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  • Today's comic by Jen Sorensen is Get well gifts for the unvaccinated:
    Cartoon by Jen Sorensen -- Get well gifts for the unvaccinated
  • The second of six straight weeks with Tuesday primaries is upon us, and tonight, voters in Nebraska and West Virginia head to the polls. All of the interesting contests are on the Republican side, and the winners of the open-seat GOP primaries for governor and Senate in the Cornhusker State will be the heavy favorites in November. Join us at Daily Kos Elections when polls start closing at 7:30 PM ET for our liveblog, and check out our preview of all the key races here.
  • U.S. considering end of crude oil export ban:
    Despite increased oil production, crude—or unprocessed—oil exports are currently banned, with few exceptions, but U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz said that overseas sales might soon be allowed as domestic stockpiles hit record highs.

    “The issue of crude oil exports is under consideration,” Moniz said at a press briefing after attending the 5th annual Clean Energy Ministerial in South Korea. “A driver for this consideration is that the nature of the oil we're producing may not be well matched to our current refinery capacity.”

  • Oil spills rose 18 percent in 2013:
    The number of spills reported at oil and gas production sites shot up nearly 18 percent last year, even as the rate of drilling activity leveled off.

    There were at least 7,662 spills, blowouts, leaks and other mishaps in 2013 in 15 top states for onshore oil and gas activity, according to an EnergyWire analysis of state records. That's up from 6,546 in the states where comparisons could be made (EnergyWire, July 8, 2013).

    That adds up to more than 20 spills a day.

    Many of the spills were small. But their combined volume totaled more than 26 million gallons of oil, hydraulic fracturing fluid, "fracking" wastewater and other substances. That's the same volume as what gushed four years ago from BP PLC's ruptured Gulf of Mexico oil well in 11 days.

  • Even when Neil deGrasse Tyson on "Cosmos" mentions Christian beliefs positively, the fundamentalists have a fit:
    Michael Faraday was introduced this week to millions around the globe for his contributions to science, many of which benefit us all today in our everyday lives. Faraday was a devout Christian, and Tyson mentioned this, but as David Klinghoffer of the Discovery Institute points out:

    “Faraday's faith is mentioned at the beginning but implicitly dismissed as having anything to do with his science.  Cosmos shows us his impoverished family saying grace at the dinner table and explains that he 'took [their] fundamentalist Christian faith to heart. It would always remain a source of strength, comfort and humility for him.' That's it—nothing more than a warm blanket on a cold night.”

    Tyson is not lying or misrepresenting Faraday here. Faraday was a great scientist who knew how to check his faith at the lab door and study the actual data in front of him.

  • Jackie Kennedy's letters to priest offer insight. The previously unpublished letters to Fr. Joseph Leonard of Dublin during a 14-year correspondence will be auctioned soon. In a July 1952 letter:
    She described with great excitement how she was in love with “the son of the ambassador to England,” but expressed concern he might prove to be like her father, John Vernou Bouvier.

    “He’s like my father in a way—loves the chase and is bored with the conquest – and once married needs proof he’s still attractive, so flirts with other women and resents you. I saw how that nearly killed Mummy.”

  • H R Giger, known for his "Alien" design, dead at 74: He died after a fall at his Zurich home on Monday.
    Born in 1940, Giger was best known for his 'Xenomorph' alien in Scott's sci-fi horror masterpiece for which he won a visual effects Oscar in 1980.

    He studied architecture and industrial design in Zurich and was known for creating strange dreamscapes. [...]

    Giger described his style as "biomechanical."

  • Netflix streams faster in Canada:
    If you’re in the US and your Netflix stream keeps freezing while you're binge-watching House of Cards, rest assured: Canadians are enjoying it faster.

    According to Netflix’s latest ISP speed index—which for the first time included Canada’s results—Canadians stream videos at an average pace of 2.52 Mbps, compared to Americans who watch videos at an average of 2.33 Mbps.

    But both countries fell significantly below most European countries, like the Netherlands, which streamed video on average as high as 3.49 Mbps, while Costa Rica lagged in last place streaming at a lowly average pace of 1.18 Mbps. In general, countries in the Americas ranked behind European ones.

  • Anti-Defamation League survey finds only 54% of people worldwide have heard of the Holocaust:
    The ADL Global 100: An Index of Anti-Semitism surveyed 53,100 adults in 102 countries and territories in an effort to establish, for the first time, a comprehensive data-based research survey of the level and intensity of anti-Jewish sentiment across the world. [...]

    Only 54 percent of those polled globally have ever heard of the Holocaust. Two out of three people surveyed have either never heard of the Holocaust, or do not believe historical accounts to be accurate.

  • On today's Kagro in the Morning show, Greg Dworkin rounds up Gop collapse on climate change, voter fraud & ACA repeal. What not to do with your camel. Grayson for Bonkersghazi committee? Greenwald's new book on NatSec Gone Wild. You had one job, Snapchat!

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Comment Preferences

  •  Fundamental problem (6+ / 0-)
    Faraday's faith is mentioned at the beginning but implicitly dismissed as having anything to do with his science.
    That's because "Teh Fundies" are cued in to take offense to anything.

    Let me be clear, to any Fundamentalist out there: You can be religious and scientific; it's not an exclusive OR!

    Crap; they won't know what an exclusive OR is, will they?  :)

    "People should not be afraid of their government; governments should be afraid of their people." --V

    by MikeTheLiberal on Tue May 13, 2014 at 12:05:07 PM PDT

    •  It's Exclusive. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MikeTheLiberal, shoeless, JeffW

      Genesis is clear that the world was created in 6 days. Not "apparently" 6 days and not "in such a way as to appear to be billions of years to mortal humans."

      Besides, whatever it says in the scriptures, the clergy and Jesus the Living Personal Lord and Savior of fundamentalists are crystal clear on the point.

      We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

      by Gooserock on Tue May 13, 2014 at 12:12:40 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yeah, but what's a day to God? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Mr MadAsHell

        That's what just floors me with these people. Talk about hubris, to assume your God is as limited as you are. If you believe in a God, how much more wonderful to believe in a God of the whole universe, one we can't really understand but can stand in awe of and admire.

        Just my $0.02, for what it's worth.

        Watch out or I'll go get my shovel and unload plant divisions on you!

        by Attack Gardener on Tue May 13, 2014 at 12:45:42 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Not exclusive at all (0+ / 0-)

        Unless we're to argue that the rejection of any single scientific fact precludes anyone from practicing science.  

    •  And which Fundamentalist takes issue (0+ / 0-)

      with that statement?  Hell, Ken Ham made that very point several times during the debate with Bill Nye.

  •  Exporting crude? (6+ / 0-)

    What happened to "energy independence"?

    Float like a manhole cover, sting like a sash weight! Clean Coal Is A Clinker!

    by JeffW on Tue May 13, 2014 at 12:07:25 PM PDT

    •  I Swear the Kochs Will Have Us Importing Sun (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Stude Dude, JeffW, Calamity Jean

      and wind.

      Though I guess if you count Niagara Falls power as solar, figuring the water reaching the turbines is 40% from Canadian waters of the Great Lakes, we're already importing renewable.

      We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

      by Gooserock on Tue May 13, 2014 at 12:14:14 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  If our stockpiles of crude oil are too high, (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      pollwatcher, JeffW, Calamity Jean

      STOP IMPORTING IT!

      Republican Health Care Plan: marry a Canadian.

      by shoeless on Tue May 13, 2014 at 12:18:27 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  We only import about half of the oil we use (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Stude Dude, JeffW, Calamity Jean

      It doesn't make a bit of sense to you to be exporting oil when we import almost half the oil we use?  Stop thinking reasonably in an Oligarch controlled world.  It can really hurt your brain trying to figure out what they're trying to pull.

    •  Uh, the KXL is designed for oil exports, from (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Stude Dude

      Canada via the US. Should anybody here be deemed to have an ownership interest in it at any point, then we need to allow exports.

      FWIW, we do export some oil right now. For some time a chunk of Alaska oil went straight to Japan.

      That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

      by enhydra lutris on Tue May 13, 2014 at 12:40:17 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Your claim about KXL being "designed (0+ / 0-)

        for oil exports" is just plain wrong.  

        Heavy sour crude to be delivered by the KXL pipeline to the gulf area is for use in gulf coast refineries who presently produce most of their product in the domestic market.

        What KXL will do is to allow replacement of Venezuelan, Saudi and Mexican heavy sour crude presently used by those gulf coast refineries with 830,000 barrel per day of heavy sour crude from tar sands sources.

        Michael Brune's and Oil Change International's allegation that the KXL pipeline is all for export is complete garbage.  

        •  Yeah, except that the Canadians are (0+ / 0-)

          trying to get the stuff to a port, not so much to a refinery. We'll see once it gets built where it winds up going.

          That, in its essence, is fascism--ownership of government by an individual, by a group, or by any other controlling private power. -- Franklin D. Roosevelt --

          by enhydra lutris on Tue May 13, 2014 at 03:40:16 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  You're trying to project your view onto the facts (0+ / 0-)

            without addressing the reality of what the rest of the world, except Michael Brune and OCI are saying.

            The tar sands heavy sour crude (which is already reaching the Gulf refineries from other pipelines) is going to Gulf coast refineries.

            There isn't any evidence or basis to insist that KXL is an export pipeline at all.  

            Saying it is an export pipeline when no other entity is making that claim in a matter involving Presidential decisionmaking is #NoKXL advocacy malpractice and a brain dead move in #NoKXL camp.

            It is conflation assertion and not legitimate environmental advocacy.

            The oil industry, TransCanada, several gulf refineries, the Canadian Ambassador all say the heavy sour crude from tar sands in the KXL will be going to Gulf refineries to be refined.

            The reason this is the case is because of declining outputs from Venezuelan fields and the fact that gulf refineries are capable of accepting heavy sour crude from tar sands.

            All of the Sierra Club and Oil Change International claims showing tankers from the KXL pipeline are like imaginary cartoon created by Brune as part of an organized lying campaign that isn't any basis for Presidential decisionmaking.

            Instead of focusing on the primary issue....that the KXL pipeline is primarily designated for 830,000 barrels per day of additional heavy sour crude from tar sands and that the United States should not become more dependent on a high greenhouse gas intensity crude oil source, Brune and company have created this phony conflation about the pipeline being for 100% crude oil exports.....this is absolutely a case of environmental advocacy malpractice, and illustrates why Brune never should have been hired in first place by the Sierra Club national board of directors.

    •  Sold to the highest bidder. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JeffW, Calamity Jean


      I’m not a big fan of vegetable gardens. Like my chickens, I prefer my salads to be cage free.

      by glb3 on Tue May 13, 2014 at 12:53:01 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I see the problem (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aquarius40, JeffW
    It would always remain a source of strength, comfort and humility for him.
    Strength, comfort and humility?  Fundies believe in guilt, punishment, and ignorant self-righteousness.

    Republicans: Taking the country back ... to the 19th century

    by yet another liberal on Tue May 13, 2014 at 12:09:22 PM PDT

  •  Holocaust Deniers: "Hitler Was A Socialist" (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    shoeless, Mr MadAsHell, rduran

    I notice that Glenn Beck favorite crackpot, Cleo Skouzen, was pushing that line back in the early 1960's, which would get anyone branded as insane.  Of course, now it's a common meme on the far right, but it is also a favorite of Holocaust deniers.

    Because if Hitler was really a leftists, then he probably never killed all those Socialist Jews did he?  

    This is really very common, and I have challenged people on this often only to have them say "Of course the Holocaust never happened, what's you're point?"

    Lots of Pat Bucchanans talking points also fit in this category.  A big favorite is the theory that Hitler was pushed into war by nasty Churchill and Roosevelt. This "Hitler-the-lamb-Hitler-the-peace-maker is an almost sure sign of a Holocaust denier.

    Men are so necessarily mad, that not to be mad would amount to another form of madness. -Pascal

    by bernardpliers on Tue May 13, 2014 at 12:12:00 PM PDT

    •  The other why around.... (0+ / 0-)

      Some wingers are now trying to drum up outrage over something that Ed Schultz supposedly said that they think is too close to Holocaust Denial....

      "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

      by Stude Dude on Tue May 13, 2014 at 12:20:51 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  One argument right-wingers always make. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Mr MadAsHell

      Hitler had to be a socialist because he was head of the National Socialist Party. I always reply, "Gee, you don't suppose Hitler lied, do you?"

      Hitler used the name National Socialist in order to fool the public into believing that they were legitimate, since the dominant political party was, and stilll is, the Democratic Socialists, who really are socialists.

      Republican Health Care Plan: marry a Canadian.

      by shoeless on Tue May 13, 2014 at 12:26:55 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  The DEMOCRATIC Socialists (0+ / 0-)

        When I hear that bullshit, i just cut right to the chase and ask if they are Holocaust deniers because that is what a Holocaust denier says.  A lot of times the answer is shocking ("So....?")

        Men are so necessarily mad, that not to be mad would amount to another form of madness. -Pascal

        by bernardpliers on Tue May 13, 2014 at 12:36:44 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Michael Faraday's faith did influence his science. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    kovie, Stude Dude

    God told Faraday, "Let there be light."

    Republican Health Care Plan: marry a Canadian.

    by shoeless on Tue May 13, 2014 at 12:14:30 PM PDT

    •  Can't wait to see this episode (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      shoeless

      I've been getting back into electronics as a hobby after a 30 year hiatus and have been reading a bunch of books on both it and its early history. One of those books is a biography of Faraday written by a favorite professor of mine in college. Right now I'm reading bios of Edison and Tesla, and I just finished a book on the history of the battery and Empires of Light, about the race to wire the country for electricity and light in the late 19th century. Faraday was a hero to both men, as well as George Westinghouse and many others.

      "Reagan's dead, and he was a lousy president" -- Keith Olbermann 4/22/09

      by kovie on Tue May 13, 2014 at 12:18:58 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  RIP H.R. Giger (4+ / 0-)

    Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "If we appear to seek the unattainable, then let it be known that we do so to avoid the unimaginable." (@eState4Column5)

    by annieli on Tue May 13, 2014 at 12:20:27 PM PDT

  •  Ha ha! (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    OldDragon, JeffW
    “Faraday's faith is mentioned at the beginning but implicitly dismissed as having anything to do with his science.  Cosmos shows us his impoverished family saying grace at the dinner table and explains that he 'took [their] fundamentalist Christian faith to heart. It would always remain a source of strength, comfort and humility for him.' That's it—nothing more than a warm blanket on a cold night.”
    Looks to me like it's Klinghoffer who's denigrating faith.

    I am become Man, the destroyer of worlds

    by tle on Tue May 13, 2014 at 12:22:51 PM PDT

  •  only 54% of people worldwide heard of holocaust? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ChuckChuckerson

    Well, almost half the world — over three billion people — live on less than $2.50 a day.  Why aren't those anti-semitic  impoverished bastards better educated about jewish history!?!

  •  I've got a legal question for youse lawyers (0+ / 0-)

    My 70ish mom lives in an unregulated apartment in a 2 family building in NYC and has been having issues with the downstairs neighbors. They make a lot of noise, especially slamming doors really loudly, especially between 7 and 10pm, when she's trying to relax before going to bed. Complaining to the landlord and talking to them hasn't helped. If anything it's made things even worse, as they appear to be retaliating at this point by making even more noise.

    I spoke to the NYC housing court today and it turns out that tenants in unregulated apartments in NYC don't have many rights, and while she could bring this to court, she'd likely lose, and the landlord would probably refuse to renew her lease when it ends, which I discovered he has no obligation to renew because it's unregulated. This is all the more likely given that the landlord has mostly taken the downstairs tenants' side, despite my mother having lived her for over 10 years, and their not having been here 2 years.

    However, I suspect, and have suspected for some time, that what's really going on here is that he wants my mother to leave so he can raise the rent. She's currently getting a really good rent, below market rate, because the actual owner is a elderly woman who until she moved to a nursing home 2 years ago lived in the downstairs apartment now occupied by these noisy tenants, and they got along well. She likes my mother and is probably keeping her rent low because of it. She and her late husband paid off the mortgage decades ago so she doesn't really need the extra rent money.

    But her children, who take care of her affairs (mainly her son), including managing these apartments, undoubtedly would like the rent to go to market rate. But since they have no legal authority to raise the rent, the only way that can happen is if my mother leaves, and their mother agrees to raise the rent to market rate for the new tenant, whom she presumably wouldn't know and care as much about. And since my mother doesn't want to leave, as she otherwise likes the apartment and neighborhood (and the low rent), the only way to get her to leave is by driving her out, through such harassment.

    What I'm asking is how does one prove to a housing court judge that one has been harassed by a landlord or their agent to motivate one to leave an apartment? If the landlord's children decline to renew my mother's lease, this would likely be her only recourse to being to stay in it. I strongly suspect that this is what's going on, but there's a big difference between suspicion and proof. My mom's been through a lot in recent years, including losing my sister under horrible circumstances, and has very limited means. It's shameful what they're doing to my mother, who's a nervous wreck because of this.

    Any advice or similar experience would be highly appreciated.

    "Reagan's dead, and he was a lousy president" -- Keith Olbermann 4/22/09

    by kovie on Tue May 13, 2014 at 12:39:12 PM PDT

  •  Bwahahahaha (0+ / 0-)

    "Taxes are what we pay for civilized society, including the chance to insure" - Oliver Wendell Holmes, Compania General De Tabacos De Filipinas v. Collector of Internal Revenue, 275 U.S. 87, 100, dissenting; opinion

    by HugoDog on Tue May 13, 2014 at 12:53:18 PM PDT

  •  Stewart vs. Limbaugh (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JeffW

    Is Limbaugh feuding back at Jon Stewart yet? I think this may go like Walter Winchell feuding with Jack Parr. An old radio guy gets over-matched by a newer guy in the age of television.

    "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

    by Stude Dude on Tue May 13, 2014 at 12:55:06 PM PDT

  •  "Why when I talk about belief" (0+ / 0-)

    "why do you always assume I'm talking about God?"-Serinity....

    Faith is mostly not talked about because too many religious nuts automatically assume that if you do not agree with them then you have a fake faith, or that if you are faithful, you automatically agree that killing doctors and lesbians and liberals is not only the correct thing to do buy mandatory.

    Here is what I have gleaned from reading about hard science during the classical period(mid to late 1600s-1900).  Many scientist were christian, Jewish, etc.  The difference, from what I can tell, is that these people of faith were not looking to maintain a power structure by fitting new observations into old scaffolding. Rather it appears that they were worshiping the almighty be studying the creation.  There was no conflict.  There is a creator, that is undeniable, and by critically observing the creation, we have a deeper understanding of what the creator expects from us, and what out divine purpose it.

    Contrast that to other people of faith who appear mostly interested on how they can impose arbitrary rules on the almighty, like who can and cannot get heaven, and extract a fee for inter-mediating between the creator and the creation.

    •  The edifice of their beliefs was also (0+ / 0-)

      without significant challenge leading all the way into the 19th century.  We often forget that our present notion of deep time is a fairly recent development, starting in the mid-18th century, and taking a good century and a half to become consensus outside of the emerging field of geology.  Hell, we couldn't even date the Earth's age reliably until after World War II.

      I don't see the point in trying to pretend that scientists are incapable of holding to religious superstitions--they clearly have and have still produced great work.  

  •  There's a typo in the headline... (0+ / 0-)

    "Fundamentlists" is missing an "a".

    Because we're educated progressives and not tea partying 'Muricans. ;)

  •  In Federal Register today: (0+ / 0-)

    Important water quality criteria publication of significance for the Great Lakes and all of the rest of the surface waters of the United States:

    National Recommended Water Quality Criteria for the Protection of Human  Health; Update

    Also in today's FR:

    This important proposed rule dealing with Sulfur Dioxide
    emissions and the need to address unmonitored geographical areas where SO2 emissions may cause a 1 hour National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) excursion:

    Data Requirements for the 1-Hour Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) Primary National  Ambient Air Quality Standard

    This latter proposed rule is particularly important for review of sulfur dioxide ambient air quality impacts around coal fired power plants, coke ovens, paper mills, petroleum refineries, sour gas sweetening plants, steel mills, oil and gas extraction involving sour gas, etc.

  •  The Christian community has mythologized ... (0+ / 0-)

    Faraday just as much as they have Jesus. Tyson didn't do that, so they are pissed.
    Reading articles about Faraday from religious and secular sources paints two different pictures of the man. Of course they do.


    I’m not a big fan of vegetable gardens. Like my chickens, I prefer my salads to be cage free.

    by glb3 on Tue May 13, 2014 at 01:20:59 PM PDT

  •  Just tweeted by the WH (0+ / 0-)
  •  Fundamentalists upset with Tyson? (0+ / 0-)

    More like Dan Arel does another recap of a Cosmos episode.  Honestly, there is no evidence that Faraday "checked his religion at the door" beyond Arel's wishful thinking.  In fact, we  have evidence that James Clerk Maxwell did the opposite:

    No theory of evolution can be formed to account for the similarity of molecules, for evolution necessarily implies continuous change, and the molecule is incapable of growth or decay, of generation or destruction.

    None of the processes of Nature, since the time when Nature began, have produced the slightest difference in the properties of any molecule. We are therefore unable to ascribe either the existence of the molecules or the identity of their properties to the operation of any of the causes which we call natural.

    Obviously this is an argument from ignorance, a categorical error, and a strawman wrapped into one, but it gives lie to Arel's True Scotsman obsession in denying the scientific accomplishments of people we'd consider to hold retrograde views.  Science is first and foremost a method of acquiring knowledge--it cares about nothing, let alone the superstitions of its practitioners.

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