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The story of the Nigerian girls kidnapped by Boko Haram has been painful, not just because of what has happened or may yet happen to them, but because there has been so little interest in them, and so little effort made to get them back. A couple of days after the kidnapping, I heard someone on NPR say that his first thought was that it was done by terrorists against girls getting schooling, but that it was unusual that no one had made any demands or claimed responsibility.

The Nigerian government has either shown no interest in the girls' return or shown how powerless it is in the remoter regions of the country or both. It didn't help that they falsely claimed to have rescued the girls, or most of them, a few days into the crisis, while the truth was that 43 girls had escaped on their own, but that officials were making no real effort to find and rescue them.

In this country, the media had hardly covered the story until the recent emergence of Boko Haram claiming to have the girls and threatening to sell them. To me it seems that the human story was of little concern until Muslim terrorists was part of it.

Feministing has published a list of the girls' names, and I think this makes them real in a way they were not real before. Some concern has been expressed that publishing their names might have negative effects, and so Feministing has changed their original list to include only first names.

But though the stark numbers are powerful, it’s important to remember that each of these girls is an individual, with a family, friends, dreams — and a name. Here, via the Christian Association of Nigeria, are the names of 180 of those still missing:

1. Deborah ​
2. Awa ​
3. Hauwa ​
4. Asabe ​
5. Mwa ​
6. Patiant ​
7. Saraya ​
8. Mary ​
9. Gloria ​
10. Hanatu ​
11. Gloria ​
12. Tabitha ​
13. Maifa ​
14. Ruth ​
15. Esther ​
16. Awa ​
17. Anthonia
18. Kume ​
19. Aisha ​
20. Nguba ​
21. Kwanta ​
22. Kummai ​
23. Esther ​
24. Hana ​
25. Rifkatu ​
26 Rebecca ​
27. Blessing ​
28. Ladi ​
29. Tabitha ​
30 Ruth ​
31. Safiya ​
32. Na’omi ​
33. Solomi ​
34. Rhoda ​
35. Rebecca ​
36. Christy ​
37. Rebecca ​
38. Laraba ​
39 Saratu ​
40. Mary ​
41 Debora ​
42. Naomi ​
43 Hanatu ​
44. Hauwa ​
45. Juliana ​
46. Suzana ​
47.Saraya ​
48. Jummai ​
49. Mary ​
50. Jummai ​
51. Yanke ​
52. Muli ​
53. Fatima ​
54. Eli ​
55.Saratu ​
56. Deborah
57. Rahila ​
58. Luggwa ​
59. Kauna ​
60. Lydia ​
61. Laraba ​
62. Hauwa ​
63. Confort ​
64. Hauwa ​
65. Hauwa ​
66. Yana ​
67. Laraba ​
68. Saraya ​
69. Glory ​
70. Na’omi ​
71. Godiya ​
72. Awa ​
73. Na’omi ​
74. Maryamu
75. Tabitha ​
76. Mary ​
77. Ladi ​
78. Rejoice ​
79. Luggwa ​
80. Comfort ​
81. Saraya ​
82. Sicker ​
83.Talata ​
84. Rejoice ​
85. Deborah ​
86. Salomi ​
87. Mary ​
88. Ruth ​
89. Esther ​
90. Esther ​
91. Maryamu
91. Zara ​
93. Maryamu
94. Lydia ​
95. Laraba ​
96. Na’omi ​
97. Rahila ​
98. Ruth ​
99. Ladi ​
100 Mary ​
101. Esther ​
102. Helen ​
103. Margret
104. Deborah
105. Filo ​
106. Febi ​
107. Ruth ​
108. Racheal
109. Rifkatu
110. Mairama
111. Saratu ​
112. Jinkai ​
113. Margret
114. Yana ​
115. Grace ​
116. Amina ​
117. Palmata
118. Awagana
119. Pindar ​
120. Yana ​
121. Saraya ​
122. Hauwa ​
123. Hauwa ​
125. Hauwa ​
126. Maryamu
127. Maimuna
128. Rebeca
129. Liyatu ​
130. Rifkatu
131. Naomi ​
132. Deborah
133. Ladi ​
134. Asabe ​
135. Maryamu
136. Ruth ​
137. Mary ​
138. Abigail
139. Deborah
140. Saraya ​
141. Kauna ​
142. Christiana
143. Yana ​
144. Hauwa ​
145. Hadiza ​
146. Lydia ​
147. Ruth ​
148. Mary ​
149. Lugwa ​
150. Muwa ​
151. Hanatu ​
152. Monica
153. Margret
154. Docas ​
155. Rhoda ​
156. Rifkatu
157. Saratu ​
158. Naomi ​
159. Hauwa ​
160. Rahap ​
162. Deborah
163. Hauwa ​
164. Hauwa ​
165. Serah ​
166. Aishatu
167. Aishatu
168. Hauwa ​
169. Hamsatu
170. Mairama
171. Hauwa ​
172. Ihyi ​
173. Hasana
174. Rakiya ​
175. Halima ​
176. Aisha ​
177. Kabu ​
178. Yayi ​
179. Falta ​
180. Kwadugu

I know girls and women with many of these names, as I'm sure you do too. So now when I think of them, they will be individuals as well as the victims of a terrible crime.

Names are powerful. Think of the power of 9/11 memorials where the names of the dead are read out loud. During the Vietnam War, one of most powerful demonstrations I ever was part of was reading out the names of the soldiers killed. And think of the power of the song Birmingham Sunday.

Let's keep them in our thoughts and keep fighting for their lives.

Originally posted to ramara on Fri May 09, 2014 at 06:00 AM PDT.

Also republished by This Week in the War on Women.

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