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8:47 AM PT (Darth Jeff): Primaries: Tuesday brings us our biggest primary night of the cycle, and our biggest election night until November. With races in Alabama, California, Iowa, Mississippi, Montana, New Jersey, New Mexico, and South Dakota there's a lot to watch, and we have our primary preview for all eight states. We'll be liveblogging the results at Daily Kos Elections Tuesday starting at 8 PM ET when polls start to close.

8:56 AM PT (Darth Jeff): California: Tuesday brings us our second-ever statewide top-two primary in California, where all the candidates run on one ballot and the two with the most votes advance to November. The primary is very important in winnowing the (sometimes extremely) crowded races down to two candidates. However, as we explain in a new piece, the top-two does a poor job in predicting how each party will perform in November.

In 2012 the primary badly underestimated Democratic performances almost across the board, with Team Blue improving by as much as 34 points between June and November. The top-two is still new and hasn't been tested in a midterm election: However, if 2012 is any guide, the June results will probably show us the bare minimum of support Democrats can expect in the general. That's good news for any Democrats at or close to 50 percent, but doesn't tell us much beyond that.  

9:09 AM PT: PA-Gov: Rasmussen: Tom Wolf (D): 51, Tom Corbett (R-inc): 31.

9:20 AM PT: NY-Gov, -LG: Despite losing the Working Families Party endorsement to Gov. Andrew Cuomo, law professor Zephyr Teachout says she's still thinking about challenging Cuomo in the Democratic primary and will decide some time over the next week. However, activist and fundraiser Bill Samuels, who'd been considering a bid for lieutenant governor against Cuomo's hand-picked choice, ex-Rep. Kathy Hochul, has now apparently declined to run.

Samuels may have left himself some wiggle room, though. Saying he expected the WFP to nominate Teachout, he's now "decided that if there isn't a candidate against Cuomo for me to run with, I will not run for LG." It's not entirely clear why his candidacy should depend on anyone else's, but seeing as Zephyr may yet run, perhaps he's leaving the door open for himself.

9:21 AM PT (Darth Jeff): RI-Gov: Cranston Mayor Allan Fung portrays Republican primary rival Ken Block as a liberal in his new ad. The spot features Block "supporters" saying how their man backed Obama and Obamacare, wants new spending, and advised outgoing Gov. Lincoln Chafee. Each of these Block supporters has a cube for a head. Because they support Block and are thus blockheads. I'll give you a minute to recover from the fit of uncontrollable laughter you must be feeling right now.

9:28 AM PT: NY State Senate: With Gov. Andrew Cuomo's pledge to help New York Democrats retake the state Senate in exchange for winning the Working Families Party's nomination, progressives are talking up some new potential challengers to the other three members of the renegade Independent Democratic Conference, Sens. Diane Savino, David Carlucci, and David Valesky. The Daily News' Ken Lovett has a rundown on all the names.

9:36 AM PT: MS-Sen: A last-minute poll of Tuesday's GOP primary, from unaligned Democratic pollster Chism Strategies, finds Sen. Thad Cochran with a narrow 46-44 lead over challenger Chris McDaniel, similar to what other recent surveys have shown. Cochran has the slimmest of edges in the HuffPo Pollster averages, too. Looks like this one is anybody's race, though we'll finally have some answers tomorrow.

And the guy most keenly waiting on the results is Democratic ex-Rep. Travis Childers, who, if he's to have any chance at all, needs McDaniel to win. Politico's Alexander Burns catches up with Childers to see where he stands ideologically these days, and he hasn't changed much since losing his bid for re-election in 2010. Childers voted against the ACA but doesn't support trying to repeal it, however, and he does say he regrets opposing the auto bailout.

10:07 AM PT: MN-Sen, -Gov: Both major parties in Minnesota regularly short-circuit democracy by having a handful of activists decide nominations at conventions, and the GOP did just that over the weekend, tapping finance executive Mike McFadden as their Senate nominee. McFadden, who actually did not pledge to abide by the party's endorsement, beat out St. Louis County Commissioner Chris Dahlberg after a lengthy floor fight. Both Dahlberg and state Sen. Julianne Ortman said they would not continue on to the primary, but state Rep. Jim Abeler says he might (though he has almost no money). So McFadden likely has a clear shot at Sen. Al Franken this fall.

Things did not, however, go quite so smoothly on the gubernatorial side. Former state Rep. Marty Seifert unsuccessfully tried to block delegates from endorsing Hennepin County Commissioner Jeff Johnson and so will try to stop Johnson in the Aug. 12 primary instead. So will two other candidates who didn't participate in the convention at all, businessman Scott Honour and former state House Speaker Kurt Zellers. The four are vying to take on Gov. Mark Dayton in November.

10:16 AM PT (Darth Jeff): Wyoming: Filing closed Friday in Wyoming for the state's August 19 primary. The state has a complete list of candidates here.

Republican Gov. Matt Mead is running for a second term and faces a primary challenge from Superintendent of Public Instruction Cindy Hill and physician Taylor Haynes. Mead starts out the clear favorite; we rate the general election as Safe Republican. Republicans also have contested primaries for the open positions of secretary of state and state treasurer.

Both Sen. Mike Enzi and fellow Republican Rep. Cynthia Lummis are running again. Enzi has had a clear path to reelection since primary challenger Liz Cheney dropped out in January, and none of his assorted Republican foes look like anything other than Some Dudes. We rate both seats as Safe Republican.

10:28 AM PT: MS-Sen: There's also the possibility of a runoff, which would be held very quickly, on June 24. If you're wondering how such a short turnaround time is compatible with federal laws that mandate enough time for overseas voters to receive and return ballots, here's something fascinating: Mississippi, along with Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, and South Carolina, will use ranked-choice voting for everyone casting votes from abroad. Rob Richie of FairVote explains the process:

Voters are sent two ballots before the election. On the first ballot, they indicate a single choice. This ballot is counted in the first round. On the second ballot, they rank candidates in order of preference. In the event of a runoff, the second ballot is examined, and each ranked choice ballot is added to the totals of the top-ranked candidate who has advanced to the runoff.
Several states have actually been using the system for some time, and one big advantage is that runoff turnout is much higher among overseas voters. Indeed, everyone should be given the option of voting this way.

10:41 AM PT (Steve Singiser): California: On the eve of the state's primary elections, it is as good a time as any to look at how the state's voter registration patterns are changing, since state officials offer a comprehensive look at their registration records, one which updated just two weeks prior to Election Day.

One thing to notice is the relative shifts in party registration since 2012. This can be done by comparing the 2014 numbers by district to the 2012 figures. Some competitive districts are getting a little more blue: most notably, the north Los Angeles County-based 25th district, where a 4 percent GOP lead in 2012 has dropped to a single point. But some have moved a shade to the right: Democratic freshman Raul Ruiz has seen his district go from almost precisely even between Democrats and Republicans, to a GOP edge of nearly 5000 voters.

Another interesting item: looking at the historical midterm data for voter registration just underscores what a monstrous registration spike Democrats enjoyed courtesy of the Obama-McCain election of 2008, and how that spike diminished, relatively speaking, with the Obama re-elect. After modest growth in registration in the previous eight years (between 480,000-675,000), there was a 1.3 million person spike in registration between 2006-10. In the newest numbers, the comparable spike was around 745,000, far less than between 2006-10, but still higher than previous cycles. The impact has also been partisan: what was an 8.3 percent Democratic registration edge before the 2006 primaries is now a Democratic advantage of 15.0 percent.

11:02 AM PT (Darth Jeff): CO-Gov: Former Rep. Tom Tancredo has an new ad out ahead of the state's June 24 primary. He rides a motorcycle as the narrator lays out his right-wing credentials and makes the dubious claim that the ultra-conservative Tancredo's "the one guy who can win over independents to take back the governor's office."

After spending the whole spot portraying Tancredo as a tough guy (though the soft guitar music undercuts this a bit) the ad ends with the candidate placing putting a motorcycle helmet on a kid's head (presumably a family member). The narrator extolls, "What you don't know is he ain't all that tough," but doesn't elaborate on that. Maybe this is supposed to be cute, but it just comes off as odd to me.

11:45 AM PT: WV-02: A Tarrance Group poll for Republican Alex Mooney and the NRCC finds Mooney leading Democrat Nick Casey 39-29 among likely voters, with Libertarian Davy Jones taking 3 and left-leaning Mountain Party candidate Ed Rabel at a surprisingly high 10 percent of the vote. However, it's very unlikely that Rabel, a former CBS News correspondent who's running to Casey's left, will hold on to such a sizable chunk of the electorate. But if he keeps eating into Casey's flank, that'll make it much harder for Democrats to pick up this seat.

11:59 AM PT: KS-Sen: State Sen. Dennis Pyle, who offered himself up as a more electable "true conservative" alternative to physician Milton Wolf, has decided not to challenge Sen. Pat Roberts in the Republican primary after all. That leaves Wolf in a one-on-one race against the incumbent, though he hasn't gotten much outside help and polls haven't offered much cause for hope.

12:36 PM PT: IA-Sen: A final poll from Selzer gives state Sen. Joni Ernst a 34-18 lead over businessman Mark Jacobs in Tuesday's GOP primary, identical to the numbers PPP saw a couple of weeks ago and very similar to the overall polling average. As long as Ernst clears 35 percent, she can avoid having the nomination thrown to a convention and proceed immediately toward taking on Rep. Bruce Braley in the general election.

1:06 PM PT (David Jarman): MS-Sen: If you've been trying to mentally model the Mississippi primary election on Tuesday, it's hard to find a template: there hasn't been a closely-fought Republican statewide primary in many years, and the candidates don't have especially strong regional identities (Chris McDaniel represents Jones County in the state's rural southern part, but has only around 50,000 constituents, while Thad Cochran represented a Jackson-centered version of MS-04 back in the 1970s).

But there are several articles today that explain that Cochran has particular strengths in the state's agricultural flatlands in the Delta region, and if he wins, it's going to be by running up the score here among the area's few Republicans (the Delta counties are majority African-American), while holding down his losses in the more populist-minded parts of the state. Stu Rothenberg talks to some of Cochran's Delta-area supporters, who like his long track record as an appropriator, while Nate Cohn locates that in its historical context, where the South has been characterized by centuries of political tension between the establishment politics of the gentry of the lowlands and the rabble-rousing of the hill-dwellers.

(To see the explanation for that difference expanded from one sentence out to over 900 pages, I'd strongly recommend reading Albion's Seed by David Hackett Fischer, if you haven't done so already. Part of that historical tension is economic, based on the different needs of plantation owners vs. small farmers, but much of that is cultural and temperamental differences going back to Cavaliers and Borderers many centuries ago in England.)

1:12 PM PT: CA-Gov: Ultraconservative Assemblyman Tim Donnelly has led fellow Republican Neel Kashkari, a former Treasury Department official, in every single public poll of California's top-two gubernatorial primary—until now. A final survey for USC and the LA Times, jointly conducted by Democratic pollster GQR and Republican pollster American Viewpoint, finds Kashkari beating out Donnelly 18 to 13. (Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown is, as per usual, far out in front with 50 percent.) While neither has a prayer in the general election, the GOP establishment would much prefer Kashkari win on Tuesday, since he'd been less of an anvil downticket than the extremophile Donnelly.

1:15 PM PT: CA-31: The DCCC had already been hitting Republican Lesli Gooch with mailers, in the hopes of ensuring she doesn't sneak through Tuesday's top-two primary, but at the last minute, they upgraded to some mass media as well. According to an independent expenditure report, the D-Trip spent $26,000 on an unspecified "media buy," which may have been for radio rather than TV, given the small size. They also forked out another $22,000 or so on more mail pieces.

1:34 PM PT (David Jarman): Votes: The House voted 219-189 last week to prohibit DEA raids on medical marijuana operations in states that have legalized it. Passed by a coalition of Democrats and the furthest-to-the-right GOPers, it was one of those rare votes where liberal-vs.-conservative status had less to do with the result than Representatives' establishment or anti-establishment orientation (something that hardcore devotees of the DW-Nominate vote-aggregation system know as the mysterious "second dimension"). The Vote View blog breaks down the vote, which counted unsavory characters like Paul Broun and Dana Rohrabacher among its backers.

1:57 PM PT: NY State Senate: A separate report from Sally Goldberg at Capital New York says that New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, who was supposedly instrumental in brokering a truce between the WFP and Cuomo, is helping to recruit IDC challengers. According to Goldberg, one of the targets is ... Jeff Klein, despite the fact that he already has an opponent in former New York City Councilman Oliver Koppell. If this story is accurate, though, then this presumably means that de Blasio & co. believe that the alternatives mentioned (City Councilman Andy Cohen; former deputy city comptroller Ari Hoffnung; and Randi Martos, chief of staff to Assemblyman Jeffrey Dinowitz) would be stronger options.

2:03 PM PT (Darth Jeff): Senate Majority PAC: These people do not mess around. Senate Majority PAC hits Republican candidates in Arkansas, Colorado, Michigan, North Carolina, and New Hampshire in new spots.

Unlike many multi-state TV blitzes, Senate Majority PAC does not just mildly alter the same ad to fit different candidates: all the ads are unique and tailored to each candidate. For instance, the Colorado ad hits Rep. Cory Gardner on abortion and his past support for the person hood amendment, while the two North Carolina ads attack state House Speaker Thom Tillis on education and taxes.

2:54 PM PT: NY State Senate: However, the WFP has already taken preliminary steps to endorse Koppell (as well as John Liu, who is running against IDCer Tony Avella), though a formal nomination at the local level is still pending, and several key unions plan to stick with Klein. Still, if Koppell locks down the WFP's backing, that makes it unlikely progressives would go another route.

3:00 PM PT: VRA: The Supreme Court just announced that it will hear a case brought by Alabama Democrats that argues Republican lawmakers impermissibly packed black voters into too few districts when they drew new legislative maps, diminishing minority voting strength in adjoining seats. A three-judge panel previously ruled 2-1 that the maps were proper. A win here for Democrats would likely require that legislators maintain majority-minority districts, but at lower concentrations of minority voters than before. However, given that the SCOTUS recently dismantled a key plank of the Voting Rights Act, pessimism is warranted.

3:05 PM PT: NH-Sen: This sure is sketchy:

An obscure company in West Palm Beach that markets itself as a firearms manufacturer made a splashy announcement last summer: It was appointing Scott Brown, the former Massachusetts senator, to its advisory board.

Not revealed at the time was what Brown received in exchange for lending his name to the venture. But a report the company made to the Securities and Exchange Commission last month, which has not been previously made public, shows that Brown received stock that was worth $1.3 million at the time. Its value has declined considerably since then, as the stock price has fallen by half.

Global Digital Solutions Inc. does not yet sell or make guns. It has no revenue, no patents, no trademarks, no manufacturing facilities, and no experience developing weapons, according to its most recent corporate filings.

It was founded as a beauty supply company in New Jersey — selling hair spray, conditioners, and shampoos, before reinventing itself as a wireless data firm from California and then again last year as a South Florida-based firearms maker and gun technology innovator.

It is the kind of company, with scant assets and a shifting business model, that some financial professionals warn investors to steer away from.

GDSI is a penny stock, and its value dropped another 20 percent on Monday, likely due to this report. The Globe's story has much, much more.

3:10 PM PT: VA-08: Former Lt. Gov. Don Beyer swamped the field in pre-primary fundraising, taking in $447,000 between April 1 and May 21, as well as loaning himself $200,000 to wind up with $351,000 in the bank. His nearest Democratic primary opponent was state Sen. Adam Ebbin, with $113,000 and $88,000 cash-on-hand. Radio host Mark Levine also loaned himself $150,000 but raised little on top of that.

3:16 PM PT: ME-Gov: GOP Gov. Paul LePage actually outraised Democratic Rep. Mike Michaud in the month-plus pre-primary fundraising period, $180,000 to $152,000, but Michaud still has an edge in cash-on-hand, $864,000 to $758,000. The brightest news, though, may be the fact that independent Eliot Cutler only managed to raise $33,000 and has just $40,000 left after spending $1.25 million to date, far more than either Michaud or LePage.

3:40 PM PT (Darth Jeff): Ads: In the immortal words of Homer Simpson: "The commercial's on! If we don't watch these, it's like we're stealing TV."

AK-Sen: Put Alaska First spends $193,000 hitting Republican former Attorney General Dan Sullivan over fishing.

HI-Sen: Both Democratic candidates have a new positive spot out. Sen. Brian Schatz highlights renewable energy, while Rep. Colleen Hanabusa emphasizes protecting social security and Medicare.

MN-Sen: Democratic Sen. Al Franken highlights his legislation to hire more mental health professionals for schools.

MT-Sen: Republican Rep. Steve Daines is the latest Republican to emphasize the problems at the VA in a spot.

OK-Sen: Oklahomans for a Conservative Future contrasts former state House Speaker T.W. Shannon and his Republican primary opponent Rep. James Lankford. It calls Shannon "the most conservative speaker in Oklahoma history" while attacking Lankford for raising the debt ceiling and "voting for the Obama budget".  

AR-Gov: The DGA goes after former Republican Rep. Asa Hutchinson on education, with some jabs at his past as a Virginia-based lobbyist thrown in.

FL-Gov: Let's Get to Work goes after former Gov. Charlie Crist on tuition costs.  

NJ-03: Democratic Burlington County Freeholder Aimee Belgard airs an introductory ad.

NY-01: American Action Network calls Republican George Demos's conservative bona fides into question by portraying him as someone who gladly takes money from liberal donors. The spot is part of a $225,000 buy.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (7+ / 0-)

    Get the Daily Kos Elections Digest in your inbox every weekday. Sign up here.

    by David Nir on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 06:00:19 AM PDT

  •  A really big deal (17+ / 0-)

    This AM the US Supreme Court just noted probable jurisdiction-that means they will almost certainly decide the two Alabama voting rights racial gerrymandering cases. These are the cases where the Alabama legislature was charged with packing black voters in vote sinks to dilute their voting strength. If this is decided in favor of the Ala. NAACP then the viability of all of the black voter sinks in the south will be problematic-especially like those in my state Florida where the R legislature has been packing African-Americans into sinks to bleach out the neighboring districts. In any event, this decision to apparently take the cases will mean that the present rules will be looked at in public.

  •  Midwest. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sulthernao

    I just noticed that if Democrats win all the races where they lead in the Midwest this cycle, which looks probable, they will have swept every senate race in the region since the 2010 elections.

    Impractical progressive Democrat. "I am becoming less and less interested in your estimates of what is possible." - President Merkin Muffley (Dr. Strangelove)

    by redrelic17 on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 07:14:36 AM PDT

  •  KY-Sen: New Grimes Web Ad (3+ / 0-)

    It's pretty much excerpts from her very well received nomination speech. I like it.

    https://www.youtube.com/...

    TX-17 (Bill Flores-R), TX Sen-14 (Kirk Watson-D), TX HD-50 (Celia Israel-D). Senate ratings map (as of 3/10/14)

    by Le Champignon on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 07:52:07 AM PDT

  •  King Juan Carlos to abdicate, give throne to son. (9+ / 0-)

    That's a shame, he was a great man and helped Spain return to democracy and fairness.

    “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

    by KingofSpades on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 08:27:54 AM PDT

    •  A lot of modern European monarchs abdicate (5+ / 0-)

      Last year, the king of Belgium and the queen of the Netherlands abdicated. A lot of Swedes want the current king of Sweden to abdicate, because he's seen as some combination of senile, ditzy, and ethically questionable, and his daughter is a lot more popular.

    •  I love King Juan Carlos (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      KingofSpades

      Spent the summers of my childhood in Sevilla, he was practically a God King in the eyes of so many Spaniards then.

      It saddens me to see the monarchy's loss of popularity in Spain, King Juan Carlos did so much to foster and protect Spanish democracy after the horrors of Franco

      24, Male, CA- 12 currently. LA-02 & TX-08 originally, SSP: sschmi4

      by Stephen Schmitz on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 04:15:31 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  ugh he was the successor selected by Franco (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      gabjoh, KingofSpades

      certainly not a Democrat in origin, like his words show clearly.

      Here is the moment in 1969 when he was appointed successor by Franco.

      Here is Juan Carlos making apology of the Francoism, and showing his admiration toward Franco.

      The Spanish Royal family is affected by serious scandals of corruption. The husband of the youngest daughter of Juan Carlos is likely to go to jail and her daughter has been indicted too. All the family is dammaged enought to have a valoration of 3 in a 0-10 scale. An example of the protests against them.

      The Spanish entire left (political parties and unions) except the PSOE, plus the parties and unions of the minorities, called for demonstrations and protest in more than 100 cities in favor of a referendum about the monarchy or a new Spanish Republic. Thousand of citizens attended the demonstrations and protests.

      The political parties that are defending the Republic obtained more than a 31% of the vote in the recent European Elections. And the PSOE (an aditional 23%) is acting against the wish of their basis.

      •  an example of the pro-Republicans in the PSOE (0+ / 0-)

        the delegates protested against the behavior of the direction of Perez Rubalcaba on this issue.

        http://www.libertaddigital.com/...

        •  unfortunately it is not possible to link these (0+ / 0-)

          these things in English. I only can find sources in Spanish and French.

          The Spanish Royal family is a obscure family. Even it is rumored that Juan Carlos accidentally killed his younger brother Alfonso in 1956. Then Juan Carlos was 18 years old, and his brother 14.

          http://en.wikipedia.org/...

          Very quickly, however, rumours appeared in newspapers that the gun had actually been held by Alfonso's brother Juan Carlos at the moment the shot was fired. Josefina Carolo, dressmaker to Alfonso's mother, said that Juan Carlos playfully pointed the pistol at Alfonso and pulled the trigger, unaware that the pistol was loaded. Bernardo Pinheiro de Melo (a.k.a. "Maná"), a Portuguese friend of Juan Carlos, also said that Juan Carlos fired the pistol not knowing that it was loaded, and adding that the bullet ricocheted off a wall hitting Alfonso in the face. Helena Matheopoulos, a Greek author who spoke with Alfonso's sister Pilar, said that Alfonso had been out of the room and when he returned and pushed the door open, the door knocked Juan Carlos in the arm causing him to fire the pistol.[9]

          There have been various stories about the origins of the pistol. The most frequently repeated is that it was a gift to Alfonso from General Franco.[10]

      •  But didn't he turn against Franco (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        abgin

        and helped restore Spain's republic?

        “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

        by KingofSpades on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 11:48:22 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  no (0+ / 0-)

          Spain is not now a Republic, is a Monarchy, and the origin of the Monarchy come from the Francoism. It even respected not the succesory order of previous monarchic times in Spain, skiping his father.

          Juan Carlos do nothing to finish the Francoism, and do nothing against the Francoist oligarchy keeping the power (specially the economic and military power) until now.

    •  Which was probably unexpected (0+ / 0-)

      by many at the time, given that Franco had appointed him as his successor, basically.

  •  Minnesota conventions recap (6+ / 0-)

    On the GOP side:

    There were a lotnof fireworks and surprised around the Senate seat. Biggest upset was Julieanne Ortmann did get off the ground, and Republicans had to reluctantly cone around to professiona loanshark Mike McFadden. It took 10 ballots, but McFadden finally got to the threshold over Chris Dahlberg, who was the surprised of the weekend. McFadden will likely run over state representative Jim Abeler in the August primary, as all the other candidates withdrew in honor of the endorsement.

    The governors race was supposed to be more interesting, utnit really fell flat compared to the senate endorsement. Hennepin County Commissioner Jeff Johnson got the nod fairly easily. This race is not yet settled,  as most of the firldbhad pledged to love forward to August anyways. Marty Seifert drew boos from the crowd when he made his announcement he was not abiding by the endorsement.

    On the DFL side:

    The event was mostly a low key coronation for most of the races, and was far less interesting than the GOP convention across the state. The one race in question was the seat vacated by retiring SoS Mark Richie. Two state legislators, Deb Hilstrom and Steven Simon were trading endorsements. But when Simon had Joan Growe (a living legendary SoS in her own right) endorsed Simon, the race was over, and the first ballot results weren't even read.

    The big fireworks came between pro-mining and anti-ining factions. There was supposed to be a least objectionable platform for the mineral industry dependent areas of Northern Minnesota. It read something like Wendy's "We support mining that does not in anyway pollute the water or the environment", but that failed to gain support, and a large portionnifnthe delegation left absolutely furious that even such a token position was denied. Expect backlash, particularly towards Auditor Rebecca Otto, who is one of the foremost leaders against Minnesota mining.

    I am a Tom Rukavina Democrat

    by OGGoldy on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 08:45:47 AM PDT

    •  Do You Think Otto's GOP Challenger..... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      PSUCentrePA

      ....will win St. Louis and neighboring counties?

      •  St. Louis is unlikely (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Mark27, PSUCentrePA

        But I could are her losing the neighbors, particular Itasca and Koochiching.

        In reality, we are lucky that Republicans nominated a broke Some Dude to run against her, because a serious challenger like Anderson or keifer would have a very strong chance at winning in the likely event Otto is kept to the mid-50s in St. Louis County.

        I am a Tom Rukavina Democrat

        by OGGoldy on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 09:27:07 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I can't stress enough how upset people were (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          PSUCentrePA, Mark27

          People I know well, and are as mild mannered as anyone you every will meet were screaming 4 letter words, and openly insulting members of their own party. I have never seen such a thing before. Senator Tomasoni physically threw his blackberry as he flat out said that anyone that opposes this is promoting 3rd world child labor sweat shops over Minnesota industry.

          I am a Tom Rukavina Democrat

          by OGGoldy on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 09:30:20 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Words are wind (0+ / 0-)

            If the Iron Rangers actually had more bite than bark, Otto would have been challenged instead of acclimation.  The Rangers know they have outsized influence in the DFL because of how long they've been in office.  They're just cranky they didn't get to bully their way through for once.

            Another thing to remember is that DFL activists are older and whiter than the DFL base.

            MN-01, long time lurker

            by Jervill on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 02:03:52 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I couldn't disagree more (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              ArkDem14, BoswellSupporter

              Without their votes, Democrats lose every race in 2010, and several more before them. The entire DFL majority hinges on the ~20 seats that they control.

              Do you really want to see them go the way of West Virginia Democrats? I certainly don't.

              It is pretty simple to keep these voters 65-35 Demo: Don't talk about guns, and don't talk about restricting mining. It is very very simple.

              I am a Tom Rukavina Democrat

              by OGGoldy on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 03:02:27 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Only made the difference for Dayton in 2010 (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                BeloitDem

                If you exclude the results from Cook, Lake, St. Louis, Koochiching, Itasca, Aitkin, and Carlton Counties (which is how Wikipedia defines the Iron Range), then Democrats would have still won the three downballot races. The closest would have been the Auditor race, which was the closest statewide, but Otto would still have pulled it out by a few thousand votes. The Iron Range just isn't that big in raw population terms, because its growth has been anemic since the 1920s. In 1936, St. Louis County cast 72% as many votes as Ramsey County did; that statistic was 41% in 2012.

                I also find the point on the majority hinging on a particular area to be unfair. Hennipin and Ramsey Counties, taken individually, each contribute more votes and more legislators for Democrats than the Iron Range does. It is true that voters in Minneapolis are less likely to ditch the party if they don't get their way than voters in the Iron Range, and I definitely don't think Democrats should abandon the latter. But it doesn't seem right for party policy to be driven by bending over backwards to appease a small minority faction of the party (that is only going to get smaller based on demographic trends) just because that small minority faction might bolt.

                •  There aren't enough seats in Hennepin and Ramsey (3+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  lordpet8, ArkDem14, gabjoh

                  We can't maintain majorities in the legislature or be as dominant statewide as we have been if we shun all but Minneapolis and St. Paul. And even if St. Louis County isn't ads big as it once was, it was still the bluest county in the state during the 2010 elections, with Dayton winning it by a larger margin than Hennepin or Ramsey Counties. And you may call it small, but the area netted the DFL 40-50k net votes. If the area voted like 95% white areas in the rest of thr xountry, it would net zrepublicams over 100,000 votes. I just find it unconscionable to thumb the eye of one of the most loyal, and longest-term factions of the party. And it isnhardly "bending over backward" to include nonbinding language that had always existed in the party's platform. It was intentionally spiteful and unnecessary. And made life unnecessarily difficult for some of the most vulnerable members of our House.

                  Let me put it this way, let's say Democrats lose the state house this fall, with people like Metsa, Anzelc, and Radinovich losing narrowly? Would this be worth it? I can't even imagine the mentality of someone that says yes.

                  I am a Tom Rukavina Democrat

                  by OGGoldy on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 04:42:26 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  What's Otto's problem? (0+ / 0-)

                    Why do Twin Cities Democrats always feel the need to try and dictate local matters for the Iron Range? That area has seen so much animosity from urban Democrats.

                    "Once, many, many years ago I thought I was wrong. Of course it turned out I had been right all along. But I was wrong to have thought I was wrong." -John Foster Dulles. My Political Compass Score: -4.00, -3.69, Proud member of DKE

                    by ArkDem14 on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 06:30:19 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  you have 2 points (0+ / 0-)

                      For Otto specifically. The governor pulled together a powow team of experts and make pokiticians to discuss mining issues. 31 members in total. 30 of them agreed with the mining industry on the issurm and Otto dissented. It really was a deliberate thumb to the eye.

                      As to the broader point, I don't see a good reason to throw a lotal segment of voters that agree with you 99% of the time. I can't imagine this kind of treatment to anyone else in the Democratic coalition. If a state Democratic party treated black voters or women the way that the urban DFLers have treated the Rangers, there would be riots in the street.

                      I am a Tom Rukavina Democrat

                      by OGGoldy on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 06:44:16 PM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  Why do urban DFLers feel entitled (1+ / 0-)
                        Recommended by:
                        BoswellSupporter

                        to do this? This kind of disrespect, lack of cooperation, and indeed the invasive, aggressive, ideological rejection of other people's livelihood? It's ridiculous. Otto seems like she's trying to position herself for the the 2014 gubernatorial race as the far-left candidate.

                        "Once, many, many years ago I thought I was wrong. Of course it turned out I had been right all along. But I was wrong to have thought I was wrong." -John Foster Dulles. My Political Compass Score: -4.00, -3.69, Proud member of DKE

                        by ArkDem14 on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 06:52:19 PM PDT

                        [ Parent ]

                        •  Otto would get thwacked by Swanson (2+ / 0-)
                          Recommended by:
                          ArkDem14, jncca

                          Swanson is the clear gubernatorial candidate in 2018 if she wants it. She is poised to win by a massive margin in 2014 after winning convincingly in 2006 and 2010. She is better known and better liked than any of the other potential candidates, like Otto or Richie.

                          I am a Tom Rukavina Democrat

                          by OGGoldy on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 07:01:39 PM PDT

                          [ Parent ]

                          •  At this point (0+ / 0-)

                            I don't see why Iron Range DFLers stay in the party. They should just create a regional party and force the Democratic party to work with them if Democrats want to get anythign done.

                            "Once, many, many years ago I thought I was wrong. Of course it turned out I had been right all along. But I was wrong to have thought I was wrong." -John Foster Dulles. My Political Compass Score: -4.00, -3.69, Proud member of DKE

                            by ArkDem14 on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 07:03:42 PM PDT

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  They had one (3+ / 0-)
                            Recommended by:
                            ArkDem14, KingofSpades, jncca

                            It was called the Famer-Labor Party. KT merged with the Democrats under Hubert H Humphrey in the 40s, and have been the dominant party in the state ever since. Before that, it was actually a Republican state, where the GOP would win plurality elections for nearly every office.

                            I am a Tom Rukavina Democrat

                            by OGGoldy on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 07:22:41 PM PDT

                            [ Parent ]

                    •  because they have more votes (0+ / 0-)

                      In reality, laws are always useful to those with possessions and harmful to those who have nothing. - Rousseau, The Social Contract, note 5

                      by James Allen on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 08:16:21 PM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  Having more votes is no excuse (0+ / 0-)

                        "Once, many, many years ago I thought I was wrong. Of course it turned out I had been right all along. But I was wrong to have thought I was wrong." -John Foster Dulles. My Political Compass Score: -4.00, -3.69, Proud member of DKE

                        by ArkDem14 on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 09:34:45 PM PDT

                        [ Parent ]

                        •  but that's how democracy works (0+ / 0-)

                          they do it there, they did it here, it happens in a lot of places.

                          In reality, laws are always useful to those with possessions and harmful to those who have nothing. - Rousseau, The Social Contract, note 5

                          by James Allen on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 10:04:06 PM PDT

                          [ Parent ]

                          •  And yet we have the VRA redistricting requirements (0+ / 0-)

                            21, CA-18 (home), CA-13 (school)
                            politicohen.com
                            Idiosyncratic, pro-establishment. Liberal, not progressive. For the poor, the children, the planet, and the rule of law.
                            UC Berkeley; I think I'm in the conservative half of this city.

                            by jncca on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 11:19:15 PM PDT

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  you're going to have to make the connection to (0+ / 0-)

                            intra-party conflict over environmental issues from that for me.

                            In reality, laws are always useful to those with possessions and harmful to those who have nothing. - Rousseau, The Social Contract, note 5

                            by James Allen on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 11:45:29 PM PDT

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  This isn't democracy (0+ / 0-)

                            it's refusing to compromise and taking a radical, uninformed, and unnecessary, knee-jerk reaction against an entire industry and the livelihood of a region you don't live in because of radical environmentalism on the part of a small fringe that blocked this.

                            "Once, many, many years ago I thought I was wrong. Of course it turned out I had been right all along. But I was wrong to have thought I was wrong." -John Foster Dulles. My Political Compass Score: -4.00, -3.69, Proud member of DKE

                            by ArkDem14 on Tue Jun 03, 2014 at 07:33:03 AM PDT

                            [ Parent ]

                    •  I could ask why Iron Range DFLers (0+ / 0-)

                      stuck their fingers into the frac sand mining debate in SE Minnesota even though it had nothing to do with them.

                      I just get tired of the theatrics Rangers put on personally, as I said on Friday, I reluctantly support PolyMet only because the EPA gave the proposal a decent rating and we need the votes from the Range.  The proposal wasn't supported or rejected, it was tabled; probably a good idea to let people cool down a bit.  Both Dayton & Franken will end up being for the proposal, it's too politically volatile to oppose.

                      MN-01, long time lurker

                      by Jervill on Tue Jun 03, 2014 at 03:42:24 AM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

            •  What does that have to do with anything? (0+ / 0-)
      •  I can't imagine a Democrat losing St. Louis County (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        James Allen, Marcus Graly

        Rebecca Otto got 58% there in 2010 and won by nearly 22% while only winning statewide by 1%. I don't think any statewide Democrat has even come close to losing St. Louis County. The closest result I can find was the 1994 gubernatorial race; when the Democratic candidate was getting stomped by almost 30%, he still won St. Louis County by more than 8%. I know the Iron Range has been trending against Democrats recently, but it would still take a ridiculous swing for a Democrat to lose there.

  •  NY State Senate (9+ / 0-)

    Carlucci is the only one of the IDCers that sits in a swing seat, as Obama won it 54-45%.  Next is Valesky at 62-36% which is past what Republicans could reasonably expect to compete in these days.

    Definitely our main targets should be Klein, Avella, Savino, and Valesky.  If even a couple of them get beaten (and Democrats nab a couple GOP seats), the GOP/IDC coalition collapses.  Simcha Felder has also made it clear he'd come back if Democrats were poised for a majority.

    I'm excited to hear that they are pushing for challengers to the IDC though.  This should have been planned the moment the IDC handed control to the GOP.

    •  Did Felder really say that? (0+ / 0-)

      Also, are they really going to bat for the challengers after Cuomo's deal?

      “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

      by KingofSpades on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 09:53:00 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Obama also underperformed in Carlucci's seat (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Skaje, James Allen, ArkDem14

      he did worse than you would expect in Rockland County in particular given how state and local Democrats do there (does it have a large Jewish Orthodox population?). Obama did 11% worse than statewide in Rockland while Gillibrand did just 6% worse and won 2/3rds there in 2012. In 2010 even Eric Schneiderman won by the same 7 points Obama did despite winning by less than half of what he did statewide. DiNapoli lost it by just a few hundred votes despite winning by less than 5 points overall!

      I think so long as Carlucci didn't have another ballot line allowing him to throw the race to the Republican, pretty much any Democrat could win here. That's not much different than Savino or Valesky's seats.

      •  Yes, it's very Jewish (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        James Allen, jncca

        It's one of the most Jewish counties in the country (31% according to Wikipedia). Many Orthodox people moved up there from NYC. It's the county where many of the controversies between the Orthodox Jews and non-Jews happen over public school funding.

        NY-03 (Home), NY-23 (College)

        by epez21 on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 11:31:23 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Carlucci will probably have another ballot line (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Stephen Wolf

        I assume he will at least have the Independence Party line. If he loses the primary and continues to run as the Independence Party candidate, a credible Republican will win this seat.

        People forget that nobody expected Carlucci to win in 2010 (that seat was slightly more red). While it was an open seat, the Republican candidate was long time Rockland County Executive Vanderhoef.

        Disclaimer: I have met Carlucci before. He is by far one of the hardest working campaigners in NY. I can't imagine him going down without a fight.

        M, 24, School: MI-12, Home: NY-18

        by slacks on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 03:21:24 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  There are targets and there are targets. (7+ / 0-)

      Right now the biggest target is probably the least objectionable member of the IDC, Tony Avella.  His poor fundraising and poor relationship with the local Queens Party means he's the fattest target.  And the one with the least political risk in opposing.  Add in Liu's extreme popularity in the Asian community in Queens (and I said Asian rather than Chinese.  Something that is almost unique given Liu's own city council seat was won by a registered Republican due in part to Korean/Chinese tensions) and you have a great challenge to Avella.  But I'll note that Avella is still very popular.

      Jeffrey Klein is very different.  Almost all of the Bronx establishment is behind him.  And the demographics of the district presents challenges.  You have conservative white areas like City Island.  Enclaves of more progressive whites.  You have a large Latino population of various stripes.  Plus sections of Westchester.  It's a tough area to navigate without help.  And besides State Sen. Gustavo Rivera, Koppel is not getting that much help.

      Diane Savino would be a tough nut to crack because most of the Staten Island Democratic Party is behind her.  From the liberal clubs to the County Party (which has a number of important members on her staff), to the local labor unions, to most importantly the elected officials.  Because a number of the best potential candidates are current or former staff members of them.  And others have jobs due in part to the influence of county or those elected members.

      Even among those who have been concerned about the IDC there is worry that any challenge to Savino might distract from the Grimm / Recchia contest.  Indeed Recchia has used Savino as his prime surrogate and speaker on a number of occasions and might feel obligated to weigh in if Savino is challenged.

      The only rumblings of her having any trouble was from a group of African-American activists who were unhappy with a police harassment bill they believed could be interpreted as to apply to someone filming a police officer making an arrest.  I believe it is this bill.

      http://open.nysenate.gov/...

      While probably a tempest in a teapot this is only notable in that it is the only vector anyone has seen until this weekend of any potential Savino challenge.

      Such a potential challenge would have difficulty because you'd need to appeal to the significant part of the district in Brooklyn which has a lot of moderate to conservative white ethnic Democrats.  And you're not going to win them over by running on the issue of opposing a bill that it's sponsors contend protect police officers and officers of the peace from violence against them.

      Alec Brook-Krasny would make an interesting theoretical opponent.  But he'd be someone who would know very little about Staten Island and how he'd appeal to conservative whites across the river or the very large black and latino voting segment on the North Shore of Staten Island is unclear.  Someone more knowledgeable than I could give us  better idea of how much backing he could get in Brooklyn outside of Coney Island.

      To get a viable Staten Island candidate you'd need Andrew Cuomo's involvement.  There are folks Cuomo could get to run with a phone call and who he could get funding for.  And if you believe Cuomo will do that I have a bridge to sell you.

      The two upstaters are risks especially since neither are leaders and would probably fall in line if you cut the head of the IDC off.  Carlucci's 54% Obama is not as strong as you'd like for upstate in an off year and if you beat him you risk a potential Republican pickup.  Valesky's seat is probably safe but the Syracuse area can be annoyingly elastic.  At 63% I'll take that chance as it's above the historic 56% dividing line.

      The lady was enchanted and said they ought to see. So they charged her with subversion and made her watch TV -Spirogyra

      by Taget on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 12:22:47 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Maybe if a few are defeated, the rest topple (0+ / 0-)

        like a house of cards.

        “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

        by KingofSpades on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 11:47:14 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Oh god (6+ / 0-)

    That Fung ad is frickin hilarious.

    He does realize he's running in Rhode Island, right?

  •  HI-01 (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lordpet8, Taget, askew

    Enrique Iglesias endorses his cousin Joey Manahan.  I never knew Iglesias was part Filipino.

    In any case, not sure that will do much good for the city councilman, who was at 1% in Civil Beat's last poll of the race.  I think he's running only because this is a free shot for the 43-year old to raise has name recognition for a future run.  Manahan was elected in 2012 and isn't up again until 2016.

  •  CO-Gov: Pretty good for a GOP primary ad. (0+ / 0-)

    Beauprez meanwhile continues to drag.

    “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

    by KingofSpades on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 11:14:30 AM PDT

  •  DCCC launches Web Ads hitting 11 GOP incumbents. (7+ / 0-)

    http://www.dccc.org/...

    Districts include AR-01, FL-02, IL-13, IN-02, KY-06, NC-02, NE-02, OH-06, OH-14, PA-08 and WV-01.

    18 year old gay Democrat living bright blue in deep red SC-04 (Gowdy). "You may say I'm a dreamer, but I'm not the only one." - John Lennon

    by SCDem4 on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 11:19:14 AM PDT

  •  IL-Gov, Not sure if this was posted already... (17+ / 0-)

    but Democrats passed election day registration. This along with a host of ballot initiatives (most of which are advisory, e.g., whether Illinois supports insurance coverage of birth control, minimum wage increase to $10.10, etc.) to boost turnout in November.

  •  So at some point (12+ / 0-)

    it looks like the Washington Post's much maligned Elections Lab has fixed a lot of their ratings.  A lot of their goofy ratings for non-competitive open seats (of which I listed some here at the time) have been sent towards 100%, reflecting a higher weighting for PVI versus the seat being open or not.

    That said, a ton of their ratings are still ridiculous.  GA-Sen is 99% GOP and KY-Sen is 97% GOP.  The most competitive GOP-held seat is somehow TX-Sen at 95% GOP.

    They still remain quite bullish on NC-Sen at 81% Dem, yet have the similarly competitive LA-Sen at 82% GOP.  MI-Sen at 60% GOP is also a joke.

    As for the House races, while they did straighten out some of the more hilarious misses from last time (like the GOP picking up NY-04 (McCarthy) and IA-01 (Braley), and easily holding CA-31(Miller)), they still do have Republicans winning ME-02 (Michaud) at 63% GOP.  They have AZ-02 (Barber) about as equally imperiled as CA-03 (Garamendi).  NY-11 (Grimm) is at 97% GOP which shows they pretty much don't even give a fuck.

    When they first released these ratings, they said it was a work in progress that would be improved as additional spices were mixed into the secret sauce.  They've done some more mixing, but are still in Dick Morris territory for a number of their predictions.

    •  When they say they're "fixing" the ratings (15+ / 0-)

      What they're actually saying is they don't have the foggiest idea what their model does and are putting their fingers on the scale in various places in order to produce results mroe in keeping with polling and the CW.

      So why not just read the polling and CW? My goodness the people doing these models are silly.

    •  The House ratings (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Avedee, Skaje, ehstronghold, sulthernao, askew

      are near-ridiculous.  CO-6, which most observers (such ad Cook, Sabato, Rothenberg, DKE, RRH) rate as a tossup or at most tilt R, is said to be a 93% chance of a GOP hold.  By contrast, my current district (MD-6) is ranked as an 88% chance of a Dem hold, even though no outside observer has called it anything but Safe Democratic.  

      I think there's too much reliance on generic PVI and not enough on candidate quality or a more detailed examination of the districts.  And they say that election results from 1980-2012 are one of the biggest factors in their rankings.  Why should election results from the 1980s, or even 1990s in many cases, be considered relevant for predicting 2014 races?

      38, MD-8 (MD-6 after 2012) resident, NOVA raised, Euro/Anglophile Democrat

      by Mike in MD on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 12:34:01 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  CO-6 (0+ / 0-)

        Is much closer to a 93% chance of flip than 93% chance of hold, although of course it's neither really. They've clearly weighted past second term mid-term results (i.e. very pro-out-party) much too highly for an era when federal races are almost never under the radar.

      •  PVI-based analysis (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        lordpet8

        I've hated PVI-based analysis for a long time. Not all R+1 districts are created equally, for instance. Peter King's district is wholly different than Frank Wolf's, despite being nearly the same PVI.

        At best, PVI is a guide. But it has to be supplemented by demographic analysis, past trends at the district level, fundraising, and candidate quality.

        TX-17 (Bill Flores-R), TX Sen-14 (Kirk Watson-D), TX HD-50 (Celia Israel-D). Senate ratings map (as of 3/10/14)

        by Le Champignon on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 01:20:19 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  The Elections Lab claims to use many factors (0+ / 0-)

          here, including "candidate experience".  But the failures of that are apparent as well considering how highly touted congressmen often fail when trying to run for Senate, and how rich business people with no political experience often win office.

          But that would require a subjective, race by race analysis of candidate quality, which is the opposite of what these model-based forecasters want to do.  Easier for them to simply assign points to candidates for being elected officials already.

        •  is there really anyone who does just that? (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          David Nir, jncca

          who says all the D-leaning seats are likely to go Dem and the R-leaning ones to go Republican, and base ratings just on how strong the PVI is?

          If there is I haven't seen them.

          In reality, laws are always useful to those with possessions and harmful to those who have nothing. - Rousseau, The Social Contract, note 5

          by James Allen on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 02:19:33 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  Especially when considering districts (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        BeloitDem

        like MD-06 where the lines are fundamentally different from any district that has existed for decades; it went from an Obama '08 loss by 18 to a win by 14.  How can you possibly use 10 or 20 year-old election results when the only thing similar between MD-06 then and now is the number and some of the territory?   You either include them in your model and they skew it hilariously or you have nothing at all to include except 2012.

  •  That Tancredo ad is god awful (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LordMike, pademocrat, Hamtree, askew

    He looks like he's about 5 feet tall and 80 years old behind that motorcycle. It's Dukakis and the tank all over again.

    •  He doesn't clash that much. (0+ / 0-)

      though I agree he's overdoing it with the macho act.

      “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

      by KingofSpades on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 11:56:03 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  NH-Sen: A bit of dirt on Brown, perhaps? (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    clevelandpacha, Hamtree, DCCyclone

    “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

    by KingofSpades on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 11:58:27 AM PDT

  •  Genius candidate makes genius move (24+ / 0-)

    Former Republican Scott Fistler switched parties this year and legally changed his name to Cesar Chavez so that he can run and win(?) in heavily Hispanic AZ-7, which I think is about as brilliant as Allen Keys moving to downtown Atlanta and running as a Democrat named Martin Luther King, Jr.

    The derp is certainly strong with this one.

    Link

  •  O should've announced new EPA regs after midterms (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    kleinburger, LordMike, sulthernao, JacobNC

    This only puts Grimes, Walsh, Landrieu, Tennant etc. in tough positions having to denounce and distance themselves from the new regulations and gives Republicans even more ammunition. I'm already expecting "Your electricity bill will triple" ads and we know how bad this administration is at messaging so people will just believe it. It just seems smarter to announce something like this after the midterms considering we're defending seats in Coal Country and energy rich states.  

    •  The opposite is true (11+ / 0-)

      And Grimes et al are probably happy to have an excuse to Obama-bash (in fact they were very likely consulted every step of the way). Obama is highly unpopular in their state and with swing voters, and this is a perfect opportunity to bash away without any real consequence, since it's an executive not a congressional action. They need to distance themselves from Obama to win.

      •  I just don't think so (4+ / 0-)

        These Dems never needed an excuse to bash the president - they've been able to do that for a long time. All this does is poison the Democratic Party in the minds of voters that Grimes and Tennant need if they want to be competitive in November. After all, the Republican Party is still being destroyed by the mere ghost of George W. Bush, even though the modern Republican Party doesn't have much to do with him any more, not even in policy (tax cuts, etc excepted).

        TX-17 (Bill Flores-R), TX Sen-14 (Kirk Watson-D), TX HD-50 (Celia Israel-D). Senate ratings map (as of 3/10/14)

        by Le Champignon on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 01:23:44 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  That's just not how swing voters think (5+ / 0-)

          They don't follow politics and Obama, though disliked, is very distant. So are EPA climate rules. The main think they're going to hear about the rules is Grimes and Tennant being hostile to them and defending coal, and their opponents doing the same and bashing Obama. If anything it helps Grimes and Tennant.

          The situations that hurt Senate candidates are where they are forced to take hard votes on behalf of the party. That is not the case here.

    •  Yeah, I don't understand the logic here... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Possible Liberal

      ...there must be a policy issue that requires implementation now instead of 6 months from now.

      "I know you cannot force people to care. Ukraine is far away for many, all have own problems. But even if cynical, realize problem will grow. It isn't only people like me, raised in a dictatorship, who don't want it to happen to others"-Gary Kasparov

      by LordMike on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 01:29:09 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  UN 2015 Climate Change Summit (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        LordMike, jncca, anshmishra

        Some media reports have said Obama wants to kick start stalled international efforts to combat climate change by leading the way in switching to cleaner energies before the major UN summit next year.

        My own personal speculation is that it could also be an issue of legacy and what Obama wants to be remembered for; I can imagine climate change being an even more important issue in the near future, and being remembered as a forward thinking president could be something Obama wants.

        •  Yes, but would six months make a big difference? (0+ / 0-)

          "I know you cannot force people to care. Ukraine is far away for many, all have own problems. But even if cynical, realize problem will grow. It isn't only people like me, raised in a dictatorship, who don't want it to happen to others"-Gary Kasparov

          by LordMike on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 02:36:18 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Actually there appears to be a summit in NY 2014 (0+ / 0-)

            Can't say I'm an expert on what happens exactly at these summits, but it seems like the 2014 summit in September 2014 is a 'get started' conference before the 2015 conference in Paris which appears to be getting more attention internationally. Perhaps that adds to the urgency?

    •  I made the same argument about health care (0+ / 0-)

      That it should have waited, particularly given the state of the economy in 2009-10.  Didn't get too many takers on that one.  Even tough it put more than just a handful of senators at risk.

      "When dealing with terrorism, civil and human rights are not applicable." Egyptian military spokesman.

      by Paleo on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 01:51:09 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Fully agree we should've waited on HC (0+ / 0-)

        It seemed like to the public that Obama/Dems had gave up on the economy to focus on the ACA which took up up months of congressional time. Probably would've been better just passing a second stimulus.

        •  waited for what? (14+ / 0-)

          The House majority was doomed in any case with the economy as weak as it was. A second stimulus would never have passed, it would have been ridiculed as throwing good money after bad. If Dems had failed to act on health care despite the biggest majorities in both houses they could ever hope to get, their base would have been even more demoralized in 2010 and the country would have been stuck with the old irrational health care system for at least another good 15-20 years.

          SSP poster. 44, CA-6, -0.25/-3.90

          by sacman701 on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 02:20:26 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  House majority was not doomed (0+ / 0-)

            Obama had slack on the economy because of how bad it was when he came in.

            "When dealing with terrorism, civil and human rights are not applicable." Egyptian military spokesman.

            by Paleo on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 03:39:55 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Obama's honeymoon evaporated.... (5+ / 0-)

              ...around June of 2009 after setting up the GM bankruptcy stuff which saved jobs.  It went downhill fast from there.  The "slack" he had on the economy evaporated as soon as he did something about it.

              "I know you cannot force people to care. Ukraine is far away for many, all have own problems. But even if cynical, realize problem will grow. It isn't only people like me, raised in a dictatorship, who don't want it to happen to others"-Gary Kasparov

              by LordMike on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 03:46:13 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Don't agree (0+ / 0-)

                That's around the time the first health insurance reform bill was introduced.

                "When dealing with terrorism, civil and human rights are not applicable." Egyptian military spokesman.

                by Paleo on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 03:52:01 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  The health care bill was at the end of june... (0+ / 0-)

                  Obama's numbers dropped significantly the week after the GM bankruptcy deal was announced which was weeks earlier.  It was not popular at all.  Trust me, I followed these things.

                  BTW, when the house health care bill was released, ABC News polled it, and it had 53% approval.  Only Dems could be so incompetent to blow that one!

                  "I know you cannot force people to care. Ukraine is far away for many, all have own problems. But even if cynical, realize problem will grow. It isn't only people like me, raised in a dictatorship, who don't want it to happen to others"-Gary Kasparov

                  by LordMike on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 08:03:36 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

        •  If we had waited, it would have never have... (8+ / 0-)

          ...happened.  The big mistake was not waiting, but having the process drag on for a year.  It should have been done by summer.

          "I know you cannot force people to care. Ukraine is far away for many, all have own problems. But even if cynical, realize problem will grow. It isn't only people like me, raised in a dictatorship, who don't want it to happen to others"-Gary Kasparov

          by LordMike on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 02:35:40 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  If we had done things your way (14+ / 0-)

        I would not have healthcare right now. I think I'll pass.

      •  A bad economy was a prefect time... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        gabjoh, Klugstah

        ...to do health care, since so many lost their health care along with their jobs.  It still amazes me to this day that a bill that expanded access to health care for millions and provided a secure safety net for everyone else could actually be unpopular.  That was a huge fail on the part of leadership.  It takes some amazing skill to bungle an inherently popular program and make it extremely unpopular.  They really had to work at that one.

        "I know you cannot force people to care. Ukraine is far away for many, all have own problems. But even if cynical, realize problem will grow. It isn't only people like me, raised in a dictatorship, who don't want it to happen to others"-Gary Kasparov

        by LordMike on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 02:39:09 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Meh (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          LordMike, Paleo, ehstronghold, BeloitDem

          Obamacare was and is too complicated for the general public to understand. I've frequently had conversations with my conservative dad where I've had to clear up several misconceptions. Once cleared up, he actually came to support the law in general. His main problem is the individual mandate forcing us to buy from companies.

          If they'd gone for single payer, we probably still would've lost big because it really would have been a government takeover, but I think our standing today would be much better. Single payer is much easier to understand, and once it was implemented and proceeded to not destroy freedumb and 'murka, it would've been much more popular.

          The biggest problem is that people like Sen. Nelson didn't realize that they were already doomed. They tried to negotiate some kind of compromise bill that would let them retain their seats. In the end, we still lost the seats, and largely because of their intransigence dividing the party and giving the Republicans an uninterrupted period where they could gin up hatred against the bill.

          TX-17 (Bill Flores-R), TX Sen-14 (Kirk Watson-D), TX HD-50 (Celia Israel-D). Senate ratings map (as of 3/10/14)

          by Le Champignon on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 03:01:57 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  It was a Republican-inspired plan (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          LordMike

          So it was inherently unpopular.  Other than tax cuts, when's the last time Republicans put forward any domestic plan that was popular.

          "When dealing with terrorism, civil and human rights are not applicable." Egyptian military spokesman.

          by Paleo on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 03:42:50 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  No Child Left Behind. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            LordMike

            Popular at the time.

            21, CA-18 (home), CA-13 (school)
            politicohen.com
            Idiosyncratic, pro-establishment. Liberal, not progressive. For the poor, the children, the planet, and the rule of law.
            UC Berkeley; I think I'm in the conservative half of this city.

            by jncca on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 06:45:50 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  He had to announce now (15+ / 0-)

      in order for it to work through the bureaucratic/judicial processes while he is still there to support it as president. Waiting until after the midterms would be too late.

      DKEers like to mock front pagers for their santimonious purism, which is often warranted, but there is an obverse fallacy as well: subordinating policy outcomes to the goal of winning elections simply for the sake of winning. Suffice it to say, I am more interested in combating global warming than in winning a couple of extra senate seats in 2014. Maybe I will elaborate in the policy thread...

      •  Agreed (6+ / 0-)

        We don't win elections to win more elections. We win elections to enact policy changes and steer the ship of the state.

        It's easy to overlook everything the Obama administration has accomplished. We are one of the few developed nations with a robust counter-cylical macroeconomic policy: the Recovery and Reinvestment Act and the temporary payroll tax cuts + extension of unemployment benefits had a powerful effect on our economy. Because it gave the economy a significant jolt, it's easy to be critical or disastified in retrospect: we never felt the full brunt of the crisis. We would have likely experienced 13 or 14% unemployment if we approached the crisis with the policy prescriptions of Europe.

        I realize that this falls into the realm of policy discussions but it certainly had an effect on the Democrats' electoral performance. It's remarkable that Democrats governed throughout an acute governing crisis and are still considered the dominant national party in the minds of the public if not in reality. Few other parties have achieved this. Consider the collapse of the DPJ, the UMP, the PSOE, the PS etc. This could have easily happened to the Democratic Party.

        •  One question: how electorally successfull are you (0+ / 0-)

          in your state? I hear a lot about tea-partiers of extreme variety from Idaho (for whom Otter is almost a socialist as well), but almost nothing - about socialist legislation there...Even from elected Democrats..

      •  I agree completely (17+ / 0-)

        A decade or more ago, you often heard elected Democrats talk about "keeping their powder dry." It was the kind of corrosive philosophy that actually inspired the birth of the liberal blogosphere in the first place. All that keeping your powder dry meant was that Bush and Cheney and Tom DeLay got to run roughshod over us without so much as a flesh wound.

        While they certainly have flaws, it was actually quite a change of pace when Reid and Pelosi took over from Daschle and Gephardt, because they were less accomodationist than their predecessors. And like you say, at a certain point, you have to do something with your majority, because it won't last forever.

        Even if HCR cost us our majority—I don't believe it did, but even IF it did—it was still absolutely worth it. It was a signature policy achievement of enormous proportions that may not be equalled for a very long time, if ever. I'm not just interested in elections because I love the horserace (I do), or because I like to win (who doesn't?), but because winning actually matters.

        Get the Daily Kos Elections Digest in your inbox every weekday. Sign up here.

        by David Nir on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 05:29:07 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  The bottom line is... (5+ / 0-)

          ...you don't govern to win elections, you win elections to govern.

          So yes, HCR was worth it.  It's the very reason we want to win at all:  to do stuff!

          46, male, Indian-American, and proud father of a girl and 2 boys, Democrat, VA-10

          by DCCyclone on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 07:17:36 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Winning the "war" matters, not the "battles" (0+ / 0-)

          The party and the country would be far better off if the 50+ Democrats in favor of a public option voted for that, and either did something about the filibuster level, or... lost that battle.

          Passing an unpopular law that sets back other social change for years is winning a "battle", but very much taking a huge setback in the "war".

          And even if you don't believe that, you have to believe that sometimes "winning" one accomplishment can be absolutely toxic when looking at the big picture.

          I don't give a shit about this or that vote.  I care about making a better world in the most prompt way possible.

          All the problems we face in the United States today can be traced to an unenlightened immigration policy on the part of the American Indian. -- Pat Paulsen

          by tommypaine on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 11:02:25 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  It's a proposed rule (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      James Allen, Klugstah, Chachy

      ... the earliest it would be implemented is 2017 even at this point, and it still needs to go through review, comments, etc., before a final rule is issued sometime next year. Waiting six months means likely pushing it into the next presidency.

  •  PPP polled PA this weekend (6+ / 0-)

    Numbers should be out sometime this week expecting Wolf by 20-25 points.

  •  Rand Paul slams 'dirty' coal in video from 2008 (12+ / 0-)

    Story

    Man Conway must of had a shitty opposition research team how come all this stuff comes out 4 years after his election.

  •  Wisconsin filing deadline is today at 5 PM CT (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LordMike

    ...and Scott Walker has yet to turn in signatures to get on the ballot.

    If Walker does not make the ballot for whatever reason (highly doubt that will happen, though), that would leave Steve Evans, an obscure candidate running a write-in campaign in the GOP primary, as the only Republican running for Governor of Wisconsin.

  •  Not many Governors get crushed for re-election (6+ / 0-)

    Seems like when Governors have approvals as bad as Corbett has they retire rather than face a crushing defeat.

    Going all the way back to the mid-90's these are the only races I could fund where the incumbent Governor lost by more than 12 points.  It's looking like Corbett's defeat may fall into the range of these two.

    2011: KY-Gov - Beshear defeated Gov. Fletcher 59-41%
    1998: AL-Gov - Siegelman defeated Gov. James 58-42%

  •  Wrong on MN Gov and Sen (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Jacob1145

    "Both major parties in Minnesota regularly short-circuit democracy by having a handful of activists decide nominations at conventions"

    Sorry David, but there's just a lot about Minnesota's nominations process you don't know about.

    •  buying primaries (0+ / 0-)

      I'll just add that I don't know how anyone can be aware of how big money buys primaries and say that about Minnesota's process. I won't say we have big money beat, but we sure take away a lot of its influence.

      •  I get what you're saying (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        James Allen

        Conventions help candidates with less money but better party connections.  I'm not convinced that's more or less democratic though.

        We saw this debate during the 2008 presidential process, where the merits of primaries, caucuses, and conventions were argued.

        Ultimately there's no perfect way to run elections in this country.  Either you open it up as wide as possible, and risk someone being able to outspend everyone.  Or you close it up and just trust the party insiders to pick the "best" nominee.

        I see no evidence that states with the former have better or worse politicians than states with the latter.

      •  Big money influences general elections, too (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        James Allen, gabjoh

        Should we move to a caucus system for the general election to get money out of that, too?

        Ultimately, caucus and convention systems are problematic because they require a much greater level of time commitment / work flexibility, which does more to shut out the most marginalized members of society.

        •  Although I'd be more okay with conventions (0+ / 0-)

          if we had a MMP / PR system that gave voters more rational options for how to spend their general election vote.

        •  But you can't buy a caucus (0+ / 0-)

          That's the trump argument. Can't speak for every state, but we not only let in anyone who claims to be a Democrat, but we even let people run for delegate or precinct chair by letter. It requires an investment of time, but we do a lot more than just pick the top of the ticket. We have one of the strongest if not the strongest grassroots parties, and face to face contact with other Democrats is a big part of that. For party building, you just can't beat face to face. Social media and TV ads don't begin to compare.

    •  Yea, it is not like that at all (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      LordMike, ArkDem14, ericf

      It is a detailed convention and delegate process. There are no smoke filled rooms, and the voters at each level pick the delegates to go to the next level.

      Not like New York or Virginia at all.

      I am a Tom Rukavina Democrat

      by OGGoldy on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 03:04:35 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  It's fine if you want to accuse me of ignorance (5+ / 0-)

      But it seems more like we have a difference of opinion.

      Get the Daily Kos Elections Digest in your inbox every weekday. Sign up here.

      by David Nir on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 05:33:46 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Not general ignorance (0+ / 0-)

        but even you can't know how every state works. In this instance, you just weren't accurate.

        •  No, I expressed an opinion (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Jervill

          One that you disagree with. There were no facts I was inaccurate about. Even if everything you say about the corrupting influence of money in politics is true, and how supposedly it has less of an impact on conventions, I still believe democracy is ill-served by allowing a small number of people to decide a party's nomination rather than conducting a primary.

          Get the Daily Kos Elections Digest in your inbox every weekday. Sign up here.

          by David Nir on Tue Jun 03, 2014 at 08:35:22 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Your facts are wrong (0+ / 0-)

            There is a primary. The endorsement has nothing to do with who gets on the primary ballot. The parties can't tell somebody to run or not. All the endorsement does is say this is who the party backs. You can still decide you don't like our system, but you clearly don't know how it works.

          •  Let's back up (0+ / 0-)

            I see no point in getting a test of snippiness with you. I know you're a knowledgeable guy because I read you election posts daily. They're really good or I wouldn't be doing that. You might well hate our system even more once you know how it works. I'm just saying the part about primary voters not getting to pick the candidates is wrong. The primary voters can ignore the party endorsement if they want. It's up to the party activists to vet the candidates well enough to pick the best candidates. I'm not saying it's a fool proof system, because while it's what makes the DFL a strong grassroots party, and we're holding everything in the state just about right now, it's not working so well for the Republicans. There are always nuances, no matter what system a state uses, and even those of us who get immersed in this stuff can know about every state.

    •  Disagree (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      BeloitDem, sacman701, SaoMagnifico

      Hate hate hate hate the Caucus system. It disenfranchises those who are not available at 7:00 winter evening in the middle of the week. If you want to attend BPOU, District or state conventions (if you are fortunate enough to advance) be prepared to spend multiple weekends and hundreds of dollars travel, hotels, convention fees etc.  I agree with David, the caucus ststem does  short-circuit democracy

  •  KY-Sen: Fan-made ad (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LordMike, KingofSpades, BeloitDem

    Check out this fan-made ad against McConnell. I swear, McConnell's just made it too easy to attack him.

    (Credit to this diary.)

    TX-17 (Bill Flores-R), TX Sen-14 (Kirk Watson-D), TX HD-50 (Celia Israel-D). Senate ratings map (as of 3/10/14)

    by Le Champignon on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 03:28:53 PM PDT

  •  NRSC already doing robocalls over new EPA rules (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    KyleinWA, LordMike
    The National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) is launching a robocall campaign tying vulnerable Democratic incumbents to Monday’s proposed carbon emissions limits for power plants.

    Starting Tuesday, the group will call swing voters in Louisiana, Colorado, Alaska and Virginia, where the NRSC said incumbents have not done enough to stop the Environmental Protection Agency’s rule. The NRSC is citing estimates from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce that the rules could cost 224,000 jobs a year.

    According to the NRSC, Sens. Mark Warner (D-Va.), Mark Udall (D-Colo.) and Mark Begich (D-Alaska) have supported other carbon emissions regulations backed by Democrats and the Obama administration, including cap-and-trade.

    Link

    Still wondering what the administration was thinking doing this 6 months before Midterms and not after. This is a basically a gift for the Republicans they can spin however they want 'your electricity bill will skyrocket', 'this will cost 200K+ jobs'. It's not even worth it, the new regulations are teethless and will do nothing to reduce our carbon emissions.

      •  Not in coal country/energy rich states (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        OGGoldy

        These rules put Landrieu, Begich, Pryor, Grimes & Tennant at most risk.

        •  Arkansas is coal country? (6+ / 0-)

          This will probably hurt Grimes and Tennant but I'm skeptical that voters in Louisiana or Alaska will decide to oust Begich and Landrieu over this issue. They might be dependent on the extraction industry but they're not coal-dependent states. Ultimately, the new emissions regulations will only be important to those who have some kind of emotional or economic attachment to coal.

          I bet the GOP's narrative will have no effect outside of Virginia, West Virginia and Kentucky come November. I do think that Warner could underperform in rural Virginia over this issue but that's only of interest to me because I'm a data nerd. A 20 point win is little different from a 15 or 12 point win.

          •  Yeah oil would hurt Landrieu but not coal (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            ehstronghold, askew
            •  Yeah, that's the cash cow, not coal (0+ / 0-)

              Besides, much of Louisiana's reserves are lignite, a poor grade of coal.

              “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

              by KingofSpades on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 04:58:58 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  Even so (0+ / 0-)

            there is quite a bit of flexibility.  KY only needs to lower CO2 by 18% by 2030 to meet the goals.  WV could try for alternate routes and only lower 4.5% by 2025.

            “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

            by KingofSpades on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 04:57:34 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  That's not the problem (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              professormike, LordMike, anshmishra

              The problem is the markets. There will be less demand for coal. With less demand comes less supply in order to keep up the profit margin. With less supply comes fewer jobs.

              I hate how Obama is approaching the war on coal. You can have a war on coal, and you can even do it now. But dammit, we need to declare Appalachia a disaster zone and invest some serious billions into rebuilding their economies. For every coal job lost, we need to have a new one waiting for them. One they can do. A well-paying, unionized job.

              TX-17 (Bill Flores-R), TX Sen-14 (Kirk Watson-D), TX HD-50 (Celia Israel-D). Senate ratings map (as of 3/10/14)

              by Le Champignon on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 05:12:33 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  That requires legislative action that's impossible (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Stephen Wolf

                It would also have horrible optics unless such action was taken to repair similar dislocated communities in urban areas. Why would a progressive politician support economic investment in Appalachia if Watts, Detroit, Laredo and Indian reservations received no such help?

                I think it's pretty embarrassing that some on the left devote special attention to Appalachia when there are many economic disaster zones in inner-cities.

                •  Yes, disaster zones we've been talking (4+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Le Champignon, LordMike, jncca, anshmishra

                  about since the 1960s. Endless government programs, redevelopment initiatives, public and private investments, policy studies and the like have targeted urban poverty. American politics is down right chauvinistic towards urban poverty. What's been ignored, what's been overlooked, is the crippling, long-term, structural rural poverty that afflects tens of millions of people, leaving them in marginalized positions and giving them absolutely no mobility. Appalachia is one of these areas, and for the most of the past century, coal was the only thing that consistently brought money to these areas. Even if the total percentage of jobs it supplied was small and has only gotten smaller, it supplied good jobs, and these jobs funded a wave of construction and other service industry jobs that kept local economies afloat. With the decline of coal, which is as much a function of all the easily accesible coal being mined already and the lack of a market for more expensive, intensive coal mining,

                  It's absolutely incorrect to say that rural poverty gets undo attention, when there's never been a national level attempt to address rural policy, other than the power of certain politicians to get money for bringing basic infrastructure to these areas decades after urban areas had such infrastructure. It's a facetious comment, and indeed I don't see much interest on the left or the right in talking about or looking at the poverty in Appalachia, which has some of the lowest quality of life indicators in the country, lower than just about any inner city area.

                  "Once, many, many years ago I thought I was wrong. Of course it turned out I had been right all along. But I was wrong to have thought I was wrong." -John Foster Dulles. My Political Compass Score: -4.00, -3.69, Proud member of DKE

                  by ArkDem14 on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 06:48:19 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Considering the most thoroughly implemented (8+ / 0-)

                    policy in response to urban poverty has been to criminalize the behaviors people are turning to as a response to poverty so we can lock them up at crazy rates, I'm not sure how much the urban poor appreciate all the "attention" that's been paid to them since the 60s. Sure, we need to do more about both urban and rural poverty, but a lot of the "solutions" we've come up with to urban poverty have been more about making suburbanites who use the city feel comfortable than actually helping poor people.

                  •  Yet poverty in many cities is far worse (0+ / 0-)

                    Not to turn this into an Oppression Olympics (all poverty is a travesty and worth combating) contest but this isn't really debatable. Detroit's unemployment rate is 17%, Gary's unemployment rate is 14%, Oakland's unemployment rate is 11%, Newark's unemployment rate is 14%. Coal country is comparable at this point due to the collapse of the coal industry but it's important to note that communities like the ones I just mentioned have been in a state of utter ruin for decades and that efforts to build a limited welfare state and a pittance directed to public housing had little effect on urban poverty. The Great Society was monumental and was one of the greatest political achievements of the past century but its scope was not large enough to absorb the death of unskilled manufacturing and structural racism that prevented people from adjusting to economic dislocation.

                    It's really disheartening to see many impoverished rural communities experience the same fate but if there's going to be another War on Poverty, it should be for everybody.

                    •  I'm saying there should be a war on poverty (1+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      BoswellSupporter

                      But no anti-poverty initiative since FDR's New Deal has been for everybody and has also included rural poverty. You talk about urban unemployment, without realizing that rural areas have the highest unemployment rates in the country is what's indicative of these issue with your comment.

                      "Once, many, many years ago I thought I was wrong. Of course it turned out I had been right all along. But I was wrong to have thought I was wrong." -John Foster Dulles. My Political Compass Score: -4.00, -3.69, Proud member of DKE

                      by ArkDem14 on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 09:40:20 PM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                  •  I'll be flatly honest with you... (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    IdahoSocialist

                    ...this country needs something on the order of the Marshall Plan to rebuild this country's middle class and modernize the economy. National and state economic development banks (similar to what North Dakota currently has) would be the signature idea (but not the only idea) of my economic plan of this country.

                    Also, one thing I despise (and most people would be surprised by this) is that I strongly dislike the increased emphasis on career development in K-12 education in this country. The only time that a K-12 student should ever have to think about what kind of career he or she wants to have is when he or she is asked what college major he or she is interested in.

                •  do you think people on the left aren't on board (0+ / 0-)

                  with programs to help those people too? I'm not sure why you would.

                  In reality, laws are always useful to those with possessions and harmful to those who have nothing. - Rousseau, The Social Contract, note 5

                  by James Allen on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 06:50:14 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  I hope my comment wasn't misunderstood (0+ / 0-)

                    I absolutely support economic aid for Appalachia and deplore the fact that many progressives take a stance on coal that reminds me Margaret Thatcher's treatment of coal in Great Britian, which is to say that those who are economic dislocated to to the death of industries should simply deal with it because it's what the market dictates.

                    I was more commenting on the fact that aid for Appalachia is untenable in current circumstances not only because Republicans control Congress but also because there are so many impoverished communities and that what would be a relatively small bill for Appalachia would rightly turn into a massive spending bill that would be difficult to navigate through Congress even under a hypothetical situation when Democrats are in control.

                    •  no, I understood completely that you (0+ / 0-)

                      said you were embarrassed by people like me who have suggested that we aid rural poor in Appalachia, without considering that we may have also said similar things about urban poor elsewhere.

                      In reality, laws are always useful to those with possessions and harmful to those who have nothing. - Rousseau, The Social Contract, note 5

                      by James Allen on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 09:15:40 PM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                    •  At the very least.. (1+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      anshmishra

                      the effort would bring some demosaurs back into the fold and maybe keep WV and KY competitive for a while longer. Obviously I really, honestly do want an economic aid package for Appalachia, and I realize it's difficult, but I don't see how Republicans can stand against it and still make inroads into traditional Democratic strength in that area.

                      They'll have to make a choice on whether to continue their progress in one of the very few areas they're actually increasing their support, or whether to abandon that progress in favor of rigid ideological disdain for Keynesian economics. It's a no-win situation for them either way.

                      TX-17 (Bill Flores-R), TX Sen-14 (Kirk Watson-D), TX HD-50 (Celia Israel-D). Senate ratings map (as of 3/10/14)

                      by Le Champignon on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 09:31:55 PM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                •  Detroit.. (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  LordMike

                  received billions in the auto bailout. Billions. Many billions, in fact. Where's Appalachia's share?

                  Shit, we should've mandated that GM have new manufacturing plants located solely in Appalachia for the next two decades while we had a controlling share in the company.

                  TX-17 (Bill Flores-R), TX Sen-14 (Kirk Watson-D), TX HD-50 (Celia Israel-D). Senate ratings map (as of 3/10/14)

                  by Le Champignon on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 07:01:28 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

              •  They've written off Appalachia (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                LordMike

                You don't do this is you're serious about winning West Virginia again in the next 30 years.

              •  More interestingly than Appalachia is the Midwest (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                LordMike

                States like Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, and Wisconsin are the ones I'm watching. All are heavily dependent on coal  power plants.

                Even before this ruling came down there was a front page article in the Milwaukee papers about the effect this would potentially have on Wisconsin.

                You can politically risk alienating West Virginia, but it's a slippery slope.

              •  It's still good for export. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                LordMike

                “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

                by KingofSpades on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 06:52:37 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

        •  Check your numbers again (0+ / 0-)

          Even in those places it's really close.

        •  Petroleum is the big thing in AK, not coal. (0+ / 0-)

          “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

          by KingofSpades on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 06:57:35 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Robocalls are cheap and easy, that's why. (4+ / 0-)

      it's not like they're making big investments.  And this is not the confirmation of the new rules, but the proposal of them for public comment and revision.

      “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

      by KingofSpades on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 05:00:37 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Yeah, I don't understand why they couldn't wait... (0+ / 0-)

      ....6 months, either.  There must be a good reason why they chose now.  I'm sure that they figured out the politics of this as well... I would hope... :-S

      "I know you cannot force people to care. Ukraine is far away for many, all have own problems. But even if cynical, realize problem will grow. It isn't only people like me, raised in a dictatorship, who don't want it to happen to others"-Gary Kasparov

      by LordMike on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 06:48:17 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Because that was their schedule (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        LordMike

        “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

        by KingofSpades on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 06:51:55 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Like I said above... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        KingofSpades, LordMike

        he had to do it now:

        The timing of Obama’s announcement was dictated by the bureaucratic clock, not the electoral one. For the president to have his new system firmly in place by the time he departs the White House, he needs time to issue his proposal, take public comments, finalize it, defend it against inevitable legal challenges, and so on. Certain political advantages do present themselves. Since the law authorizing Obama’s plan has already passed Congress (the Clean Air Act, in 1970), there will be no drawn-out battle on the Hill like the one that bled the polls on health care. Americans do support, by a wide margin, regulating the greenhouse-gas emissions of power plants.
    •  Ds need to talk about bringing new jobs 2 the area (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      KingofSpades, LordMike, pademocrat

      21st jobs, tech jobs, manufacturing etc. The coal industry is dying rapidly and the jobs are going with it a lot of people are out of work Ds should be working to diversify the regions economy bring tech jobs in the area or something. Right now to them were destroying their livelihoods because of the EPA 'War on Coal' even though its really the markets.

      •  I agree, they need to do that (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        James Allen

        but how do they do that with Republicans holding the House?

        “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

        by KingofSpades on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 07:08:56 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  21st century jobs require a college educated (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        LordMike, JacobNC, Taget

        workforce.  Appalachia doesn't have that.  There's a reason our big tech hubs (Bay Area, Boston, Research Triangle) are near top-tier universities.

        21, CA-18 (home), CA-13 (school)
        politicohen.com
        Idiosyncratic, pro-establishment. Liberal, not progressive. For the poor, the children, the planet, and the rule of law.
        UC Berkeley; I think I'm in the conservative half of this city.

        by jncca on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 08:37:24 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  No one will invest there... (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        James Allen, JacobNC, jncca

        The workforce is less educated than in other parts of the country, infrastructure is dismal with little ability to improve on it due to the mountainous terrain, and the only natural resource is coal and sometimes gas.  It's a bad mix for a growth economy. No one will invest there willingly. That's why it's been such a problem for so long.  Coal and other heavy industry kept the area alive, but that's pretty much gone now.... There's very little that can replace it.

        "I know you cannot force people to care. Ukraine is far away for many, all have own problems. But even if cynical, realize problem will grow. It isn't only people like me, raised in a dictatorship, who don't want it to happen to others"-Gary Kasparov

        by LordMike on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 08:48:11 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  The biggest problem with this... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      KingofSpades, James Allen

      ...is that robocalls are a waste of money.

      By "problem," I mean for Republicans.  I'm more than happy that they blow dough on this.

      On the other hand, our side, too, spends money on pointless robocalls.  Once in a great while I think there's one that a few people might actually listen to, for example in Virginia if Mark Warner records one.  But even then, it largely goes unheard.

      46, male, Indian-American, and proud father of a girl and 2 boys, Democrat, VA-10

      by DCCyclone on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 07:15:05 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  NY-SD: A comeback for Rep. McMahon (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    abgin, lordpet8, ehstronghold, pademocrat

    to win back Savino's seat?
    http://www.capitalnewyork.com/...

    “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

    by KingofSpades on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 05:01:49 PM PDT

    •  It would be replacing a pretty stark (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      KingofSpades

      progressive who has allied with IDC for personal reasons, with a conservative Democrat who made an enemy of labor groups (the main reason he was upset in 2010).

      "Once, many, many years ago I thought I was wrong. Of course it turned out I had been right all along. But I was wrong to have thought I was wrong." -John Foster Dulles. My Political Compass Score: -4.00, -3.69, Proud member of DKE

      by ArkDem14 on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 06:49:32 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  No. That list is pure garbage. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      KingofSpades

      Just someone brainstorming.  Let me go down the list.  I'll leave Debbie for last.

      Mike McMahon - If he wanted to run for something he would've run for Congress.  He's risk adverse and he LOVES the money he makes as a lawyer/lobbyist.  It's part of why it was tough to get him to run the first time.

      Mike Nelson - Already has denied any interest.

      Andrew Gounardes - I know nothing about him.  Did ask a friend in Brooklyn who told me he had just gotten the job and while ambitious would be unlikely to run.

      Ari Kagan - I know nothing about and could not find anyone who knew anything about him.

      Tom Scherbenko - Last I saw him he was arguing in favor of SIDA endorsing Diane Savino.  He's not running.

      Alec Brook-Krasny - Is in the State Assembly and is not going to risk a safe seat just to run for the State Senate.  And it is not much of an upgrade over the State Assembly.  You still have to run every two years.  You risk going from being someone with influence in the majority to being someone without influence in the minority.  Nevermind he'd be running in a district made up mostly of Staten Island where nobody knows who the hell he is.

      Debbie Rose - People I know who know her consider that very much unlikely.  Plus right now she has a job close from home where she has a higher staff budget and member items she can dole out to directly help people and organizations.

      Looking at the City Council though is not the worst way to go.  Since even if the job of being on the City Council is better someone can run for something like the State Senate without risking anything.  And if they are term limited they might have an added incentive to seek out their next job.

      So let's look at the City Council.

      The person you'd probably look first to would be Vincent Gentile.  Served six years in the State Senate before losing to Marty Golden.  Hitting up on term limits.  And is right across the bridge from Staten Island.  But there is the rub.  And a lesson for all your would be map makers.  There is no rule that says you have to include Bay Ridge or use "bridge contiguity" with a Staten Island district.  He's not in her district even if you may think that would make logical sense.  So scratch that name off.

      That leaves you with Carlos Menchaca.  His district includes Sunset Park.  I believe he does not live there and thus would be inelligible to run.  If he was eligible he just won his seat in 2013.

      Then we have Mark Treyger who won in 2013 after a very hard fought race. Not likely.

      And lastly the Orthodox Jewish Chaim Deutsch.  He moved from Midwood to Brighton Beach just this January.  That puts him in the district but you'd have to check the timeline on the residency requirements to see whether that is good enough.  Won a hard fought battle for Mike (Chaim) Nelson's seat in 2013.  A lot of Russian versus Orthodox action in the primary and general. Again highly unlikely.

      And who does that leave?  Beats me.  As far as I know there is no candidate and the press is just name dropping.

      The lady was enchanted and said they ought to see. So they charged her with subversion and made her watch TV -Spirogyra

      by Taget on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 11:01:53 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  So what's going on with the Brown thing? (4+ / 0-)

    Sugar daddy wanting to keep him in the black -- to put it mildly -- while he waits to run for something? Straight bribe?

    And someone who knows corporate practice better than I ... What the heck is going on with that company? Why would it have three different utterly different products in such a short time and how could it possibly be in a position to gift stock worth over $1m without making or selling anything? It's not an internet business with angel investors and the like. This has to be a scam.

  •  KY-Sen: Anti-McConnell Majority PAC ad airing: (0+ / 0-)

    “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

    by KingofSpades on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 06:48:47 PM PDT

  •  MI-03: Amash leaders challenger in poll (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    KingofSpades, James Allen

    Unsurprisingly, Congressman Justin Amash continues to lead his business man challenger, Brian Ellis, in a recent poll.  The poll was commissioned by MIRS (Michigan Information and Research Service, or MIRS.) and conducted by Practical Political Consulting between May 27-29, sampling 475 respondants with a margin of error of 4.5%

    Amash: 42%
    Ellis: 23%
    Undecided: 35%

    Primaries are ridiculously difficult to poll, but I'm actually surprised that Amash is not further ahead, and I think Ellis could make this competitive at some point.  Amash has the built-in advantage of not just being a congressman, but about as close to the legitimate Second Coming of Ron Paul as you'll find in Congress.  

    Still, he has been made a social pariah in Michigan's Congressional delegation, and has made some powerful enemies across all swaths of his party from religious conservatives to country club conservatives.  He has a rabid following as is the case with most of these libertarians, but the question is is it enough support to carry him through in the end?

    It's funny, because I'd actually be happy to see Amash stay or go precisely because he's such a prig.  If he stays, he's always a good extremist to juxtapose anything else against.  If he goes, he deserves to have his smug, immature ass sent packing. lol

    Don't Blame Me, I Voted for Kodos.

    by MetroGnome on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 07:19:32 PM PDT

    •  That's really not impressive for an incumbent (0+ / 0-)

      My guess is that Amash wins in the end because it's hard for any non-scandal-tarred incumbent to lose in a primary, but based on these numbers, I wouldn't be surprised if he loses. This will be a fun one.

    •  MI3 (0+ / 0-)

      Has Ellis spent any money yet? The high number of undecideds suggests that the campaign hasn't really started.

      SSP poster. 44, CA-6, -0.25/-3.90

      by sacman701 on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 08:25:39 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yes (0+ / 0-)

        Ellis has spent around $416,000.  Amash has spent around $531,000, and third parties have spent quite a bit against Ellis.  Ellis also didn't get in until later than Amash.  There has been quite a bit of money spent here, and I expect quite a bit more.

        Amash has raised about $1.3 million as of the April quarterly with $841,000 cash on hand.  Ellis has raised $830,000 with $413,000 CoH.

        Don't Blame Me, I Voted for Kodos.

        by MetroGnome on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 09:36:33 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Man (9+ / 0-)

    the rest of dailykos has been absolutely bonkers the past week.  Upwards of 20 hidden comments each day, hundreds of hide rates, tons of same-day signup trolls, and plenty of longtime users banned as well.

    I've browsed mainpage dailykos for ten years now, but only comment when something catches my eye.  But the past week has reinforced what a sanctuary of civility and sense that DKE is.  Ugh, I am really dreading the start of 2016 primary season.

    •  Seems to have gone downhill (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      SaoMagnifico

      I've been reading this site for a long time too (six years now), and I find myself increasingly repelled by the front page. It's probably that I've grown more cynical than any long term trend of the site, though. Today I noticed a glaring example of leftists accepting bad science uncritically just because it supports their worldview, the same thing we criticize rightists of doing (and yes, right wingers do it a lot more, but preferably left wingers wouldn't do it at all). That was pretty depressing.

      •  GMO stuff? (0+ / 0-)

        That's a popular anti-scientific position on the main site.

        TX-17 (Bill Flores-R), TX Sen-14 (Kirk Watson-D), TX HD-50 (Celia Israel-D). Senate ratings map (as of 3/10/14)

        by Le Champignon on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 09:50:37 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Yeah, and some people go overboard on it. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Le Champignon

          “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

          by KingofSpades on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 09:52:15 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  No, today it was that stupid hurricane article (6+ / 0-)

          A couple of stupid researchers did some study that purported to show that more people die in hurricanes with female names than with male names. Except in the first 20+ years of their 60-year dataset, hurricanes were only given female names, and hurricanes have become less deadly over time because of better forecasting technique and warning systems. And if they split off the first 20+ years of female-only naming, the dataset would be too small to be statistically significant. Instead of being responsible researchers and admitting there is no discernible correlation, these two stupid researchers did some kind of statistical fudge.

          And then a bunch of feminists seized upon the study to claim that it indicates some sort of deep-seated sexism in society because "people don't take female names seriously". Most of them clearly hadn't read the publication. And when they were presented with information debunking the study, the feminists responded by calling the debunkers "pretentious" and scrambling for any reason to cling to the study's utterly shredded credibility. Basically, they did exactly what the stereotype of modern feminism says feminists do.

          This is obviously a tangent and I went on a bit longer than I intended. But it really annoys me because I've been tracking hurricanes for the past ten years; I'm not an expert by any means, but I do know a lot about the subject. And it's gross to see people mangle science, especially if it's a field I'm familiar with.

    •  They got rid of some of the worst today (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ModernDayWarrior, anshmishra

      Two in particular were banned. If there was an argument, they were almost invariably a part of it. They abused the hell out of the HR system and were some of the most vile commenters I've ever read.

      It was pure civil war today. I thought it was bad some months back when the conspiracy theorist guy was rambling about a conspiracy by Kos to shut him down, and several dozen people (part of his "faction", apparently) launched an all-out attack on everyone. But this.. this is just bad. I've seen rape survivors use their own personal rape stories to score a point in an argument. I saw another rape survivor called a "stain". I saw a front page female diarist be accused (subtly) of having slept with management to secure her position on the front page.

      It's madness. And you're right. DKE hasn't been great recently, and some of that has been my fault, but DKE's worst is infinitely better than the main site's best. I think part of it is that we are much more careful with our use of community moderation. I don't think I've seen a single comment successfully hidden here - not even that comment calling Cuomo a terrorist, I don't think. Instead, we take the time to call people on it and explain why their actions are harmful to the community. It's much less... violent, I suppose.

      I dunno. A part of me wants to never click on the main page ever again, but another part of me loves gorging on popcorn as these people make a mess of themselves.

      TX-17 (Bill Flores-R), TX Sen-14 (Kirk Watson-D), TX HD-50 (Celia Israel-D). Senate ratings map (as of 3/10/14)

      by Le Champignon on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 09:48:56 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Wow, glad I missed this mini-invasion. (0+ / 0-)

        “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

        by KingofSpades on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 09:50:37 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Hey! (0+ / 0-)

        nothing wrong with sleeping with the boss to get ahead!

        Kidding...;)

        18 year old gay Democrat living bright blue in deep red SC-04 (Gowdy). "You may say I'm a dreamer, but I'm not the only one." - John Lennon

        by SCDem4 on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 10:07:42 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  For the morbidly curious (4+ / 0-)

        This is the source of today's drama, pushing 1300 comments now, with maybe a quarter of them being hide-worthy (not that anyone has enough hide rates to do that).  The worst offenders did make the hidden comments list of course, but not without a lot of counter-uprates.  If this were any other website the entire diary would have been deleted by admins.

        It's not DKE's aversion to hide-rating that has made us such a successful community.  Comments have gotten hidden here before, and rightfully so.  No, it really is the people that make DKE such a great place, which ends up leading to very few hidden comments.  And I most definitely believe the great people we have are here because of our purpose: to analyze elections, not debate policy.

        Some more thoughts, as today's live digest winds to a close...the "liberals upset with Obama" meme is vastly overstated on a macro sense, since liberals are undeniably the ideological group most in support of the president.  However, "primarily white male internet-savvy lefties upset with Obama" is a very real thing, and has played out on dailykos for four years now.  Cliques form, and fights linger between diaries.  The mainpage was great when Bush was president...not so much after we actually won.

        Fights like that draw assholes.  Same thing as yahoo or youtube comments, just to a lesser extent.  As bad as today (and this past week) was, it's nothing compared to the cesspool that was the Primary Wars in 2008.  Which is why I am so glad SSP was a primary-free zone in 2008, and so glad that DKE has already shut down 2016 arguments.  People who really want to fight those wars already can go to the main site.  DKE is so great precisely because that's not what we're about.

        •  yeah, that made me sick. (4+ / 0-)

          I almost always avoid the front page and things like that are why. My girlfriend is a rape survivor and that reminds me just how mad I got at Todd Akin when he made his comments... probably the reason I worked so hard for Claire McCaskill. ;)

          DKE is fantastic... I'm perfectly content just staying here.

          26, male, Dem, born and raised in MO-08, currently living in MO-04.

          by ModernDayWarrior on Tue Jun 03, 2014 at 12:46:40 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  I'm content never looking at anything on the FP (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ModernDayWarrior
  •  OR-Sen: increasingly uncompetitive (7+ / 0-)
    Wehby declined The Post’s request for an interview. She also has refused to speak with most in-state media since May 16, when news broke of a 2013 police report in which her ex-boyfriend...

    Wehby’s Washington-based consultants and operatives with the National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) have been helping her manage the scandals. Last week, Wehby held a few small public events, but they were in rural parts of the state and her campaign did not announce them until an hour beforehand, making it logistically impossible for Portland-based reporters to cover her appearances.

    link

    In reality, laws are always useful to those with possessions and harmful to those who have nothing. - Rousseau, The Social Contract, note 5

    by James Allen on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 08:49:06 PM PDT

    •  Ah (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      James Allen, BeloitDem, KingofSpades

      she couldn't meet the media but she had PLENTY of time to fly down to New Orleans and attend the Republican Leadership Conference. Maybe she met with the Daily Caller, Washington Times or Washington Examiner while she was down there.

      The Republican party is now an extreme right-wing party that is owned by their billionaire campaign contributors. - Bernie Sanders

      by ehstronghold on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 08:54:30 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Must be a really biting issue for her. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      James Allen

      “The universe is big. It’s vast and complicated and ridiculous. And sometimes, very rarely, impossible things just happen and we call them miracles.” -The Doctor

      by KingofSpades on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 09:50:10 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

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