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February 24, 2014- Amherst- Governor Cuomo outlines his 2014-15 Executive Budget.
Andrew Cuomo (WFP-NY)
Given everything that New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo stands for (Wall Street, in summary), there is a certain hilarity seeing the Working Families Party endorse him this weekend.

It wasn't an easy decision, clearly. 41 percent of WFP delegates voted against Cuomo. But the party's activist wing was trumped by its labor backers, afraid of running afoul of Cuomo for the next four years. And the party's inability to recruit a top-flight challenger made that decision that much easier.

And that's the WFP's biggest failure. With polling showing them tied with Republicans for second place, they had a historic opportunity to replace Republicans as the second major party in New York, and with that, premier ballot line positioning and seats on county boards of election. And heck, their generic candidate wasn't too far behind Cuomo (only 14-15 points). A WFP governor was a long shot at best, but within the realm of possibilities. Instead of embracing this chance to become a major power broker, they recruited a joke of a potential candidate, one that would threaten their 50,000-vote threshold needed for continued ballot access. Capitulation was pretty much their best option.

But it's not all bad. Cuomo has carefully crafted his Wall Street-friendly image by building a bulwark against genuine progressivism in his state. He seems to think this will help him with the Third Way corporatist crowd when running for president. (No one tell him the primary electorate has changed since 1992.) Yet despite cultivating an image of inevitability, the polling was clear: the state's liberal base had abandoned him. In polling, half of Democrats were abandoning him for an unnamed WFP candidate. He's got some weird desperate need for a crushing electoral victory (probably thinks it'll catapult him to the White House), and that was all slipping away.

So despite the WFP's failure in candidate recruitment, Cuomo went crawling to them, begging for love. He promised them the world, including a $10-million fund to retake the state Senate, legislative work toward a state DREAM Act and a minimum wage increase (something Cuomo prevented New York City and other local municipalities from doing, and apparently still opposes).  

Will Cuomo come through on this stuff? I wouldn't bet on it. It's Cuomo, after all. But given a choice, he would've promised none of this. He's been happy with GOP control of the Senate, and now he's verbally committed to changing that. He's been forced to publicly repudiate his cherished bullshit "bipartisanship" persona.

Is that worth surrendering their ballot line to a governor who is anathema to much of the Working Families Party agenda? In a perfect world, not even close. But given the lack of an alternative, credible candidate, it's amazing that they got anything at all.

Originally posted to kos on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 11:33 AM PDT.

Also republished by New York City and Daily Kos.

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Comment Preferences

  •  still more centrist triangulation (12+ / 0-)
    Will Cuomo come through on this stuff? I wouldn't bet on it. It's Cuomo, after all. But given a choice, he would've promised none of this. He's been happy with GOP control of the Senate, and now he's verbally committed to changing that. He's been forced to publicly repudiate his cherished bullshit "bipartisanship" persona.

    Is that worth surrendering their ballot line to a governor who is anathema to much of the Working Families Party agenda? In a perfect world, not even close. But given the lack of an alternative, credible candidate, it's amazing that they got anything at all.

    Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "If we appear to seek the unattainable, then let it be known that we do so to avoid the unimaginable." (@eState4Column5)

    by annieli on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 11:38:53 AM PDT

  •  Politics is a dirty business. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Deep Texan, HoundDog, Mannie
  •  i remember gray davis (26+ / 0-)

    his arrogance and self-righteousness, his alienating the democrats in the legislature, and his play to the right as tough on crime, pro death penalty, tool of the correctional officers' lobby. it was going to make him palatable to the center when he ran for president. i remember when the recall came. he didn't have many friends left.

    The cold passion for truth hunts in no pack. -Robinson Jeffers

    by Laurence Lewis on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 11:42:10 AM PDT

  •  Sure Is Entertainng Sitting Here in Tax Slash Ohio (14+ / 0-)

    watching the "move yer biz to NY state tax free" ads.

    Come to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, New Yorkers, and afterward we'll give you a tour of your tax-cutting future.

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 11:43:34 AM PDT

  •  Uh Oh (16+ / 0-)
    He's got some weird desperate need for a crushing electoral victory (probably thinks it'll catapult him to the White House), and that was all slipping away.
    This sounds very similar to the plan of a neighboring state's governor, whose need for a "crushing" win seems to have led to a self-crushing.

    Tread carefully, Andy, lest the ghosts across the Hudson haunt you.

    •  Very similar, maybe it's in the river water. (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      TomP, pollbuster, Mannie, Matt Z

      I was ready to block quote the same thing.

      Oh for crying out loud!

      by 4mygirls on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 11:59:36 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  He's very crushable now (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Mannie, PrahaPartizan

      Seems the NJ governor has lost 85 pounds. It used to be off limits to talk about his weight, but now it's perfectly okay. However if he puts on the weight again, it will be off limits again. They used to call this hypocrisy, I think they still do.

      Wanting to own a gun is an immediate indicator that you should be the last person to have one.

      by pollbuster on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 12:29:23 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  It actually made much more sense (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Mannie, PrahaPartizan, LI Mike

      with Christie. He wanted to tell national republican primary voters: Here I am a republican winning a crushing victory in blue New Jersey, I could win blue states for you in 2016. Cuomo winning a crushing victory in blue New York is no big deal at all and is, for the most part, expected.

      Wanting to own a gun is an immediate indicator that you should be the last person to have one.

      by pollbuster on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 12:35:40 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Thanks. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    TomP, Mannie

    Humor Alert! No statement from this UID is intended to be true, including this one. Comments and Posts intended for recreational purposes only. Unauthorized interpretations may lead to unexpected results. This waiver void where prohibited.

    by HoundDog on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 11:58:42 AM PDT

  •  Circling the drain (8+ / 0-)

    I don't think his career has much further to go, but none of it is upwards.

    This is not a sig-line.

    by Joffan on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 12:11:26 PM PDT

    •  Sure it is . . . (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      LI Mike

      You've got to go a long way up to get to your corner office at a Wall Street investment bank.

      "The great lie of democracy, its essential paradox, is that democracy is the first to be sacrificed when its security is at risk. Every state is totalitarian at heart; there are no ends to the cruelty it will go to to protect itself." -- Ian McDonald

      by Geenius at Wrok on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 07:28:49 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Andrew Cuomo's chances of ever running (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mannie, PinHole, Remediator, jbsoul, LI Mike

    for President are slim and none. As of now, Hillary Clinton would appear to have the nomination locked down for 8 years. After that her VP, who won't be Cuomo, but who will undoubtedly be young and ready, would likely follow.

    Of course a million things could change between now and then, but Cuomo would still be a very unlikely choice.

    Wanting to own a gun is an immediate indicator that you should be the last person to have one.

    by pollbuster on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 12:12:19 PM PDT

  •  What happened with the LG slot? (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jrooth, pollbuster, Mannie

    Did they agree to nominate Hochul or is Samuels stilla contender for that?

    "Valerie, why am I getting all these emails calling me a classless boor?"

    by TLS66 on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 12:12:45 PM PDT

  •  Is Cuomo really for Wall Street? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    PrahaPartizan, David in NY

    I think he is mainly for Cuomo.

    Not that makes him particularly unique.

    And it may be unrealistic to expect any significant NY pol to come out against Wall Street. Bernie Sanders' career would be over were he to defy the dairy farmers.

    But there are a lot of things that make me sick that have nothing to do with Wall Street. The massive expansion of casino gambling here in NY will destroy lives and communities. Yes, Wall Street is a casino but can't it be contained to lower Manhattan? Wall Street doesn't have a problem with a Dream Act. Wall Street should not have a problem with forcing consolidation of small inefficient school districts, something that would have a real impact on the confiscatory property taxes in much of the state. Wall Street really doesn't care about the minimum wage -- banks and brokerage firms may not pay well, but they are well above McDonald's level. I could go on and on.

    •  I think people overestimate how much (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      jbsoul

      could be saved by consolidating the school districts. You'd still need the same teachers, most of the same administrators and support staff, same buildings, etc.

      Hillary Clinton's Liberal Ranking http://www.dailykos.com/story/2007/8/10/122232/619

      by tigercourse on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 01:04:55 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  You need a lot fewer administrators (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        LI Mike

        and you can have larger schools, which are also more efficient. We have single schools in NYC with fewer schools than some entire districts in Westchester County. That is one reason why are taxes are lower.

        •  So you lose some superintendents. That's (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          jbsoul

          about it. The ones who remain would have more responsibilities and need higher pay. A wash.

          Larger schools? That would mean spending a ton of money in construction.

          Hillary Clinton's Liberal Ranking http://www.dailykos.com/story/2007/8/10/122232/619

          by tigercourse on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 02:34:54 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  NY property taxes are high bc Medicaid costs (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      PrahaPartizan, milkbone, PinHole, jbsoul

      unlike other states, are divided between the state and localities.  The Federal govt pays half of Medicaid costs, but NYS shifts about half of its share to the counties.

      NYS Medicaid also covers long term care which is expensive, unlike most other states, so the local burden is very heavy.

      "On average, Medicaid accounts for 45 percent of a county’s local property tax levy."  - Lohud
      http://polhudson.lohudblogs.com/...

      There's no such thing as a free market!

      by Albanius on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 01:39:56 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  On a county level, that's correct. (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Mannie, jbsoul, LI Mike

        However, there are also structural issues at the local level when it comes to local property taxes in many municipalities.

        School and public safety budgets are a big part of that, but not for the reasons Republicans would suggest that employees are merely being paid too much.  It's more complex than that.

        Many districts have huge special education programs where the cost per student is 2 - 3 times the cost per student of a student in a regular program.  Obviously, that isn't to say special education is a bad thing.  It's just the costs need to come down to be closer to the cost of educating a student in a regular program.  Many also have too many administrators and have gone on building binges or buying sprees that have put them significantly in debt, and Cuomos failure to fund education at the proper levels hasn't helped.  Cuomo just pushed yet another buying spree in the state budget this year -  if I recall the details correctly, it allows schools to bond the purchase of iPads and other soon-to-be obsolete tech over 15 years.  That's just idiotic.  Yes, I want the kids to have the best educational environment possible.  But bonding shit like iPads for so long is just asinine - they'll be in the trash long before the bonds are paid for.

        Public safety budgets have exploded because many local pols are so concerned with looking like they "expanded government" by hiring more cops and firefighters that they rely far too heavily on overtime to cover shifts, which creates a massive pension tab to cover the salaries earned on O/T.

        Finally, at all levels - county and municipal - many seem to have given huge tax breaks that end up significantly narrowing the tax base.  Many localities have practically 50% of their tax base "exempt" due to IDA deals, PILOT agreements, etc, and even when they're not exempt, many businesses end up getting sweetheart deals that lower their taxes significantly compared to the average homeowner when looking at it on an assessed taxes per $1000 in value basis - or are simply (and purposely) underassessed.  This is by far the largest issue in many municipalities.  Too many giveaways causing a narrow tax base.

        "There was no such thing as a "wealthy" hunter-gatherer. It is the creation of human society that has allowed the wealthy to become wealthy. As such, they have an obligation to pay a bit more to sustain that society than the not-so-wealthy." - Me

        by Darth Stateworker on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 03:09:57 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Progressives in NY were sold out (8+ / 0-)

    Does ANYONE believe that Cuomo will keep his word?

    Seriously?  Anyone? (Other than happy turd way Dems who love this Koch funded repug in Democratic clothing)

    What Cuomo & WFP did was seriously marginalize the progressive movement in NY.  They pushed the only force for progressives (WFP) into a center right position.  When we can't even keep WORKING FAMILIES PARTY from tacking right, what chance is there?!!!!!

    The leadership of WFP who stood by Cuomo who has targeted their union brothers & sisters is just plain deplorable!

    Also the WFP just stomped all over their "unit" on this move. How many people will NOT vote for WFP over this?  WFP may have just marginalized themselves as they sold out.

    And guess who is cheering that?!  

    CUOMO!

    A total clusterfuck all the way around, and the only winner is that slimeball Cuomo!

    Never underestimate stupid. Stupid is how reTHUGlicans win!

    by Mannie on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 12:29:54 PM PDT

    •  deBlasio, and the WFP leadership (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      PrahaPartizan

      who weren't born yesterday,  believe it.  WFP has a record of winning actual gains for the working class using the leverage of the ballot line plus a strong GOTV operation in targeted races. See this article by Harold Meyerson in The American Prospect:
      http://prospect.org/...

      Lettia James a strong progressive who is now NYC Public Advocate, the second highest elected office in the City, was originally elected to the NYC City Council on the WFP line only. (As I heard it, whe was the original first choice of WFP to run for Gov, but declined (she has a full time job).

      In Albany, WFP organizers ran the historic David Soares campaign for DA against a machine incumbent who was a statewide leader in defending NY's draconian Rockefeller Drug law.  Soares smashing victory led to the repeal of the mandatory long sentences in many cases.  In the last cycle, the get out the vote operation coordinated by WFP's Elric Kline was decisive in the hair-thin victory of strong progressive Ceci Tkaczyk in a newly created district custom tailored for her wealthy GOP opponent.  Ceci's win gave the Democrats a nominal 33-30 majority in the NYS Senate, until the "Independent Democratic Conference (IDC) defected to support continuing GOP leadership, with the silent but obvious support of Cuomo.

      Now Cuomo has publicly pledeged to support a working majority for the D's in the state Senate, and reportedly has promised to raise $10M for that effort, a proposition that will be empirically tested soon.

      We will see whether he delivers.

      There's no such thing as a free market!

      by Albanius on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 01:31:08 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  All that may be true . . . (0+ / 0-)

        but I can only think of the WFP as a party with a sledgehammer-subtle name which was invented to give Peter Vallone another ballot line in '98. Bleh.

        "The great lie of democracy, its essential paradox, is that democracy is the first to be sacrificed when its security is at risk. Every state is totalitarian at heart; there are no ends to the cruelty it will go to to protect itself." -- Ian McDonald

        by Geenius at Wrok on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 07:33:07 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Agreed. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Mannie

      Apparently, there's few currently available parties that can be trusted to not move to the center-right or farther right, and perhaps none at all.

      There is no way for a citizen of a Republic to abdicate his responsibilities. ---Edward R. Murrow

      by SouthernLiberalinMD on Tue Jun 03, 2014 at 02:32:27 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  He made them an offer they could't understand nt (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mannie, pollbuster

    I want 1 less Tiny Coffin, Why Don't You? Support The President's Gun Violence Plan.

    by JML9999 on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 12:31:27 PM PDT

    •  Having followed the Andrew Cuomo legacy (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Mannie, JML9999, jbsoul

      from afar, my first reaction to the 'working families' party is What the F#%$* People are you doing backing this guy?  I'd vote in November, and more than likely skip the governor candidates, or write in a more suitable choice.  Of course I have the advantage of not being a New Yorker.  Is there really no one better in the D party in such a diverse and interesting state?

  •  Support Randy Credico's primary campaign (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Simplify, ChuckChuckerson

    http://www.credico2014.com/

    Get him on the ballot to try to drag Cuomo the Lesser a bit to the left.

    I haven't forgotten The Path to 9/11, Disney. You're still dead to me.

    by beemerr on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 12:34:43 PM PDT

    •  Credico is a clown. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Mannie, Remediator

      Literally.  He's a comedian.

      Even if he gets on the ballot to primary Cuomo, he wouldn't draw enough votes to even be a blip.  He's prone to outrageous stunts and foot-in-mouth disease.

      Not that I have a problem with that, but I don't think he'd sit well with primary voters.  Personally, I tend to like the guy.  But he's not going to get any traction.

      "There was no such thing as a "wealthy" hunter-gatherer. It is the creation of human society that has allowed the wealthy to become wealthy. As such, they have an obligation to pay a bit more to sustain that society than the not-so-wealthy." - Me

      by Darth Stateworker on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 03:16:03 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  None for me, thanks. /nt (0+ / 0-)

      "How can we know the dancer from the dance?" (Yeats)

      by Remediator on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 04:52:26 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  And as assuredly the liberals and dems left him (3+ / 0-)

    Within 24 hours, he abandoned the WFP in return.

    •  FALSE MEME - this is important (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      LI Mike

      Cuomo may or may not renege on the deal with the WFP, deBlasio and the unions, but he did NOT renege on the minimum wage deal yet - he emphasized its limits.

      Here are the facts:
      The deal was for the Gov  to push through a raise in the state minimum wage to $10.10, and to allow localities to raise it up to 30% above that.

      Yesterday Cuomo spoke against authorizing localities to raise the floor w/o limit, which is consistent with the agreement:

      "I would allow localities within a state-prescribed formula to adjust a local wage,” he said. “But not that the locality gets to set rate wherever they want. I’m against that.”

      So he has not yet reneged on the agreement; time will tell. $10.10 statewide and an option of $13.13 for localities would make a big difference to low wage workers - about a 45% increase over current law ($9, not yet in effect).  We'll see if he delivers.

      BTW, the Seattle minimum wage hike, though a great victory for the working poor, raises the minimum to $15 over several years, and has exceptions, so NY won't be that far behind if Cuomo delivers on his promise.  In any case the movement for $15, plus benefits, w/o loopholes - won't demobilize, it will be energized.

      And as evidence accumulates that raising the minimum wage decreases turnover, and increases purchasing power of workers who spend more locally, the case for further increases to a full living wage would be strengthened.

      There's no such thing as a free market!

      by Albanius on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 01:12:38 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  That is certainly why (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        LI Mike

        NYCC was for the deal.  I know people involved in the fast-food campaign and they were there supporting the deal with Cuomo, even though they almost certainly think he's a complete megalomaniac and jerk.  

        •  EVERYONE I know in WFP agrees (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          LI Mike

          he's a complete megalomaniac and jerk.  The difference is on whether he has pushed a pro-1%, anti-99% agenda out of principle or opportunism. If the latter, he may follow through on the deal.

          But politics is politics - you can't always get what you want.  IF he delivers on the deal and uses his clout to put the D's in control of the state Senate, opening the door to all kinds of progressive legislation, the WFP leadership will look good in retrospect.

          There's no such thing as a free market!

          by Albanius on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 02:56:23 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  Triangulation (0+ / 0-)

        Every politician who potentially faces a diverse audience needs to find a way to appeal both to his base and to the general public. Romney/McCain failed miserably at it. Cuomo is a governor of a very liberal state that is nevertheless diverse ideologically, even as it has a very weak Republican Party.

        It will be interesting to see a potential Cuomo presidential campaign.

      •  Of course, all that you just said (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Mannie, jbsoul, dfarrah

        only comes into play if Cuomo is the kind of person that you can take him at his word.

        He's repeatedly proven that that is not the case, so his "clarification" is backtracking in Cuomo-speak.  Anyone who has heard enough Cuomo-speak will instantly recognize it as such.

        He'll purposely put a weak formula out there, and few municipalities will be able to go above $10.10 - by design.

        And that's if he doesn't welch on his deal to get the Senate back in the hands of the Dems, because if he welches on that (and I think he will), he can just use the "I can't get it past the Republicans in the Senate" excuse he's used his entire first term for anything he personally didn't want.

        "There was no such thing as a "wealthy" hunter-gatherer. It is the creation of human society that has allowed the wealthy to become wealthy. As such, they have an obligation to pay a bit more to sustain that society than the not-so-wealthy." - Me

        by Darth Stateworker on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 03:20:49 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Notice how close his strategy is to Christie's (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mannie, Darth Stateworker

    The "bipartisan appeal" and the big electoral margins. And like Christie, he is seeing lots of push back against his third way agenda.

    "You can die for Freedom, you just can't exercise it"

    by shmuelman on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 12:48:51 PM PDT

  •  Cuomo really is not a progressive (0+ / 0-)

    and I don't think he ever presented himself as such

  •  They recruited a joke of a potential candidate (0+ / 0-)

    [smiles] Who would that be, now?

  •  He's probably jockeying for a cushy position (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mannie

    in the corporatist, Third Way, "Wall Street uber alles" Presidential administration that we are likely to be stuck with starting in 2017. Or maybe even a VP slot.

  •  WFP didn't have much choice (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    PrahaPartizan

    if the endorsed someone else, they ran the risk of a very poor finish and minor party status, which could have caused them to fold, like the Liberal Party did after 02.

    •  And they aren't risking that now? (4+ / 0-)

      How many people are now PISSED at WFP and won't vote that line?!

      What the WFP feared may happen BECAUSE of they backed Governor 1%er!

      WFP lost me on that line for this year.

      Never underestimate stupid. Stupid is how reTHUGlicans win!

      by Mannie on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 01:17:30 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  no (0+ / 0-)

        The Liberal Party lost it's automatic spot on the ballot in 02 because they endorsed Cuomo, who lost the Dem. primary and didnt' run in the general. Due to the poor showing of Cuomo, who remained on the ballot, they lost their automatic spot and couldn't afford the expense of petition drives to get back on. The WFP is trying to avoid a similar fate. By endorsing Cuomo, their candidate will win in November, in all liklihood.

        •  Let the WFP die (0+ / 0-)

          and let the WFP activists fight in Democratic Primaries.

        •  But what will the WFP vote count be? (0+ / 0-)

          That is the question.  And that is how WFP may marginalize themselves by selling out

          Never underestimate stupid. Stupid is how reTHUGlicans win!

          by Mannie on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 01:37:42 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  That is (0+ / 0-)

            the problem they face.  But if they throw themselves into the Senate races, and there is a Democratic Senate, they could come out on top -- having influence with the swing votes there.

            Or not.

            •  Depends on how powerful Cuomo still is. (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Mannie, jbsoul

              WFP and the unions have plenty of power already in the Assembly.

              But when Cuomo says "Jump!", much of the Assembly says "How high?, because they are afraid Cuomo will help back a primary challenger or even a Republican opponent - either outwardly or behind the scenes.

              The only real way to stop Cuomo is to strip him of some of his popularity, which will cause his power to wane.

              "There was no such thing as a "wealthy" hunter-gatherer. It is the creation of human society that has allowed the wealthy to become wealthy. As such, they have an obligation to pay a bit more to sustain that society than the not-so-wealthy." - Me

              by Darth Stateworker on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 03:33:42 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

      •  I wouldn't. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Mannie

        I don't need someone to talk about helping working people and then side repeatedly with big money. I've got Democrats for that.

        There is no way for a citizen of a Republic to abdicate his responsibilities. ---Edward R. Murrow

        by SouthernLiberalinMD on Tue Jun 03, 2014 at 02:34:28 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Nonsense. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Mannie, jbsoul

      MoveOn polled 500k of their members in NY and found 73% of them wanted Cuomo to get a liberal challenger.

      They would have gotten 50k votes in a walk.

      "There was no such thing as a "wealthy" hunter-gatherer. It is the creation of human society that has allowed the wealthy to become wealthy. As such, they have an obligation to pay a bit more to sustain that society than the not-so-wealthy." - Me

      by Darth Stateworker on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 03:22:39 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Guess the consensus is already in: (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mannie, cybrestrike

    1. The WFP has lost the chance to _______ (insert alternative course of action here) by deciding to endorse Cuomo.

    2. The union leadership essentially sold out its membership in exchange for some lip service.

    3. Cuomo's promises aren't worth the CO2 he used to exhale them.

    4. Albany is unlikely to change, and thus NYS politics will remain a four-ring circus that makes Texas look rational.

    Fine.  SO WHAT THE HELL DO WE DO ABOUT IT NOW??!?!

  •  the word of the day (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mannie

    for the left seems to be capitulation.

  •  WFP = "Weasel for President"? nt (0+ / 0-)
  •  Andrew Cuomo will never be President. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mannie, jbsoul

    He makes Joe Lieberman look Elizabeth Warren.

  •  Must Be Pressing Clinton Not to Run (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mannie

    Cuomo's racking up a monstrous win in 2014 would mean nothing if Hillary Clinton does decide to run in 2016, unless he means to challenge her in the primaries.  If she runs and wins, Cuomo will be cooling his jets for the subsequent eight years.  So, ten years from now, he'll be looking at running for President as the sitting VP, or a ranking Cabinet member, or governor of NYS or a private individual.  The first two offer him the best chance to buff his resume, but it tends to take him out of the spotlight and away from any levers of real power.  NYS governors tend to have shaky third terms and fourth terms are almost unheard of, because all of the deals one needs to cut in the first two terms start to turn into political floaters and embarrassments.  Running as a private individual would allow him to work the political apparatus around the country.  None of those options is helped by a major win in 2014 produced by crafting noisome political deals.  That's what Christie is learning in NJ and he doesn't even have the option of running for a third term.

    "Love the Truth, defend the Truth, speak the Truth, and hear the Truth" - Jan Hus, d.1415 CE

    by PrahaPartizan on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 02:13:26 PM PDT

  •  Just wait until after the election. The Clinton (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mannie

    people will be bringing out the knives to squash him.

    •  Not a HRC 3rd way fun, but (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Darth Stateworker

      should they squash the political ambitions of Cuomo, I must say that would raise her stock with me!

      Never underestimate stupid. Stupid is how reTHUGlicans win!

      by Mannie on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 02:37:54 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  That raises a good point. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Mannie, jbsoul

        Where were the Clinton people at the WFPCon pushing against Cuomo?

        Given that her people have worked hard to crush all potential challengers, you'd think they'd have wanted Cuomo to be embarrassed...

        ...unless of course, they're on the same team (the Wall Street team) - which many of us believe to be the case.

        After all Cuomo was a protege of Bill.

        "There was no such thing as a "wealthy" hunter-gatherer. It is the creation of human society that has allowed the wealthy to become wealthy. As such, they have an obligation to pay a bit more to sustain that society than the not-so-wealthy." - Me

        by Darth Stateworker on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 03:26:17 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  He's already started backtracking. (5+ / 0-)

    http://www.capitalnewyork.com/...

    It took him less than 24 hours to do so.

    Great job, idiots.

    "There was no such thing as a "wealthy" hunter-gatherer. It is the creation of human society that has allowed the wealthy to become wealthy. As such, they have an obligation to pay a bit more to sustain that society than the not-so-wealthy." - Me

    by Darth Stateworker on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 03:11:50 PM PDT

    •  Where's all the Cuomo & WFP apologists now?! n/m (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Darth Stateworker, jbsoul

      Never underestimate stupid. Stupid is how reTHUGlicans win!

      by Mannie on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 05:14:46 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Still being apologists and stating (4+ / 0-)

        that "endorsing Cuomo" was the only option they had.

        That story will never change, because it's an easy excuse which cannot be proven or disproven.

        "There was no such thing as a "wealthy" hunter-gatherer. It is the creation of human society that has allowed the wealthy to become wealthy. As such, they have an obligation to pay a bit more to sustain that society than the not-so-wealthy." - Me

        by Darth Stateworker on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 05:17:41 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Way to destroy your party's brand (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Darth Stateworker

      right when it's apparently gaining some traction.

      WFP is coming into MD. I was interested. I'm not interested now.

      Like I said, if I want to support politicians like Cuomo, and pro-Wall St, pro-Chamber of Commerce policies, I've got Mike Miller and Michael Bush for that. And, on the federal level, Steny Hoyer.

      There is no way for a citizen of a Republic to abdicate his responsibilities. ---Edward R. Murrow

      by SouthernLiberalinMD on Tue Jun 03, 2014 at 02:36:40 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I don't blame the party per se. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        SouthernLiberalinMD

        I blame the unions that usurped the votes from the party activists.  Essentially, they're short sighted idiots that were too afraid of losing the party line and alienating the governor then they were about their members long-term well being.

        Basically, they're chicken shits, apologists, and Turd-Way shills.  Their members should elect new leaders that have a spine.  Some very well may.  I was talking to a CWA member I know that was pretty pissed their leaders pushed for Cuomo at the WFPCon.  She didn't even know her leaders were doing that - and she's a steward, so she should have known.  They apparently did it quickly and quietly.

        "There was no such thing as a "wealthy" hunter-gatherer. It is the creation of human society that has allowed the wealthy to become wealthy. As such, they have an obligation to pay a bit more to sustain that society than the not-so-wealthy." - Me

        by Darth Stateworker on Tue Jun 03, 2014 at 04:43:14 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  This is one reason Occupy doesn't (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Darth Stateworker

          like having leaders. Because leaders are a vulnerable point. They can be corrupted, intimidated, whatever, and you can lose a great deal before you even know it. Sometimes without knowing it until much, much later.

          The other reason, of course, is that the mainstream press has been transformed over the last 25 years into more or less a character assassination machine that tends to get used on anybody who challenges entrenched power. Anybody who wants to damage a movement or a party by taking down its leaders can do it very very easily via our extensively corrupted press. That's why the press was so desperate to find a leader of Occupy to talk to, and were endlessly frustrated when one did not emerge.

          There is no way for a citizen of a Republic to abdicate his responsibilities. ---Edward R. Murrow

          by SouthernLiberalinMD on Tue Jun 03, 2014 at 05:42:17 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I think it's a indictment (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            SouthernLiberalinMD

            of weak leaders more than a support of being effectively leaderless.

            I agree that leaders can be corrupted, co-opted, bullied, bribed, and tons of other nasty things.  At the same time, I think party of the reason why Occupy eventually fizzled was because there was little direction and no one to follow in the directions that were chosen.

            Don't get me wrong - I'm not disparaging Occupy here.  Occupy was great as far as starting a conversation, but we need more than simply starting a conversation, and I don't think you can do more than that without leaders to follow and to build political machinery behind.  Not in post Citizens-United America.

            The beauty of the "old" progressive movement was that it had passionate people behind it (like the Occupiers) and had incorruptible leaders that stayed the course, like MLK.

            "There was no such thing as a "wealthy" hunter-gatherer. It is the creation of human society that has allowed the wealthy to become wealthy. As such, they have an obligation to pay a bit more to sustain that society than the not-so-wealthy." - Me

            by Darth Stateworker on Tue Jun 03, 2014 at 06:14:44 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I totally agree that Homo sapiens (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Darth Stateworker

              does better with leaders. And movements usually do better with leaders too.

              However, I think the current conditions of near limitless corruption have made leaders a tactical vulnerability we can't afford. I so far haven't seen anything to contradict that--god knows I'd love to. There are very very few leaders around now I could trust, and even the ones I do, I worry about sometimes.

              Cause it's not just being corruptible that's the problem. It's that almost anybody can be blackmailed, even if they've done nothing wrong, if they care about anything, or anyone, that could be hurt.

              Just to give an example:  look what Jamie Dimons said to Marcy Kaptur. Look at 6:19 into the video:

              What is that? A threat?

              And, in fact, sometimes it's not even necessary to engage in outright blackmail--it's more a question of letting people see they'll lose their jobs, status, position, money if they challenge you. It's so easy for people to become seriously compromised.

              There's lots of people out there that would rather be pushing good policy and standing in solidarity with their constituents, members, whatever--but they're afraid. Hey, guess what, I'm afraid too. It's patently ridiculous for somebody like me to be standing against people like Jamie Dimons, the Carlyle group, the Kochs, and all the rest of the unmentionables. But, as Jerry Garcia said once Somebody has to do something and it's just incredibly pathetic that it has to be us. And, as Murrow said...well, see my sig. :-)

              There is no way for a citizen of a Republic to abdicate his responsibilities. ---Edward R. Murrow

              by SouthernLiberalinMD on Tue Jun 03, 2014 at 06:33:44 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  I hear you. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                SouthernLiberalinMD

                I just don't have any ideas to get from ideas and discussion to outright changes in policy without leaders.

                Without leaders, who do you elect to office to represent your ideals and push for legislation that will implement those ideals?

                This is the $100,000 question if you can't find incorruptible, fearless leaders.

                It's a riddle wrapped inside a mystery wrapped inside an enigma.

                "There was no such thing as a "wealthy" hunter-gatherer. It is the creation of human society that has allowed the wealthy to become wealthy. As such, they have an obligation to pay a bit more to sustain that society than the not-so-wealthy." - Me

                by Darth Stateworker on Tue Jun 03, 2014 at 06:43:47 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  I don't have a quick answer (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Darth Stateworker

                  obviously, if I did I'd be out implementing it instead of chatting on DK (grin). But I'm looking for one. If I think I've found one, I'll let you know. :-)

                  Gotta get offline now, as it's almost ten.

                  Nice to have talked with you.

                  There is no way for a citizen of a Republic to abdicate his responsibilities. ---Edward R. Murrow

                  by SouthernLiberalinMD on Tue Jun 03, 2014 at 06:46:45 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Have a great evening! n/t (0+ / 0-)

                    "There was no such thing as a "wealthy" hunter-gatherer. It is the creation of human society that has allowed the wealthy to become wealthy. As such, they have an obligation to pay a bit more to sustain that society than the not-so-wealthy." - Me

                    by Darth Stateworker on Tue Jun 03, 2014 at 06:50:26 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

            •  Thanks for having this conversation with me. (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Darth Stateworker

              It's really refreshing to have a tactical conversation with someone whose views I share.

              There is no way for a citizen of a Republic to abdicate his responsibilities. ---Edward R. Murrow

              by SouthernLiberalinMD on Tue Jun 03, 2014 at 06:43:47 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  I also agree on the press. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            SouthernLiberalinMD

            The press has turned into little more than a machine moving from one story they can sensationalize to the next.

            On that, however, I lay a good chunk of the blame on the internet.  Most of the press has lost a large portion of their revenue as people stopped subscribing to newspapers and stopped watching TV news, so the press now relies on clickbait as a major revenue stream.

            There is no longer any real motivation for them do to actual reporting, much less in-depth investigative reporting.  Add in that partisan think tanks will gladly ghost write articles or source materials, and the click bait articles are all that much easier for them to produce with the smaller staffs they have due to the decreased revenues.

            "There was no such thing as a "wealthy" hunter-gatherer. It is the creation of human society that has allowed the wealthy to become wealthy. As such, they have an obligation to pay a bit more to sustain that society than the not-so-wealthy." - Me

            by Darth Stateworker on Tue Jun 03, 2014 at 06:24:02 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  More to the point of your comment: (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Darth Stateworker

          the union movement isn't just a mess because it's been under attack. Some seriously bad moves have been made by the unions themselves, starting I guess with the Teamsters supporting Nixon and the AFL-CIO siding with Reagan over the air traffic controllers, if I'm getting my history right.

          To bring it more up to date, every goddamned union should be endorsing John Conyers' Jobs For All bill (HR 1000) but most of them are nowhere to be found.

          There is no way for a citizen of a Republic to abdicate his responsibilities. ---Edward R. Murrow

          by SouthernLiberalinMD on Tue Jun 03, 2014 at 05:44:17 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Agreed. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            SouthernLiberalinMD

            I see this all the time as a union member, and it frustrates me to know end.  Many unions simply keep re-electing entrenched assholes who clearly don't give a shit about anyone but themselves; or are weaksauce, spineless idiots that just do whatever they're told by Democrats; or are simply so old and entrenched in the (now false) idea that unions have tons of political power that they think they can simply rest on their laurels and not fight, and pols will simply roll over for them.

            A large part of this is the membership itself though.  When it comes to political activism and keeping their union leaders in line, many of them don't pay attention and won't get off their asses.  Instead, they just bitch that "the union" should fix it.  They tend to forget that they are the union and

            "There was no such thing as a "wealthy" hunter-gatherer. It is the creation of human society that has allowed the wealthy to become wealthy. As such, they have an obligation to pay a bit more to sustain that society than the not-so-wealthy." - Me

            by Darth Stateworker on Tue Jun 03, 2014 at 06:20:08 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Well, I think maybe--and I hope this doesn't (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Darth Stateworker

              sound snotty--people need to be educated both in the fact that they aren't automatically powerful (in other words, they can't just call their Congressman and expect things to change) and also in the fact that they ARE powerful (in other words, this culture of tacit despair we're living in has to be broken).

              I think we need something like what this woman did:

                Dorothy Cotton and Citizenship Education

              but on a possibly more challenging topic, because we're going to have to reinvent our traditions.

              There is no way for a citizen of a Republic to abdicate his responsibilities. ---Edward R. Murrow

              by SouthernLiberalinMD on Tue Jun 03, 2014 at 06:38:41 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Bingo. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                SouthernLiberalinMD

                People tend to forget that as individuals, they're essentially powerless, but as a group, they have power - the larger the group they are, the more powerful they become.

                This is, by far, the most frustrating thing about unions today.  People have forgotten that completely - or are too young to have ever learned it from seeing how unions used to function.

                This is exactly what we saw when we were fighting with Cuomo in 2010/2011.  People would bitch and moan and shout the union should "do something", and then the union would organize a protest at the Capitol and maybe a few hundred people would show up.  They simply didn't get it.

                /facepalm

                "There was no such thing as a "wealthy" hunter-gatherer. It is the creation of human society that has allowed the wealthy to become wealthy. As such, they have an obligation to pay a bit more to sustain that society than the not-so-wealthy." - Me

                by Darth Stateworker on Tue Jun 03, 2014 at 06:49:18 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

  •  In the words that great social philosopher (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mannie, SouthernLiberalinMD

    Bugs Bunny to the WFP, "You'll be SORRY!"

  •  Andrew Cuomo is about Andrew Cuomo. Period, full (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mannie, LI Mike

    stop.  THE END.  Sometimes remaining a full real person is better than heeling.

    If you don't have a seat at the table, you're probably on the menu.

    by CarolinNJ on Mon Jun 02, 2014 at 06:00:34 PM PDT

  •  Awesome. He won. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mannie

    WFP just trashed their reputation. Why should any progressive trust them?
    59% said yes? Sounds like what happened with the Democratic party in NJ supporting Christie.

    "Oh, I'm so scared the Big Bad Guy will hurt me if I don't endorse him."

    There is no way for a citizen of a Republic to abdicate his responsibilities. ---Edward R. Murrow

    by SouthernLiberalinMD on Tue Jun 03, 2014 at 02:31:06 PM PDT

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