Skip to main content

NOTE TO READERS: If you all want to get a reportorial perspective upon a recent decision in the case Vergara v. California threatening teacher tenure in the state of California (and possibly, later, in other states!), read zenbassoon's diary here or Laura Clawson's diary here or Bill Raden's earlier piece here.  My task here is to explain the bigger picture, of the organized attack upon the employment status of America's teachers as part of a greater, long-term effort.


I can't say what you were all thinking when you read about this ruling, and the commentary that followed from the White House -- my own immediate reaction was that "they're now getting what they want directly, rather than having to fuss over "school reform"!  Want to mess with the teachers' unions?  Have the courts do it!  Perhaps in the future we can now expect a new era of honesty, in which open-ended class warfare upon teachers and students is no longer seen as requiring justification through the ever-expanding rationalizations of "school reform."

  We can see a long history of "school reform" dating back to the 1970s -- Ira Shor's volume titled Culture Wars details the beginnings of "school reform," with career education, "back to basics," and "excellence" as public excuses for "school reform."  And of course the most recent "school reform" efforts have exhibited their own guiding philosophies: "No Child Left Behind," as justified by a philosophy of universal achievement through universal standards and testing, or the "Race to the Top" philosophy of excellence through market-based reform.

But at its core "school reform" is really about one, and only one, motivating force: capitalist discipline.  To make schools into conduits for profit, teachers must be made cheaper, and schools must be shown to produce an "added value" labor force while imposing permanent debt servitude upon graduates of the system at its highest levels after they graduate from college.  The idea behind "school reform," in sum, is to impose the discipline of capital upon the schools.  As Noam Chomsky might put it, costs will be borne by the public, and profits will go to private actors.

The singular, official mythology in support of "school reform" is that teaching is absurdly easy, because all teaching is really just pouring facts into heads, which (supposedly) any adult can do.  Teaching, then (like work at McDonald's or WalMart), is properly a job for up-and-coming youth who will move on to something else when it's time for their real careers (the purpose of "Teach for America").  This official mythology views teachers as a centrally-placed unionized gang of thieves, who are currently overpaid while at the same time being the only real factor in the presence or absence of "student achievement."  All of the faults of the system, then, can be blamed upon "bad" teachers who soak up salary while doing their (ostensibly easy) jobs.  And look!  They bagged a judge with this line of thought.

Now, once upon a time, before hegemonic neoliberalism took control of the capitalist world-system, there was a then-current debate in policy discussions of American education which engaged terms such as "relevance."  Are students learning anything in school which is relevant to their lives? the intelligentsia used to ask.  And then there's that question intimately related to relevance, which at times they asked as well -- are we educating students merely to adapt to society, or to make contributions to society which would improve it?  Those debates were fruitful.  Discussing "relevance" meant that policy designers had to discuss what student lives were actually like, and also to discuss what such lives would be like once said students graduated from school or college or university with diplomas and degrees in hand.  Discussing "school reform" in terms of "relevance" would prompt the immediate question: these reforms may be good for capital, but are they good for students?  As a friend on Facebook asked: if you end teacher tenure, who's going to want to teach?  They have to put a warm body in that classroom.  Should it be just anyone?

This whole matter of student lives, lived constructively or otherwise from birth to death, was what made the debate about "relevance" so vital to real improvement in education, both in terms of Kindergarten-through-12th-grade education and college/ university education.  If education is about life, then improved education ought to result in improved life.  Now, back in 1983, the trend-setting "A Nation At Risk" report (as released by the Reagan administration) tried to confuse the issue here -- said report attempted to address the concern that the "United States' educational system was failing to meet the national need for a competitive workforce (Wikipedia)".  Never mind that there never was, or is, such a "national need," not when the nation-states were (and are) proxies for a world-system run by a transnational capitalist class.  At any rate, my example of "A Nation At Risk" is in itself really not all that relevant -- when elites work to attain public acquiescence in public school systems which aren't relevant to the needs of the students, any excuse will do.  In that light, we would do well to ignore forty years of bad "school reform" excuses, and bring the discussion back to "relevance."

Now, honestly, I'm not really sure why people have children anymore, given that world society has at present failed to solve its "capitalism" problem, with catastrophic consequences ahead.  You'd think that, when reflecting upon the distinct possibility that indefinite capitalism might produce runaway climate change (as we fail to mitigate it today), they'd think twice about bringing lots of babies into such a world.  And that's not to consider the exorbitant expense of raising children today.  Well, never mind -- I'm sure people have good, solid instrumental reasons for doing what they do, and so babies we are getting.  And so said babies must still be educated once they reach schooling age.  Or so our systems of mandatory public and economically-guided college education have determined.

From this survey of the irrationality of the system I would like to return, once again, to the issue prompted by the ruling itself -- which is to say, equal educational opportunity.  From the Wall Street Journal's piece on this ruling:

In Tuesday's decision in Vergara v. California, Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Rolf M. Treu cited the Supreme Court's 1954 Brown v. Board of Education "separate but equal" ruling, writing that the laws in this case "impose a real and appreciable impact on the students' fundamental right to equality of education."
The rather curious claim by Rolf M. Treu, here, is that teacher empowerment has a nontrivial negative effect upon "equal educational opportunity" such that the Court is obliged to strike down teacher tenure laws as a remedy.  Now, of course, one is justified in asking about the economic hypotheses of economists such as Raj Chetty, whose work was used by the plaintiffs in Vergara v. California, and whose methodologies appear to have been both badly written and badly interpreted in producing the Superior Court's decision in Vergara v. California.  

And, of course, there's the hidden assumption in the Treu argument that the tenured teachers somehow produce the lowest-performing students, an assumption which goes against all of my own personal experience with public school systems.  My experience, mostly as a substitute teacher (which means I was able to see a variety of different systems), tells me that tenured teachers typically migrate toward nice upper-class schools where the students will do well regardless of how they teach.  But we might also ask about how a body of social science created to distinguish "good" teachers from "bad" teachers can be so blind to the role of social class as a predictor of the future success of students.  

I keep waiting for the clear evidence that is supposed to refute the claims made in Annette Lareau's Unequal Childhoods -- that differences in income result in differences in parenting styles, which themselves result in differences in outcome for students of different social classes.  I haven't seen it yet.  At any rate, I'm sure all of the popular researchers ignore Lareau while festooning attention upon Chetty because there's no money in showing how social class itself, and not the sum of "bad teachers," is the origin of America's problem with social class.

At any rate, "remedies" are always where one wishes to find them.  Relevant remedies, however, have to be in places where talk addresses the whole of life itself, and isn't just a vehicle to attain acquiescence in profit schemes. Treu's decision in Vergara v. California, as a vehicle for official mythology, is part of the latter category of talk.  Meanwhile, the financial vultures circle the prostrate body of the public school system, looking for money here and money there.

(also up at Firedoglake.com)

Originally posted to The Rebel Alliance on Wed Jun 11, 2014 at 04:00 PM PDT.

Also republished by California politics and Community Spotlight.

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  Good Diary...couple of things (17+ / 0-)

    First off, don't forget the education technology piece here as well...it is the vehicle whereby the corporatism will enter the classroom...

    Neil Selwyn's Distrusting Educational Technology and Joel Spring's Education Networks: Power, Wealth, Cyberspace and the Digital Mind both address this.  If you haven't seen it, two things to review are the Hoover Institution's Terry Moe talking about the confluence of ed tech, the death of the teaching profession in about as open a way as I have seen:  http://www.hoover.org/...

    Also, see the Knewton video--starts off with the chilling phrase

    "So, the human race is about to enter a totally data-mined existence."

    As far as the decision goes, in the post-trial brief, the defense is claiming:

    "Plaintiffs have not established that the statutes have ever caused them any harm or are likely to do so in the future. None of the nine named Plaintiffs established that he or she was assigned to an allegedly grossly ineffective teacher, or that he or she faces any immediate risk of future harm, as a result of the challenged statutes. The record contains no evidence that Plaintiffs Elliott, Liss, Campbell or Martinez were ever assigned a grossly ineffective teacher at all. Of the remaining five Plaintiffs, most of the teachers whom they identified as “bad” or “grossly ineffective” were excellent teachers. Because none of the five Plaintiffs are reliable evaluators of teacher performance, their testimony about the remaining purportedly ineffective teachers should not be credited. Nor could Plaintiffs link their assignment to purportedly “bad” or “grossly ineffective” teachers to the challenged statutes. Not a single witness claimed that any of Plaintiffs’ teachers were granted permanent status because of the two-year probationary period, would have been dismissed in the absence of the dismissal statutes, or would have been laid off had reverse seniority not been a factor in layoffs. Indeed, Plaintiffs did not call any administrator of any of Plaintiffs’ schools to corroborate their testimony or in any way connect the teachers they identified to the statutes they challenge. Furthermore, any threat of future harm to Plaintiffs caused by the challenged statutes is purely speculative. Plaintiffs Elliott and DeBose are high school seniors who will almost certainly graduate in spring 2014. Plaintiffs Monterroza and Martinez both attend charter schools that are not subject to the challenged statutes at all. Beatriz and Elizabeth Vergara both attend a “Pilot School” in LAUSD that is free to let teachers go at the end of the school year for any reason, including ineffectiveness. As for the remaining three Plaintiffs, there is no concrete, specific evidence supporting any claim that they will be assigned to grossly ineffective teachers due to the challenged statutes; instead, their claims are based on pure speculation."
    What a mess.

    To be free and just depends on us. Victor Hugo.

    by dizzydean on Wed Jun 11, 2014 at 04:42:23 PM PDT

    •  Now in looking at "data-mining" (9+ / 0-)

      I would mine the whole technological effort for its "data" (i.e. prior assumptions) about how it constructs the student -- is the student in any sense free to not consume?

      "Our society is run by insane people for insane objectives." -- John Lennon

      by Cassiodorus on Wed Jun 11, 2014 at 05:02:32 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Not in this brave new world..the student is (11+ / 0-)

        to provide data and said data will be sold to third parties so they can establish brand loyalty at as early an age as possible.  

        The sad part is (and Selwyn discusses this) that not all of the reformers are corporatists--they started in the land of open source software and saw ed tech as a way to bring about anti-authoritarian classrooms, providing a way for the vision of Dewey and Freire to come to fruition.  The problem is that the devices themselves are laden with ideology--they promote an individualistic and consumerist type of education which does not provide for deep thinking.  

        By decentralizing the classroom and pushing "student centered" learning, they actually develop a more authoritarian-prone student, who sees not need for the common good...

        To be free and just depends on us. Victor Hugo.

        by dizzydean on Wed Jun 11, 2014 at 05:13:45 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  The post trial brief - Wow! (7+ / 0-)

      How were the plaintiffs ever granted standing to bring the suit?

    •  That Knewton video is one of the (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Cassiodorus, Egalitare

      scariest things I've seen in a long time. Think of what it could result in if applied to higher education (it's already entrenched at Arizona State):

      No more professors using their own knowledge to write their own syllabi or lectures or do their own grading (not only would it be unnecessary, but that would get in the way of Pearson). Professors will continue to exist, but only in very small numbers at the handful of Ivy League institutions serving the privileged 1%. The rest of the population will attend Phoenix U-type "labs" in industrial parks or strip malls.

      Instruction will be "flipped" to the utmost so that all learning occurs on the students' home time and the class session can be devoted entirely to standardized testing. To rack up enough data points for Knewton to continue customize learning material standardized testing will have to be constant.

      "Instruction" wouldn't even need adjuncts knowledgeable in the subject-- just a supervisor/tender to make sure students' terminals are working and passing out to them their "personally customized" lesson packets produced by Pearson.

      Knewton would have in its data banks a cumulative personal learning profile for every student, showing the thousands of concepts the student encountered and aced or failed. This profile could follow the graduate through the rest of his life and be used by employers far more "precisely" than grade transcripts to fit graduates to jobs according to their Cognitive Task ratings. (NB: the Knewton CEO in the video confesses the movie Gattaca just fascinates him.)    

  •  To anyone who has set foot in a classroom in (13+ / 0-)

    the past several years, this is patently absurd:

    The singular, official mythology in support of "school reform" is that teaching is absurdly easy, because all teaching is really just pouring facts into heads, which (supposedly) any adult can do.
    Teaching well is hard, hard work!  You have to get them to respect you and then re-engage their little minds about every 10 minutes.

    (NOT a teacher, just a volunteer!)

    ...Son, those Elephants always look out for themselves. If you happen to get a crumb or two from their policies, it's a complete coincidence. -Malharden's Dad

    by slowbutsure on Wed Jun 11, 2014 at 04:55:17 PM PDT

    •  And, ultimately inhospitable to teaching science. (6+ / 0-)

      ". . . just pouring facts into heads . . ." is as far from actually teaching and learning science as one can get.  Science is not received wisdom.  While much background needs to be taught that way, treating it as a mere acquisition of fact provides no education about the conduct of science.

      Ah well, treat education as merely the acquisition of fact and we might as well produce the capitalist's wet dream of Rosumovi Univerzální Roboti.

      •  I call it memorization as opposed to learning... (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        spacecadet1, caul, P E Outlier

        memorizing facts seems to be the technique de jour these days.  Memorize this formula, memorize these names and dates, memorize this spelling...  Everything is about remembering for the test.

        Seldom do they teach my kids to understand WHY there was an American revolution (if they did, maybe Tea Partiers would understand that the tea party was about lack of actual representation rather than the taxes themselves).  Seldom do they teach WHY a formula works (if they teach it at all.  They do not even teach kids how to find the square root of a number any more).   It is all about passing a test and the information is forgotten as soon as said test is over.  Is it better to practice times tables over and over again until you get an 80% on a test and then allow them to use calculators from that point forward in the interest of time?  Or... is it better to constantly reinforce that foundation of mathmatics, show different ways to do math in your head, show practical applications like in shopping or building a playhouse and take longer but make sure the skills are mastered?

        Education should be slow and deliberate and seek to acheive mastery of fewer skills rather than exposure to lots of skills.  Learning how to learn and to love learning is the most important job of a true educator.  That cannot be measured on any existing proficiency test.

        "Perhaps the sentiments contained in the following pages, are not YET sufficiently fashionable to procure them general favour..."

        by Buckeye Nut Schell on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 09:19:29 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Exactly (0+ / 0-)

          But then, you are fighting the idea that education should be "training."  I hear the canard that people need to be trained for jobs far too frequently and I am sick of it.  I'd argue that an education is far more important than training because it is more generally applicable.

          To me, it seems that corporations want a set of narrow skills rather than taking an educated person, a person who has been shown to have the ability to learn within a discipline, and train them in their specific and necessary skills.  I have seen trained people, many of which cannot think past their training, whereas the educated people I've worked with, even if their current work is not in their specific discipline, contribute in novel, and frequently, more effective and efficient ways.

    •  And even harder in the poorest schools! n/t (4+ / 0-)

      America, where a rising tide lifts all boats! Unless you don't have a boat...uh...then it lifts all who can swim! Er, uh...um...and if you can't swim? SHAME ON YOU!

      by Back In Blue on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 05:47:04 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  The reformers see teaching very differently than (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Sparhawk

      what the diary claims in

      The singular, official mythology in support of "school reform" is that teaching is absurdly easy, because all teaching is really just pouring facts into heads, which (supposedly) any adult can do.
      I have never seen reform advocates say anything even close to the above.

      If teaching was very easy, there is little difference between the least effective and the most effective, so little is to be gained by removing the least effective - so having tenure or not matters very little.  The view that teaching is easy is much more consistent with those wanting tenure.

      The reformers consistently assert that there is a very big difference in how much more students benefit from highly effective teachers than with the least effective.

      The most important way to protect the environment is not to have more than one child.

      by nextstep on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 08:18:49 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  That may be their words, but their actions belie (5+ / 0-)

        their words.

        See TFA. Their entire premise, that any young college grad can, in five weeks, learn to be an effective teacher, is being used to break unions (and therefore tenure).

        TFA is an important component of the "reform" platform.

        •  TFA does not use "any" young college grad (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Be Skeptical

          They are very selective.  

          Large scale studies on TFA effectiveness are starting to come out.  Full studies would need to consider, the effectiveness of TFA teachers Vs other new teachers in the same schools.  In addition it should measure how effective TFA teachers who are still teaching after 5 years, compare to teachers who entered the same schools at the same time.

          I don't like reports commissioned by TFA, advocacy groups or unions, I prefer those from Dept of Ed.

          In a recent Dept of Education Study see http://ies.ed.gov/... it stated:

          The study had two main findings, one for each program studied:

          1. TFA teachers were more effective than the teachers with whom they were compared. On average, students assigned to TFA teachers scored 0.07 standard deviations higher on end-of-year math assessments than students assigned to comparison teachers, a statistically significant difference. This impact is equivalent to an additional 2.6 months of school for the average student nationwide.

          2. Teaching Fellows were neither more nor less effective than the teachers with whom they were compared. On average, students of Teaching Fellows and students of comparison teachers had similar scores on end-of-year math assessments.

          But this is just one study, more are needed to be useful in making public policy decisions.

          Some TFA supporters do so from an anti-union bias, others do so from a view of trying different approaches to improve education at significantly underperforming schools.

          The most important way to protect the environment is not to have more than one child.

          by nextstep on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 01:05:44 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  TfA: (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Egalitare, caul, Odysseus, JerryNA

            https://www.jacobinmag.com/...

            After twenty years of sending academically gifted but untrained college graduates into the nation’s toughest schools, the evidence regarding TFA corps member effectiveness is in, and it is decidedly mixed. Professors of education Julian Vasquez Heilig and Su Jin Jez, in the most thorough survey of such research yet, found that TFA corps members tend to perform equal to teachers in similar situations—that is, they do as well as new teachers lacking formal training assigned to impoverished schools. Sometimes they do better, particularly in math instruction. Yet “the students of novice TFA teachers perform significantly less well,” Vasquez Heilig and Jin Jez discovered, “than those of credentialed beginning teachers.” It seems clear that TFA’s vaunted thirty-day summer institute—TFA “boot camp”—is no replacement for the preparation given future teachers at traditional colleges of education.

            "Our society is run by insane people for insane objectives." -- John Lennon

            by Cassiodorus on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 01:57:32 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  Don't blame me -- (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        caul

        if you don't see what's going on.

        If teaching was very easy, there is little difference between the least effective and the most effective
        But it's that little difference they claim makes all of the difference.  The tenured teachers who are the target of Treu, Students Matter, and their billionaire backers are supposedly lazy because (ostensibly) tenure law protects them.  The reasoning goes that if they were motivated by the fear of losing their jobs, they'd work harder at stuffing those facts into those young heads.  This is why these people would prefer TfA teachers to tenured ones.

        "Our society is run by insane people for insane objectives." -- John Lennon

        by Cassiodorus on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 12:46:56 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I think their view of how teacher quality improves (0+ / 0-)

          comes not from fear motivating people to work better (although this is a secondary effect), but mainly by replacing teachers who are seen as being in the bottom 5%, 10% or 20% with new teachers - who on average will perform better than those they replace.

          The most important way to protect the environment is not to have more than one child.

          by nextstep on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 01:11:06 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Which is still a load of crap. (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            caul, Odysseus, JerryNA

            Enron fired its bottom 10% every year, and history's verdict on Enron wasn't a good one.

            Everyone knows that "performance" is tied so strongly to class position that all the other factors melt away.  Why continue the pretense?

            "Our society is run by insane people for insane objectives." -- John Lennon

            by Cassiodorus on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 01:54:13 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Problem at Enron was financial fraud at the top (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Be Skeptical

              It has nothing to do with personnel strategy.

              The most important way to protect the environment is not to have more than one child.

              by nextstep on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 01:58:29 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  The problem with "school reform" is... (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                caul, JerryNA

                fraud at the top!

                http://dianeravitch.net/...

                So whaddaya know!

                "Our society is run by insane people for insane objectives." -- John Lennon

                by Cassiodorus on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 02:03:02 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  You seriously think student performance (0+ / 0-)

                  wouldn't increase if the worst 10% of teachers were replaced?  Jeeez...

                  •  Turnover is already pretty bad (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    caul

                    in the "worst" schools.  You want there to be even less continuity in the lives of lower-class students?

                    "Our society is run by insane people for insane objectives." -- John Lennon

                    by Cassiodorus on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 10:03:00 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  Yes, if it's the worst who are being turned over (0+ / 0-)

                      No question about it.  Why should any student, rich or poor, have to endure a crappy teacher?  I'd rather take my chances with someone new than a proven loser.

                      Not to say that better initiatives to improve teacher retention at the toughest schools aren't needed.  Keep the good ones longer and get rid of the bad ones sooner.

                      •  Do you even know what happens (0+ / 0-)

                        in lower-income schools?

                        As someone upthread noted: take some of the "bad" teachers and put them in schools where the students have parents with decent incomes, and you'll see "bad" teachers become "good" ones right away.

                        "Our society is run by insane people for insane objectives." -- John Lennon

                        by Cassiodorus on Fri Jun 13, 2014 at 10:01:24 AM PDT

                        [ Parent ]

                        •  You think we can't tell good teachers from bad (0+ / 0-)

                          within the same schools?  I am not talking about some meaningless idiotic comparisons of teachers in rich schools vs poor schools.  Admit, you know who the worst 10% are at your school.  The students know.  The parents know.  They are the ones who clear out at 3:15 every day, who use the same error-ridden handouts year after year, whose students think they're a joke, the ones who don't return parents' calls or emails, the ones who show videos the last month of school, the ones who take long weekends so they don't have to drive back from their weekend excursion on Sunday afternoon, the ones who insult students, the ones who can't be bothered to give actual feedback on writing assignments (if they even give writing assignments), the ones who routinely give quizzes with five matching questions and five choices so that every student gets either an A or an F, the ones who just aren't very smart, the ones who spend large blocks of class time noodling on their smart phones in class while their students do the same, the ones who are just plain not suited for teaching.

                          It's frustrating you can't even agree with my simple points.  If teachers cannot cop to the fact that there other teachers who should be canned then I am not optimistic their pleading for better treatment will be well received.

                          •  I no longer teach at public schools. (0+ / 0-)

                            Do you?

                            I keep repeating the same argument over and over again, with no real response from the "other side," which can't seem to recognize that I'm talking about them.

                            Yeah, that's right, I"M TALKING ABOUT YOU.  I've been talking about you and your billionaire patrons from the moment I began to write this diary.  There may be "bad teachers" and "good teachers" within any population of teachers, but the differences between the two are minimal when compared with the differences in educational outcome between students of different social classes.

                            And I keep repeating, over and over again, that pointing to the "bad teachers" (oooh and even erecting a stereotype of them, such as are of course vastly inappropriate to the actual conditions in which teachers find themselves; do you seriously think that any teacher working in a lower-class neighborhood could even spend a small portion of "class time noodling on their smart phones" without running into some serious classroom management problems?) over and over again (which is what YOU'RE doing) isn't going to solve the problem because the real problem with schooling is related to the class-based outcomes of schooling far, FAR more significantly than it is related to teacher quality in any sense.  Read some Jonathan Kozol -- any book will do, because they're all tightly researched and they all say the same thing.  Choose a recent volume so you don't end up dismissing the research contained within as "obsolete."  Then come back and tell us all where Kozol went wrong.

                            Now I know from great experience on the Internet that "persuasion" doesn't typically work, because the "other side" is hemmed in by cognitive dissonance.  They all reason that I have to be wrong, because to think otherwise would be to lose face.  Erving Goffman would tell you as much.  So let's go with some reverse psychology here.  Keep blaming the "bad teachers" and keep ignoring America's problem with social classes.  And I will continue to talk about you.  Let's see where it goes from there.

                            "Our society is run by insane people for insane objectives." -- John Lennon

                            by Cassiodorus on Fri Jun 13, 2014 at 10:54:12 AM PDT

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  I'm glad we agree (0+ / 0-)
                            There may be "bad teachers" and "good teachers" within any population of teachers
                            I know that was real hard.  Congrats.

                            As for my "stereotypes," I have direct personal knowledge of each and every one of those circumstances occurring in an urban public school with many poor students in the past year.  You seriously don't think it's easier to "control" a class by letting them screw around on their smart phones than it is to get them to pay attention to subject matter they're not interested in?  Uhhhhhh....
                            Maybe you're the one with no recent experience in the real world of public education.

                            As to the rest, well, I'll be happy when those fundamental changes come and I do what I can to make that happen.  In the meantime. I support any reasonable measures to improve our children's education, including, among other things, getting rid of bad teachers.

                          •  We still don't agree. (0+ / 0-)

                            And you still don't get it.

                            In the upper-class neighborhoods "bad teachers" don't matter.  The parents will guide their children through to the nice schools, and thereafter to the nice jobs.  They do that already now, regardless of the quality of teaching in their schools.

                            In the lower-class neighborhoods "bad teachers" may be precisely what the system asks for.  Giving handouts may be the only way said teachers can maintain classroom discipline, thus to pass inspection when the principal comes to visit.

                            At any rate, you must have missed this link in my diary --

                            http://www.theawl.com/...

                            There might be some difference in students' lives in being exposed to different teachers -- but it's pretty minimal.  So you just keep focusing on those trivial differences, while ignoring that 800-pound social class gorilla in the room.

                            As for your response to my comment, well, if the teachers are playing on their cellphones, how many students have cellphones too?  I gather there's no digital divide in your universe, in which case my answer for the upper-class neighborhoods stands.

                            "Our society is run by insane people for insane objectives." -- John Lennon

                            by Cassiodorus on Fri Jun 13, 2014 at 01:28:57 PM PDT

                            [ Parent ]

  •  Given the high turnover rate in high poverty (19+ / 0-)

    schools, I suspect many of those teachers are non tenured.  So the argument that tenure is the cause of the low student achievement is bogus. Most teachers don't stick around when the working conditions are such that they cannot be successful. Take an "ineffective"  teacher out of one of these schools and put them in an upper middle class school in the suburbs and watch how quickly they become "effective."

    “It is the job of the artist to think outside the boundaries of permissible thought and dare say things that no one else will say."—Howard Zinn

    by musiclady on Wed Jun 11, 2014 at 05:02:43 PM PDT

  •  The Decision (7+ / 0-)

    I did not find the opinion to be an attack on teachers.  The Court held that 3 statutes were unconstitutional under the CA Constitution.  First, a statute that made it more difficult to terminate teachers than other employees of schools was unconstitutional.  The Court asked why teachers should have more due process rights under the stature than under the Skelly decision in 1975, which afforded reasonably balanced due process before a termination could occur.  Second, the court found that the statute requiring a school district to make a tenure decision after only two years of teaching forced a school district to make an uniformed choice.  Third, the school found that the LIFO (last in first out) system used in layoffs did not take into account a teacher's effectiveness.  The decision did not invalidate all statutes that allow tenure or give teachers due process rights.  It enjoined these particular statutes, which the court found protected highly ineffective teachers too much.

    •  5 statutes (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      FogCityJohn

      "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White -6.00, -5.18

      by zenbassoon on Wed Jun 11, 2014 at 09:31:19 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Even if the decision itself appears innocuous -- (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Chi, spacecadet1

      the precedent it sets might not be.  Do judges have the right to make educational law based on offhand citations of civil rights precedent?

      "Our society is run by insane people for insane objectives." -- John Lennon

      by Cassiodorus on Wed Jun 11, 2014 at 10:20:47 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Judges were the driving force in changing marrage (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        in the Trees

        to reflect marrage equality in a similar way.  So the answer to your question is yes.

        The most important way to protect the environment is not to have more than one child.

        by nextstep on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 08:23:04 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  That's not educational law. (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          spacecadet1, caul

          So the answer is "no."

          "Our society is run by insane people for insane objectives." -- John Lennon

          by Cassiodorus on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 09:20:55 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Judges rule on all law, "education law" is not (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Be Skeptical, in the Trees

            exempt. Why do you think judges would not have the authority to rule on "education law", other than you not liking the result?

            The most important way to protect the environment is not to have more than one child.

            by nextstep on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 09:38:51 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Why do you think marriage law (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              caul

              is the same thing as educational law?  

              "Our society is run by insane people for insane objectives." -- John Lennon

              by Cassiodorus on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 10:22:31 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  The powers of judges is the same for all laws, (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Be Skeptical

                except for matters of general jurisdiction, such as a state judge cannot rule a federal law is unconstitutional.  

                While you may label some law as "educational law", "marriage law", securities law, real estate law, trademark law, etc., judges have the power to rule on these matters.  

                Consider for the moment, how would education law be enforced if judges did not have jurisdiction to rule upon its interpretation when different parties have disputes.

                The most important way to protect the environment is not to have more than one child.

                by nextstep on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 10:59:23 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  Marriage law -- (0+ / 0-)

                  doesn't involve an offhand citation of civil rights precedent.  The First Amendment guarantee of freedom of association has a well-established set of judicial precedents as regards freedom to marry, which apply well to gay marriage.  

                  Making new tenure laws while throwing out Brown as justification, on the other hand, is 1) illogical, 2) contrary to the evidence, and 3) unprecedented.  

                  (Never mind that the plaintiffs in this case didn't really establish standing, as per the comments upthread.)

                  There's a significant possibility this judge's ruling will be overturned.

                  "Our society is run by insane people for insane objectives." -- John Lennon

                  by Cassiodorus on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 11:06:32 AM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

    •  As someone who has direct experience (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      spacecadet1, caul, Odysseus

      I would say that lengthening the 2 year probationary period will have the effect of less supervision and mentoring of new teachers and more retention of questionable ones.

      Like that homework assignment that's due in two weeks, the evaluations will get pushed off to the final days.

      Fry, don't be a hero! It's not covered by our health plan!

      by elfling on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 08:04:18 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  In all these teacher ratings based on student test (0+ / 0-)

    scores, has anyone seen a system that looks at improvement in a students score over the year? Isn't that the metric that they should be attempting to measure? So far all the cases I have seen only look at the final results. Those who have designed this type of assessment deserve a huge fail grade in their logic. It's not like the students performance the preceding year is unknown. They are tracking everything.

    Using student test scores as a metric is at best dubious because teacher performance is not the largest factor in student performance. The largest factor is the parents' involvement (not necessarily their education level or class, but the interest they show in their child's education ) Using test scores relies on the assumption of all other things being equal- but they aren't. Sample (class) sizes aren't large enough or random enough to even these effects out.

    •  That's how they measure school improvement (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      mapamp, white blitz

      A school I taught at had quite a bit of growth, but "not enough", and so it was rated an "F" school.

      Even though ALL students made growth.

      You can't make a student jump three grade levels in one year.

      "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White -6.00, -5.18

      by zenbassoon on Wed Jun 11, 2014 at 09:32:42 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  "Improvement" is not measured per se (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      caul, Odysseus

      though they attempt to do so.

      Schools are expected to improve their overall score every year. This is independent of what may be happening with their students.

      There is an attempt to control for some socioeconomic factors.  However, it's a crude marker. If your kids are poor because they're the children of graduate students, it's a rather different situation than if they're poor because they're from migrant families and they change schools every 4 months.

      Some of the Value-Added Models (VAM) try to control by using last year's scores. So, Suzie got ranking 3/5 for 3rd grade and 3/5 for fourth grade, that's considered flat. However, the 4th grade material is completely different, so obviously she learned quite a bit over the year to get to 3/5.

      Meanwhile Jenny, who is a self-starter and reads constantly gets 5/5 every year regardless of who teaches her. No room for improvement, also no risk of failure.

      Clearly a better way would be by giving the kids pretests on the same material. But, kids are like Schrödinger's Cat, in that taking the measurement changes the outcome. Kids don't like to take tests they're not prepared for and it's harmful to set them up to fail or flail at one. Not to mention the time involved... and wait, why were we doing this? Oh, to ensure the children get the best teachers... we've kind of gone far afield of that.

      Some subjects and grades aren't tested, so again in the name of data completeness, you have states administering standardized tests to kindergarteners so those teachers can be 'evaluated' with this method too. Remember, these are kids without the motor skills to fill in a bubble test sheet.

      And you're quite right that over large sample sizes, some of these issues soften up and end up creating useful data. If your class size is 20 or 25, you need 5 classes or more of data before you have anything truly useful. Honestly, waiting 5 years to decide whether a teacher is effective is way too long.

      Fry, don't be a hero! It's not covered by our health plan!

      by elfling on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 08:15:43 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  It's much worse than you think: (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Cassiodorus, caul

      the ultimate purpose of standardized testing is not to rate a school or school district's performance over time, it's to rack up enough data points so the Learning Resource Provider (Pearson) can customize each students' next lesson. In other words, standardized testing must be constant, with tests administered in each subject every day.

  •  Why should anyone be surprised that (5+ / 0-)

    the White House comes out against due process for teachers.

    Whereas teachers had the President's back in the last two elections, he has not had ours.

    With friends like these ...

    A proud member of the Professional Left since 1967.

    by slatsg on Wed Jun 11, 2014 at 08:37:02 PM PDT

  •  Brilliantly done. Shared with the (4+ / 0-)

    Badass Teacher Association.

    "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White -6.00, -5.18

    by zenbassoon on Wed Jun 11, 2014 at 09:25:23 PM PDT

  •  Press release going out tomorrow: (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Unitary Moonbat, mapamp

    "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White -6.00, -5.18

    by zenbassoon on Wed Jun 11, 2014 at 09:29:16 PM PDT

  •  Vergara explained (6+ / 0-)

    "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White -6.00, -5.18

    by zenbassoon on Wed Jun 11, 2014 at 09:30:19 PM PDT

    •  Not true (0+ / 0-)

      We understand very well and our communities no longer wish to support a failed concept.

      Yeah, blame parents and students for speaking up. Teachers are never the problem. That sure is a winning strategy to deflect the issue.

      Oh wait.

      Bad teachers and tenure is a problem and will be going away.

      Thank God.

      •  The official ideology emerges! (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        caul

        Did you even bother to read any of my diary's links?

        "Our society is run by insane people for insane objectives." -- John Lennon

        by Cassiodorus on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 12:50:22 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  This one -- (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          caul

          "Our society is run by insane people for insane objectives." -- John Lennon

          by Cassiodorus on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 12:51:44 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  I read and have experienced more than you. (0+ / 0-)

          This hatred of the students and parents who won this fight speaks volumes of how teacher union supporters feel about taxpayers and our children. It's all about the poor teachers for your ilk.

          It's amazing that we never hear about the students from your side. It's all about you and your fight to protect an antiquated and ridiculous system that's harmed our kids.

          But keep finding more excuses as to why many poor and minority citizens are rebelling against teachers unions. Keep up the insults and bs. We will just keep organizing, going to court, and change this unfair system. Your side is losing period.

          •  You don't know anything about me. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            caul

            And your "righteousness" is as transparently phony as is the "reform" cases of the billionaires who fund your "cause."

            Here's an additional appetizer for the secondary audience.  From Fredrik DeBoer's blog:

            http://fredrikdeboer.com/...

            Part of the deal for teachers for years has been accepting lower salary– and, increasingly, little respect, particularly from the media– in exchange for job security. With the demise of tenure, that attraction would be gone. So that’s suppose to get more talented people into the system… how, exactly? I cannot understand that logic. Teacher attrition is sky-high, with best estimates of between 40-50% leaving the profession within five years of starting. That amounts to something like a thousand teachers quitting for every school day of a given year. Anecdotally speaking, most successful, Ivy League striver-types do not consider teaching as a serious option. But why would they, when there’s so many more remunerative, less stressful, less emotionally grueling, and better respected options out there? If your argument is that a profession’s problems stems from a talent deficit, you should be doing everything to make the job more attractive, not less.
            DeBoer points out the obvious from another angle -- complaints about lousy teachers look pretty fatuous when coming from those whose trumpeted solution is to smash the teacher's unions.  

            "Our society is run by insane people for insane objectives." -- John Lennon

            by Cassiodorus on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 03:38:16 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  Let me ask you this, O Great Expert: (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            caul, Cassiodorus

            What happens when a teacher gets fired for being gay?

            What happens when a teacher gets fired for giving the star athlete an F?

            What happens when a teacher gets fired for becoming pregnant?

            What happens when a teacher gets fired for fighting to get a service for a disabled student that costs the school district a ton of money?

            Google "teacher fired for" and you'll be surprised at the little and petty things some teachers get fired for.

            Like the teacher who got fired for breaking up a fight.

            How do you prevent these from happening?

            The Civil Service Protections more commonly known as "tenure"

            "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White -6.00, -5.18

            by zenbassoon on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 10:52:04 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Teachers should get the same civil service (0+ / 0-)

              protections and due process that other professional-level public employees get.  No more, no less.

              I don't think many people would be opposed to that.  

              •  They do right now. It's called TENURE (0+ / 0-)

                "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White -6.00, -5.18

                by zenbassoon on Fri Jun 13, 2014 at 11:01:39 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  If so, fine (0+ / 0-)

                  However, it doesn't take years to fire other civil servants.  Teachers should have the same due process mechanisms, and they should work in a timely fashion.

                  As I've said before, I don't think public school teachers are well served by continuing to call those fundamental job protections "tenure."

                  •  It doesn't take "years". What they do is they (0+ / 0-)

                    add on court time if the person who got fired decides to appeal and take the case to court.

                    Which is how long it takes ANYONE in that situation.

                    The difference is that teachers have the union to hire the lawyers.

                    Other people are on their own.

                    MOST teachers, once the writing is on the wall, will accept their fate.

                    "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White -6.00, -5.18

                    by zenbassoon on Fri Jun 13, 2014 at 12:29:53 PM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  Most public servants get representation (0+ / 0-)

                      Certainly in California they do.  If it takes years to fire an incompetent prison guard or microbiologist or park ranger than that's a problem too.

                      A process that takes years for those who use all their options for appeal is not a functional process.  

      •  Have some more research: (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        caul, Cassiodorus

        "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White -6.00, -5.18

        by zenbassoon on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 10:45:17 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Comparing, of course -- (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Odysseus, Be Skeptical

          a low-income state such as Mississippi with a high-income state such as Massachusetts.  Harvard University isn't in Mississippi, right?  It's good to focus upon the underlying reality that the war on teacher tenure is a class war.

          "Our society is run by insane people for insane objectives." -- John Lennon

          by Cassiodorus on Fri Jun 13, 2014 at 05:32:18 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  And one more thing: (0+ / 0-)

        "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --M. L. King "You can't fix stupid" --Ron White -6.00, -5.18

        by zenbassoon on Fri Jun 13, 2014 at 08:00:35 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Nailed it! The lesson in "Capitalist Discipline" (5+ / 0-)

    isn't just for teachers, either. Ideologically, it's part of a broader narrative that empowering workers through unions, or even paying them a living minimum wage, is economically "inefficient" (which just means that the top's share of socially-created wealth is smaller than it would like).  Simultaneously, the decision strikes a a practical and concrete blow against a political target (teachers' unions) and a community institution (public schools) that support ideals of community and citizenship that undermine the ideal conditions for rabid capitalism.

  •  did teachers who voted for Kasich in OH learn??? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Cassiodorus, KJG52

    did they learn their lesson?

    or were they taken by neo liberalism bullshit?

    One final question. Are you optimistic about the future of the left and of progressive politics in general?

    It is impossible to be on the left and at the same time surrender to the normalization of a dystopian vision. One has to be optimistic, but also realistic. This means that there is no room for a kind of romanticized utopianism. Instead, one has to be motivated by a faith in the willingness of young people principally to fight for a future in which dignity, equality and justice matter and at the same time recognize the forces that are preventing such a struggle. More specifically, hope has to be fed by the need for collective action. Power is never completely on the side of domination and resistance is not a luxury but a necessity.

    "Power is never completely on the side of domination and resistance is not a luxury but a necessity."

    As Stanley Aronowitz has argued the left has to engage the issue of economic inequality, overcome its fragmentation, develop an international social formation for radical democracy and the defense of the public good, undertake ways to finance itself, take seriously the educative nature of politics and the need to change the way people think, and develop a comprehensive notion of politics and a vision to match. History is open, though the gates are closing fast. The issue for me personally is not whether I am pessimistic, but how am I going to use whatever intellectual resources I have to make it harder to prevent various events and problems from getting worse while at the same time struggling for a society in which the promise of democracy appears on the horizon of possibility.

    An interview of Henry Giroux. The questions are in bold.

    The Specter of Authoritarianism and the Future of the Left: An Interview With Henry A. Giroux

    •  more from Henry Giroux (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      KJG52, grimjc, hlsmlane, Cassiodorus
      What we have seen in the United States and a number of other countries since the 1970s is the emergence of a savage form of free market fundamentalism, often called neoliberalism, in which there is not only a deep distrust of public values, public goods and public institutions but the embrace of a market ideology that accelerates the power of the financial elite and big business while gutting those formative cultures and institutions necessary for a democracy to survive.
      note, this goes beyond "more and better democrats"
      The commanding institutions of society in many countries, including the United States, are now in the hands of powerful corporate interests, the financial elite and right-wing bigots whose strangulating control over politics renders democracy corrupt and dysfunctional. Of course, what is unique about the United States is that the social contract and social wage are subject to a powerful assault by the right-wing politicians and anti-public intellectuals from both political parties. Those public spheres and institutions that support social provisions, the public good and keep public value alive are under sustained attack. Such attacks have not only produced a range of policies that have expanded the misery, suffering and hardships of millions of people, but have also put into place a growing culture of cruelty in which those who suffer the misfortunes of poverty, unemployment, low skill jobs, homelessness and other social problems are the object of both humiliation and scorn.

      Neoliberal societies, in general, are in a state of war - a war waged by the financial and political elite against youth, low-income groups, the elderly, poor minorities of color, the unemployed, immigrants and others now considered disposable. Liberty and freedom are now reduced to fodder for inane commercials or empty slogans used to equate capitalism with democracy. At the same time, liberty and civil rights are being dismantled while state violence and institutional racism is now spreading throughout the culture like wildfire, especially with regards to police harassment of young black and brown youth. A persistent racism can also be seen in the attack on voting rights laws, the mass incarceration of African-American males, and the overt racism that has become prominent among right-wing Republicans and Tea Party types, most of which is aimed at President Obama

  •  Plutocrats are buying public education (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Egalitare

    CTU put out a statement about Vergers that everyone should read here:

    http://michaelklonsky.blogspot.com/

    It must be nice to be a wealthy tech mogul like David Welch. When you want to “prove” a theory, you just go get someone else’s kids to be the guinea pigs. When you want to “prove” a theory, you conveniently omit the most relevant and direct causes of harm. Such was the case in this week’s California lawsuit decision against tenure for teachers. Fortunately, our Constitution and legal system have clear protections for speech and structured processes for appeal so that we non-billionaires have an opportunity to air the facts.
  •  My son got a TFA teacher (6+ / 0-)

    for fourth grade.  She was awful.  She was terrible at communicating with her students because she never "checked in" to make sure they understood her expectations.  As a result, he brought home incompletes and bad grades. His confidence in himself vanished.  He told me in tears that he'd never be able to understand, he'd never pass 4th grade, and he'd never graduate high school or go to college.  At the teacher conference the teacher seemed harrassed and overwhelmed.  Her attitude about my son was, "I'm sorry, but I have so much to get through this semester, I don't have time to help him catch up.  Have you thought about having him see the school counselor?"
    So this TFA employee saw it as her job to push a set amount of knowledge into her students' brains by a certain deadline.  When those brains didn't cooperate, she had no idea what to do.
    After that, I asked the principal to move my son to a different classroom.

    "YOPP!" --Horton Hears a Who

    by Reepicheep on Thu Jun 12, 2014 at 08:40:59 AM PDT

  •  judge in CA case deserves F (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Cassiodorus, caul, Odysseus

    Teacher tenure case: Another sign the judge's ruling deserves an F

    As Ravitch points out, lawyers for the unions intervening in the case checked out the records of the teachers of the nine plaintiffs, who were all California public school students. "Two of the plaintiffs attend charter schools, where there is no tenure or seniority," she observes. Two others (the Vergara sisters) attend a pilot school in the Los Angeles Unified School District where teachers can be dismissed for any reason, including "ineffectiveness."

    In other words, their teachers weren't even subject to the rules on teacher dismissal they were challenging.

    and,

    if the judge is this full of it, need due process for dismissal

  •  Equal chance to get a poor education (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Cassiodorus

    Judge Treu has cleared the way for everyone to have a weal compliant teacher.

    "And all I ask is a merry yarn from a laughing fellow-rover, And quiet sleep and a sweet dream when the long trick’s over." - John Masefield

    by mungley on Fri Jun 13, 2014 at 07:03:54 AM PDT

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site