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As probably everyone in the nation knows by now, Coloradans over 21 can buy and use marijuana throughout the state. And yet civilization has not collapsed. Just as it didn't collapse after 2000, the year Colorado legalized marijuana for medicinal purposes with Amendment 20.

Sane laws that, let us hope, are universal throughout the states within a decade or so.

But, despite Coloradans' herbal far-sightedness, there's a problem. An infuriating problem that should have been resolved with a modest legal tweak years ago, but was blocked once again this week by a 6-5 vote in a state House committee.

Amendment 20 sets forth the "debilitating medical conditions" for which medical marijuana is legal. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder is not included. But the law includes means for adding conditions to the list. For years, Brian Vicente, attorney for Sensible Colorado and author of Amendment 64, which legalized recreational marijuana in 2012, has tried to get PTSD added to the list. Six states now accept a diagnosis of PTSD as grounds for giving someone a medical marijuana ID card.

Why should this matter now that military veterans afflicted with PTSD who want to relieve their symptoms can buy recreational pot in Colorado from the same dispensaries that sell it to people who just want to get a buzz on? The problem is that if they self-medicate this way they can lose their federal benefits since the law does not recognize pot as a legitimate treatment.

Please read below the fold for more on this situation.

Both legislative efforts and two petitions to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment have been employed to get PTSD listed. To no avail. The health department has refused to hold a hearing on the matter. This year, Democratic state Rep. Jonathan Singer introduced House Bill 14-1364, which would have added PTSD to the list. At a hearing on the bill before House Committee on State, Military and Veterans Affairs Monday, CDPHE representatives testified against the move. As Michael Roberts at Westword reported:

Among those who spoke against the measure at yesterday's hearing was Dr. Larry Wolk, who's served as the CDPHE's executive director and chief medical officer since last September.

"His argument against the bill was essentially that there's not enough data out there to show that PTSD is assisted by cannabis," Vicente notes, adding, "The CDPHE says they need federal studies, but the federal government won't authorize those studies. So the department has basically been in lockstep with the federal government, putting hurdles in front of any progress in this area." [...]

In the meantime, Vicente says, "we're still hearing from dozens of veterans and PTSD sufferers every year who want this to be recognized as legitimate medicine. We need to figure out if we'll work again with honorable representatives like Jonathan Singer or petition the state health department. But we feel this is an important issue to keep fighting for."

Last month, the federal government finally has signed off on a single PTSD-mariuana study, but its results could be a long time coming.

For years during and after the Vietnam War, the U.S. government did not recognize PTSD as a medical condition at all. Indeed, members of the armed services were sometimes dishonorably discharged for behavior stemming from PTSD, thus losing any benefits they would otherwise have received, including medical treatment.

It makes no sense now for Colorado—or any of the other 14 medical marijuana states that don't recognize pot as treatment for PTSD—to continue to do so.

Originally posted to Meteor Blades on Thu May 01, 2014 at 01:12 PM PDT.

Also republished by DKos Cannabis Law and Drug War Reform, Colorado COmmunity, and Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  the fight continues... (19+ / 0-)
    For years during and after the Vietnam War, the U.S. government did not recognize PTSD as a medical condition at all. Indeed, members of the armed services were sometimes dishonorably discharged for behavior stemming from PTSD, thus losing any benefits they would otherwise have received, including medical treatment.

    It makes no sense now for Colorado, or any of the other 14 medical marijuana states that don't recognize pot as treatment for PTSD to continue to do so.

    Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "I’m not the strapping young Muslim socialist that I used to be" - Barack Obama 04/27/2013 (@eState4Column5).

    by annieli on Thu May 01, 2014 at 01:18:19 PM PDT

  •  Legal question (10+ / 0-)

    In the six states that recognize marijuana as a valid treatment for PTSD, has the federal government done anything to those veterans' benefits?  I'm surprised the federal government defers to state-level determinations about something the feds continue to oppose.

    It's not the side effects of the cocaine/I'm thinking that it must be love

    by Rich in PA on Thu May 01, 2014 at 01:19:03 PM PDT

  •  Only in America can something be legal at the (14+ / 0-)

    state level and illegal at the federal. Legal to use recreationally and illegal to use medically.

    No we aren't confused...

    Join the DeRevolution: We are not trying to take the country, we are trying to take the country back. Get the money out of politics with public financed campaigns so 'Of the People, By the People and For the People' rings true again.

    by fToRrEeEsSt on Thu May 01, 2014 at 01:49:40 PM PDT

  •  I believe that we should approach this from (9+ / 0-)

    another direction. The strains of cannabis that seem to have the most medically beneficial effects have higher CBD to THC ratio strains which do not produce much of a THC high. We need to divorce marijuana or pot used recreationally from the medically beneficial strains of cannabis plants that have higher concentrations of CBD.

    It is just plain stupid to continue to allow the prohibitionist to frame the entire debate around the medical benefits of herbal cannabis by using the stereotypes created around the mythology of marijuana. Why can't we just stop agreeing with their rhetoric and instead argue about the real medicinal value of the actual cannabinoid drugs produced by the resin glands of cannabis plants.

    There is actually quite a bit of scientific study done on cannabinoid drugs, mostly offshore, that could be used to persuade lawmakers if and only if we stop trying allowing the prohibitionist to control the language of the discussion. Herbal cannabis and industrial hemp are not marijuana and we need to stop agreeing with the prohibitionists that they are. Please just stop calling herbal cannabis medical marijuana! The drugs produced by the cannabis plants are called cannabinoids.

    Really don't mind if you sit this one out. My words but a whisper -- your deafness a SHOUT. I may make you feel but I can't make you think..Jethro Tull

    by RMForbes on Thu May 01, 2014 at 01:53:55 PM PDT

    •  You know, of course, how utterly unwilling... (13+ / 0-)

      ...politicians are to accept scientific studies that weren't done here. We knew about radiation poisoning of uranium miners from Czech studies in the 1930s, but didn't do anything about it until the 1960s.

      Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

      by Meteor Blades on Thu May 01, 2014 at 01:58:48 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Some people that don't get relief from opioids do (4+ / 0-)

      not get the cbd benefit either.

    •  I understand the politics of bifurcating ... (6+ / 0-)

      cannabis into 'medical' and 'recreational' uses, but I hate the term 'recreational'. Why is it anyone's business as to WHY someone would be a consumer of cannabis? Is the paternal hand of government going to dictate HOW one consumes their 'recreational' cannabis next?
      Are we asked at the purchase counter we are using this bottle of scotch for 'recreational' purposes?? NO! No one gives a shit.


      Some days it just makes more sense to climb out of the window when I leave my house.

      by glb3 on Thu May 01, 2014 at 03:46:06 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I agree but that's not my point (4+ / 0-)

        Marijuana is no more a drug than herbal tea. The drugs produced by the resin glands located primarily in the female flowers of cannabis plants are called cannabinoids and we should be focused upon these actual drugs when we are discussing the medicinal effects and benefits.

        When we look at it like we would every other herbal drug there would be little or no purely recreational use because cannabinoids effectively treats insomnia caused by the stress of modern life. Most if not all cannabis use could be considered in reality medicinal. However, I would agree that most so called "stoners" would not think they are using herbal cannabis medicinally even if they very likely are. The problem we have came out of the stereotypes created by the mythology of marijuana. It's time to undo this rhetoric.

        Really don't mind if you sit this one out. My words but a whisper -- your deafness a SHOUT. I may make you feel but I can't make you think..Jethro Tull

        by RMForbes on Thu May 01, 2014 at 04:05:05 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Food in general could be classified as medicinal. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          oldpotsmuggler

          It keeps us alive, and the vitamins and minerals have a beneficial reaction with our bodies.


          Some days it just makes more sense to climb out of the window when I leave my house.

          by glb3 on Thu May 01, 2014 at 04:11:04 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  True, but on the other hand food could become (3+ / 0-)

            poison if too much is consumed too fast. Many healthy vegetables become toxic very quickly if they are not consumed in moderation. That is not true of cannabinoids. The herbal cannabinoids found in cannabis resins are some of the most therapeutic and least toxic substances known.  

            Really don't mind if you sit this one out. My words but a whisper -- your deafness a SHOUT. I may make you feel but I can't make you think..Jethro Tull

            by RMForbes on Thu May 01, 2014 at 04:22:18 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I'm confused. (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              oldpotsmuggler

              Beyond my interest in discovering those toxic vegetables you refer to, I'm not sure if you are a supporter of legalizing cannabis, as I am.


              Some days it just makes more sense to climb out of the window when I leave my house.

              by glb3 on Thu May 01, 2014 at 05:00:39 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  No true Scotsman would... (3+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                RMForbes, Santa Susanna Kid, grover

                How about agree to disagree about who is the greatest supporter of cannabis. With that done let's work to make cannabis products more acceptable from a medical and recreational standpoint.

              •  Many common vegetables produce small amounts (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Santa Susanna Kid

                of natural pesticide toxins which become toxic to us if we eat more than our body's can detoxify. That is not true of cannabis or cannabinoid drugs.

                Come on, you know very well that I'm a huge advocate to end the ridiculous prohibition against all the more than 50,000 uses of the cannabis genus of plants. I nearly died circulating the CCHI2014 petition to legalize cannabis completely in California. All you have to do is click on my name to look at my history here.

                Really don't mind if you sit this one out. My words but a whisper -- your deafness a SHOUT. I may make you feel but I can't make you think..Jethro Tull

                by RMForbes on Thu May 01, 2014 at 06:35:17 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

        •  How about air? (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          oldpotsmuggler

          "the northern lights have seen queer sights, but the queerest they ever did see was the night on the marge of Lake Lebarge when I cremated Sam McGee" - Robert Service, Bard of the Yukon

          by Joe Jackson on Thu May 01, 2014 at 04:56:16 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  correction ... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        oldpotsmuggler, weezilgirl

        ...counter whether we...


        Some days it just makes more sense to climb out of the window when I leave my house.

        by glb3 on Thu May 01, 2014 at 04:07:12 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  I see your point, but... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        oldpotsmuggler, RMForbes

        I see it more as being asked about whether that diazepam you've been prescribed as being for medical or recreational purposes. In the US, naproxen used to be only available with a prescription, now it is available OTC as Aleve. It will take time for me to accept cannabis for recreational purposes, I would like to see this associated with better QA/QC than currently exists.

      •  As a "green card" holder in Wa State (3+ / 0-)

        Washington State is trying to work out the logistics of regulating medical and non-medical uses of marijuana. As I understand it, the concern is that the State of Washington is leaning toward putting both under one regulatory umbrella. The problem is that medical is different than non-medical marijuana and to put them all in the same category really devalues the very real medical uses of the drug.

        I was prescribed -- and used -- medical marijuana to counter side effects of chemotherapy. I used more than one form of the drug -- one kind to help me sleep and another to help me keep nausea down and allow me to work during the day. In reality, MM allowed me to stop taking some very powerful pharmaceuticals, which is of course why the pharmaceutical industry opposes MM so much.

        In essence, I think there is a really meaningful reason for the bifurcation and it is something that policy makers need to keep in mind when states legalize marijuana for both medical and recreational uses.

    •  Yes, exactly (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      oldpotsmuggler, RMForbes, grover

      My son has a form of epilepsy classified as Lennox-Gestaut Syndrome (LGS) and is being put on the list for a trial with the GWPharma CBD. Your comment is spot-on. The recreational angle is interfering with the potential medical benefits of cannabis extracts. As a chemist I have become very frustrated with those who are only after the THC and not understanding the extraordinary benefits that CBD could provide. In the diaries context, it would be interesting if there was a study that can show PTSD resulting from some form of inflammation that CBD might be able to address.

  •  I'm willing to participate in a PTSD/POT study (3+ / 0-)

    as long as I don't have to first be bombarded with more stress. Especially traumatic stress.

    Add me to the control group and then give me the bong.

  •  I'm not going to argue for PTSD special treatment (7+ / 0-)
    The problem is that if they self-medicate this way they can lose their federal benefits since the law does not recognize pot as a legitimate treatment.
    That's sort of correct.  The problem is that federal law doesn't recognize pot as legitimate, in any form.

    If a PTSD soldier self-medicates with a  fifth of whisky a day, does he lose his federal benefits?  If he smokes two packs of tobacco a day, does he lose benefits?
    No, because those substances are legal, regardless of whether they are "legitimate treatment" or not.

    If the federal government gave a damn at all about veterans (and it's clear it doesn't), and gave a damn about civil liberties at all (it's clear it doesn't), it would end the War on Drugs and just legalize all of it and end this nonsense.

    Sorry, I'm not going to argue for special marijuana federal rights only for those with PTSD.  I'm not going to wait for or depend on medical research to validate pot for PTSD.  It may or may not ever come.  But people have the right to self-medicate with pot if it helps them regardless of whether a team of doctors agree.  So I'm going to argue for the federal government to stop banning drugs altogether.

    •  We're on the same page when it... (9+ / 0-)

      ...comes to drug bans.

      But given the impact PTSD has on those who have it and the families who are harmed by it, I'm not willing to wait the many years it will take for the feds to get out of the War on (some) Drugs®.

      A person who gets a medical marijuana card for treating glaucoma or alleviating problems associated with cancer therapy doesn't lose his or her right to obtain student loans (the way a convicted recreational smoker can), so why should veterans with PTSD lose their federal benefits.

      Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

      by Meteor Blades on Thu May 01, 2014 at 03:16:46 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I don't understand the distinction (0+ / 0-)

        If the feds don't recognize Colorado's legalization of recreational pot, why would it recognize its legalization of medical pot?

        •  Obviously, interpretations around marijuana... (3+ / 0-)

          ...for medical use are in transition because the laws are and likely to remain so for a while. The so-called Ogden Memo is operative federally, although there is still ambiguity. The memo is from Deputy A.G. David W. Ogden in October 2009. Here is the relevant language:

          The prosecution of significant traffickers of illegal drugs, including marijuana, and the disruption of illegal drug manufacturing and trafficking networks continues to be a core priority in the Department’s efforts against narcotics and dangerous drugs, and the Department’s investigative and prosecutorial resources should be directed towards these objectives. As a general matter, pursuit of these priorities should not focus federal resources in your States on individuals whose actions are in clear and unambiguous compliance with existing state laws providing for the medical use of marijuana. For example, prosecution of individuals with cancer or other serious illnesses who use marijuana as part of a recommended treatment regimen consistent with applicable state law, or those caregivers in clear and unambiguous compliance with existing state law who provide such individuals with marijuana, is unlikely to be an efficient use of limited federal resources. [...]

          This guidance regarding resource allocation does not “legalize” marijuana or provide a legal defense to a violation of federal law, nor is it intended to create any privileges, benefits, or rights, substantive or procedural, enforceable by any individual, party or witness in any administrative, civil, or criminal matter. Nor does clear and unambiguous compliance with state law or the absence of one or all of the above factors create a legal defense to a violation of the Controlled Substances Act. Rather, this memorandum is intended solely as a guide to the exercise of investigative and prosecutorial discretion.

          Don't tell me what you believe, show me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

          by Meteor Blades on Thu May 01, 2014 at 06:58:51 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Okay, but still... (0+ / 0-)
            This guidance regarding resource allocation does not “legalize” marijuana or provide a legal defense to a violation of federal law, nor is it intended to create any privileges, benefits, or rights, substantive or procedural, enforceable by any individual, party or witness in any administrative, civil, or criminal matter.
            Translation:  If the feds want to take federal benefits away from veterans with PTSD who smoke pot, they can.  And what the federal government can do, it usually does.  So that's not much comfort.
      •  Federal benefits? Are we talking monetary (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        RMForbes

        compensation or medical care?  Because I thought the only way one could lose their monetary compensation is conbiction of a felony and would marijuana use be considered a misdemeanor?  Also, the ACLU should take this up as we all know the chemicals used at the VA do contain heroin, etc.  We also know that they get so many veterans on a cocktail of prescribed meds for the big pharma and then send them into detox facilities for va prescribed and non va prescribed meds.
        We also know that chemical that helped with the ptsd onset of chemical imbalances was called AGENT ORANGE and for what purpose did that stuff do for the good of the vet and believe PTSD should also be added to the list of herbicide exposure after sitting three days with an expert who wrote all the enviornmental toxin agents newsletters for the VA.

        Just how much Koch do Right Wingers want in their life? . United Veterans of America

        by Vetwife on Fri May 02, 2014 at 04:19:57 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  I think they are afraid that if studies do show it (9+ / 0-)

    to be beneficial the VA will have to pay for the treatment.

    Of course, the cost of medical marijuana would probably be no greater than anti-depressives or whatever other drugs are being prescribed, but big Pharma doesn't stand to make a profit from it.

  •  They don't know what they are doing. (9+ / 0-)

    As I've posted here before - marijuana has given me (mostly) back my life.

    I had a diagnoses of PTSD and, of course, panic disorder.  I couldn't even go shopping if there were too many people in a store (among other things).  Since I got my MM license (thank you California), there are many things I can do that I hadn't been able to do in almost 10 years.

    I didn't believe it at first, I didn't think it would help... but it's been a godsend.  

    I will have to check out the CBD strains and see if my dispensary has some.

    It is better to light a candle than curse the darkness- Unknown -7.50, -5.03

    by dawgflyer13 on Thu May 01, 2014 at 04:08:21 PM PDT

    •  All strains of herbal cannabis have CDB (4+ / 0-)

      CBD is a primary cannabinoid drug found in cannabis resins just like THC. Strains that have higher concentrations of CBD will produce a mellower THC high with less sleepiness and less memory loss than the strains that have lower CBD content and the same level of THC. The dispensaries that we deal with advertise both the THC and CBD content of the products they sell.

      Really don't mind if you sit this one out. My words but a whisper -- your deafness a SHOUT. I may make you feel but I can't make you think..Jethro Tull

      by RMForbes on Thu May 01, 2014 at 04:35:38 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I have a fellow Vet friend (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      RMForbes, flo58, Vetwife, Eric Nelson

      who had been undergoing treatment for PTSD at the VA here in L.A. He attempted suicide twice, his marriage dissolved, and he could not hold down a job for more than two weeks at a time. He was diligently following his VA doctor's drug protocol. Me and another friend intervened and drove/forced him to go get his Ca card and he quit the pharma products and began MMJ. Within two weeks, nightmares went away, he was very stable and "sleeping like a baby", (said with a huge smile). Within 6 months, he had repaired his marriage, and had held down a job with a great future outlook. It saved his life; I am glad he is still around; he has much to contribute...SSK

      "Hey Clinton, I'm bushed" - Keith Richards UID 194838

      by Santa Susanna Kid on Thu May 01, 2014 at 08:54:48 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Thank you for pointing out this problem (4+ / 0-)

    which I was unaware of.

    Sure once I was young and impulsive, I wore every conceivable pin. Even went to socialist meetings, learned all the old union hymns. Ah, but I've grown older and wiser. And that's why I'm turning you in. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u52Oz-54VYw

    by SouthernLiberalinMD on Thu May 01, 2014 at 04:42:25 PM PDT

  •  Tweeted to @HHSGov & @DeptVetAffairs (6+ / 0-)

    Because this is really a 50 State issue, even though both Colorado and Washington allow adult citizens to obtain and use cannabis legally.

    Thanks for writing, even if it only improved the life of one Veteran, it would be worth the effort.


    "I like paying taxes...with them, I buy Civilization"

    by Angie in WA State on Thu May 01, 2014 at 05:27:25 PM PDT

  •  Veterans deserve the very best pot available (4+ / 0-)

    Let me know when they start passing it out

    Happy just to be alive

    by exlrrp on Thu May 01, 2014 at 06:55:13 PM PDT

  •  Copped bit of a buzz just from lead photo. TY MB. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Eric Nelson
  •  I'm very glad that a study has been signed off on (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    RMForbes, Meteor Blades, KenBee

    ..and wanted to post a comment from a few days ago showing that the Federal government has not only been studying the medical benefits of medical marijuana but has been supplying this gentleman with a prescription for 30 years:
    The real dope on medical pot
    The federal government says medical marijuana is a schedule one controlled substance. But they've been sending it to me, to use as medicine, for 30 years - BY  Irvin Rosenfeld | August 20, 2013

    Starting in the late 1960s, the University of Mississippi operated a federally approved and legal marijuana farm and production facility. The National Institute on Drug Abuse contracts with the university’s lab to grow, harvest, process and ship marijuana to licensed facilities across the country for research purposes.
    [...]
    Today, there are only four of us still alive, who continue to receive our medical marijuana from the feds — living, breathing symbols of our government’s medical marijuana hypocrisy. By sending me my medicine every month, it acknowledges cannabis works as medicine — which is why it is inexplicable to me that pot continues to be classified as a Schedule I controlled substance under federal law.
    Shouldn't that count for something? A Federal facility that has been doing this work for that long seems like a good place to start - imo

    Thx MB

  •  Caught this article at Vox ... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    KenBee

    The feds are looking to score 650 kilos of weed
    Updated by German Lopez on May 2, 2014, 6:20 p.m. ET

    Snippet:

    This is a big deal: it means the federal government is moving closer and closer to accepting marijuana for research and, potentially, medical purposes. It's worth noting, however, that substantial regulatory barriers remain, even though there is some evidence marijuana can treat some medical conditions better than conventional medicine.

    [...]

    The nonprofit Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS), which has been pushing the federal government to loosen its restrictions on marijuana, was quick to point out that NIDA still holds a monopoly over marijuana for research. MAPS President Rick Doblin said his organization will continue working to end that monopoly.

    Researchers often complain that, as a result of NIDA's monopoly, they've had to abide to extra regulatory hurdles to conduct medical marijuana research. The process can extend a study's approval by months or even years, on top of the Food and Drug Administration process that medical drug research typically goes through.

    The monopoly also puts medical marijuana in a contradictory legal area: it's legal, at least in some states, for private growers to supply marijuana for medical consumption, but it's not possible for researchers to go to the same private growers to find out if the marijuana is safe for medical consumption in the first place.

    Read more... Also a map of What's the status of marijuana in the United States?

    http://www.vox.com/...

    I would rather spend my life searching for truth than live a single day within the comfort of a lie. ~ John Victor Ramses

    by KayCeSF on Fri May 02, 2014 at 05:26:54 PM PDT

  •  Thanks Meteor Blades for exposing this outrageous (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Meteor Blades, KenBee

    obstinate refusal to aid our Wounded Warriors. Probably being held up by the same assholes that wave the flag and yell "support the troops" when they want us to go on some misadventure in a foreign country. Makes me really angry when those troops return home broken in mind and body and these same "Patriots" react with "crickets" when it comes to help/benefits for Veterans. Just makes me want to go out and "kick some right wing ass".

    "Three things cannot be long hidden: The Sun, The Moon, and The Truth." Buddha

    by Grandson named me Papa on Fri May 02, 2014 at 05:44:49 PM PDT

  •  Alcohol can be medicinal too, (0+ / 0-)

    so can some herbs in my garden, but a prescription?  Pharma pot is a phony angle. Phony. It's like America has to fool itself into decriminalizing.  Otherwise how could it live with its stupidity and all the jailed 'offenders'.
    Michigan has medical marijuana laws, and anyone can find dr. Feel good, anyone, if they also want pay the dr. to be a state registered, card carrying, stoner.  

    Are you saying the VA will strip health benefits from a vet who smokes pot in Colorado?
    Or is the federal government supposed to be buying pot for vets?
    I don't get it.
    What's next, Medicaid

  •  Heat changes the THC (0+ / 0-)

    When you smoke or cook Canabanoids you change the composition of the tHC.  I know by experience and have dozens of quaintness who know this also.  I never heat my mariuana any more, I am tired of being high.  I have not been high in ten years.  But I do use canabanoids every day.  I use them for removing Precancerous growths on my face and head.  The benefit of fresh Mariuana  Is starting to be studied and seems to be the best part of the medical treatment.  I'm really surprised that no one brought this up.  There is so much evidence surfacing at this time.  Mac

    Some truth will always be, among the lies we see.

    by waukez on Fri May 02, 2014 at 07:52:17 PM PDT

  •  I can't think of any benefit that would be lost (0+ / 0-)

    by smoking pot or by using any other drug.  You won't lose compensation or pension benefits. You won't be denied a VA loan guarantee. Your VA healthcare will not be revoked.  You keep your GI Bill benefits.  It doesn't matter whether the use is legal or not.  There is no GOP style drug testing requirements for benefits.

    That said, you may get removed from certain residential programs that have zero tolerance requirements to stay in the programs. Also, incarceration based on criminal convictions could effect monetary benefits.  Considering the legality of MJ in Co. though, this wouldn't be an issue.

  •  I believe the solution (0+ / 0-)

    is for Congress And/or this admin to direct the DEA to Completely De-Schedule (remove cannabis from Fed CSA) and allow states to decide how they want to regulate it.

    We're gonna have to insist upon that, cuz--well Congress could give a crap about Vets (or any of the rest of us for that matter)...Our Vets need Us to support Them--at this juncture.
    It is a Botanical Medicine-Not some "manufactured wicked chemical blend" that causes more damage than it treats, in far too many instances.

    As a matter of fact, The American Herbal Pharmacopoeia has just published their first Cannabis Monograph in Dec 2013--a second is due to be published later this summer.

    Cannabis apparently, was listed in The American Herbal Pharmacopoeia from the middle of the 1800's until 1942 after cannabis prohibition in 1937, forced it's removal.

    http://www.naturalnews.com/...

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