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Watching Grumpy Grandpa McCain try to explain how we won the war in Iraq, but somehow failed in Iraq at the same time and now have to go back in and, what, re-win it? It was interesting to watch him try and navigate through that tortured reasoning, even a little bit comical in a dark, cynical way, sort of a crazy neo-con blast from the bloody past. But here's what sets civil war in Iraq apart from Syria or Libya:

Five of the six major fields, together representing several million barrels per day of potential output, went to European, Russian and Asian oil companies. It looked as though not much was going to companies from the United States, the country that took the leading role in the war. But read the fine print of those contracts, and companies more familiar to Americans are now poised to benefit handsomely as the oil business picks up in Iraq.

The oil services companies Halliburton, Baker Hughes, Weatherford International and Schlumberger already won lucrative drilling subcontracts and are likely to bid on many more in one of the world’s richest markets for companies that drill oil wells.

When comparing the cost of alternative energy produced from renewable, green sources to traditional fossil fuels, isn't it about time we start including the two or three trillion dollars we've spent keeping oil flowing from places like Iraq, or the other trillion or two that neo-con fossils would have us spend going forward?
  • There's been a debate, at times heated, about dinos: were some hot-blooded, others cold-blooded? The latest idea is they were 'tweeners.
  • A new study suggests at least 10,000 people have committed suicide thanks to the Great Recession:
    “Suicides are just the tip of the iceberg,” said co-author David Stuckler. “These data reveal a looming mental health crisis in Europe and North America. In these hard economic times, this research suggests it is critical to look for ways of protecting those who are likely to be hardest hit.”
  • Before Young Earth old testament literalists have a field days, some sobering facts about Earth's newly discovered "underground" ocean, it's barely even water. It's certainly not an ocean as we know them up here on the surface:
    "It's no longer liquid water that we're talking about at these great depths. The weight of hundreds of kilometers of rock and very high temperatures above 1,000 degrees Celsius (1,832 Fahrenheit) break down water into its components. And it's not accessible. It's not a resource in any way," Jacobsen added.

Originally posted to Daily Kos on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 06:00 AM PDT.

Also republished by SciTech.

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Comment Preferences

  •  This (23+ / 0-)

    could be a sweet video project if the original song by Eon, The Spice Must Flow, were set to raw flickering images and/or realist art portraying the endless, tragic consequences of unending energy/resource-warfare.

    •  old Dune on BBC last night (8+ / 0-)

      I was caught watching Dune the 1984, not great film of a great book last night. - My adult sons who don't live here dropped in. One is moving because of new job the other is up from law school to help. - I expected nerd derision but they having read the book and watched this old movie fell into a nostalgia fest. Later deriding me for my experimental cooking, Erik regaling his girl friend with mostly elaborated tales of how I am banned from meatloaf.
      Turning to the analogy: we are capable of requiring no imports of oil from Middle East. We could spur a new economy by pressing aggressively for new energy combined with new efficiencies. Our thinking the oil in the Middle East is a strategic resource is neocon nostalgia dream, we need to move to a new reality. Let us leave behind the House Harkonnen of GOP/Tea neocons; we can overwhelm them with the numerous yet invisible Fremen. - All we have to do is go vote in the midterm a revolutionary empire shaking act. We do not even have to drink the vile liquid water of life to accomplish this.  

      The past, present, and future are equally compelling; none of the three are easily understood.

      by Grey Panther on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 06:49:28 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Thanks DarkSyde (7+ / 0-)

    I voted Tuesday, May 6, 2014 because it is my right, my responsibility and because my parents moved from Alabama to Ohio to vote. Unfortunately, the republicons want to turn Ohio into Alabama.

    by a2nite on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 06:08:16 AM PDT

  •  And, oh - the oceans are tiny. Really... (7+ / 0-)

    Have a look at All the Water On Earth

    The oceans are but a tiny veil of moisture on our planet.

    And yes - this picture may help to understand why even a partial melting of the Greenland or Antarctic ice shields will have a real impact on the amount of water in the oceans...

    Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away. -- Philip K. Dick

    by RandomGuyFromGermany on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 06:10:19 AM PDT

    •  The Crust Is Soaked (6+ / 0-)

      I don't know why anyone would think that finding moist layers deep inside the crust is proof of anything except that water runs downhill.

      The exact nature of the moisture is worth scientific investigation, but it's not "an ocean" any more than the Antarctic's ice cap is an ocean. Indeed, the ice cap is very much closer to becoming an ocean, by melting, than these moist layers ever will be.

      Besides, the Earth is flat - god* sez!

      * For some values of "god". Your mileage may vary. Void where prohibited by proof.

      "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

      by DocGonzo on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 06:30:51 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Let Eurasia Fight ISIL (9+ / 0-)
    Five of the six major fields, together representing several million barrels per day of potential output, went to European, Russian and Asian oil companies.

    So let the EU, Russia and Asia send troops to fight ISIL which is threatening to grab their oil. Let Iraq get military support from Iran, which is right next door and bases its power on being the capital of the Shiites who ISIL is massacring in Iraq.

    ISIL is not our enemy. If those many other countries, each with their own oil at stake and their own huge military budgets and forces, can't defeat their own existential enemies in their own backyards, then maybe the US should as a last resort do something about a jihad that could eventually in principle threaten the US.

    I damn well don't want Obama sending even US airstrikes to keep the paradigmatic dumb war going for a goddamn third round. Not again and again, not to protect Halliburton, Baker Hughes, Weatherford International and Schlumberger as if those are "national security".

    If he does, I defy any of his many Democratic cheerleaders to deny that we are indeed in Bush's fourth term. Indeed, counting Iraq War Sr under the first Bush, and the power the NSA had then (and the recession Bush wouldn't get us out of - and hey, the unprosecuted Savings & Loan heist banksters too) we'll really be in Bush's fifth term.

    Chump change you can believe in.

    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

    by DocGonzo on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 06:13:53 AM PDT

    •  Excellent (7+ / 0-)

      point Doc. Aside from the futility of a finite, dirty energy resource fueling a technological culture growing geometrically, how did we get stuck with lion's share of the steep military price that pays for propping it all up?

      It's like this Cold War debt we keep having to pay even though that simmering conflict is now two decades past. It's not just the cost and loss of life and limb, it's annoying when other 0.1 percenters in other parts of the world triangulate against us while benefiting enormously from stable oil prices, many profit hugely from it, and then they get to mount up on their high horse and denounce our entire nation.

    •  Are you sure they're not our enemy? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      palantir

      We seem to be their enemy, and, we should have learned from 9/11, Benghazi, Nairobi, Tanzania, Karachi, the US Cole, etc that people like this, with a base to work from and resources to work with, can hit us hard if they want to.

      These guys might just want to.

      LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

      by dinotrac on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 06:25:23 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Everyone's Our Enemy, Eh Neocon? (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        annieli, palantir

        The US is the top gun in the world, with the lion's (lyin's) share of the wealth. The US is the enemy of so many - people, corporations, gangs, individuals - who might want to hit us that we would never do anything but preemptively strike them until we were quickly exhausted. And then overrun by some of our (relatively few) actual enemies, or even an opportunistic "ally".

        No, "guys might just want to"  isn't the basis of a threat assessment requiring airstrikes.

        What we should have learned from 9/11/2001, Nairobi, Tanzania, Karachi, the Cole was that the Qaeda (the actual one, not just a copycat calling themself that on a website or in a desert march) was "determined to attack inside US" - as the PDB clearly said.

        We should have learned that, and let me make this clear:

        FIGHTING AN OIL WAR IN IRAQ JUST DISTRACTS US FROM ACTUAL TERRORISM SECURITY ELSEWHERE!

        OK, you can't read the perfectly clear part of my post that said:

        If those many other countries, each with their own oil at stake and their own huge military budgets and forces, can't defeat their own existential enemies in their own backyards, then maybe the US should as a last resort do something about a jihad that could eventually in principle threaten the US.

        But can't you learn the most headslamming lesson of the entire Bush/Cheney catastrophe? Evidently Obama hasn't quite learned it, as airstrikes are clearly the main subject at the White House this week. But does that mean that Conservatives like you have to ignore our most immediate history that hasn't at all ended in Iraq?

        "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

        by DocGonzo on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 06:42:37 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  You made an unsupportable statement and now (0+ / 0-)

          you're whining about being called on it, and trying to construct some crazy lies about what I have said.

          ISIL is not our enemy
          You don't know that.
          You might not want to admit it, but it's true.

          They don't like us in the least and they are crazier, more radical descendants of Al Qaeda, which, if you are able to recall, struck US soil multiple times and killed many people in the process.

          What is our best course of action?
          Beats the shit out of me.  Wary alertness and intensive information-gathering seems like a good thing.

          Pretending we'll sit down to tea and discuss our favorite colors?

          Not so much.

          LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

          by dinotrac on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 11:10:08 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  You Go Fight Them (0+ / 0-)

            You did't even read my post where I said it's our business if it's real.

            Stop yapping at me. You said the kind of stupid neocon thing that this site is more dedicated to laughing at than any other stupid neocon thing.

            Just slink off and stop it. You just look stupider with every post.

            "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

            by DocGonzo on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 03:08:03 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  You didn't read anything, did you? Just makin' (0+ / 0-)

              stuff up to fit your preconceived notions.

              That's OK.
              This is the internet.

              Wish you'd stop pretending that I said it.

              LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

              by dinotrac on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 03:59:55 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Yap Yap Yap (0+ / 0-)

                Now you're just copying my legitimate criticism of you. Of course I read your twaddle. That's how I knew to write that you didn't read my post. Where I said we should fight them as a last resort, if they are then a legitimate threat. I even repeated it in blockquote, in bold type, in my next post. That you also didn't read.

                Instead you posted some gibberish about tea, repeating your wankery about how we have to watch them, as if that's somehow disagreeing with what I wrote. Which you didn't read either time.

                You are a nutcase.

                "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

                by DocGonzo on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 08:23:05 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  What legitimate criticism (0+ / 0-)

                  You've made up a lot of bullshit and pretend that I said it.

                  And you've completely avoided what I actually did say because you don't want to admit that what you actually did say is unsupportable.

                  You, my friend, are the head case here.

                  LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                  by dinotrac on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 09:03:19 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  Avoid (0+ / 0-)

                    I challenged your saying we should treat ISIL as our enemy right now by saying that's neocon craziness, with the reasons.

                    I preempted your saying we should watch them for becoming an active threat after their definite enemies in Eurasia fail to stop them.

                    I supported what I said. All you've done in response is spout gibberish, perhaps even after reading what I wrote that makes your responses obviously nuts.

                    Quote what I attributed to you that you didn't say, instead of all the handwaving.

                    And now all you're doing is "I know you are but what am I", the lizard brain of the neocon digging in its heels.

                    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

                    by DocGonzo on Sun Jun 15, 2014 at 07:45:46 AM PDT

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  But I never said that, and that is the problem. (0+ / 0-)

                      You were the one making assertions, specifically that they are not our enemy.

                      LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                      by dinotrac on Sun Jun 15, 2014 at 08:04:52 AM PDT

                      [ Parent ]

                      •  Crazy LIAR (0+ / 0-)

                        Me:

                        Quote what I attributed to you that you didn't say, instead of all the handwaving.

                        You:

                        [nothing]

                        You are a lunatic. And a liar.

                        "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

                        by DocGonzo on Mon Jun 16, 2014 at 06:25:03 AM PDT

                        [ Parent ]

                        •  Liar. Fine. Here's one. (1+ / 0-)
                          Recommended by:
                          PinHole

                          What a lying lunatic you are.
                          The burden of proof should be on you to quote the place where I say what you claim I say, but, since you are such a head case, I will provide your own lie to you.

                          How about your own admission:

                          I challenged your saying we should treat ISIL as our enemy right now by saying that's neocon craziness, with the reasons.
                          I never said that.
                          That is your own bullshit.

                          LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                          by dinotrac on Mon Jun 16, 2014 at 06:35:22 AM PDT

                          [ Parent ]

                          •  What I Said (0+ / 0-)

                            I said:


                            ISIL is not our enemy. If those many other countries, each with their own oil at stake and their own huge military budgets and forces, can't defeat their own existential enemies in their own backyards, then maybe the US should as a last resort do something about a jihad that could eventually in principle threaten the US.

                            You said:


                            We seem to be their enemy, and, we should have learned from 9/11, Benghazi, Nairobi, Tanzania, Karachi, the US Cole, etc that people like this, with a base to work from and resources to work with, can hit us hard if they want to.

                            You disagreed with my saying "maybe the US should as a last resort do something about a jihad that could eventually in principle threaten the US.", insisting on the lessons of "9/11, Benghazi, Nairobi, Tanzania, Karachi, the US Cole".

                            I repeated what I said in stark, unmistakable terms:


                            What we should have learned from 9/11/2001, Nairobi, Tanzania, Karachi, the Cole was that the Qaeda (the actual one, not just a copycat calling themself that on a website or in a desert march) was "determined to attack inside US" - as the PDB clearly said.

                            We should have learned that, and let me make this clear:

                                FIGHTING AN OIL WAR IN IRAQ JUST DISTRACTS US FROM ACTUAL TERRORISM SECURITY ELSEWHERE!


                            And then I quoted where I'd said let ISIL's  immediate enemies fight them, and take over if they can't and we do determine they're actually determined to strike the US.

                            You lied about what I said, claiming to paraphrase it with:

                            Pretending we'll sit down to tea and discuss our favorite colors?

                            That is neocon craziness, lies. Crazy lies that send us to war against other people's enemies instead of defending ourselves when they can't and we must.

                            "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

                            by DocGonzo on Mon Jun 16, 2014 at 07:48:07 AM PDT

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  Again you lie. (1+ / 0-)
                            Recommended by:
                            PinHole
                            You disagreed with my saying "maybe the US should as a last resort do something about a jihad that could eventually in principle threaten the US.
                            I did no such thing.

                            I disagreed and still disagree with your simplistic and unwarranted assumption that ISIS is not our enemy.

                            You seem to think like a fundamentalist:

                            My way or the highway, with no room for doubt.

                            LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

                            by dinotrac on Mon Jun 16, 2014 at 08:11:24 AM PDT

                            [ Parent ]

    •  ISIS/ISIL which is arabic for (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DocGonzo, palantir

      too crazy for Al-Qaeda

      I want 1 less Tiny Coffin, Why Don't You? Support The President's Gun Violence Plan.

      by JML9999 on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 07:27:08 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  They Know How to Drive Tanks and Helicopters (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        palantir, JML9999, RiveroftheWest

        Yes, they're too crazy for the Qaeda.

        But who taught them to drive tanks and fly helicopters? Where did all that weaponry come from? Where did this sizeable army train, before it so effectively (if not quite decisively) attacked Assad's Syria? Who's paying for all that?

        The US is not the top of the list of "whose problem is ISIL?" But the answers to those questions are what Americans have been paying $TRILLIONS FOR YEARS to know, and to do something about. Even if that something isn't airstrikes or invasions.

        "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

        by DocGonzo on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 07:40:41 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  I'm with you. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DocGonzo, RiveroftheWest, Gwennedd

      We can't take care of the veterans as it is, this because of two simultaneous wars that are longer than any war in history. Then the Republicans cut funding for the veterans. And now we're all shocked that the case load at the VA hospitals is overwhelming? I thought the Republicans always chanted about fiscal responsibility and -- well, Conservative values, as if they invented and owned same. Try this for conservative: Don't send Americans to fight wars that weren't directed at Americans. Consider the cost of war, both economically and in human life, before you punch in The Code.  If you can't clean up the mess, don't applaud the fireworks.

    •  This is more than a bit hyperbolic: (0+ / 0-)
      If he does, I defy any of his many Democratic cheerleaders to deny that we are indeed in Bush's fourth term.
      One need hardly be an Obama cheerleader or in favor of intervention to recognize the myopia underlying that assertion.
      •  Who Cares (0+ / 0-)

        If Obama gets us back into a shooting war in Iraq, no amount of criticism will be sufficient in response.

        If your response to it is to quibble with its "hyperbole", joining the defense of Obama on any basis (and so protecting his immeasurable crime), the myopia is far more on your part, pal.

        "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

        by DocGonzo on Sun Jun 15, 2014 at 07:50:08 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Powerlies (7+ / 0-)

    Steven Hayward of Powerline calls the climate science community cultists.
    http://www.weeklystandard.com/...

    I have tracked the Powerliners for years. They are cornucopians in terms of editorial content never mentioning oil depletion concerns until the wimpy results from Bakken started coming in.

    The Powerline law firm of Faegre-Benson represents Koch Industries, which owns refineries in the state next door to the Bakken and also owns land in the Bakken.

    Koch is also involved in the shady Weather Derivatives market and hired the Powerliners law firm to defend themselves in their partnership with Enron.

    This has relevance because the weather derivatives were dealing with betting outcomes of climate events such as El Nino.

    Who are the cultists, eh?

    •  Denial Projection (3+ / 0-)

      Conservatives are driven by denial. In the extroverts among them, the denial transfers to projection. Psychology 101, though The Mass Psychology of Fascism is an advanced case.

      This denial projection was refined to an artful science by Karl Rove, who'd attack his political enemies for his clients' own worst weakness, especially if the enemy were the opposite, and it was their strength. It is the core of Conservatism. The ideology and the practice are just the new clothes on the Denial Projector Emperor.

      "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

      by DocGonzo on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 06:49:53 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  One of the wingnuts who comments on my local (2+ / 0-)

        paper's online edition consistently complains about "low information voters" who keep electing Democrats to office in CA.

        That term was made popular by John Stewart in 2012, after six studies came out showing that FOX viewers are less well informed than people who get their news elsewhere.

        Rush Limbot took a page from Rove's playbook and started using the expression in 2013. But he doesn't use it to mean "people who can't name both their U.S. Senators". He uses it to mean "people who disagree with me".

        I'm guessing that my local wingnut isn't a big John Stewart Fan.

        “It is useless to attempt to reason a man out of a thing
        he was never reasoned into” - Jonathan Swift

        by jjohnjj on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 12:01:49 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Dumbest Republicans (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Webster Hubble Telescope

          I saw on DKos this past week a new study that showed of all Republicans, the worst informed are those who watch Fox News.

          They're stupid, to the point of insanity. They're willfully stupid because they're sick, to the point of evil. The denial projection is just their opening gambit.

          "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

          by DocGonzo on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 03:12:09 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Our solar system may actually be pretty unusual (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Wee Mama, CenPhx, palantir

    Doubtless this will give the Creationists something new to chew on in their quest for evidence of our specialness.
    Or it could just be an artifact of the limitations on our methods of detection. It will take years to sort out.

    http://www.economist.com/...

    •  Wow. Two references to creationists in one day. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      melvynny, palantir

      Who the Hell cares what they think?

      Science is science.

      I certainly hope we haven't reached a point where we hesitate to report the science because it may encourage creationists.  Remember our won words: creationism has nothing to do with science.

      LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

      by dinotrac on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 06:27:13 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Because they make policy and scientists DONT (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        palantir

        And tx to 'home schoolin' and boards packed with guys whose 1st sexual experience was with Mom in the outhouse, this country is well on its way to creating a gen of Eloi with cell phones, morons who depend on technology but have no more inkling how the world actually works than my cat. (Come to think of it, he watches TV a lot too.)

        •  We home school our daughter. Is that a problem (0+ / 0-)

          for you?

          Lots of people home school for lots of reasons.  In many cases, its because their very smart and creative kids get bullied mercilessly in public schools where nobody seems to give a damn.

          Sometimes its because the kids are pursuing passions (like robotics, or even hockey) that make staying in one place and meeting a regular school schedule impossible.

          And guess what? All of the home-schooled children I know come from homes with indoor plumbing.

          You really should leave your prejudice behind.

          LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

          by dinotrac on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 11:14:23 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Intriguing - yet another Goldilocks point we (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      palantir, DrTerwilliker, Gwennedd

      lucked into - like living in the good neighborhood of the galaxy.



      Is it true? Is it kind? Is it necessary? . . . and respect the dignity of every human being.

      by Wee Mama on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 07:26:26 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  The original (for those who like such stuff) (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Gwennedd

      is here.



      Is it true? Is it kind? Is it necessary? . . . and respect the dignity of every human being.

      by Wee Mama on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 09:35:56 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Bingo! (5+ / 0-)
    When comparing the cost of alternative energy produced from renewable, green sources to traditional fossil fuels, isn't it about time we start including the two or three trillion dollars we've spent keeping oil flowing from places like Iraq, or the other trillion or two that neo-con fossils would have us spend going forward?
    I've been saying this for twenty years! We should have a direct tax on all petroleum products that funds the cost of our "excess" military - That military which is over and above what is required to meet the self-defense obligations of our nation and our legitimate allies.

    Screw John Galt. Who's John Doe?

    by Mike Kahlow on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 06:19:19 AM PDT

    •  Import Tax (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      CenPhx, palantir, Mike Kahlow

      Yes, absolutely. I've been saying that for over twenty years, too - since Iraq War Sr.

      In fact, the cost of policing the world beyond our own (obviously much smaller) legitimate self defense budget should be assigned to the imports from each country according to what we spend to defend them, and our "national interests" in them.

      And while we're at it we should tax imports from countries we spend to legitimately defend ourselves from - including China, Russia, Pakistan, Iran - according to those costs. Make them pay to defend ourselves from them, and their threats will go down.

      The entire global trade system was sold to us as being the basis for security. The lies about the world being our net consumer gave way to more lies about using our top consumer status to demand concessions from producers dependent on our commerce. Let's use at least the way that actually worked out to make it true. Tax our imports to pay for what we spend on the exporter's behavior.

      "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

      by DocGonzo on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 06:58:57 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  So...if it's not water, why call it water? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Wee Mama

    I don't call flour, sugar, milk and eggs a cake.

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 06:20:32 AM PDT

  •  Rage Against the Machine (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    laurnj, CenPhx, palantir

    More relevant today than ever.

    "Give to every other human being every right that you claim for yourself." - Robert G. Ingersoll

    by Apost8 on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 06:27:52 AM PDT

  •  Iraq (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    palantir

    It's not only about oil--blame it on the Brits and the French.  Colonialism plus arrogance leads to instability and warfare.
    article

    Actions speak louder than petitions.

    by melvynny on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 06:44:19 AM PDT

  •  More about those mesothermic dinosaurs (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    CenPhx, palantir

    here.



    Is it true? Is it kind? Is it necessary? . . . and respect the dignity of every human being.

    by Wee Mama on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 06:46:35 AM PDT

  •  Very sobering article about the suicide rate. (5+ / 0-)

    Was definitely preaching to the choir when it came to myself.  I very nearly was one of the suicides.

    It was a friend offering me a place to stay that stopped it.  Many are not so lucky.

    •  This economy is much more than money (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      RiveroftheWest, ArchTeryx

      The careers, families, couples and lives it is destroying goes much deeper. Policy has very real world consequences.

      My saving grace was Obama's stimulus; in 2010 I was accepted into the Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Rehousing Program. It paid my rent and utilities for a year and effectively kept me in my home. Now I'm back on track; if I had lost my place to live, I don't know where I'd be now.

      Glad you pulled up from your descent, ArchTeryx.

      Mediocrity cannot know excellence ~ Sherlock Holmes

      by La Gitane on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 11:33:33 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Europe's Geothermal is 38% of Global Electricity (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    palantir, RiveroftheWest

    Engineers at Spain's University of Valladolid have published research that shows Iberia (Spain + Portugal) have 700 Gigawatts geothermal power capacity, a followup to their research showing Europe as a whole has 6.5 Terawatts capacity, 38% of total world energy consumption of about 17TW.

    Europe as a whole (excluding Asian Russia) consumes under 600 GW  electricity right now. Geothermal, even EGS, plants take only a few years to build, and can be built simultaneously, quickly filling Europe with electricity to build a proper grid and replace oil/gas for transit, and then export to the growing regions around it (replacing their coal/oil/gas/dung).

    Building plants now would boost local labor, which is extremely depressed now. Between the Mideast and Russia, Europe's worst security threats would all be externalized by replacing its imported fuel for electricity with clean local geothermal generation. All the FUD about wind and solar intermittency would be eliminated by basing them on steady geothermal baseload. Existing coal and nuke plants already have most of the same infrastructure new geothermal plants need; existing drilling corps can retool for clean geothermal. European technology in the global energy sector (geothermal is global) could get a boost to lead the world.

    We are crazy not to do this.

    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

    by DocGonzo on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 07:32:00 AM PDT

  •  Major fallacy in this post (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    RiveroftheWest

    No, we did NOT spend 2-3 trillion dollars "keeping oil flowing".  It was already flowing.  Nobody was threatening to stop it from flowing.  Nobody is threatening that now.

    In fact, the one thing we know for sure is that WHOEVER runs Iraq (including Islamic crazies) will pump out the oil and sell it.  And that is all we really need - as long as the oil gets into the international market then the oil price and quantity of oil out there will stay what it would have been.  One reason they are fighting so viciously is that whoever wins gets all the oil money!!  And they only get it if the oil keeps flowing.

    So what did we spend the 2-3 trillion dollars on?  Aside from macho imperial posturing it was in order to make sure that Halliburton and their cronies got to pump the oil out instead of somebody else.  That it would be pumped out was never in doubt.

  •  I'm tired of Oil Wars. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    RiveroftheWest

    We have viable alternatives, if only a handful of corporations and their hand picked politicians could be stripped of their power to dominate the direction of our energy future.

    A civilization built on whale oil was unsustainable.

    A civilization built on fossil fuels is unsustainable. We managed to get a good 100 years out of this approach, but time is running out...again.

    The position of every denialist is to continue their destructive behavior until the very last 'DoDo Bird' has been consumed into extinction.


    How do you tell your pet slug that you had escargot for dinner?

    by glb3 on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 08:44:49 AM PDT

  •  In that same stupid floor speech (0+ / 0-)

    McCain said "we need to bring back the team that WON in Iraq!"

    And almost in the next breath, he said "we should never leave a battlefield before we've won!"

    Which is it, dumbass? Did we win or lose? I can't tell the difference, frankly.

    Mediocrity cannot know excellence ~ Sherlock Holmes

    by La Gitane on Sat Jun 14, 2014 at 11:36:54 AM PDT

  •  Fish fossil may be a precursor to vertebrate jaw (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    RiveroftheWest, Gwennedd
    New fossils discovered in Kootenay Park in British Columbia have helped identify what could be an important ancestor to most vertebrate animals. The 505-million-year-old fossil is of a fish with preserved remains that include important structures near the mouth that are thought, in time, to evolve into jawbones. The appearance of the jaw in fish was an important innovation that allowed animals to consume a wider array of foods, and diversify into more ecological niches.
    http://www.cbc.ca/...

    In case you missed it:

    Scientists say a recently located fossil site on the Alberta-B.C. border is already yielding major new discoveries about early animal evolution.

    The Marble Canyon fossil beds were located in 2012 by a team of Canadian, U.S. and Swedish researchers in Kootenay National Park, about 40 kilometres from the 505-million-year-old Burgess Shale in Yoho National Park — which is considered one of the most important fossil fields in the world.

    http://www.cbc.ca/...

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