. It's so damn patronizing and insulting.

        Politically, even better Dems are quite clueless, being driven by either anger at the right or pie in the sky altruism about how we should all love one another. Most people are driven by a combination of fear and bread and butter self-interest. We're good at the former but suck at the latter.

        "Reagan's dead, and he was a lousy president" -- Keith Olbermann 4/22/09

        by kovie on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 10:26:46 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Dems lose the enthusiasm gap to GOP voters (0+ / 0-)

    Polls have shown that GOP voters are more enthusiastic about voting in November than Democratic voters.

    When and if that metric turns around, I will become more optimistic.

    In a low-turnout election, with our voters consistently historically voting in smaller percentages than the other party's voters (in non-Presidential years) and with polls showing the other party's voters are more enthusiastic than our voters, I am not as optimistic as some on here.

  •  So, on the one hand... (6+ / 0-)

    a majority voters back the policies the Dems and Obama support, but yet they want the Republicans to stay in charge of congress to put a check on Obama's power and ability to get anything done.
    Either Americans are way dumber than I thought, or there is something else going on here that I apparently don't understand.

     

    •  What you're missing is called (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      FutureNow, rbird, salmo, LI Mike

      The Enthusiasm Gap. It's that place where good Democratic election strategy goes to die...

      This all started with "what the Republicans did to language".

      by lunachickie on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 07:31:12 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  the "way dumber" part is getting close... (0+ / 0-)

      If the plutocrats begin the program, we will end it. -- Eugene Debs.

      by livjack on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 07:46:43 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  The argument is being made (2+ / 0-)

      just to generate hits on political sites.

      "Dems to lose Congress." gets hits.
      Status quo doesn't.

    •  Americans are way dumber than you thought (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      unfangus, LI Mike

      is the best possible explanation. Always has been, as far as I'm concerned.

      The other thing could be the Democratic party's suckiness at getting their message out to voters, and also Obama's apparent unwillingness to use the bully pulpit to apply pressure on congress and shame Boehner for his leadership, or lack therof. He's the most unpopular speaker in history, the teahadists, and yet not enough voters want to see a change. Hmm.

    •  This has been going on for years (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      LI Mike

      A decent percentage of the public generally supports Democratic policies, but gets roped in on style points or flag-waving or some such bullshit to vote Republican.

      Don't forget this is a country where about 10% change their mind on which party they'll vote for in the next Congressional election every two weeks.

      “Republicans...think American standard of living is a fine thing--so long as it doesn't spread to all the people... And they admire of Government of the United States so much that they would like to buy it.” Harry S. Truman

      by fenway49 on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 08:39:54 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Plus... (0+ / 0-)

        A lot of them still buy into the "no difference between the parties" meme (thanks again, Ralph Nader).  

        •  Looking up from the bottom of the socioeconomic (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          LI Mike

          ladder the differences between the parties can be VERY difficult to discern, even if they are real.

          And Nader didn't lose the 2000 election. Al Gore running as a blue dog lost that election, because that's what blue dogs do. And he didn't even lose; he won but conceded unnecessarily. The eight year Bush debacle should be laid squarely on the shoulders of Al Gore and the Keystone Kops that ran his campaign.

          •  Dream on (0+ / 0-)

            Nader lost 2000 for us through his ego trip.  That is simple fact that can't be denied.  Gore would have easily won FL if Nader had not been on the ticket.  

            The result:  the horrors of the Iraq war and the current Supreme Court.  

  •  This poll doesn't mean anything. (7+ / 0-)

    What matters is how our Senate candidates do and they seem to be doing fine, though there are a number of close races and Democrats remain vulnerable. Obamacare is not an albatross for them and might actually help increase their vote margin in red counties.  The 2010 election was not about a shift of opinion away from Democrats.  It was about turnout.

    Global Shakedown - Alternative rock with something to say. Check out their latest release, "A Time to Recognize": Available on iTunes, Amazon, Google Play, Spotify and other major online music sites. Visit http://www.globalshakedown.com.

    by khyber900 on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 07:31:10 AM PDT

  •  I would like to help, (5+ / 0-)

    but I think time is best spent helping with voter registration, especially in states with restrictive voting laws. Does anyone know of organizations that are working on this? Now's the time.

  •  When Democrats act like Republicans (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    smiley7, Cadillac64, Ezekiel in Exile

    they lose.

    The hamster wheel continues.

    The Republicans are crazy, but why we follow them down the rabbit hole is beyond me.

    by Jazzenterprises on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 07:36:00 AM PDT

  •  I predict we will see more polling showing this (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    katesmom, brn2bwild, Cadillac64, LI Mike

    to be an outlier.

    I'm recognizing a pattern with ABC polling where they will get out ahead with a poll showing bad news for Obama/Dems, but other polls come out on it's heals showing a different story.

    We'll see.  I happen to think we're at Obama/Dem nadir and we will see significant improvement from this point on.

    Imagine the most profound idea ever conceptualized occupying this space. Now expect exactly the opposite. You'll never be disappointed.

    by Gurnt on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 07:39:15 AM PDT

  •  Bias Always Shows Opposition Needed To Check Prez (3+ / 0-)

    The PDF for that poll shows that nearly the same question was asked before the opposition party Democrats had disastrous midterms in 2002. 55% wanted the Democrats to hold Bush in check. That is really more a communication test question than it is a way of reflecting what are current opinions. It is always above 50% for wanting to keep the incumbent President in check. Ask if they want the opposition to continue to obstruct and keep nation in legislative gridlock and see what kind of numbers you get.

  •  Case study in Colorado (4+ / 0-)

    I'm supposed to be walking my precinct this summer, making sure registered Dems are going to vote and informing them about candidates. Sen. Mark Udall is up for reelection, and I'd like to be able to recommend him as I go door to door.

    But he's just too friendly to some of the things I believe are antithetical to progressive Democratic principles. He's championing the bone-headed idea to rush exports of natural gas to Europe. He's apparently very pro-TPP. I just can't go out and tell people to vote for someone who backs those policies. Being less bad than the other guy is no longer good enough.

    I know he has taken some strong positions regarding transparency in government and domestic spying, but that really doesn't make up for his pushing bad fossil fuel policy.

    I'm willing to listen to other opinions about Udall, of course, but the argument of going with the lesser evil is no longer convincing to me.

    •  It should be MORE than enough! (11+ / 0-)

      I feel the same way about Udall, but giving control of the Senate to the Republicans is absolutely crazy.  We will be paying for decades for staying home in 2010, and then to do it again in 2014 is beyond insane!

      After the voter suppression, the legalized bribery, the reinstating of racism, ... to have the "they're  both the same" attitude is just as bad as the crazy stuff the Tea Party says.

      I really don't like Udall, but i'll not only hold my nose and vote for him, I'll put a big freaken smile on my face and pound the pavement for him until I can't walk anymore.

      You should FEAR the Republicans like our democracy and our civilization depended on it, because IT DOES!

      SHAME for even thinking of handing over power to the Republicans!

      •  Fear is not a great behavioral motivator if (6+ / 0-)

        you are trying to win an election. Big bold ideas and inspiration would serve us better in the elections. I'll vote in the mid terms but because I've voted in every election in the last 12 years after I turned 18. To people who don't vote that often or only vote in presidential elections the lesser of two evils is not a compelling reason to vote.

        If he had proposed 15$ an hour for min wage, medicare for all, real mortgage relief for homeowners, student loan forgiveness, and rejection of the keystone pipeline with real advances in tackling climate change rather than "all of the above" we would not be suffering from the same sort of enthusiasm gap we went into 2010 with.

        You need bold ideas to win. Not "Mr Romney and I have pretty much the same views on entitlements and social security." Third way does not give people a vision for a better future. Progressive policies do.

        “The further a society drifts from the truth, the more it will hate those that speak it.” George Orwell

        by Tool on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 08:13:24 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Fear (and lies) are the basis for Repub campaigns (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Tool

          That's all the Republicans have, is fear and lies, and for some crazy reason which is well beyond my understanding, it seems to work for them very well.

          •  Because fear is the root of conservatism, (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            LI Mike, bryduck

            while aspiration and hope are at the root of liberalism. Using fear as a motivating factor for people who are optimistic and are essentially the opposite of the racist, backward teabaggers  and who are not driven purely by fear will lead to the exact opposite of what you want to achieve.

            “The further a society drifts from the truth, the more it will hate those that speak it.” George Orwell

            by Tool on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 08:51:14 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  Okay, I'm listening (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        pollwatcher, Cadillac64, LI Mike

        although FEAR and SHAME aren't talking points I personally would use with someone.

        I don't believe "they're both the same." What I think I indicated was that two specific policies Udall is pushing (hard) are beyond the range of acceptable.

        Maybe you can suggest a way that dissatisfied yet active people like me can translate our willingness to work on the ground into a willingness by the senator to shift his policy? Or something else constructive?

        •  Think about the Senate and Supreme Court (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Lenny Flank, LI Mike

          I didn't mean my little rant to be directed specifically at you, but every election from here on out is critical.  We are literally on the verge of losing our democracy and causing the collapse of civilization.

          "I vote for the person, not the party".  How many times have you heard that bull shit?  Anyone who thinks their representative or Senator is Mr. Smith going to Washington to change how things are done, is as naive as Smith was.

          Look at all the important votes in congress and you'll see that both parties vote 95+% together.  So you're not voting for Udall, you are voting and working for Democratic policies to fight against the fascism of Republican policies.  Look at what the Conservatives on the SCOTUS have done to this country.  If Udall doesn't make it, we probably lose the Senate, and Obama will have 0 chance of getting another justice like the 4 in the minority.

          5 sane supreme court justices can overturn Citizens United, can stop voter suppression laws...

          So the reality is, you truly are voting for and working for a set of Democratic principles, and they are by no means perfect, and you're really not so much voting and working for the individual who's name is on the ballot.

          •  if this is true . . . . (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            pollwatcher, LI Mike
            every election from here on out is critical.  We are literally on the verge of losing our democracy and causing the collapse of civilization.
            Then we are doomed.  The Dems are simply NOT going to win every election from here on out. It's just not gonna happen.  Period.

            But then, I don't accept your premise to begin with. Not only will civilization not collapse if we lose an election, but our winning elections does not seem to be improving civilization any.

            In the end, reality always wins.

            by Lenny Flank on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 09:01:24 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Think Global Warming (0+ / 0-)

              I firmly believe civilization will collapse if we continue down the current fossil fuel path.  It will come in the form of droughts, famine, and mass migrations leading to regional wars.  The Republicans will not only do nothing to stop this, they are actually trying to speed it up.  This alone is more than enough reason to fight like crazy to stop them from gaining power.

              •  no argument from me (0+ / 0-)

                That is not in dispute.

                But that does not change the fact that: (1) Democrats simply will NOT win every election from here on out, and (2) our winning elections does not seem to have helped any.

                In the end, reality always wins.

                by Lenny Flank on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 10:35:21 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

    •  Then don't campaign for him (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Cadillac64, LI Mike

      Campaign for the Democrat running for dog catcher or justice of the peace or head librarian...

      It matters on the local level  who's in office. One of the reasons we're in a box now, we didn't show up to vote for state legislative races in 2010. These local and state races really do matter.

      Join Essa in a revolt against the gods. Continue the fight, Causality.

      by rbird on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 08:28:15 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Udall will win on immigration..!!! (0+ / 0-)
  •  Still better than... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    notallthatpolitical, LI Mike

    The Shrub:  Bush's approval ratings slide to new low

    Obama has nowhere to go but up as ACA benefits kick into high gear while Republican'ts shamble on, trying to convince people to not believe their own lying eyes...

  •  Is there anything that can be done (0+ / 0-)

    About gerrymandering? Can it be challenged it court?

    I love president Obama!!!

    by freakofsociety on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 07:54:27 AM PDT

  •  Net neutrality, bankers running the treasury (4+ / 0-)

    Why are the Republicans coming in and saving the day on Net Neutrality?

    Why has no one been arrested for the financial crisis?

    These two things are major achilles heels for the Democrats. They are beholden to Hollywood, and are weak on the financial oligarchs.

    The excessive use of television and automobiles can be hazardous to your health.

    by Greenkermie in AZ on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 08:03:00 AM PDT

    •  Stop with the old libertarian screed. This is a (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      LeftCoastTom, LI Mike, doroma

      Democrtic site. Take that shit to Firedoglake. We are voting. We are organizing and we are working to win. Don't let this same crap infest this site again. The republican budget has passed the house. No Social Security, no Medicare, no Medicaid, no food stamps, no public education. This is beyond serious. The idea is the total destruction of people on the margins.

       I do not want to hear about the g*d***ed bankers. What do you think is going to happen under Republicans? This is nonsense. This is a fight for our lives and the democracy. The financial oligarchs hate the democrats and are spending billions to defeat them. I am tired of this bullshit. I am in New York and we are stoking voters citywide; working people, people of color, women,LBGT, youth... We are just starting but we are hopeful. This is voting season. As far as I am concerned the debate is over. We have everything to lose.

       

      •  Just because you don't want to hear it... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        BradyB

        Doesn't make it a "libertarian screed" unfit for a Democratic site.

        Don't let this same crap infest this site again.
        When was the last time it did so?
        The republican budget has passed the house. No Social Security, no Medicare, no Medicaid, no food stamps, no public education. This is beyond serious. The idea is the total destruction of people on the margins.
        Yep. So for you that means...
        I do not want to hear about the g*d***ed bankers.
        If you want to live in Happy La-La Land, disconnected from reality, that's your choice. Don't expect everyone else to join you.
        What do you think is going to happen under Republicans?
        Worse. That doesn't give Democrats a pass, though.
        This is nonsense.
        I agree, your absolute refusal to hear anything that doesn't comport with the reality you've created for yourself is, indeed, quite ridiculous.
        This is a fight for our lives and the democracy.
        So why are you so afraid of calling out the Democratic Party?
        The financial oligarchs hate the democrats and are spending billions to defeat them. I am tired of this bullshit. I am in New York and we are stoking voters citywide; working people, people of color, women,LBGT, youth... We are just starting but we are hopeful. This is voting season. As far as I am concerned the debate is over. We have everything to lose.
        And the above comment to which you're objecting managed to destroy all of that progress in one fell swoop. Dammit. Back to the drawing board.




        Somebody has to do something, and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. ~ Garcia

        by DeadHead on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 11:27:18 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Your position is regressive. You are in La-la Land (0+ / 0-)

          if you think the average voter gives shit about the bankers.
          We are concerned about losing the entire safety net that those  very same bankers want to destroy. You are still fighting a past battle. They've been investigated and fined. Should it have been more aggressive and some sent to jail? Yes, but it is over and I am tired of hearing about it. I am not here to call out democrats. I am a democrat and I am here to exchange ideas about GOTV. You are here to agitate and disrupt. We  don't need this shit again. If you don't want to vote, then don't. But you are on the wrong site. We are voting our interests and voting for the party that doesn't hate us and promote hateful policies that are decidedly against our interest. . Your issues are republican right wing libertarian issues.  We are voting for the party that will promote policies, ACA for example, that uplift us. The party that promoted a jobs initiative and was blocked. You are out of step with average democrats, or the base, and we will not allow you or others to promote positions that are against or are not primary our interests.      

  •  Rejecting the Keystone Pipeline (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Yang Guang, Cadillac64, Choco8, LI Mike

    would send a huge single to the base that maybe - just maybe we are ready to turn the page on dirty fossil fuels and that we are ready for real energy solutions and not "all of the above" bs.

    We only have this one fragile planet to live on. If our study of the universe has shown that there are climates out there where diamond shards rain sideways, acid floats about in massive storms, there are extreme heats that melt obsidian and then freeze it when the planet rotates & conditions that make Dante's Inferno look like a mild day at the park.

    There is no planet B.

    If he rejects the Keystone Pipeline & does so before the midterm elections it will increase the turn out of young and environmentally conscience voters/activists. Let alone motivate them to knock on doors and get people energized.  

    “The further a society drifts from the truth, the more it will hate those that speak it.” George Orwell

    by Tool on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 08:04:28 AM PDT

  •  It just boggles my mind (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    smiley7, LI Mike

    to think that a significant number of Americans will walk into a voting booth this November and vote for Republican candidates.

    If you're not a millionaire or a certain type of paranoid anger bear, why on God's earth would you vote for a Republican at this point? I just don't get it.

    What is it that people think the Republicans are offering? When people complain about government being broken or failing to get things done, what is it they think is the cause? Are they just not paying attention?

    It just boggles my mind.

  •  not really a surprise (5+ / 0-)

    When we don't turn out, we lose. And the Dems have not given the non-political-junkies any good reason to turn out in 2014 at any higher rate than they do in any other off-year election. Which means we'll get thumped.

    It is becoming apparent that "the goppers suck more than we do !!!" won't win us elections anymore. We need to give people a reason to vote FOR us, instead of just voting AGAINST our opponents. And we are not giving them any reasons to do that--because as a party we don't have the spine to fight for (or even propose) any good reasons. Even our "bold ideas" are half-assed watered-down shit like our "immigration reform", which doesn't impress anyone. The best we have to offer is ACA--which even much of our own side considers to be weak tea.

    In a way it's surreal---US elections are now contests between two parties, both of which people hate and have zero respect for. When the approval rating for BOTH parties is lower than that for the IRS, then elections themselves have become meaningless. NOBODY is giving voters what they want.

    It is not a sustainable situation.  Sooner or later, one or both parties will simply implode, and the entire political landscape will change overnight.

    In the end, reality always wins.

    by Lenny Flank on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 08:17:14 AM PDT

  •  Obama is a disappointment (4+ / 0-)

    Hello, Long time reader hardly ever post.

    I worked hard to get Mr. Hope and Change elected in 2008, gave money, manned phones, knocked on doors, etc.  As far as I'm concerned in the big picture Obama has been a disappointment and according to recent polls it looks like I'm not alone.  There is no fight in him (or most other Dem politicians) and he has shown himself, more than once, to be naïve when dealing with Republicans.  He really is more what Republicans would be if they were more reasonable & compassionate; Protecting the special Interests, Corporations and Big Banks/Wall Street but compassionate enough to cushion the slid down and throw some crumbs out.  Does anyone doubt this.  From the current Net Neutrality to Gitmo I can state again and again where he has be lackluster and disappointing.  The Left needed a knight in Shining Armor, a leader, a rallying point, a Beacon.  We thought we found one.  We didn't.

    Why should I come out and vote for any Dem...  I know, I know to keep the Republicans from taking control of all three branches of power.. and I will come out and hold my nose and vote Dem... but that's it?  that's all the Dems have?

    Same with Hillary, she is just another Obama as far as Special Interests, Power, Corporations and Wall Street/Big Banks are concerned.  She will bring in the worst elements of the previous Clinton Administration most likely.  I will vote for her but expect no major changes, except (hoping) stopping the worst excesses of the Right while presiding over the continued loss of power of the left, of the Democratic wing of the Democratic party.

    What a disappointing dispiriting time to be a Democrat.  IMO KOS and this page should be addressing the lackluster performance of the Dem Politicians to a higher degree.  

    Rgds

    •  it may be no consolation but (0+ / 0-)

      I really think that PBO would have gotten things you mentioned accomplished if he had had a filibuster proof Dem Senate and a Dem House for more than a few months.  Even with Dem control, ACA almost got killed when Scott Brown replaced Ted Kennedy.  All of the magnificent legislation LBJ got passed was done with large majorities in both the House and Senate.  I guess this comes across as an excuse but I just don't think you can dismiss these things.  In fact, if the Senate goes to the GOP, I fully expect that PBO will be facing impeachment.

      •  Why do you think this? (0+ / 0-)

        He never even proposed that kind of lege . . .

        "Lone catch of the moon, the roots of the sigh of an idea there will be the outcome may be why?"--from a spam diary entitled "The Vast World."

        by bryduck on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 12:21:46 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Thanks for coming out of (0+ / 0-)

      lurkdom to voice your opinion, even though it is one that might disappoint many in the community.

      You probably don't need this, given how long you've been around, but...

      Welcome to Daily Kos. If you have any questions about how to participate here, you can learn more at the Community Guidelines, the Knowledge Base, and the Site Resource Diaries. Diaries labeled "Open Thread" are also great places to ask. We look forward to your contributions.
      ~~ from the DK Partners & Mentors Team.

      Words can sometimes, in moments of grace, attain the quality of deeds. --Elie Wiesel

      by a gilas girl on Wed Apr 30, 2014 at 03:59:25 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Dems were NOT +5 in 2010 just before election (4+ / 0-)

    certainly not in the aggregate of polling, which was very close to the actual result of R+6. Maybe ABC/Wapo did a terrible poll just before election day that showed that, but CNN and AP had R+13, so that is very misleading.

  •  Headline (0+ / 0-)

    should read: A LOT OF VOTERS ARE IDIOTS

  •  What it all means (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LI Mike

    I got called and answered 10 minutes or so of political poll questions several days ago.  That "Approve or disapprove of Obama's performance" question was in there.  I responded that in general, I disapproved but from the left.  I explained at some length, going on about the ACA, austerity, a proposed budget that eschews progressive insights into the nature of our problems and the role of government in fixing them, and dwelling on Obama's proposal again and again of a "Grand Bargain."  The person administering the poll seemed impatient because I am sure she had two boxes in which to register my answer, one of which she had already checked.  More than just a feeling, the fact that the poll was littered with questions framed such that a conservative leaning answer was being induced and a nuanced answer was not possible, meant that I was participating in biased polling.

    I am also sure that more than just the Washington Post poll was being done within that time frame.  Nevertheless, one would have to see the way the Post's poll coded responses like mine to understand what their data means.  Until someone has done that, I think skepticism is in order.

    •  Polls are direct and not wishy washy. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      LI Mike

      You disapprove and you are marked with the republicans. There is no nuance. This is politics. You support democrats or you don't. Your type of disapproval for the ACA, for example,
      is what keeps the disapproval numbers higher than they should be, I mean if you are a real democrat. A real democrat knows the ACA is a great achievement and does not quibble. This is reminds me of the sixties. "If your not part of the solution, your part of the problem."

      •  Having designed, administered, taken and analyzed (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        LI Mike

        polls and public opinion surveys, I have a good basis on which to disagree.  There are plenty of wishies and washies in polling, and there is a ton of research about the introduction of bias - what not to do, which by implication can be read as how to do it.  Recognizing that a question is being asked in an attempt to introduce bias in the results does not obligate me to calculate my answers to game the bias I detect.  After all, I could be wrong about the way responses are being recorded.  There could be a box for extra information, and the person reading the question could just be having a bad day.  I have found that honesty is generally the best policy, and it is what I delivered in this instance.  I offer no apologies for having done so.  The obligation to deal with bias rests on those who would use the poll results.  

  •  Bottom line: Obama has moves he can make (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LI Mike

    Already mentioned coming out for expanding Social Security upthread. Net Neutrality is another no-brainer. We lose on that, Dems won't turn out in November.

    Rejecting Keystone before the midterms is probably too risky. But if Obama has made the decision to nix KXL, I would hope they've done extensive polling on the issue to find out if helps or hurts with voters. If nixing the pipeline GOTV, then you totally do it.

    •  There are many issues. (0+ / 0-)

      You have only mentioned two. Keeping Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid ,Hud, Food Stamps, Education. Every thing is on the line. These are bread and butter issues. That is what will make working people turn out. For people of color, voter's rights and the republicans endemic hatred for people of color is a big motivator. I work with blacks, hispanics and asians and we are afraid. We must turn out and vote our interests. This is what I am working for. GOTV.

      Note: people of color have historically been underrepresented in the polls.

  •  hope I'm wrong (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LI Mike

    but to quote Han (and Lando, and Luke, and Leia, and C3PO)...

    I've got a bad feeling about this.

  •  For goodness sakes (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Proud Liberal Dem, LI Mike

    another one of these polls.  Do we have a President

    Romney?  Did the Democrats lose the Senate?

    Republicans won the house because of gerrymandering the

    Democrats won the popular vote.

    My point here is, the majority of the polls do not reflect

    the views of the average American and this has been

    proven time and time again.  

    Our focus should be connecting with the communities and

    ensuring we have all of the available means to get them to

    the polls.

    Everything that we see is a shadow cast by that which we do not see. Martin Luther King, Jr.

    by destiny1 on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 08:42:12 AM PDT

  •  President seriously needs to get engaged (0+ / 0-)

    and get in campaign mode and go out on the road and GET FIRED UP about OBAMACARE, and point out exactly what happens if the GOP Gets in in November!!! Get going Mr. President, we know you can do it!

  •  We've been burned too many times (0+ / 0-)

    not to take polls like this seriously. Propaganda does work on some people.

  •  This is our problem (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LI Mike

    Dems should be winning. Period. This is consistent, and the crux of our problem. Or Americans are just crazy stupid.

     photo 376b5f92-e0ba-40a3-9779-ffb94fee1a12_zpscb299523.jpg

    Money should be treated like any other controlled substance; if you can't use it responsibly then you don't get to use it.

    by La Gitane on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 08:48:44 AM PDT

  •  Here's an odd thought. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Choco8, LI Mike

    Let me put my genius hat on here and give a piece of advice to the Party:

    Energize. The. Fucking. Base.

    No appealing to mealy-mouthed indies who likely won't vote anyway, actually offer up real proposals (even if you can't get them passed) and deliver for your constituents. Obamacare is good, but it's simply not enough, if we're counting on that to be the main appeal then we're fucked.

    The denial that I am seeing up and down this thread is just sad. The President is NOT a very popular figure (and I think he should be, at least more than 41%) but we shouldn't be dealing in what we think, we need to deal with what is! (I have reasons why I think he's not so popular, but this isn't the thread.)

    But back to basics, energize the base, energize the base, energize the base, and when you're done doing that, energize the base some fucking more! Baby steps is how you learn to run, but it is not running! Boldness and strength are needed, not "the other guys suck."

    "Been made accomplice to all that I promised I would never fucking be!" Propaghandi

    by Yang Guang on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 08:52:14 AM PDT

    •  The president is very popular in my community (0+ / 0-)

      and in most of the communities representing his real base; blacks, hispanics, women and youth. They know what a lifesaver ACA is, and jobs and infrastructure programs could be. Expanded medicaid has helped millions. The people we don't need to concern ourselves about are mealy mouthed libertarians who have hated Obama from day one.  

  •  The poll from April 2010 (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LI Mike

    There was indeed an ABC poll from April '10 that had Dems leading by 5. It was pretty much an outlier. Most other polls around the same time had the GOP leading, and by July ABC had them leading as well by 4 points.

    http://www.realclearpolitics.com/...

    I'm still worried. I think it will be bad. I'm praying we can hold the senate.

  •  This is not a good poll for us (mostly) (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LI Mike

    and I am loathe to claim that every "bad" poll is fake or "skewed", however, this is only one poll and we shouldn't lose our heads over it regardless of how bad it might seem.  First off, President Obama and the Dems have the voter's trust on several issues and their approval rating dwarfs the Republicans.  Second of all, whatever problems people have with the ACA (and I believe that many of these results are from misinformation/lies from GOP, Fox, Kochs), the fact remains that the Republicans don't have an alternative plan, let alone a bill they're prepared to vote on.  Third, the poll results seem strange.  Dems have the voters' trust on several issues but nearly 60% of people still plan to vote for Republicans for Congress?  Really?  And President Obama has lost a lot of non-white support but why?

  •  polls mean nothing now. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    notallthatpolitical

    Except for us political junkies, the majority of voter do not pay atteniton to election until 2 weeks before the vote.

  •  Here is a fun exercise: (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LI Mike

    imagine that you are trying to convince a working class non-voter into voting for Democrats this November, but you CANNOT mention the Republican Party as part of your argument. You have to sell the Democrats solely on their own merits, without comparing them to other parties.

    I work with a bunch of non-voters, and I constantly find myself in this predicament. The Democratic Party as a product is terrible. Absent the "but Republicans are so much worse" argument we have almost nothing to stand on.

  •  Can't depend on Republicans (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LI Mike
    Six months for Republicans to nominate awful candidates and run their mouths about rape.

    Assuming that your opponents will make the worst moves is abominably bad strategy.

    We, not only Democratic candidates but everybody who posts a comment on dKos, should be getting out the awful things that Republican incumbents have done in the past. We should be putting the word out in blog posts and LTEs in local media every day between now and Labor Day.

  •  Bush Fatigue :: Obama Fatigue (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LI Mike

    The GOP lost Congress and the WH in a big way. GWB fatigue had a lot to do with this. This is déjà-vu all over again, only the roles are swapped. Unless the Democrats can come up with something big that generates momentum then this is not looking good. As long as the Democrats are positioned as "safe" for the Oligarchy then they will never raise enthusiasm in the base. The best we can do is mimic what the Republicans did, wait out the fatigue. At some point Obama will cease to be an effective negative political issue.

    •  Congress gridlock fatigue (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      The Wizard

      And a significant and almost insurmountable barrier to turnout:

      As long as the Democrats are positioned as "safe" for the Oligarchy then they will never raise enthusiasm in the base.
      Yep.  That undercuts everything about the Congress and allows the incumbency protection racket to continue until some group with charisma primaries the hell out of them in every Congressional District.

      50 states, 210 media market, 435 Congressional Districts, 3080 counties, 192,480 precincts

      by TarheelDem on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 10:41:34 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  First of all, this isn't 2010...GOP enthusiasm is (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LI Mike, Danali

    way down....

    Thanks to Cliven Bundy, Trey Radel, Michael Grimm, and Vance McAllister....and the war on women...

    Immigration and income inequality have the GOP divided...

    Also, enthusiasm will continue to grow in support of Obamacare...as the economy continues upward and the Ukraine crisis becomes a memory by November....

    The best Dems can do is hold the Senate anyway, and I think they will....

  •  41 percent. Christ. I hate voters. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    GoGoGoEverton

    Good thing the ACA is now 'popular.'  It is with me, but I'm easy.

    The only thing keeping us from another 2010 is the fact we already had a 2010, in 2010.  The GOP doesn't have many seats left to win.

    Did I mention my feelings about voters?  And of course, NON-voters?

    And of course, peruse that 'fact-check on Hillary' diary on the wreck list, and you'll see plenty of non-voters are on 'our' side.

  •  I hate to say it but I really believe sometimes (0+ / 0-)

    that the American people are just too stupid to help themselves. Its just so depressing. The Cons are just so bad for 90% of voters on economic issue, its unbelievable that its even this close.

    "The Earth is my country and Science my religion" Christiaan Huygens. The gold standard ended on August 15, 1971, its time we start acting like it. If we can afford full employment killing Germans, we can afford full employment during peace-time.

    by Auburn Parks on Tue Apr 29, 2014 at 01:05:11 PM PDT

  •  Free public higher education (0+ / 0-)

    It would cost by some estimates 90 billion to give students in public universities a free education. Would that fire up the base? What an idea ...

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