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69 words GM says you can't use in internal memos
WSJ:
The 69 Words You Can’t Use at GM  
@edyong209 @kathrynschulz @katzish there's no permission to say “you’re toast”, alas. “Well done” is ok, along with “medium" and “rare".
@DemFromCT
 

Karin Kamp:

Silent Spring was excerpted in The New Yorker before its 1962 publication. Furor over the book from the chemical industry came swiftly. [Rachel] Carson was accused of being a communist sympathizer and sexist statements dismissed her as a spinster who was “hysterical” and “over empathetic.” One major pesticide manufacturer threatened to sue her publisher, implying that she was some kind of agricultural propagandist working for the Soviet Union.
More politics and policy below the fold.

I love this argument on Slate Plus between @dankois and @laurahelmuth about how mean an editor should be: http://t.co/...
@WillOremus
Arkansas Times:
At 4:30 p.m. today, with many of the justices at an out-of-state conference, the Arkansas Supreme Court issued a stay of Judge Chris Piazza's ruling last Friday that Arkansas law and constitutional bans on same-sex marriage violated the U.S. Constitution.

It was a one-sentence order without any elaboration granting motions by the state and four counties for a stay.

Here it is.
This will again end the issuance of marriage licenses to same-sex couples in Arkansas. It's been an on-and-off process in a handful of counties since Saturday, with most of some 500 licenses issued in Pulaski County. Video above from Fox 16's David Goins shows one of the last ceremonies at the Pulaski County Courthouse.  

Ron Fournier:
It's easy to demonize conservatives and Christians. It's harder to recognize that faith is a stern master, especially among African-Americans whose animus toward homosexuality runs deep. We should know by now that social change takes times, but the American public tends to eventually get things right.

"The arc of the moral universe is long but it bends toward justice," Martin Luther King Jr. said of the fight for racial equality. Five decades later, Donaldson and his wife posed for pictures in front of the Little Rock Nine monument and dismissed the fight for sexual equality. In the not-too-distant future, their views on homosexuality will pass into history. Nobody can stop the arc of justice.

Jamelle Bouie:
Overall, MTV confirms the general view of millennials: Compared with previous generations, they’re more tolerant and diverse and profess a deeper commitment to equality and fairness. At the same time, however, they’re committed to an ideal of colorblindness that leaves them uncomfortable with race, opposed to measures to reduce racial inequality, and a bit confused about what racism is.
Pew study: Median net worth of young households with student debt: $8,700. Of those without student debt: $64,700. http://t.co/...
@wrmead
 

Binyamin Appelbaum:

Atif Mian and Amir Sufi are convinced that the Great Recession could have been just another ordinary, lowercase recession if the federal government had acted more aggressively to help homeowners by reducing mortgage debts.

The two men — economics professors who are part of a new generation of scholars whose work relies on enormous data sets — argue in a new book, “House of Debt,” out this month, that the government misunderstood the deepest recession since the 1930s. They are particularly critical of Timothy  Geithner, the former Treasury secretary, and Ben  Bernanke, the former Federal Reserve chairman, for focusing on preserving the financial system without addressing what the authors regard as the underlying and more important problem of excessive household debt. They say the recovery remains painfully sluggish as a result.

At stake in their debate with Mr. Geithner, whose own account of the crisis was published last week — in a book called “Stress Test” — is not just the judgment of history but also the question of how best to prevent crises.

Susan Glasser:
Editing While Female
Field notes from one of journalism’s most dangerous jobs.

Of course, when it comes to stories about female editors and their difficult alleged management styles, it’s not about the journalism. Google the phrase and you’ll see what I mean: Among the articles you are likely to encounter is a controversial Politico news story last year by Dylan Byers about Abramson’s tenure at the Times. The article had a great scoop as its lede, about a conflict between Abramson and the managing editor, Dean Baquet, who will now succeed her, but what drew most attention was the criticism leveled at Abramson in the article by various anonymous sources. And those complaints more or less boiled down to critiques of her style and personality: “temperament.” It occasioned a furious backlash elsewhere in the media, as women rushed to defend Abramson and mock the article for its caricatured, out-of-date portrayal of a woman boss. “Leave Jill Abramson Alone, You Sexists,” demanded an article in the Daily Beast. Some now see the Politico article as a harbinger of this week’s ugly denouement, or proof of how Abramson really was a flawed leader.

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Comment Preferences

  •  I keep thinking of when Toyota was being savaged (20+ / 0-)

    in the media for the problems its cars - some of them - had with the accelerator pedal or some chip in some of them.

    As far as I know, that all has been repaired and/or the uproar has abated.

    Just this year - and it is only May - GM has had to recall cars and trucks somewhere in the 14 million range?? Just this year.

    The most shocking thing I saw yesterday was that GM has several of it trucks, including its smugly advertised "professional grade" offerings that have SUCH a fault in them they are saying DONT DRIVE THEM" and they will come to you to pick them up.

    THAT, my friends, is some shit.

    Legal means "good".
    [41984 | Feb 4, 2005]

    by xxdr zombiexx on Sat May 17, 2014 at 04:24:31 AM PDT

    •  * (12+ / 0-)

      2014 Chevrolet Silverado, GMC Sierra, 2015 Chevrolet Tahoe Recalled for Steering Loss

      WASHINGTON — General Motors is recalling 477 2014 Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra pickup trucks and the 2015 Chevrolet Tahoe SUV for possible tie-rod separation and loss of steering, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

      The Silverado, Sierra and Tahoe recall is part of a larger recall of about 2.7 million GM vehicles announced on Thursday.

      In the case of the Silverado, Sierra and Tahoe recall, owners of the affected vehicles are advised not to drive their vehicles until they have been inspected and repaired. Owners should contact GM to have their vehicles towed to the dealership, the automaker told federal safety regulators.

      "In the affected vehicles, the tie-rod threaded attachment may not be properly tightened to the steering gear rack," said NHTSA in its summary of the problem. "An improperly tightened tie-rod attachment may allow the tie rod to separate from the steering rack, resulting in a loss of steering, increasing the risk of a vehicle crash."

      Legal means "good".
      [41984 | Feb 4, 2005]

      by xxdr zombiexx on Sat May 17, 2014 at 04:27:59 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  "That is some shit" (11+ / 0-)

      I think that was on the list of things you can't say at GM, too.

      Imagine being an engineer needing to write a report describing a dangerous defect in a GM car without using the words "dangerous" and "defect."

      It's as though some nitwit in management thought the dangerous defects wouldn't exist if they avoided using certain words.

      •  See, I don't get it. (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Stude Dude, Garrett, elmo

        No engineer would have any difficulty avoiding the phrase "dangerous defect," because that's a subjective judgement, and engineers deal in facts and numbers. No engineer would ever use the word Kervorkianesque in a report, no matter how hilarious it is. And how the hell did Cobain get on there? As a synonym for suicide? Or genius?

        I can easily imagine marketing people being told to reign in this stuff, if the critiques are aimed at the competition. Bashing the competition is great fun, but terribly unprofessional.

        Is it possible the WSJ mangled the story? Hindenburg.

        Early to rise and early to bed Makes a man healthy, wealthy, and dead. --Not Benjamin Franklin

        by Boundegar on Sat May 17, 2014 at 05:27:59 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  one gets the feeling they're highlighting words (6+ / 0-)

          they've heard around the office ;-P

          "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

          by Greg Dworkin on Sat May 17, 2014 at 05:44:36 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I was a copyeditor (4+ / 0-)

            for a group of Superfund engineers. It's the job of us grammar nazis in the eyeglasses and long skirts to deal with word choices.

            Those words should have been edited out between the engineer's draft and the final version. In a well-run publications department they wouldn't have gotten past the smudgy LOL list on the breakroom bulletin board.

            •  the memo includes 'presentations' (6+ / 0-)

              I want to be at the one that used Kevorkianesque, Hindenberg and Titanic.

              "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

              by Greg Dworkin on Sat May 17, 2014 at 05:55:05 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Those ARE excellent words. Fox News would love (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                JG in MD

                to conflate them into half and hour of GM/suicide hate.

                What stronger breast-plate than a heart untainted! Thrice is he arm'd, that hath his quarrel just; And he but naked, though lock'd up in steel, Whose conscience with injustice is corrupted. Henry VI Part II Act 3 Scene 2

                by TerryDarc on Sat May 17, 2014 at 08:32:31 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

            •  The engineering drafts should be (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              TerryDarc, Subterranean, JG in MD

              Discoverable in litigation. That's why they are trying to keep these words out from the beginning.

              They are unanimous in their hate for me--and I welcome their hatred.

              by bdtlaw on Sat May 17, 2014 at 08:15:36 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Absolutely. (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Subterranean, JG in MD

                And a "presentation" could be a powerpoint that you show to an ad hoc meeting on Thursday meeting that's been called to discuss a minor design issue on a subproject of a subproject of a subproject.

                This directive isn't just about the documents that go into some sort of official filings, or even into some sort of official paper trail created to meet ISO requirements. Rather, it is about every kind of communication that happens in the office or lab.

                There's not one word/phrase in that proscribed list that makes me wonder, "Why in the hell would anybody ever use that in a report?" We all communicate in metaphor, all the time -- indeed the best communicators are the ones who use metaphor in the most creative, imaginative, demonstrative fashion. In a meeting, I once described a particular microorganism as being really slutty. Yeah, I know, the word "slut" is soon going to be banished from everything even resembling polite or professional discourse, but at the time it really got across what I was trying to communicate. As soon as you become metaphorical, anything can happen with language.

                To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

                by UntimelyRippd on Sat May 17, 2014 at 08:35:59 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

        •  Cobain? (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Subterranean, anshmishra

          Maybe for being stupid and contagious.... >:3

          "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

          by Stude Dude on Sat May 17, 2014 at 06:18:22 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  actually they do have problems (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          tarkangi, Subterranean

          engineers don't, as a group, write good (yes, i know it should have been well).  Also, engineers tend to be passionate and this is seen in their writings, which aren't very good to start with.  Trial lawyers eat this up in court, and many cases were lost do to poor English/grammar skills that include off-the-cuff remarks like most of them on the banned list.  (PS.  Ford has one too, and it looks nearly the same.)

          this is a true case that was lost by an OEM (some details are omitted).  A trial lawyer got a hold of the source code for a particular automotive safety related product.  the code worked as spec'd and as intended -- it did not fail!  As coders have been known to do; some of the code was written at late night.  In the code comments, the words, and it goes {a word not allowed at another OEM now}, were included and never removed. the case was lost due to this comment and not the product performance.  the product performed as designed.

          Email has made this worst, because most people are not use to policing what they type for their personal email.  it takes only one moment of oops and a case can be lost on a simple flippant phase included in an email.

          Born in Oklahoma Raised in Ohio Escaped to Meechigan!!!

          by MI Sooner on Sat May 17, 2014 at 06:39:08 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Hmm (0+ / 0-)
            The case was lost due to this comment and not the product performance.
            Might you be exaggerating just a tad there? I know of no possible tort that involves only a comment. Somebody had to have gotten hurt in some way by the product.

            A comment does help to establish knowledge on the part of the manufacturer of the defect, though.

        •  Ok, so how would an engineer (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          LNK

          describe a dangerous defect?

          •  I would expect (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            LNK, elmo

            in terms of failure rates, loss of control... you know, numbery stuff.

            Early to rise and early to bed Makes a man healthy, wealthy, and dead. --Not Benjamin Franklin

            by Boundegar on Sat May 17, 2014 at 08:27:20 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  e.g. "This will cause the tie rod to separate..." (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Subterranean, elmo

            "...with subsequent loss of control."

            This without Hindenberg, Kervoikianeques or Titanic. No "Only customers willing to follow Kurt Cobain into the great hereafter would be stupid enough to drive this vehicle resulting in legitimate lawsuits totaling trillions of dollars."

            What stronger breast-plate than a heart untainted! Thrice is he arm'd, that hath his quarrel just; And he but naked, though lock'd up in steel, Whose conscience with injustice is corrupted. Henry VI Part II Act 3 Scene 2

            by TerryDarc on Sat May 17, 2014 at 08:36:56 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  The whole point is to avoid having anything (0+ / 0-)

            in the document trail that ever acknowledges the existence of any sort of concern of any kind.

            Thus, somehow, the corporation needs to address design problems without ever acknowledging internally that there is a design problem. It's nutty, but that's what the lawyers are trying to achieve.

            To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

            by UntimelyRippd on Sun May 18, 2014 at 09:55:16 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  It makes perfect sense. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        DRo

        What they are saying is "don't put it writing."

        •  It seems that way, but no... (0+ / 0-)

          ...one can express any engineering problem in simple, clear easy to understand terms that do not use words on that list.

          Emails, otoh, might well use Hindenberg, Kervoikianeques or Titanic and still result in lawsuits. Reports and presentations are enjoined, not emails or private conversations.

          As an engineer, you need to assume your audience has at least the IQ of a cucumber sandwich when you point out that a bug or engineering problem will result in complete loss of functionality.

          I agree with GM's list and those words, fun as they are, have no place in a document or presentation.

          What stronger breast-plate than a heart untainted! Thrice is he arm'd, that hath his quarrel just; And he but naked, though lock'd up in steel, Whose conscience with injustice is corrupted. Henry VI Part II Act 3 Scene 2

          by TerryDarc on Sat May 17, 2014 at 08:41:42 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  IQ of a cuke sandwich (0+ / 0-)
            As an engineer, you need to assume your audience has at least the IQ of a cucumber sandwich
            That would be a dangerous assumption when dealing with GM management (and I say this as someone with many family members employed at GM's design studios).

            "When I was an alien, cultures weren't opinions" ~ Kurt Cobain, Territorial Pissings

            by Subterranean on Sat May 17, 2014 at 09:54:35 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  The lawyer for GM that drafted that list (0+ / 0-)

            was doing a good job lawyering for GM, notwithstanding the political sensitivity of the list.

            However, not all of the words on that list should be there for a list of word criteria for non-use by engineers.

          •  In my experience, John Carter is much closer (0+ / 0-)

            to the truth than you are. Note that the word "safety" is on the list.

            The objective is, insane as it seems, to avoid having any documentation of the existence of any problem of any kind. There are engineering records of what was done, but no records of why.

            To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

            by UntimelyRippd on Sun May 18, 2014 at 09:57:02 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Well it doesn't take much of a plaintiff's atty. (0+ / 0-)

              to ask, "Well, what happens if your tie-rod falls off at 65 MPH? If the problem has been recorded in less inflammatory verbiages, it's still basis for a suit.

              Hindenbergesque or "tie-rod falls off" are equivalent in a court of law.

              Safety or loss of functionality (in my case) can be described w/o using the words on the list.

              What stronger breast-plate than a heart untainted! Thrice is he arm'd, that hath his quarrel just; And he but naked, though lock'd up in steel, Whose conscience with injustice is corrupted. Henry VI Part II Act 3 Scene 2

              by TerryDarc on Sun May 18, 2014 at 10:56:48 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  That's my point. (0+ / 0-)

                These guidelines include some specific "inflammatory" language, but the rules go well beyond those, with the intent, again, of creating an environment where no problem is ever recorded if it doesn't have to be.

                Of course, under things like ISO, many problems DO need to be recorded, and there is a formal scheme for doing that recording. The objective in that context is for as little as possible "natural language" to be introduced. The natural language that simply can't be eliminated is stuff like an actual consumer complaint that triggers a quality control event -- but almost everything after that can be dealt with sans natural language: Nothing but a record of tests, results, and changes to specifications.

                And also, of course, quality control systems like ISO are in direct conflict with the corporate desire to avoid accountability. ISO strives to enforce complete documentation of design and manufacturing processes. So corporations struggle to meet the ISO requirements while not exposing themselves to litigatory liability.

                To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

                by UntimelyRippd on Sun May 18, 2014 at 11:23:17 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

      •  It's Luntzification taken to the max. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Stude Dude

        Building a better America with activism, cooperation, ingenuity and snacks.

        by judyms9 on Sat May 17, 2014 at 06:06:00 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Damn! (0+ / 0-)

        "Rolling sarcophagus" is out too?!
        How better do describe a GM vehicle- or a Republican motorcade

        Ice cream has no bones

        by victoreador on Sat May 17, 2014 at 08:36:20 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  The ghost of George Carlin is now preparing (15+ / 0-)

    his monologue on the 69 dirty words you can't use at GM

  •  According to the list from GM (10+ / 0-)

    "fucked" is still available.

    Legal means "good".
    [41984 | Feb 4, 2005]

    by xxdr zombiexx on Sat May 17, 2014 at 04:30:03 AM PDT

  •  Certainly Timothy Geithner (13+ / 0-)

    is in the running for Obama's worst cabinet pick. No doubt he is very popular with the banksters.  The rest of us, not so much.

    If the Republicans ever find out that Barack Obama favors respiration, we'll be a one-party system inside two minutes. - Alan Lewis

    by MadRuth on Sat May 17, 2014 at 04:33:10 AM PDT

    •  Even Timmy himself (6+ / 0-)

      agrees.

      This week, Geithner provided a fuller mea culpa with the release of “ Stress Test,” his book on the financial crisis. It does elaborate—albeit modestly—on his oversight of Citigroup, including issues our reporting raised about his time at the New York Fed.

       - - - -

      One of his key mistakes, Geithner writes in the book, was failing to realize that Citi’s equity, or capital, was weak. Capital is the cushion meant to protect a bank from losses and, ultimately, insolvency.

      “I should have paid more attention to Citi’s lack of common equity while I was at the Fed,” Geithner writes. Although Citigroup, at the urging of the New York Fed, began raising capital in late 2007, he said it “came in the lower-quality forms that investors now found meaningless.”

      Legal means "good".
      [41984 | Feb 4, 2005]

      by xxdr zombiexx on Sat May 17, 2014 at 04:38:16 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  No, he did an excellent job. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      brooklynbadboy, mstep

      He did precisely what the President expected of him.  And I say that without any sarcasm. Obama wanted a macro fix without any punishment and Geithner did just that.  Geithner's self-criticism in his book seems to be about his time at the NY Fed, not his time as Treasury Secretary.

      It's not the side effects of the cocaine/I'm thinking that it must be love

      by Rich in PA on Sat May 17, 2014 at 04:55:07 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  The need for punishment (6+ / 0-)

        (I assume you're referring to punishment of the bankers on Wall Street who caused the economic meltdown) wasn't the purview of the treasury secretary.  If Obama deliberately abstained from punishment of these people, his instructions would have been directed at the Department of Justice.  The available means for lessening the lingering effects of the recession were in the hands of congress, which the president used to the extent possible as long as the Democrats controlled both houses.

        Punishment of Wall Street criminals wouldn't have made recovery any better or faster, although a few high-level perp walks would no doubt have acted as a deterrent to further malfeasance both on the Street and in the shadow banking system.

        "All that is necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing" - Edmund Burke

        by SueDe on Sat May 17, 2014 at 05:52:12 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Watching Geithner the other night in an interview (5+ / 0-)

        he very clearly stated that there was no question in his mind that preserving the big banks was the paramount goal. I kept waiting for him to be asked why he thought that was more important than preserving millions of families homes, or why preserving Jaime Dimon's job was more important than those of 8 million other Americans. Waiting and waiting and it was never asked. The psychopath slithered off untouched.

        •  I don't think he really cared (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Subterranean

          One way or another about Jamie Dimon's job. From what I've read, while Geithner, like just about everyone else, did not anticipate the awful crash our economy took in 07 thru 09, once he became involved in day to day crisis management, 1st as pres of the NY fed and then as Secy of the Treasury, he performed well.

          He said the other day that Obama was not interested in biblical eye for eye justice with the banksters,  but wanted to 1st stop the bleeding and then repair and reform the economy. Compared to the EU, where north European inspired austerity seems to still be the order of the day, our economy is much farther along. Dodd Frank is law and that legislation will go a long way toward preventing another crash, least until everyone forgets lessons from 2008.

          Lots of blame for The Great Ressession, from the ratings agencies, The Clinton and Bush administration fiscal and economic policies, greedy Wall Street investment banks, even unsophisticated  home buyers.

    •  Pick didn't come from thin air. (6+ / 0-)

      No way President Obama was going to raise as much money from Wall Street as he did and them not get their people at the Treasury. Lets face facts.

      As Democrats, we fail to sometimes take a step back and look at where the power centers are in the country. We can never take them on all at once. We will see what happens when Silicon Valley is uncovered to be not so wonderful and liberal-approved.

      Im much more critical of Obama for not getting Medieval non Big Oil. He got nothing from them and theyve got a hug pile of cash thay only finances Republicans for the most part. Yet, he hasn't kicked their asses at all.

      I suspect the Clinton people will shake em down though.

    •  Clearly a 2 person race (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      peregrine kate

      Geithner and Duncan.

      Change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability, but comes through continuous struggle. --Martin Luther King Jr.

      by Egalitare on Sat May 17, 2014 at 06:50:20 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  GM--I'm speechless (7+ / 0-)

    Thanks for the roundup, Greg!

    "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

    by Diana in NoVa on Sat May 17, 2014 at 04:35:54 AM PDT

  •  So, at a meeting (8+ / 0-)

    of GM engineers, you couldn't say, "Hey we noticed that some of the ignition switches were defective. In fact we found some failed in a critical and dangerous way. This is a safety related issue, and could turn a car into a rolling sarcophagus." (I love that one)

    That explains why they didn't fix the problem. BTW I'm surprised that "ignition switch" wasn't on the list.

    A true craftsman will meticulously construct the apparatus of his own demise.

    by onionjim on Sat May 17, 2014 at 04:39:12 AM PDT

  •  Good thing we can use them all in DK comments n/t (7+ / 0-)

    It's not the side effects of the cocaine/I'm thinking that it must be love

    by Rich in PA on Sat May 17, 2014 at 04:55:41 AM PDT

  •  Stern master? (7+ / 0-)

    "Hard to understand that faith is a stern master"?  What a load of BS!  Faith isn't what drives Black or White religious animus against gays.  A sanctimonious sense of moral superiority erected on the foundation of blind superstition surrounding the belief in magical writings is what drives it.  

    •  but what do you really think? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      brooklynbadboy, rl en france

      understand what the point was: unjustified by faith, but for those who wrongly think it is, they, too, should give up that fight. I's over.Those folks will, however, come slower.

      "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

      by Greg Dworkin on Sat May 17, 2014 at 05:02:41 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  here's a great example of the virtues of patience (4+ / 0-)
      I’m sorry for not understanding a decade ago, for not challenging the ideology of injustice, for muffling my ears to the cries for equality. I understand now, and I thank all of those who worked tirelessly for marriage equality in Massachusetts, blazing a trail for equality in seventeen US states so far. They proved that justice and logic can defeat money and power. They proved that true morality can defeat false morality. They proved that impossible tasks can be accomplished with irresistible strength. They established a template that all who believe in making a better world real can follow.
      http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/...

      "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

      by Greg Dworkin on Sat May 17, 2014 at 06:10:58 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  a decade ago (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        FogCityJohn

        A decade ago, I would attribute much of the hesitancy of moderates and progressives to support marriage equality to tradition, more than anything else.  But it HAS been a decade.  And those intervening years have offered the opportunity to all who have open minds to recognize the rightness of the cause.  The obstinacy of the religious zealots in clinging to discrimination is a feature of orthodoxy.  And I deny that this feature is related to faith, as they claim.  I believe it is the feature of their self-righteousness and their over-inflated egos.   That is not dissimilar to the source of racist discrimination...something these preachers and their flocksmight want to give some thought to.

        •  question on the table is how to best (0+ / 0-)

          bring them along (that they are wrong is a given).

          Patience or contemptuousness?

          "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

          by Greg Dworkin on Sat May 17, 2014 at 09:09:18 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  premises (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            FogCityJohn

            You begin with the premise that they CAN be brought along.  Like the diehard Southern racist bigot, I believe the best we can hope for is to either gradually shame them out of existence or into a blessed silence.  Social disapprobation at least benefits society by suppressing the spread of discrimination and bigotry.

            But you are not dealing with my basic point, which is that the foundation for the opposition of these people is not faith.  Their "assurance of faith," I believe, is a fraud.  I have patience with the faith of people with humility, not with people who claim to know God.  I went to a Jesuit high school many years ago, and saw two kinds of Jesuits: those like Pope Francis who is willing to ask "Who am I to judge," and those like Pat Robertson who claim "I am the judge."  Like the ideologically retarded conservatives whose bedrock is authoritarianism, this second group is governed by pathology--a psychological disorder--rather than a religious principle.

            •  I'll grant you there are two kinds (0+ / 0-)

              I think the former group is much larger than the latter group, more Francises than Robertsons

              Stewardship of the earth can be a common goal, as can human decency, eventually.

              Economic justice and the future of religious progressives: A conversation with E.J. Dionne

              In the meantime, maybe best to avoid broad brush religion bashing? At least you note two groups. Many of the former post here.

              "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

              by Greg Dworkin on Sat May 17, 2014 at 11:28:28 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  perhaps (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                FogCityJohn

                Perhaps what you characterize as religion bashing, I might refer to as self defense.  Perhaps the religious zealots, who attempt to victimize gays, should avoid acts of discrimination.  If you read up this string, you will see that all along it has been focused on the purportedly religious whose faithe encourages animus.

                •  case in point (0+ / 0-)

                  I see no point in trying to be polite in the face of this:

                  www.joemygod.blogspot.com/2014/05/michigan-clergy-gays-are-our-enemy.html

                  •  there are fringe nuts (0+ / 0-)

                    but the many voices at my link who post here hate being broad brushed.

                    Can't blame them.

                    "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

                    by Greg Dworkin on Sat May 17, 2014 at 02:21:20 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  I read the post (0+ / 0-)

                      Had seen it before, and find it pretty convincing as far as coalition building.  Quite politically savvy.  On the other hand, I find it totally irrelevant to my opposition to, as I said in my first post, those religiously orthodox people who demonstrate a "sanctimonious sense of moral superiority erected on the foundation of blind superstition surrounding the belief in magical writings."

                    •  We hate it too, Greg. (0+ / 0-)

                      See, we gay people have been "broad brushed" in this country since time immemorial.  We've been called pedophiles.  We've been imprisoned as punishment for our love and even castrated as a way of "treating" our "condition."  We've been denied jobs, services, and housing because of who we are.  We've been denied equal rights.  We've even been denied the right to profess who we are in public.  Until very, very recently, we lived in the closet, a prison of silence enforced by the threat of violence..

                      In contrast to this kind of barbaric mistreatment and discrimination, the so-called "Christians" or "people of faith" you're talking about complain that they are painted with too broad a brush.  Apparently, this hurts their feelings.  Well, I'm afraid I can't find it within myself to feel particularly sorry for them.  They're part of the group that holds all the political and social power in this country, so I suspect they'll do just fine even if they have to face a little bit of misdirected criticism.

                      I'll be willing to listen to their complaints when they come to the LGBT community and beg forgiveness for what their "faith" has brought upon gay and trans people over the years.  Because compared to the hell their religion has created for us, some hurt feelings don't amount to a hill of beans.

                      "Ça c'est une chanson que j'aurais vraiment aimé ne pas avoir écrite." -- Barbara

                      by FogCityJohn on Sat May 17, 2014 at 05:45:43 PM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  I guess my point (0+ / 0-)

                        is that those who are wrong need to be defeated politically, without mercy and without accommodation. But some of who you dismiss will turn out to be people like this over time.  What do you do with them?

                        "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

                        by Greg Dworkin on Sat May 17, 2014 at 05:58:53 PM PDT

                        [ Parent ]

                        •  I dismiss no one. (1+ / 0-)
                          Recommended by:
                          Greg Dworkin

                          What I'm talking about is a problem that typifies people with privilege.  They end up feeling like they're the oppressed ones.  Their little feelings are hurt because someone may have said (entirely correctly) that religion has been used as an excuse to persecute LGBTs for ages.  They're deeply, deeply offended that someone should sweep people like themselves -- people so pure of heart -- in with the fundamentalist bigots.

                          My questions to them are: Where were you all those centuries and decades ago?  Were you sitting on your hands too afraid to speak up?  Or did you yourselves find gay people just too "icky" to defend?  Did you turn a blind eye to a fag bashing or to bullying of gays in school?  Were you so fearful of being called gay yourselves that you kept silent?

                          Do these people expect me to thank them for finally getting around to recognizing my humanity?  Again, like all people with privilege, they still think we owe them something.  The problem, as they seem to see it, is not what they and their co-religionaries did or failed to do.  The problem is that some of us LGBTs aren't been careful enough with our language.  They want to make sure they get full credit for not being malicious, bigoted, hateful human beings.

                          As for the guy in the linked article, his is the most minor of sins.  He supported civil unions but not full marriage equality.  People like him are hardly the problem to begin with, and now he's come around.  I'm glad he's realized he was wrong, but please don't ask me to pin a medal on his chest.  I've known I was a human being all along.  I'm not giving him bonus points for finally figuring out the obvious.

                          "Ça c'est une chanson que j'aurais vraiment aimé ne pas avoir écrite." -- Barbara

                          by FogCityJohn on Sat May 17, 2014 at 06:25:53 PM PDT

                          [ Parent ]

  •  Brakes like an "X" Car (9+ / 0-)

    For those that weren't around then. The X-body cars were GM's first attempt at a small front-wheel-drive platform in the 1980s.

    These were the Chevy Citation, Buick Sklark, Olds Omega and Pontiac Phoenix. They had quite a few issues, most notably loss of control under hard braking.

    Now I'm sure someone's going to respond with "My '83 Phoenix was the greatest car ever! I put 300,000 miles on that thing and all I ever did was change the oil." I guess you were the lucky one then. When was the last time you saw an '83 Phoenix on the road?

    If the pilot's good, see, I mean if he's reeeally sharp, he can barrel that baby in so low... oh you oughta see it sometime. It's a sight. A big plane like a '52... varrrooom! Its jet exhaust... frying chickens in the barnyard!

    by Major Kong on Sat May 17, 2014 at 04:58:48 AM PDT

    •  I had an Escort with rust issues. (6+ / 0-)

      One day I had to apply firm braking to stop in a line of cars. When I tried to proceed forward I realized the right front wheel had just broken off. Scrap.

      A true craftsman will meticulously construct the apparatus of his own demise.

      by onionjim on Sat May 17, 2014 at 05:03:45 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Oops (0+ / 0-)

      Looks like I played right into your hands... people just can't resist defending their cars...

      •  Depends on the car (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        JG in MD

        I've owned quite a few (too many actually).

        Some were great, some were junk, most were in between.

        If the pilot's good, see, I mean if he's reeeally sharp, he can barrel that baby in so low... oh you oughta see it sometime. It's a sight. A big plane like a '52... varrrooom! Its jet exhaust... frying chickens in the barnyard!

        by Major Kong on Sat May 17, 2014 at 06:05:36 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  GM Ruined 1 of the best autos evolved 4 America- (0+ / 0-)

      What was that evolved auto?

      1997/1998 SAAB 9000 Aero

      1997 SAAB 9000 Aero - 1998 SAAB 9000  CSE (Same Car)
      5 - Speed Manual 225Hp capable of > 35Mpg in a 4 cylinder high output turbo, comfortably efficient flybox-

      More here:

      GM Wants to Kill SAAB

      Who KIlled SAAB???

      Evidence that contradicts the ruling belief system is held to extraordinary standards, while evidence that entrenches it is uncritically accepted. -Carl Sagan

      by RF on Sat May 17, 2014 at 06:30:28 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  GM was the worst thing to happen to SAAB (0+ / 0-)

        After GM started homogenizing them, they weren't funky enough anymore for SAAB lovers but they were still too funky for the average GM shopper.

        If the pilot's good, see, I mean if he's reeeally sharp, he can barrel that baby in so low... oh you oughta see it sometime. It's a sight. A big plane like a '52... varrrooom! Its jet exhaust... frying chickens in the barnyard!

        by Major Kong on Sat May 17, 2014 at 09:11:08 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Lack of words (7+ / 0-)

    I always liked the aspect of George Orwell's 1984 that things that we can or should be able to talk about can be taken away by editing out the word or concept.

    California, for example, is struggling with an epic drought yet terms like resource theft or peak water are almost completely absent. Yet how else could you describe the unsanctioned over-removal of 10 cubic kilometers of groundwater in the San Joaquin Valley every year, or the diminishment of aquifers throughout the state?

    BTW: Anybody ever write for Bloomberg? Their stylebook used to forbid the use of the word but. I'm not even sure Orwell could have imagined going that far.

  •  I rather like "Kevorkianesque" (7+ / 0-)

    I'm giving fair notice that I'm totally stealing that one.

    If the pilot's good, see, I mean if he's reeeally sharp, he can barrel that baby in so low... oh you oughta see it sometime. It's a sight. A big plane like a '52... varrrooom! Its jet exhaust... frying chickens in the barnyard!

    by Major Kong on Sat May 17, 2014 at 05:10:14 AM PDT

  •  "What's Good for GM is Good for America" (3+ / 0-)

    remember that one?

    the $35 million dollar fine, the largest possible under the law, is the gross income GM earns in one day.

    Obviously the financial penalties have to be much larger in order the get the attention of negligent corporations.

    "We are beyond law, which is not unusual for an empire; unfortunately, we are also beyond common sense." Gore Vidal

    by Superpole on Sat May 17, 2014 at 05:19:09 AM PDT

    •  It was kind of the UAW to take all those hits over (4+ / 0-)

      recent years so that GM can make their mea culpa payments.  An do take note that engineering, parts and management dereliction seem to be the problem, not the assembly of the vehicles.

      Building a better America with activism, cooperation, ingenuity and snacks.

      by judyms9 on Sat May 17, 2014 at 06:18:31 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Even the engineers are top notch (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Superpole

        GM has an incredible talent pool at their Warren design center.  The problem has always been the management, which resembles a good 'ol boy club more than a meritocracy.  

        Remember in the 80s, they would have four differently badged versions of the same car?  The only difference would be the badge, grill, and minor trim.  Talk about colossally stupid management.

        A few family members who work in GM design studios always complained about how they would build a mock-up of a beautiful car, only to have a few executives see it and complain that it didn't look like a Cadillac or Pontiac or whatever.  As a result all the designs ended up looking like the generic GM cars you saw on the roads.  My uncle says that if those 80s managers had seen today's Corvette Stingray, they would have soiled their pants and screamed at the designers for spoiling a "classic".

        Recalls aside, GM has made an incredible revival relatively quickly considering the size of the company.  It's one of Obama's greatest achievments, and that includes his decision to fire the incompetent CEO and force a major restructuring of the company.  Too bad he didn't treat the banks the same way.

        "When I was an alien, cultures weren't opinions" ~ Kurt Cobain, Territorial Pissings

        by Subterranean on Sat May 17, 2014 at 10:13:25 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Rachel Carson's book came out when I was in High (14+ / 0-)

    School and taking Biology. I didn't read the book at the time but the issue fed my interest and helped me decide to major in the subject in college and teach it later in life. While we still have pesticide manufacturers claiming that they should be able to put products out for sale before knowing their ecosystem impact (just saw a mountain of "Round Up" for sale at the local big box)...we can thank Ms. Carson for helping to birth the modern the environmental movement and for those wonderful birds of prey soaring over the Hudson River whose egg shells are no longer too weak from DDT to come to term. Another great woman in a long line of those who have suffered the slings of outrageous fortune.

    •  Diazinon was good....too good..... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ER Doc
    •  What did you teach, singe? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DRo, rl en france

      Chemistry?  Biology?  Ecology?  I assume you finally read Carson's book.

      "All that is necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing" - Edmund Burke

      by SueDe on Sat May 17, 2014 at 06:02:16 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I read it in parts over time. I taught high school (4+ / 0-)

        biology for three years, then worked as a staff trainer in a government agency for about 30 years running a training operation that trained juvenile justice workers, adoption services workers, day care licensors, mental health and mental retardation workers, then retired and went back and taught another year of high school biology. did some tutoring of kids in an inner city drop in program, some od consulting for a private child care agency in nyc and  now I just teach a college course once a semester for adult returning students who are non science majors. The course is an overview of the biological sciences with an emphasis on how that content applies to current issues. So for instance the BP blowout, the nuke power plant disaster in Japan, the Supreme Court decision on not allowing the patenting of naturally occurring genome info (as in the case of the breast cancer gene), anthropogenic climate change and so on....this course is done as a hybrid which I really like as we get the face to face contact which facilitates group development and a sense of community which then makes the sharing and feedback process of the cyber component quite vibrant. I don't want to teach a complete on line course because after learning a bit about it I realize to do such a course really well would be a huge amount of work as opposed to just taping one's self lecturing.

        Anyhow I try to highlight women's contributions to science in the course and Rachel Carson is a great example, there is a good clip on YouTube about her.

        Well I guess that is a bit more than you asked for.....but the fingers are working good this morning. Last night we had tons of rain here in the Hudson valley and the morning sky is blue and clear as clear could be....time to entertain the lab mix pooch.  

  •  Whazzup with all the "control the language"? (4+ / 0-)

    I know this is about GM...cars etc.  But, my grandkids now have to watch everything they say in SCHOOL...sheeesh.

    We're letting this PC crap get out of hand, think?

    Hell...I'll probably get a bunch of shit for using the term "PC" here !

    •  I suspect it's for legal purposes (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      StrayCat, judyms9, Hoghead99, DRo

      Imagine if an internal report describing a car as "life threatening" turned up in a lawsuit.

      This is corporate CYA (Cover Your Butt).

      If the pilot's good, see, I mean if he's reeeally sharp, he can barrel that baby in so low... oh you oughta see it sometime. It's a sight. A big plane like a '52... varrrooom! Its jet exhaust... frying chickens in the barnyard!

      by Major Kong on Sat May 17, 2014 at 05:57:08 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Atif Mian and Amir Sufi have written (9+ / 0-)

    a book that sounds as though it has come to the conclusion that any working economist without a political agenda has reached regarding the sluggish recovery from the most recent U.S. financial recession - the enormous debt burden of American households.  This household debt, from mortgages to credit cards to personal loans, had been building up for decades, but grew out of control during the 2000s.  Consequently the deleveraging of this debt, which began in 2008 and continues today, has resulted in a drag on any recovery that could have been fashioned.

    Of course it doesn't help that with the election results of 2010 and the Republicans' insistence on austerity (and the president's agreement with the need for deficit reduction) that previous methods of ameliorating the effects of the recession were  prohibited, most notably aid to the states and an increase in government employment.  

    "All that is necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing" - Edmund Burke

    by SueDe on Sat May 17, 2014 at 05:38:13 AM PDT

  •  Totally get it (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    JG in MD, foresterbob, rl en france

    I work with engineers - they don't do nuance or sarcasm or even puns, everything needs to be spelled out in exact language. This list could have come from "that guy" at the office.

  •  So, you can't write "widow-maker," (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Stude Dude, Crashing Vor

    can you write "orphan-maker?"

    "Soylent Green is people too, my friend!" Guess Who

    by oldmaestro on Sat May 17, 2014 at 05:53:37 AM PDT

  •  Does the New York Times Know How to Fire Someone (5+ / 0-)

    good read here.

    http://blogs.hbr.org/...

    "It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it!" — Upton Sinclair

    by Greg Dworkin on Sat May 17, 2014 at 05:56:22 AM PDT

  •  Smells like Teen Spirit n/t (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Stude Dude

    Evidence that contradicts the ruling belief system is held to extraordinary standards, while evidence that entrenches it is uncritically accepted. -Carl Sagan

    by RF on Sat May 17, 2014 at 05:57:52 AM PDT

  •  I read geitner's book. Not impressed. (5+ / 0-)

    Some interesting anecdotes, but in terms of policy, economic reasoning, it was light. Unappetizing. Hollow.

    What we call god is merely a living creature with superior technology & understanding. If their fragile egos demand prayer, they lose that superiority.

    by agnostic on Sat May 17, 2014 at 05:58:48 AM PDT

  •  Poor Jamelle.. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Hoghead99

    he haz a sad that race is not an issue with millenials.

    Race will always be an issue to those who derive their livelihoods and power from keeping the races divided.

  •  Is it disengenuous? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Crashing Vor, JG in MD

    If us Pinto enthusiasts have a giggle at GM's expense? :3

    My hibachi seats four and has Discotastic portholes!

    "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

    by Stude Dude on Sat May 17, 2014 at 06:09:48 AM PDT

    •  Separated at Birth (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Stude Dude

      Stude Dude, You've seen pix of my dad's Studebaker. My Pinto was green, like the back right-hand corner one in the link you posted.

      Are we soulmates, destined to live out our connection as imaginary friends?

      Wish you lived Here Near DC so we could meet up at the picnic on the Mall today.

      •  Any lost Wingnuts from yesterday? (0+ / 0-)

        Still wandering around the Mall?

        Maybe some are lost until they accidentally get pointed homeward.....

        "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

        by Stude Dude on Sat May 17, 2014 at 10:43:37 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Millennial question? (0+ / 0-)
    opposed to measures to reduce racial inequality,
    So did all those years of ranting about 'verse 'scriminmation get under their skin?

    "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

    by Stude Dude on Sat May 17, 2014 at 06:16:26 AM PDT

  •  This GM directive is a response to the ludicrously (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    salmo, Subterranean, Greg Dworkin

    broken character of judicial process in the US. Legal argument in American jurisprudence is just one big bucket of epistemological fail, and this is as true in tort law as anywhere else.
    Most of the proscriptions on language are there because if there exists, anywhere in the email/paper trail that accompanies "research, development, production and marketing," any indication anywhere that anybody suggested (or even suspected) that anything was wrong with any aspect of the project, some jackass lawyer is going to hang your corporate ass with it.

    Somebody around here has been using the Richelieu quote for a sig, to the effect, "Give me six lines written by the most honest man in France, and I will find something in it to hang him." This is precisely the state of jurisprudence in the US, and particularly the jurisprudence of civil litigation.

    Note that I am not grinding some sort of right-wing tort reform axe here, trying to protect corporate villains from righteous consumer victims -- this is a problem that transcends that particular relationship. When I worked in the "medical devices" industry, the corporate attorneys gave the scientists a very similar set of instructions for what could be written in a lab notebook: No speculation. No opinion. No conclusions. Think about that! No fucking conclusions in a lab notebook!. Does that conflict just a teensy bit with whatever you learned all the way back in 8th-grade science?

    The reason in that case had more to do with intellectual property than with liability. If you wrote that something "didn't work", then later you tried to claim prior art against someone else's patent, their lawyers could point to your conclusion and say, "HA! Look! You had concluded it didn't work, and abandoned the attempt! How can you call that prior art?" For that matter, if you erroneously concluded that it did work, someone could use that to show that your company as an entity didn't understand something important, and therefore did not have prior art, or that an idea couldn't possibly have been stolen from you. Or if perhaps you wrote a note to yourself referencing something that motivated an experiment, that could be evidence that you had "stolen" the idea from someone else. And so on.  Any and all speculations/opinions/conclusions might imperil the company's intellectual property. Thus, researchers in high tech are forced to do a bizarre dance, trying to somehow document their research without documenting anything about the thought processes that go into their research. How the hell are you supposed to do that? How the hell are you supposed to even keep track of what you're trying to get done?

    If you think that GM directive is ridiculous, well, yes, perhaps it is -- but the fundamental fault is the system of law (including the absurd system of intellectual property) that makes such a ridiculous directive necessary.

    To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

    by UntimelyRippd on Sat May 17, 2014 at 08:27:12 AM PDT

  •  Which Candidates Need Money? Please advise (0+ / 0-)

    I'm in a generous mood today. . . . .

  •  Tools >> Thesarus....or Thesarus.com.....or (0+ / 0-)

    Google chrome for "two-word descriptive phrases".....

    I also have the Roget's Thesaurus....to satisfy the Luddites....

  •  As the mortgage crisis unfolded, (0+ / 0-)

    I clearly remember a full-page ad in the NYT from a banker - could have been the Hudson Valley Bank maybe? - who urged the Federal government to pay the first $250 of every mortgage every month to buy time for reorganization of the banking and housing sector. That ad ran more than once and, when you think of how much the recession cost the country, that idea could have provided tremendous assistance to people who needed it most. So it's not like people were unable to fathom what to do. It was more about ensuring a comfortable seat on the lifeboats for the first-class passengers.

    Voting is the means by which the public is distracted from the realities of power and its exercise.

    by Anne Elk on Sat May 17, 2014 at 09:01:40 AM PDT

  •  Pompous, Arrogant, Cynical, Entitled (0+ / 0-)

    …Why are not some GM executives in prison? For life?

  •  "corvair-like" (0+ / 0-)

    "deathtrap," "rolling sarcophagus."  Yep, definitely want to avoid those.

    "You cannot win improv." Stephen Colbert (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m6tiaooiIo0 at 16:24).

    by Publius2008 on Sat May 17, 2014 at 10:27:45 AM PDT

  •  Flashback about Rachel Carson (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Greg Dworkin, BeninSC

    Karin Kamp's description of the attacks on Rachel Carson's "Silent Spring" brought back memories of American History class, at a high school somewhere in the depths of GOP-dominated Central Illinois, circa 1982:

    Like many Am. Hist. HS courses, I guess, we never made it past WWII. But I read ahead in the official textbook, and found this dismissal of pretty much all of the '60s (I'm pretty sure I can still quote it):

    "While a minority of malcontents listened to shrill voices like Rachel Carson's and took to the streets to make trouble, most young people studied, worked hard and led normal, decent lives."

    Still brings a bit of bile up to this day.

    •  Of course, they're happiest when she is never (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      piloucha

      mentioned.

      What would that brilliant woman say today?!

      Good first comment, piloucha.

      Welcome to Daily Kos. If you have any questions about how to participate here, you can learn more at the Community Guidelines, the Knowledge Base, and the Site Resource Diaries. Diaries labeled "Open Thread" are also great places to ask. We look forward to your contributions.
      ~~ from the DK Partners & Mentors Team.

      "The opposite of war isn't peace, it's CREATION." _ Jonathan Larson, RENT -9.62, -9.13

      by BeninSC on Sat May 17, 2014 at 07:05:26 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Thanks! I wonder if that textbook (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        BeninSC

        was published by one of those Dallas(?)-based schoolbook mills that also leave out Darwin, etc. ...

        As used to the ambient conservatism

         (of a town of 13,000 people and over 30 churches, and of a high school where the biology teacher announced that he refused to teach the section on evolution -- all that had taken some getting used to, as a European immigrant)

         as I was back then,  I think that phrasing stayed with me all these years because of its sheer sneering contempt, and its incongruous 1960s target: not even a member of the Black Panthers, or the SDS (though that would have been insulting and mendacious enough),

         but Carson, of all people...

        Graduation couldn't come soon enough.

        And yes, imagine what she would say today... And today there would be whole TV channels devoted to tearing her down on the pesticide makers' behalf. Shrill voices... jeez.

        Thanks for the kind welcome, Ben.

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