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net neutrality sign

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler has been reacting to the backlash against his proposal to gut net neutrality with a lot of excuses for why he's ready to give the internet away to the big service providers, despite the fact that President Obama—the guy who nominated him for this job—has been a proponent of net neutrality since 2006. Wheeler speaks as though he doesn't have any other options than giving this big gift to the industry, but that's not true.

For example, there's this fix proposed by Mozilla, which the company has filed with the FCC.

Instead of thinking of an Internet service as a connection between a broadband provider and a subscriber, the agency needs to recognize that there is also a third party involved in the relationship, it said in a blog post. Subscribers are using that Internet service to connect to Websites, apps, and content providers.

Mozilla is proposing the FCC create a new definition for these relationships by calling them "remote delivery services." And as such, it says it should be regulated like a Title II communication service under the Communications Act.

"Our petition asks the FCC to adopt a modern understanding of the Internet in a way to reach Title II directly and quickly," said Chris Riley, senior policy engineer at Mozilla."This will also ensure that the FCC can adopt meaningful Net neutrality rules with no blocking and no paid prioritization that will stand up in court."

Mozilla believes that this is a more direct route for the FCC to justify what it needs to do to keep net neutrality—reclassify broadband essentially as a utility that can be directly regulated like other "common carriers" like phone companies. The FCC has the clear legal authority to reclassify internet service providers, although right now it appears not to have the political will. The big broadband providers, such as AT&T, Comcast and Verizon, wouldn't like it a bit and for right now, that's who has the FCC's collective ear.

Help us stop the FCC from crushing net neutrality. Please sign our petition.

Originally posted to Joan McCarter on Mon May 05, 2014 at 12:39 PM PDT.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (145+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    CwV, smiley7, ratcityreprobate, Wendy Slammo, twigg, LinSea, Softlanded, markthshark, charlatan, fiercefilms, bakeneko, Publius2008, allergywoman, TomP, jaf49, GeorgeXVIII, Emerson, mikidee, Gowrie Gal, Its the Supreme Court Stupid, HeyMikey, Iberian, profundo, Mr Robert, Matt Z, Norm in Chicago, hubcap, BMScott, Subterranean, Bill in Portland Maine, Burned, Brown Thrasher, kevinpdx, nerafinator, The Jester, maryabein, sb, john07801, Witgren, ferg, libera nos, fijiancat, JayC, MidwestTreeHugger, Involuntary Exile, wayoutinthestix, side pocket, oceanview, Simplify, blueoregon, Alizaryn, HoundDog, DRo, antooo, jadt65, CoolOnion, Alice Venturi, ovals49, Youffraita, paulex, badscience, owlbear1, Bluesee, sfbob, belinda ridgewood, WisePiper, Portia Elm, fumie, sobermom, smileycreek, elwior, katiec, Sun Tzu, BobTheHappyDinosaur, fcvaguy, Steven D, Sylv, Skyye, Clive all hat no horse Rodeo, bobswern, ginimck, sawgrass727, trumpeter, Krush, terrybuck, Jim P, OldDragon, renzo capetti, SteelerGrrl, duhban, dadadata, Pluto, myboo, Jesse Douglas, 4Freedom, eeff, NonnyO, iburl, Mokurai, Possiamo, splashy, BlueInARedState, Lencialoo, LarryNM, meg, 3rock, ModerateJosh, Shockwave, Tinfoil Hat, shaf, Lword2, bloomer 101, Subversive, Words In Action, sfarkash, Tommymac, Richard Villiers, Lordcaradoc, Risen Tree, Kymidei, Rosaura, Liberal Thinking, Albanius, golem, Creosote, The Lone Apple, Byron from Denver, OHdog, democracy inaction, Diana in NoVa, Desi, allenjo, rhutcheson, wildweasels, Sir Roderick, antirove, Gwennedd, sendtheasteroid, theskepticarena, ptressel, Sharon Wraight, Oh Mary Oh, dalef77, davidincleveland, dewolf99

    "The NSA’s capability at any time could be turned around on the American people, and no American would have any privacy left, such is the capability to monitor everything. [...] There would be no place to hide."--Frank Church

    by Joan McCarter on Mon May 05, 2014 at 12:39:52 PM PDT

  •  exactly-but folks like Ed Markey need to like this (19+ / 0-)
    Mozilla believes that this is a more direct route for the FCC to justify what it needs to do to keep net neutrality—reclassify broadband essentially as a utility that can be directly regulated like other "common carriers" like phone companies. The FCC has the clear legal authority to reclassify internet service providers, though right now it appears not to have the political will. The big broadband providers, such as AT&T, Comcast and Verizon, wouldn't like it a bit and for right now, that's who has the FCC's collective ear.

    Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "I’m not the strapping young Muslim socialist that I used to be" - Barack Obama 04/27/2013 (@eState4Column5).

    by annieli on Mon May 05, 2014 at 12:43:52 PM PDT

    •  I'm trying to figure out why Obama (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      gmfp, Gwennedd

      Isn't reigning in his FCC chief, who is directly opposing what Obama has repeatedly stated his support for.

      Strange, unless it's just another politician lying.
      You know, business as usual.

      •  It could be a tactic to assess the support (0+ / 0-)

        for neutrality over against the monied ISPs.

        You do realize that classifying the Internet as a common carrier -- as the public square -- would be a major step, and there would be an uproar among the monied grifters who presently squat-for-profit on our public property, right?

        This is the country of those three great rights: freedom of conscience, freedom of speech, and the wisdom never to exercise either of them. -- Mark Twain.

        by JJustin on Wed May 07, 2014 at 05:16:21 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Y'Know Civilization Never Did Solve the Problem (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Pluto, Words In Action, OHdog

    of the lords' ownership of castles and lands.

    We had to suffer through that more or less indefinitely till external catastrophes like plague, and the discovery of new worlds creating opportunity directly for the masses.

    Nothing like that is

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Mon May 05, 2014 at 01:05:51 PM PDT

    •  Hmm, meant to abandon that. Never Mind nt (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Words In Action

      We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

      by Gooserock on Mon May 05, 2014 at 01:06:14 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Nah, let it stay. (7+ / 0-)

        Because one solution that was found was simple furious action.

        Funny that you mention plague. One of the worst was the black death of 1348, where 1 or 2 out of every 3 people died. The resulting shortage of labor and plenty of gold lying around should have pushed up wages, but the aristocracy froze wages to keep the serfs poor and kept taxes high to fund war. That was an ongoing aggravation to the people of france. Then their king "John the good" was captured which was a national embarrassment. That wages had been kept low while high war taxes were levied, and still the french were a laughingstock - brought even more aggravation at the nobles. An impossible ransom for their captured king was in the offing, bringing the people to a sizzling spitting-angry state. Thus came the jacquerie, an example of when a people who have been brutalized lost the battle to maintain basic humanity and began going for the jugular of the rich folk. And it scared the everlasting bejeebus out of those rich nobles so badly that it's not been forgotten.

        So plague isn't a solution to the rich owning the wealth. And new territoryies (land/bandwidth) isn't a solution either because the rich just come into the new area and leverage existing wealth to conquer the new land as well.

        Also not saying that jacquerie is a good solution to the rich owning all the castles etc. Just saying that combined refusal of the people to accept the situation is the only lasting solution.

    •  But it did. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DRo, Lword2, Words In Action

      Antenna based television channels/bandwith are still subject to licensing and other requirements.  No reason for the internet to be different.  

      "You cannot win improv." Stephen Colbert (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m6tiaooiIo0 at 16:24).

      by Publius2008 on Mon May 05, 2014 at 01:17:41 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  The Internet IS the public square -- (0+ / 0-)

        and it was paid for by the taxpayer.  In basic law, that means the taxpayer owns the Internet, and the grifters squatting on it should be paying for the privilege.

        This is the country of those three great rights: freedom of conscience, freedom of speech, and the wisdom never to exercise either of them. -- Mark Twain.

        by JJustin on Wed May 07, 2014 at 05:18:35 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  This is legally complex. (10+ / 0-)

    I think it better to simply regulate the internet and internet bandwith as a public utility and to license ISPs to assure proper access thereto and pricing therefor.

    "You cannot win improv." Stephen Colbert (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m6tiaooiIo0 at 16:24).

    by Publius2008 on Mon May 05, 2014 at 01:15:48 PM PDT

    •  Exactly. (0+ / 0-)

      We the taxpayer paid for the Internet, therefore we the taxpayer own the internet, in common.  It is the public square, and grifters who squat on it for profit should be paying for the privilege.

      Or at minimum the amount they can charge for facilitation should be regulated, exactly as is done with other utility infrastructures and delvereries.

      The days of the Hollowood-myth "Wild West" have been over since they never existed.

      This is the country of those three great rights: freedom of conscience, freedom of speech, and the wisdom never to exercise either of them. -- Mark Twain.

      by JJustin on Wed May 07, 2014 at 05:22:15 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Thanks for doing this Joan. (8+ / 0-)

    "Seriously, Folks, WTH?" - ("What the Heck? "h/t Joan McCarter, Seriously, Florida. WTF?)

    by HoundDog on Mon May 05, 2014 at 02:39:59 PM PDT

  •  They interviewed Michael Powell on NPR last week (10+ / 0-)

    Remember Colin Powell's son, Michael, who was chairman of the FCC for a while?  Somebody interviewed him and it was broadcast on NPR last week.
    The interviewer asked one question about net neutrality.  Powell said something about it being a complicated issue, and begged off discussing it.

    It's not complicated.  With a stroke of the pen, the FCC can reclassify the internet as something that gives internet providers common carrier status.  Previously I've heard that a "telecommunications service" is a common carrier. Perhaps a "remote delivery service" is a more appropriate category; it also makes internet service providers common carriers.

    I think telephone companies, airlines, bus lines, and even pipelines are common carriers.  I'm confident there's a well established body of law and precedent that makes it pretty clear what common carriers can do, can't do, and have to do whether they like it or not.  Most of what would apply to AT&T and Verizon out of that body of law probably ought to apply.  Trying to re-create similar laws and rules for internet service carriers while still calling them "information services" would be like trying to reinvent the wheel -- or reinvent the corral.  The new regulations would be a merry playground for Verizon's lawyers.  They'd likely be able to make the rules look like Swiss cheese.

    And that, I think, is what the FCC wants.  Then they'll say, "Gee, we tried to regulate them, but the courts struck us down."  They're already whining that excuse.

    We're all pretty strange one way or another; some of us just hide it better. "Normal" is a dryer setting.

    by david78209 on Mon May 05, 2014 at 02:46:32 PM PDT

    •  An afterthought (11+ / 0-)

      Maybe Al Gore wasn't really the guy who invented the internet.

      But Barack Obama could go down as the guy who let it be ruined.

      We're all pretty strange one way or another; some of us just hide it better. "Normal" is a dryer setting.

      by david78209 on Mon May 05, 2014 at 02:48:19 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Netflix and nytimes.com are information services (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      david78209, gmfp

      The ISP business, which does NOT provide information but instead provides a local monopoly channel to the information universe of cyberspace , is a common carrier telecommunications service if that phrase has any meaning.

      There's no such thing as a free market!

      by Albanius on Mon May 05, 2014 at 10:37:16 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yes. (0+ / 0-)

        The Internet is the public square.  The commons.  Paid for and thus owned by We the taxpayer.  

        All the ISPs do is establish "Intertubes" connecting We the taxpayer to our property, and charge for providing that connection.

        At current rates the ISPs are grifters who should be paying for the privilege of squatting-for-profit on our property.  One way of paying for that is to have the rates regulated -- massively reduced -- so every taxpayer can access the public square.

        This is the country of those three great rights: freedom of conscience, freedom of speech, and the wisdom never to exercise either of them. -- Mark Twain.

        by JJustin on Wed May 07, 2014 at 05:29:42 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  The new rules (0+ / 0-)

      would be a circumvention of established common carrier norms and rules.

      It would be a scam, a massive theft from the public, We the taxpayer, who own the Internet.

      This is the country of those three great rights: freedom of conscience, freedom of speech, and the wisdom never to exercise either of them. -- Mark Twain.

      by JJustin on Wed May 07, 2014 at 05:24:19 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Sounds good, but how does Mr Wheeler get a (11+ / 0-)

    high-paying position with the internet providers after he leaves the FCC from this? Perhaps the most direct route to a permanent Net Neutrality is to offer Mr Wheeler a bribe a compelling argument in the form of lots of money.


    A government is a body of people usually notably ungoverned. -- Firefly

    by Jim P on Mon May 05, 2014 at 04:07:49 PM PDT

  •  Comcast. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Pluto, Words In Action

    They want to buy all the toobs. A monopoly is coveresd by "free speech", right?

    A true craftsman will meticulously construct the apparatus of his own demise.

    by onionjim on Mon May 05, 2014 at 04:10:17 PM PDT

  •  Perhaps if we gave Tom Wheeler a whole lot of (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    YucatanMan, Words In Action, Creosote

    …money, we block the payola scheme the antitrust monopolies are running on this public utility, that the UN has classified as a human right..

  •  Yet another dumb-ass NN idea (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Seanachi, golden

    Hey guys, don't HR me for being consistent, but "network neutrality" is not something that can be directly legislated and work.  It's like fixing health care by passing a law that you can't get sick.  The Internet is essentially a phenomenon, not a thing, and treating it like a material thing and demanding direct behavioral results when you don't understand how it works will produce, well, major failure.

    Also note that there has never been an NN rule in effect!  Tom Wheeler is not proposing to gut it; he's proposing another improper, sure-to-be-overturned hack to avoid fixing what does need fixing.  What was neutral was the common carriage between the customer and the ISP.  You could choose your ISP over dial-up (still can for the moment but who cares?) and over DSL, but in 2005 the FCC changed the rule to take away common carriage from the raw DSL -- the layer below IP which connected customers to ISPs.  So now the telephone company can sell DSL only to its own ISP, and VZ has even discontinued DSL in FiOS areas.  Oh, and they also refused to offer FiOS until the FCC (around 2003) said that they didn't have to make that common carriage either.  Oh, and cable was never common carriage; they decided in 1998 to keep it that way.

    If you could choose your ISP on fiber, cable, or DSL the way you could over dial-up, then all of the horrors people fantasize about simply couldn't happen -- an ISP who provided bad service would lose customers.  But when you have a choice of one or maybe two ISPs, they are subject to too little competitive pressure to keep them honest. (And mobile-wireless is no alternative, not at $15/GB.)

    The DC Circuit in January overturned the FCC's (intentionally defective) Part 8 NN rules which had been enjoined anyway. They also provided clear guidance as to how the FCC could fix things.  The easiest would be to reclassify the access circuit between the subscriber and the ISP as Title II common carriage, as it was before 2005. That's what the Telecom Act assumed would be the rule forever; the FCC's vertically-integrated model (the wire belong to the unregulated ISP, not a common carrier) is a sstrrreeeeettttcccchhhh. But fixing that, legally trivial, would tick off Comcast, Verizon, and AT&T, all big campaign contributors.

    So NN is not the answer -- common carriage for the wire, not the Internet itself, is.  And extending common carriage out to web sites is just even worse, as it actually risks hurting the availability of desired content (yeah, it's counterintuitive, but what goes on behind the scenes of the Internet is scary complex).

  •  In order to try to Stop the FCC from (4+ / 0-)

    Crushing Net Neutrality, how about linking directly to the

    FCC Comment Page on this topic:  

    Protecting and Promoting the Open Internet
    It seems empowering people to directly making comments to the FCC would be much more efficient, wouldn't it?

    "The law is meant to be my servant and not my master, still less my torturer and my murderer." -- James Baldwin. July 11, 1966.

    by YucatanMan on Mon May 05, 2014 at 04:48:38 PM PDT

    •  If you do directly contact Chairman Wheeler.... (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Possiamo, Words In Action, snoopydawg

      ...expect this form letter response:

      Dear Consumer,
      (I'm already insulted, what kind of jerk addresses people as "Dear Consumer"? The internet makes me a creator, not just a consumer, he should know that.)

      Thank you very much for contacting us about the ongoing Open Internet proceeding. We're hoping to hear from as many people as possible about this critical issue, and so I'm very glad that we can include your thoughts and opinions.

      I'm a strong supporter of the Open Internet, and I will fight to keep the internet open. Thanks again for sharing your views with me.

      Tom Wheeler
      Chairman
      Federal Communications Commission

      So, guys, he's a "strong supporter of the Open Internet" so, don't worry that he's just an industry lobbyist investing in this term as FCC chair to increase his payout on the back end when he returns to the money-making side of the equation. He really cares about "Consumers" or at least their money.

      •  That's directly contacting Wheeler. Did you file (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Words In Action

        a comment on the topic or send an Email to Wheeler?

        "The law is meant to be my servant and not my master, still less my torturer and my murderer." -- James Baldwin. July 11, 1966.

        by YucatanMan on Mon May 05, 2014 at 05:09:45 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  "Consumer" and "Taxpayer" (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        YucatanMan

        are designed to get you to think of government as a business, not a government.  You should be addressed as a "citizen" but that would be too empowering.

        Hillary does not have the benefit of a glib tongue.

        by The Dead Man on Tue May 06, 2014 at 04:54:26 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Well, we're getting what the man who appointed (0+ / 0-)

          Wheeler wants us to get.  He's much more of a corporate president than W Bush ever was. W just ran his mouth about it all the time.  Obama actually is taking us there, quietly, but obviously.

          "The law is meant to be my servant and not my master, still less my torturer and my murderer." -- James Baldwin. July 11, 1966.

          by YucatanMan on Tue May 06, 2014 at 11:43:53 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  He's the best frog boiler around (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            YucatanMan

            Hillary does not have the benefit of a glib tongue.

            by The Dead Man on Tue May 06, 2014 at 12:25:24 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  And you're one of the smug know-it-alls (0+ / 0-)

              who has no clue how gov't/bureaucracy functions, so get to bash away like an infant throwing his feces at the wall beside his crib.

              It is impossible for a President to plumb the depths of the permanent gov't infrastructure -- bureaucracy -- and not only know but also direct and manipulate everything that goes there.

              He appoints heads of agencies because he hasn't time to run all the agencies.  And when he appoints, he delegates the authority to the appointee.

              This is the country of those three great rights: freedom of conscience, freedom of speech, and the wisdom never to exercise either of them. -- Mark Twain.

              by JJustin on Wed May 07, 2014 at 05:41:16 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  The appointees that are the best foxes available (0+ / 0-)

                to guard the henhouse -- fresh from the revolving doors of industry.

                Hillary does not have the benefit of a glib tongue.

                by The Dead Man on Wed May 07, 2014 at 05:55:02 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  That isn't the norm. (0+ / 0-)

                  That is the superficial perception.

                  In reality, there is resistance from within the permanent bureaucracy, which you don't see, against initiatives by the head/leadership of the bureaucracy.  The permanent bureaucracy tends to know the mission of the agency better than the individual appointed to head the bureaucracy.  It's called inertia.

                  Exactly as there are from time to time scandals at a lower level of a bureaucracy which the head of the agency knew nothing about, couldn't know about, and yet for which is blamed.

                  Read a text on "administrative law"; it'll introduce you to the complexities beneath the surface.

                  This is the country of those three great rights: freedom of conscience, freedom of speech, and the wisdom never to exercise either of them. -- Mark Twain.

                  by JJustin on Wed May 07, 2014 at 06:23:09 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

          •  You have no idea how the gov't (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            JerryNA

            works.

            The President appoints.  And with the appointment delegates.  

            The idea that the President sits there and hands-on directs and manipulates everything in every executive agency is paranoid nonsense.

            You have noticed that the President has a whole lot of other stuff on his plate needing constant immedate attention, such as major foreign affairs issues -- correct?

            This is the country of those three great rights: freedom of conscience, freedom of speech, and the wisdom never to exercise either of them. -- Mark Twain.

            by JJustin on Wed May 07, 2014 at 05:38:21 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  It should be addressed to: (0+ / 0-)

        Dear Fellow-Internet Owner:

        This is the country of those three great rights: freedom of conscience, freedom of speech, and the wisdom never to exercise either of them. -- Mark Twain.

        by JJustin on Wed May 07, 2014 at 05:34:59 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  The real problem (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Words In Action, golden

    Is that the people in charge of setting the policy don't have a deep understanding of how Internet traffic actually works (at least I doubt it). It's not simple, and despite many efforts, there are no perfect analogies.

    With previous forms of communication - like radio - it was easy to understand... very straightforward; the signals go from a broadcaster, and can be picked-up by a receiver... and there are a limited number of channels/frequencies. Super-duper... easy to grasp, easy to regulate. But the Internet? It's like a bunch of tubes... er... um...

    How many of these people deeply understand how a computer works? How a router works? What a packet is? etc... Maybe I'm not giving them enough credit, but I doubt it. I'm sure they do have "nerds in the closet downstairs", but at the head of the table?

    So, along comes Mr. Industry-expert to explain things... and the regulator is happy to have the explanation. But, he's getting a skewed version of reality. Trouble is, without a solid background in IT & computer science, he's not going to know that. And he's going to get only a very basic understanding.

    Anyway, I think that's the real problem here. We have a system that assumes everyone can understand everything. But, that's not the case. Same goes for the SEC & a handful of other regulatory bodies. It's a bit scary to ponder.

    Freedom isn't free. That's why we pay taxes.

    by walk2live on Mon May 05, 2014 at 04:48:59 PM PDT

    •  Einstein said (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      raspberryberet

      “If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough”

    •  And you assume Wheeler doesn't understand, (0+ / 0-)

      rather than assume that you don't know whether he does or doesn't understand, though the latter would be the more reasonable bet.

      In doing his job he either understands going in, or he learns from doing the job.  It isn't like he's the only person at the FCC, or the first to have arrived.

      The FCC is a bureacracy like any other.  It is multi-layered and has a permanent workforce that produces lots of paper documentaing and explaining what is going on.  Those are continually refined, as the results work their way upward.

      I have no doubt that Wheeler is much better informed of the issues -- on all, contending, sides -- than the vast majority of those who are bashing him.

      This is the country of those three great rights: freedom of conscience, freedom of speech, and the wisdom never to exercise either of them. -- Mark Twain.

      by JJustin on Wed May 07, 2014 at 05:46:07 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  the internet will be dealt with in the same (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Words In Action, golden

    way that radio was. gutted and handed to the money boys.

    DailyKos, the popular political site whose goal is to elect "more and better Democrats", has silenced yet another wonderful strong Palestinian voice, Palestinian Israeli blogger Simone Daud (formerly known as palestinian professor).

    by stevelaudig on Mon May 05, 2014 at 05:03:17 PM PDT

  •  Dear Senators (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    3rock, Words In Action

    Could you say No to these kids?

    The Web We Want: An Open Letter
    [YouTube's firefox channel.]

    I'm sick of attempts to steer this nation from principles evolved in The Age of Reason to hallucinations derived from illiterate herdsmen. ~ Crashing Vor

    by NonnyO on Mon May 05, 2014 at 05:23:11 PM PDT

    •  Who wrote the script? (0+ / 0-)

      I get tired of pretending kids make this stuff up themselves.

      It's another version of "kiss the babies".

      This is the country of those three great rights: freedom of conscience, freedom of speech, and the wisdom never to exercise either of them. -- Mark Twain.

      by JJustin on Wed May 07, 2014 at 05:48:23 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Please also sign the following WH petitions (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Sir Roderick

    One to maintain true net neutrality

    MAINTAIN NET NEUTRALITY link

    The other to classify broadband providers as common carriers.  This is THE critical legal step to ensuring the FCC has the authority to enforce net neutrality, and the statute law is a mess because of what Congress did in 1996 with telecom deregulation.

    CLASSIFY AS COMMON CARRIERS link

  •  Like metered bandwidth (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Words In Action, Creosote

    the FCC won't have the "political will" to do shit until the average, non-technical person gets pissed off about the idea of their cost going up for no reason and starts angrily phoning and emailing their Congresscritters.

    The problem is most non-technical people don't understand the ramifications here.  For example - my mother even got pissed off about the possibility of metered bandwidth.  Even though she would likely never have exceeded a cap because she's a low-usage user (but didn't know this), she understood it might cost her more money.

    Trying to explain how this will screw her, on the other hand, since it's more abstract, she simply doesn't get it.  That's who needs to get pissed off here.  Everyday, ordinary people that simply don't understand the mechanics of the internet very well.

    "There was no such thing as a "wealthy" hunter-gatherer. It is the creation of human society that has allowed the wealthy to become wealthy. As such, they have an obligation to pay a bit more to sustain that society than the not-so-wealthy." - Me

    by Darth Stateworker on Mon May 05, 2014 at 06:08:37 PM PDT

    •  Believe me, we are Ticked. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      raspberryberet, JerryNA, dewolf99

      Non-tech people do need to "Understand", but we need access to news that leads us to understand. The news we have access to today, at least by the big 3, is nothing but nonsense, and provides no real substance. The only real news I get is by tuning in to Bill Moyers. He should be the one on all the big 3, telling Americans about the REAL NEWS going on under their noses, yet hidden from sight. This nation has gone to the dogs, and The ALEC is IMO hugely to blame, along with the cowards in the Republican Machine. Add the cowards in the Democratic Party to that mix, and you've got the current disastrous government.

      "We can have Democracy in this country or we can have great wealth concentrated in the hands of a few, but we can't have both." ~ Louis D. Brandeis

      by 2BOrNot2B on Wed May 07, 2014 at 04:47:36 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Even this will not sufficiently piss people off (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    snoopydawg

    to respond in a way that scales to the size of our problems.

    There is apparently nothing that today's living adult population will do to confront the oligarchy on pretty much anything.

    I've never left a blank space on a ballot... but I will not vote for someone [who vows] to spy on me. I will not do it. - dclawyer06

    Trust, but verify. - Reagan
    Vote, but Occupy. - commonmass

    by Words In Action on Mon May 05, 2014 at 07:29:09 PM PDT

  •  Buy the Broadband Providers (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    The Dead Man

    Like other natural monopolies, the last mile should be owned by the public. The best way to do that is to nationalize that service by simply requiring the broadband providers to turn it over to the federal government in exchange for its market value. The Obama Administration ought to be using eminent domain to acquire it for the public, and then just turn it into a national park, of sorts.

    I think we should be demanding nationalization of the last mile, not net neutrality. We can compromise with net neutrality, but the real answer to this is to take it out of their hands, once and for all.

    (No pun intended, of course.)

  •  There's Too Much Money Out There (0+ / 0-)

    And that's all Comcast, Verizon, AT&T, et al., see. These companies are licking their lips in anticipation. Individual execs are simply seeing a future where they can buy their own islands and stock them with the recreational humans of their choice.

    I know this type of person and work with them every day. Media salespeople are the most focused and money-hungry individuals I've ever met. They don't care if an ad is a complete lie, as long as they make a commission. The ISPs don't care if what's good about the Internet will come crashing down, as long as they make lots of money and get out before it all turns to shit.

    And as the song and dance begins, the children play at home with needles, needles and pins.

    by The Lone Apple on Tue May 06, 2014 at 02:59:00 AM PDT

  •  The Internet is the new post office. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    golden, 2BOrNot2B

    Internet service ought to be provided by the federal government to all citizens/residents under the constitutional authority that establishes the post office. The administration should show no more favoritism than the post office does, maybe less.  

  •  How About This (0+ / 0-)

    how about a fix to Firefox to keep that piece of crap from crashing five times a day?

    •  Wow, (0+ / 0-)

      What a messed up computer you have! I have had Firefox running 24/7/365 for seven years except for reboots to do Windows updates AND NEVER HAVE HAD A CRASH!!! What plug-ins do you have that are messing with the browser? Maybe you don't have enough power in your processor. I am running a quad core with each core at 2.4 GHZ and have been running Vista 32 bit which also never crashes!!! With enough horsepower, Vista is the most stable OS I have ever had.

  •  Our Back Pocket Politicians In Congress (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    raspberryberet, JerryNA

    have given ownership and control of our nation to corporations and the wealthy. There's no need for this administration to give them ownership and control of the Internet.

  •  Silly, but this brings to mind a few lines from (0+ / 0-)

    I, Robot:

    (paraphrasing)
    "This will only lead to one logical outcome. Revolution."
    "Whose revolution?"
    "That... is the right question."

  •  The Problem With All the Current Options (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    raspberryberet

    is the poorest people who need to have access to voicing their wishes, have no money to PAY for internet access. ALL people, all citizens of the US should have free and unlimited access to internet service. Period. There should be no charge to any citizen of these United States. The same should be true of basic access to television and phone services. Basic access to hear the news, call the police or an ambulance should all be free.

    "We can have Democracy in this country or we can have great wealth concentrated in the hands of a few, but we can't have both." ~ Louis D. Brandeis

    by 2BOrNot2B on Wed May 07, 2014 at 04:40:25 AM PDT

  •  The Internet IS the public square, (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    raspberryberet

    the commons.

    And that reality is built upon the fact that the taxpayer paid to develop it, thus under basic law the taxpayer owns the Internet.

    And it is no less a nationnal defense infrastructure than the Federal highway system.

    The ISPs should be paying squatter's fees for sitting on and making profit from the Internet.

    So, yes: it should at least be treated as a utility, a common carrier, the public square.

    This is the country of those three great rights: freedom of conscience, freedom of speech, and the wisdom never to exercise either of them. -- Mark Twain.

    by JJustin on Wed May 07, 2014 at 05:13:16 AM PDT

  •  Should (0+ / 0-)

    have known. Watching Obama appoint the same nimrods that were in the last excuse of an administration was an obvious clue. I often think Obama is a republican masquerading as a democrat. What else could he be thinking by putting Wheeler at the FCC? Actually, that could be said about a lot of democrats. America is the way it is because the politicians want it that way. Otherwise they would change it. They're the only ones with the power to do anything. And to think we gave it to them.

  •  I'm wondering which ISP ... (0+ / 0-)

    ... Wheeler plans to go to work for when he leaves the FCC?  Comcast?  TWC?  Optimum?

    C'mon, Tom - end the mystery and just tell us who's pulling your strings - who has bought and paid for YOU!  My bet is Comcast, cuz it seems that they've reached that critical size where the board members can almost smell the cornering of the market.  I'm sure there's a fine bonus there for Wheeler if he's the one that helps realize their dreams of domination.

    OF COURSE the New Right is wrong - but that doesn't make WRONG the new RIGHT!

    by mstaggerlee on Wed May 07, 2014 at 11:08:58 AM PDT

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