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Republicans might be talking a lot less about Obamacare these days, but you can be sure that when they are talking about it, they're pretty much lying. And when they have campaign ads about it, well, there's going to be some debunking. Steve Benen catches the latest, this time an ad by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce for embattled Sen. Mitch McConnell, the one who is all for repealing Obamacare, "root and branch."

Benen points out the problem with this ad in a nutshell: "[T]he Chamber of Commerce is running a health care ad to help McConnell featuring a business owner who disagrees with McConnell about healthcare. Oops."

The ad features Lexington business owner Patty Breeze, who tells voters that the ACA is "stifling business." Curious about that, Kentucky reporter Joe Sonka talked to Breeze, who actually had a few praises for the law, along with criticism, and who firmly places herself in the "keep it and fix it" camp.

"There are some good parts to that federal act,” said Breeze, “that people aren’t denied (coverage for) pre-existing conditions, and children can stay on their parents health insurance for longer to age 26, and that we’ve got free preventative services that promote wellness. There are good pieces to that.”

Asked whether lawmakers should go back and fix the parts of the Affordable Care Act that arent’ running smoothly, or repeal the law and start over from scratch, Breeze answered that she favors the “keep and fix” approach. […]

Asked what she thought of politicians who favor repealing the law “root and branch,” Breeze answered, ” I don’t know… I’ve already told you I think it needs revision. I think they need to keep the good parts of it, and they need to revise the way they’re delivering it. They need to encourage the free market (to participate), and I think they’re discouraging it.”

That doesn't really sound much like what Mitch McConnell is saying about the law. As Benen points out, it's what his Democratic opponent—Alison Lundergan Grimes—is saying. But McConnell has to get through his primary against a tea party candidate, so he's stuck. And the Chamber of Commerce is running ads for him using a surrogate who disagrees with his position on the law.

That's a perfect example of the problem Republicans have trying to run against Obamacare, the dilemma they're all going to have once they get past the primaries and have to run in the general election when they have to justify running on taking away the health care of millions of people.

Originally posted to Joan McCarter on Thu May 15, 2014 at 12:02 PM PDT.

Also republished by Obamacare Saves Lives, My Old Kentucky Kos, and Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (48+ / 0-)

    "The NSA’s capability at any time could be turned around on the American people, and no American would have any privacy left, such is the capability to monitor everything. [...] There would be no place to hide."--Frank Church

    by Joan McCarter on Thu May 15, 2014 at 12:02:34 PM PDT

  •  Wow, I always thought McConnell was a (14+ / 0-)

    lying uncaring selfish asshole; but under the gun, he is really showing how low and disgusting he can be.

    Please know I am not rude. I cannot rec anything from this browser. When I rec or post diaries I am a guest at some exotic locale's computer. Ayn is the bane!

    by Floyd Blue on Thu May 15, 2014 at 12:06:43 PM PDT

  •  Good grief, (6+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    HoundDog, Witgren, Lujane, Scioto, shoeless, TKO333

    "People aren’t denied coverage for pre-existing conditions, and children can stay on their parents health insurance for longer to age 26, and that we’ve got free preventative services that promote wellness."

    So, don't fund the law and stop calling it Obamacare -- and she's good with it?!?

    •  Good law (4+ / 0-)

      Apparently she's for it but thinks there isn't enough "free market" involvement.  When did Insurance companies become government agencies?

      •  Even worse. (5+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        fishnleo, acornweb, rabrock, VPofKarma, tubaguy

        The only way those "good" provisions worked without breaking the bank was to do the whole thing as one big compromise! You cannot pick and chose without turning the whole thing upside down. Why would insurance companies agree to these terms if you did not give them "universal coverage"? The new customers deepen and strengthen the pool and allow for these new benefits. Take away any part of the whole and the thing collapses. What is so hard for these idjuts to understand??? Yes, every party or interest involved gave up something but they also gained something to create an interlocking whole!

        •  The best answer (0+ / 0-)

          would still be single payer, government run health care.

          To get that  we have to kick the corporations out of government, which means we must kick at least one and preferably more of the corporate owned justices off the Supreme Court, and replace them with strong progressives.

        •  The worst part of their complaints is that they (0+ / 0-)

          ignore the fact that this is good business for the insurance companies, while they talk about how it hurts business. Aren't insurance businesses "business"? And some of the nation's biggest businesses?

          Breeze says "All these different taxes that are associated with this law are just mind-boggling".
          Which taxes would those be, exactly?

          Republicans - A pathology, not a party.

          by storeysound on Tue May 20, 2014 at 04:42:40 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  My reaction as well. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Gwennedd

        What's up with people who don't think the insurance companies running this new system are "free market" entities?  I can only conclude what I've thought all along:  they're really and truly stupid.  Or all they watch is Fox entertainment and that has made them so uninformed they've dropped 20 IQ points.

    •  She's simply not fully informed -- but she isn't (0+ / 0-)

      for repeal -- she does note some positives in the law.

      This is the country of those three great rights: freedom of conscience, freedom of speech, and the wisdom never to exercise either of them. -- Mark Twain.

      by JJustin on Mon May 19, 2014 at 09:42:52 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I so want to see that man gone. (6+ / 0-)

    I live under the bridge to the 21st Century.

    by Crashing Vor on Thu May 15, 2014 at 12:31:18 PM PDT

  •  Thanks Joan. Vote for Alison Lundergan Grimes. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Pinto Pony, Ditch Mitch KY, shoeless

    Humor Alert! No statement from this UID is intended to be true, including this one. Comments and Posts intended for recreational purposes only. Unauthorized interpretations may lead to unexpected results. This waiver void where prohibited.

    by HoundDog on Thu May 15, 2014 at 12:35:45 PM PDT

  •  sadly the woman knows (7+ / 0-)

    there are good parts but thinks the free market is being discouraged. The parts she really liked were the non free market parts, making the insurance companies offer coverage.  

    I think she should ask the free market insurance companies, I think they've been pretty encouraged by the number of enrollees and the spread of the risks over age groups.  And those people mostly paid, too.  And they said so in a Congressional hearing.

    •  I've been having a back&forth with a Facebook (9+ / 0-)

      friend. He's a decent guy, not a racist, not a fool. Yet he hates  the ACA. Just complained that his wife left her job in a hospital because the new ACA regs meant a huge amount more paperwork; and also that his wife's premiums have doubled because of the ACA.
      Since I don't know the specifics of her insurance or job, I can't answer those complaints. However I told him about what it was like in 1986 when our little son had a stroke and we spent the next 4 years (the last years of his life) fighting the insurance company (Blue Cross/Blue Shield) to get them to pay for the services we had been promised and had paid for with our premiums.
      And how I couldn't leave my job because then his condition would be considered pre-existing by any new policy in a new job.
      And how I met families with disabled children in which the parents had to quit working to qualify for Medicaid because their insurance coverage (this was true of mine also) didn't pay for health coverage for children with congenital conditions (see, it was pre-existing because they had it in the womb!).
      I doubt if any of this will penetrate past his anger, but I'm trying to bring it down to the same personal level from which his complaints are coming. Logic -- talking about extending care to so many more people, talking about the costs of treating uninsured people who wait until their illness is severe before getting care, talking about being the only 1st world country without universal coverage -- none of that will have any effect on his thinking.
      He feels that he and his wife have worked and paid for their own care all these years and that now others are getting a free ride on his dime. I'm hoping personal stories of people who have also worked and paid for their care but have run into catastrophe might help.

      While Democrats work to get more people to vote, Republicans work to ensure those votes won't count.

      by Tamar on Thu May 15, 2014 at 01:10:10 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  that doesn't make a whole lot of sense (6+ / 0-)

        to me, but I don't know what his wife's job was.  The ACA does mean that hospitals have to be careful discharging medicare patients because they aren't paid if re-admitted for the same complaint, I am sure hospitals are trying to paper over readmittances so they can get paid.  If the state expanded medicaid, the hospitals could be a lot busier because people are getting treatment.  Since hospitals/doctor offices have to share records to avoid repeating expensive tests, there is probably a lot more communication going on now.  Records must be computerized, so new systems are going in some places.

        Long term, none of that should double paperwork, and should bring it down.

        Doubling premium talk sounds like RWTP from a Koch Bros Commercial.   Few people had that happen on employer plans, unless they were catastrophic only plans before.

        •  my husband's a shrink and he had to change (9+ / 0-)

          the way he did a lot of things because of the ACA. i think there was about a month where it was taking a lot of time and annoying him, but then he got used to it and it doesn't seem to be causing him any problems now.
          My bet is that you're exactly on target -- if she had stuck with it a while longer, his wife might have found that the new procedures became routine and no longer caused her all that trouble.
          And her premiums doubling were for private coverage (I asked). He said he didn't want her to go on the exchange because the ACA is "under the IRS" so he doesn't trust it and because he's sure that the government will make changes to make it even worse.
          Meanwhile, he's on Medicare which he likes and which he describes as the "insurance I paid for." He's a nice guy personally, from what I know of him he's quite charitable, but I think he likes government only when he's getting something from it, not when someone else is getting something.

          While Democrats work to get more people to vote, Republicans work to ensure those votes won't count.

          by Tamar on Thu May 15, 2014 at 01:34:03 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I got mine (6+ / 0-)

            but that other guy is a dead beat.  I know the type.

            Change is hard, even simple changes require concentration until they become routine.

            •  Teanuts (0+ / 0-)

              demand for themselves that they refuse to everyone else.

              This is the country of those three great rights: freedom of conscience, freedom of speech, and the wisdom never to exercise either of them. -- Mark Twain.

              by JJustin on Mon May 19, 2014 at 09:50:38 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  I would think that the rules (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Lujane

            requiring more things in mental health care probably meant more insurance patients than previously, that alone could be frustrating as you learn billing codes and rules.

            •  my husband doesn't have more patients (he's half (6+ / 0-)

              time in a county clinic with set hours and half time in a private practice that's already too full). However he did tell me that the changes have resulted in a slight increase in what he's paid. He's always supported the ACA (though he and I both would have preferred single payer), but it's nice to get a little extra payment for the work he does.

              While Democrats work to get more people to vote, Republicans work to ensure those votes won't count.

              by Tamar on Thu May 15, 2014 at 01:54:36 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Not so much that he got more new patients (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Lujane

                but since parity rules and certain basic coverage rules in every medical policy had to cover more mental health and substance abuse issues, I figured he'd have some patients that now file insurance rather than pay cash/payment plans, etc., but I could be wrong.  I am not a doctor.

                •  Well, it's more that insurance is now paying (5+ / 0-)

                  a little better. For a while I convinced him to stop accepting most insurance because the pay was terrible -- he was making less per hour (when you include the over-the-top paperwork the insurance companies require) than people with half his education and training.
                  I pointed out that he spends half his work life at a clinic for the poorest county residents, and that many of his private patients make more than we do (you should see some of the cars they drive!), so they could afford to pay him a fair rate.
                  He told me recently he's started accepting a few more insurance companies again because now they pay better.
                  He's still the best bargain in town -- ask anyone who refers patients to him!

                  While Democrats work to get more people to vote, Republicans work to ensure those votes won't count.

                  by Tamar on Thu May 15, 2014 at 02:05:54 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

          •  I hate to say this, but her husband is not the (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Lujane, AnnieR, True North

            sharpest tool in the shed.  The IRS, not to mention the NSA and Google, already know all about them.

            He also doesn't understand how Medicare works -- current retirees are paid for by the people currently working.  He paid for his parents and his kids are paying for him.  It's the quintessential welfare program, just like Social Security is.  I bet his head would explode if you told him that.

            •  Totally disagree that it's the "quintessential (0+ / 0-)

              welfare program."
              I do agree with you that it's not exactly insurance (we're not pooling risk and contributions in order to give us coverage that's immediately available), but he's right that he's earned his coverage in the sense that he contributed to the system in earlier years and now it's providing for him.
              What Medicare & Social Security are most like is the old Chinese system. You take care of your parents and your children take care of you. Medicare & Social Security are government administered versions of that, which is far more reliable. (your kids might end up hating you and refuse to contribute to your support when you're old, but Social Security doesn't have to like you).

              While Democrats work to get more people to vote, Republicans work to ensure those votes won't count.

              by Tamar on Thu May 15, 2014 at 10:12:39 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  That use to be true! (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                acornweb, reasonshouldrule

                However, during the Regan administration we did a fix to the Social Security system and at the same time we looked at the future of Soc Sec and Medicare in the short term (the baby boom bubble). At that time in order to plan ahead for the boomers, WE DOUBLED THE PAYROLL TAXES -- half for current users and half to PUT AWAY FOR THE COMING BUBBLE! However, due to the fact that Soc Sec was required to buy U. S. Bonds, Congress spent it all and now the tax payers MUST redeem those bonds that were our advanced savings for the bubble years. And that is why the right-wing nutjobs are screaming we cannot afford this!!! The money we are paying back today is the money that REGAN spent on his STARWARS initiative!!!

                •  Good post with good information. (0+ / 0-)

                  And all true.  What nobody mentions, though, is that this large boomer generation people are now paying for is followed down the generation line (past the Gen Xers) by the Millennials, an even larger generation than the boomers.  That will alleviate a lot of the problems not only for the boomers but also for the GenXers.  How the Millennials will fare, I don't know.  :-)

          •  there is his problem (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            AnnieR, True North, Tamar
            And her premiums doubling were for private coverage (I asked). He said he didn't want her to go on the exchange because the ACA is "under the IRS" so he doesn't trust it and because he's sure that the government will make changes to make it even worse.
            clearly this guy can only view this law through the prism of the RW talking point bullshit he's swallowed. and that is the most frustrating thing about the whole thing. we have a law that is improving things for people who refuse to see it for what it is, to the point of making up reasons for denying themselves its benefits.
            •  I have a friend whose son has had a hard (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              True North, Tamar

              time holding a job - there were drugs involved at some point  He just got fired from Red Lobster (the only one who was fired, mind you) and was told it was because of Obamacare.  Are these employers blaming Obamacare for getting rid of people who don't do their jobs well?  Sounds like it to me in this instance.  It's an easy excuse, using right wing talking points.

              The GOP will destroy anything they can't own.

              by AnnieR on Fri May 16, 2014 at 11:19:05 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  all stems from the same thing though (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                AnnieR

                people went into the debate over the ACA the same way they went into the Obama Presidency from day one. they were prepared to believe anything negative about the man and everything he tried to do, because they wanted to believe the worst about him.

                of course the GOP and their media allies were more than ready and willing to stoke those fears by any means necessary. so even after there is clear evidence that all of the accusations about him and things like the ACA were nonsense, the people committed to believing them still can't let go.

              •  An elderly man in a waiting room told me (3+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                AnnieR, rabrock, thanatokephaloides

                that the ACA messed up Medicare for him -- it now only pays for him to check his blood sugar once per day.
                I tried to explain that Medicare rules are Medicare rules and are not caused by the passage of the ACA. But he said "that's what my supplier told me and he knows!" When I told him that I had some expertise in this area (I have a Ph.D. in public health), he said "well my doctor told me this too!"
                I just looked online and as of June of 2013, it looks like Medicare covered 80% of the cost of 100 test strips per month (so more than 3/day), and that there's been a recent improvement that will save the Medicare recipient some money each month.
                Unfortunately, I didn't know those specific details when I was in the waiting room. But it's clear that there's a campaign to misinform people about the ACA.

                While Democrats work to get more people to vote, Republicans work to ensure those votes won't count.

                by Tamar on Fri May 16, 2014 at 04:36:42 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  My Dad, when he was alive, (2+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Tamar, thanatokephaloides

                  was able to test his blood sugar 3 times a day, paid by Medicare and his supplement, and the company he ordered the strips from delivered them automatically to the house each month.  That poor man is so misinformed.  You have to be able to check your blood sugar after each of your 3 meals per day, at the very least, or you don't know how your blood sugars run.  Very sad all the lies out there.

                  The GOP will destroy anything they can't own.

                  by AnnieR on Fri May 16, 2014 at 05:02:04 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  That amounts to (2+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    tubaguy, reasonshouldrule

                    causing the death or serious complications by convincing people they can only check their blood sugar once a day.  For a doctor to tell his patient this, it becomes malpractice and is indefensible.

                    There are people literally dying because they have been so thoroughly brain-washed that they refuse to even do any of their own research on the ACA.  Some still believe in the "death panels."

          •  Refuses (5+ / 0-)

            So, he refuses to buy a subsidized policy from the regulated exchanges and then complains about the outrageous cost of a private plan. Yet another example of right wing willfull stupidity.

            •  Yes, good example. (0+ / 0-)

              We had an ad run here in Michigan with a nice-looking family complaining about the ACA and having their premiums doubled etc. etc.  Turns out it was exactly the same thing:  they wouldn't go on the exchange because they didn't want the government to have anything to do with their health care.  So they paid a lot more for the private plan their old insurance company offered them.

              I don't know if these people are just stupid or they have bought so completely into the right-wing lies that they're willing to hurt themselves before they'd consider a different mind-set.

          •  I think I know (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            chrisculpepper, reasonshouldrule

            a guy very much like this that I have have lots of discussions with. He is also a rather radical 2nd Amendmenter.  Sometimes I think I've gotten through just a little, most specifically that only delusional people want to take back all the guns and what the vast majority of people want is nothing more than rational, universal gun control laws.  I've done some shooting myself and would gladly accept an offer to go to a gun range and try to hit some targets.

            I say I sometimes think I've gotten through because the next time the topic comes up, we seem to be back at square one.

            Part of the problem in any issue like this that people have expended lots of time and energy explaining and defending their stance on an issue. That makes it very difficult to admit they were wrong.  The same dynamic exists in almost any disagreement.

          •  ACA (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            reasonshouldrule

            If he likes Medicare he must be a Socialist.

        •  Readmittances are down significantly (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Tamar, jfromga, myboo, Lujane

          in part by expanding home care to keep patients stabilized while they finish recovering. Hospitals and insurance companies will do anything they can afford in order to prevent getting dinged. Even provide health care. ^_^

          The ACA greatly reduces paperwork by not requiring medical histories for issuing new policies. So that is also a RWTP.

          Back off, man. I'm a logician.—GOPBusters™

          by Mokurai on Thu May 15, 2014 at 01:34:55 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Nice for the wife (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Calamity Jean, Lujane, Tamar

          Nice that she can just up and leave her job because she doesn't like the paperwork she has to do.  

          •  she's just a few years short of full retirement (0+ / 0-)

            so it's not quite surprising.
            From what I know of this couple, I think they live pretty simply and he has his own business making beautiful furniture (which is how I know him).
            I like the guy, I just feel frustrated that someone who is smart in many ways (ask him about the intersection of math, physics and art) is so incredibly ignorant and closed when it comes to politics.

            While Democrats work to get more people to vote, Republicans work to ensure those votes won't count.

            by Tamar on Thu May 15, 2014 at 10:16:53 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  Yep, doesn't make sense (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          True North, TKO333

          Hospitals do have to establish policies and procedures that will reduce 30 day readmissions, but that isn't going to increase some individual employee's paperwork such that she quits her job. Also highly unlikely that her premiums have doubled due to ACA. If she's a hospital employee she probably has employer-provided insurance. It's been a long-time secular trend for employers to increase cost-sharing of health insurance premiums; the ACA isn't responsible.

      •  Ask him why he prefers paying taxes (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Calamity Jean, AnnieR

        Then you can explain that he has been doing that to cover emergency room care for the uninsured under the law that Reagan signed. Also his tax money will go to other states for Medicaid expansion instead of coming back to his and keeping emergency rooms and hospitals open for him.

        Back off, man. I'm a logician.—GOPBusters™

        by Mokurai on Thu May 15, 2014 at 01:30:31 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  But he's the type who would launch into a rant (0+ / 0-)

          against taxes exactly for that reason, so I don't think the argument will work.
          He lives in Tennessee. I think I'll check and see if Tennessee is one of the states (like so many of the red states) that gets more back from the government than it contributes in taxes....

          While Democrats work to get more people to vote, Republicans work to ensure those votes won't count.

          by Tamar on Thu May 15, 2014 at 01:36:51 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  p.s., checked on Tennessee's ratio of (0+ / 0-)

          contribution to federal monies received and it's a bit mixed. Overall probably comes out even, which I'm sure my friend would think was just fine.
          But what's interesting about a state that gets back in federal money about the same as it gives -- it's not contributing to the services the federal government provides to the country as a whole. While people like him may view those services as unnecessary, most of these people support the military. So a state that contributes nothing to the federal budget above what it gets back is not contributing to our military.

          While Democrats work to get more people to vote, Republicans work to ensure those votes won't count.

          by Tamar on Thu May 15, 2014 at 01:51:18 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  I subsidized (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Tamar

        the insurance premiums of people like this over the last 7 years. Of course, they are oblivious that by excluding me from  the risk pool they pay lower premiums. 14 MRI's CASH. 50-60 doctors appointments CASH, medicine--$1500/year CASH. $400/500 month COBRA payments over the first 2 years.

         "He feels that he and his wife have worked and paid for their own care all these years and that now others are getting a free ride on his dime."

        Brain cancer. I'm taking my fucking dime back.

        •  You have every reason (0+ / 0-)

          to be pissed. On the other hand, you are blessed that you have the resources to meet those expenses, even at great personal sacrifice to yourself and your family.

          I have never been able to afford COBRA after the many mergers, restructures, down-sizing, and cost cutting programs I've been snared by in the last 30 years. I've been blessed that I didn't get a catastrophic diagnosis like yours.

          I sincerely pray you are able to beat this.

    •  the follow up question (0+ / 0-)

      should have been: How would you encourage more free market participation? The insurance companies are having "bumper" business with the new enrollee's, so I wonder what new idea designed to "screw"the working poor does this nice person can come up with

  •  Another Republican Ad Full Of Lies. (0+ / 0-)

    This one with a stinky breeze.

    "I think that gay marriage is something that should be between a man and a woman.” - Arnold Schwarzenegger 2003

    by kerplunk on Thu May 15, 2014 at 04:24:56 PM PDT

  •  I know the perfect ad for McConnell (4+ / 0-)

    and the others:

    "When I am reelected, I will pass a bill that repeals Obamacare and replaces it with an identical bill called the Ronald Reagan Health Care for Patriots Act."

    "Moon landing was real. Evolution exists. Tax cuts lose revenue. The research has shown this a thousand times. Enough already." - Austan Goolsbee

    by anonevent on Fri May 16, 2014 at 09:49:03 AM PDT

  •  Nonspecific Crrtiscism (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    david78209

    How is ACA discouraging participation by free market?  How could ACA encourage more particpation by free market?

    Other than medicaid expansion ACA is all about free market offering a known product where comsumer and supplier have perfect information.  Policies are a known quantity and prices are a known quantity.  Standard policies is how ACA keeps premium prices down.  Before ACA small companies biught 'special' policies.  

    •  "All these new taxes associated with Obamacare"? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      rharshaw

      Am I forgetting something?  Does the Affordable Care Act have new taxes?  If so, somebody please remind me.  Maybe the lady in the ad is thinking of the way that the Medicare tax now applies to all income, rather than cutting out after you earn something over $100,000 a year?  But that shouldn't put a dent in hiring new workers; it only puts a dent in overpaying the boss.

      I'm a doctor.  People who believe GOP propaganda ask me how much harder Obamacare has made things for me.  I can't see any new problems or difficulties, and more people now can afford to see me and get the tests I think they need.
      People looking for ways to criticize "Obamacare" seem happy to blame any new rule or law on the ACA.

      For example, there are some impending new rules Medicare has pulled out of somebody's favorite bodily orifice that could be a major headache for me, BUT THEY AREN'T PART OF THE ACA.  They've been in the works for years.  A big hassle that may be coming down the road is switching to a new way to code in diagnoses.  We still use ICD-9, the International Classification of Disease, ninth edition.  Many countries have gone to ICD-10, which is much more detailed and complicated (the number of codes roughly tripled).  ICD-10 may be better for keeping public health statistics, and that's the main thing it's used for around the world.  The USA is the only place that ties how doctors and hospitals get paid to the diagnosis.  That can put a major financial incentive into coding most diagnoses to the most severe illness possible.  In turn, that will likely make US health statistics look different from the rest of the world.  It will also reward the doctors and hospitals that are best at stretching the high-paying codes to include as many patient as possible.

      We're all pretty strange one way or another; some of us just hide it better. "Normal" is a dryer setting.

      by david78209 on Fri May 16, 2014 at 01:29:53 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  What does "free market participation" even mean? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    TKO333
    They need to encourage the free market (to participate)
    That's just standard Republican boilerplate.  I'd love to hear specifics about what free market participation is missing.  The hospitals and healthcare workers are not part of the government, nor are the insurance companies.  How much more free-marketiness does Obamacare need to make it acceptable?

    These people are like the king in Amadeus: "The symphony has too many notes! Remove some!"

    I don't know what's been trickling down, but it hasn't been pleasant---N. Pelosi

    by Russycle on Fri May 16, 2014 at 09:58:40 AM PDT

  •  I am sick of these GOP types saying one thing (0+ / 0-)

    in the primaries and then something completely different in the general election.  After the 2012 election, I think we are all hip to that trick.

  •  Tangentially related, but... (0+ / 0-)

    ....people like Breeze bug me. She's the "middle-of-the-road" Republican that wants the good stuff without paying for it. Better than wars I guess.

    Misconduct by the government is by definition NOT a government secret.

    by Doug in SF on Fri May 16, 2014 at 10:09:28 AM PDT

  •  Encourage the Free Market (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Egalitare, True North

    What does that even mean? The entire ACA is a stimulus to the free market for insurance, forcing everyone into it to buy some in it. The only part that isn't free is the part where those for whom whom the free market has proven to be inaccessible get more Medicaid - relieving the free market from the expense of serving them. And the other parts, like preexisting conditions and "children" up to age 26, being unexcludable, that this Republican twaddler claim to like.

    There is no free market. Markets can be fair when protected by law (and so less than free), but otherwise they're free to be plundered by those with a force advantage. It's gibberish.

    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

    by DocGonzo on Fri May 16, 2014 at 10:11:45 AM PDT

  •  Mitch McConnell is the Rethug Asshole Who Devoted (0+ / 0-)

    the last 6 years to making Obama a 1 term president and failed miserably.

    Why doesn't he just go work with that South Carolina Confederate teabagger moron Jim DeMint at the Heritage Foundation, suck down mint julips, and reminisce how valiantly they fought but lost their Waterloo against the black man in the White House.

  •  Why Wegmans Food Markets supports this crap... (0+ / 0-)

    ...I can't understand.

    Wegmans #2 executive is on the board and was the chair for a while.

    The highest form of spiritual practice is self observation with compassion.

    by NCJim on Fri May 16, 2014 at 10:54:20 AM PDT

  •  Here in GA with the primary coming up (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    david78209

    for Saxby Chambliss' seat, that's all you see in the ads for the candidates - that they're 'going to get rid of Obamacare.  Must work here - not surprised.

    The GOP will destroy anything they can't own.

    by AnnieR on Fri May 16, 2014 at 11:13:44 AM PDT

    •  It may not work in November (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      AnnieR

      By November, a lot of people may know somebody whose bankruptcy was prevented thanks to "Obamacare".

      And don't forget how the GOP "brain trust" let themselves get into an echo chamber before the 2012 election, listening only to the people who said the polls were skewed.  It's probably even easier to find "experts" who will tell you what you want to hear about how well anti-Obamacare ads work, based on their study groups.  

      We're all pretty strange one way or another; some of us just hide it better. "Normal" is a dryer setting.

      by david78209 on Fri May 16, 2014 at 01:52:27 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I used kynect (0+ / 0-)

    And as an individual, I had no real problem signing up for health insurance.  Maybe the exchange is a nightmare for businesses?  I have no idea.  

    However, I take exception to Breeze's characterization that KY cannot afford the Medicaid expansion.  Even after the first three years, Kentucky will only have to pick up 10% of the costs for Medicaid, while the federal government picks up the rest.  And it costs more to have people uninsured, so KY will actually save on health care costs with its investment in the Medicaid expansion.  

    And to prove that Breeze doesn't know what she is talking about, she also pointed to Kentucky's high risk pool as a solution.  As she noted, the high risk pool was eliminated under the ACA, and no one except her seems to mourns its loss.  Only around 4000 people ever signed up for insurance with the high risk pools because the premiums were so damn high.

    So while I might agree with Breeze on fixing the exchange for business owners, her other complaints about the ACA demonstrate typical Republican rhetoric and ignorance on health care issues.  Too bad she doesn't see fit to expand on her concerns with the rest of the media.

  •  you need video/audio of her stating that. Printed (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    thanatokephaloides

    word don't make the cut anymore.

  •  Bitch McDummo (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    thanatokephaloides

    It is high time to use an object lesson on Congress to convey the importance of ACA. Be it resolved that effective Jan. 1. 2015 all Congress persons and their staffs, the SCOTUS, and all Senators and their staff will forfeit their health insurance. The taxpayers will no longer foot the bill for these individuals.

    •  health insurance for federal officials (0+ / 0-)
      Be it resolved that effective Jan. 1. 2015 all Congress persons and their staffs, the SCOTUS, and all Senators and their staff will forfeit their health insurance. The taxpayers will no longer foot the bill for these individuals.
      DO. NOT. hold your breath.   DO. NOT.

      ;-)

      "It's high time (and then some) that we put an end to the exceptionalistic nonsense floating around in our culture and face the fact that either the economy works for all, or it doesn't work AT all." -- Sean McCullough (DailyKos user thanatokephaloides)

      by thanatokephaloides on Sat May 17, 2014 at 04:03:56 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  *** (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    reasonshouldrule

    "They need to encourage the free market (to participate), and I think they’re discouraging it.”

    I'd love to ask her what she means by that. The ACA is insurance offered through the free market. The minimum requirements for coverage are spelled out & any insurance company wanting to offer plans through the exchanges is welcome to do so.

    But I'm going to guess even though she's in the "keep and replace" camp she still thinks "Obamacare" is government insurance. Why is it so difficult for people to understand that government has always regulated insurance and the ACA is no different?

  •  Free Market? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    reasonshouldrule

    Free Market? What the hell does he think the exchanges are all about?

  •  Of course, the best fix (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    reasonshouldrule

    for the ACA (aka Obamacare) is the public option.

  •  Let's be honest ... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    reasonshouldrule

    Okay, low-road and sleazy campaign ads are common place, but few could argue that the so called conservatives have established some new records when it comes to deception and mind-bending.

    Stop sending crusaders and bar-room brawlers to Washington ... vote for a Democrat.

  •  McConnel...The Turtle... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    reasonshouldrule

    is nothing but a turtle stuck in mud for our country. Lets do him the same favor he and his right wing Neo-Confederate kind have done for us over the last thirty-three years and put the Kentucky turtle out of a job.

    If you like bicycles, check out the newest and coolest products at my site, "ZiggyboyBullet.com." You can also find my products at e-Bay under the name, "Ziggyboy." See all the products on my "See seller's other items" link.

    by JohnnieZ on Sun May 18, 2014 at 08:01:58 AM PDT

  •  Has anyone see the political ad he ran on the (0+ / 0-)

    "Last Week Tonight with John Oliver" show on Sunday, the 18th? Actually John Oliver ran it. It was great but as a sixty year old man I had to avert my eyes. More that once. It's aired on HBO. I don't have any idea where you might see it but it shows Mitch in a light I never thought of. And its quite distracting, to say the least. Maybe HBO.com might show it? John Oliver, if one doesn't know was a correspondent on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. He has his own show now and it is, two episodes in, very good.  

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