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Henry Paulson offers good advice, possibly for the first time... Ross Douthat believes no good thought goes unpunished... Paul Greenberg looks at the tangled path fish take to your plate.  But first...

Timothy Egan on corporations as a potential source of good.

For some time now, Republicans in Congress have given up the pretense of doing anything to improve the lot of most Americans. Raising the minimum wage? They won’t even allow a vote to happen. Cleaner air for all? They may partially shut down the government in a coming fight on behalf of major polluters. Add to that the continuing obstruction of student loan relief efforts, and numerous attempts to defund health care, and you have a party actively working to make life miserable for millions.

So, our nation turns to Starbucks. And Walmart. In the present moment, both of those global corporate monoliths are poised to do more to affect the huge chasm between the rich and everybody else than anything that’s likely to come out of John Boehner’s House of Representatives.

As long as the Supreme Court says that corporations are citizens, they may as well act like them. Starbucks is trying to be dutiful — in its own prickly, often self-righteous, spin-heavy way — while Walmart is a net drain on taxpayers, forcing employees into public assistance with its poverty-wage structure. ...

It’s a sad day when we have to look to corporations for education, health care and basic ways to boost the middle class. Most advanced nations do those things for their people. We used to — witness the G.I. Bill, which helped millions of returning soldiers get a lift to a better life. But you go to war against the income gap with the system you have, and ours is currently broken. By default, we have no choice but to lean on our corporate overlords.

The really sad thing is that so many Americans don't expect any better. In fact, people have developed a perverse pride in the meanness of the support we give our citizens. Many of them aren't worried about how we might fill basic gaps, they're fixated on stopping the little that we do.

This really is a kind of American exceptionalism — a burning desire, expressed loudly and often, to be exceptionally vile, exceptionally stingy, exceptionally heartless toward our fellow citizens.

Come on in. Let's be exceptionally hopeful.

Henry Paulson, the secretary of the treasury during the 2008 crash, sees an even bigger collapse approaching.

There is a time for weighing evidence and a time for acting. And if there’s one thing I’ve learned throughout my work in finance, government and conservation, it is to act before problems become too big to manage.

For too many years, we failed to rein in the excesses building up in the nation’s financial markets. When the credit bubble burst in 2008, the damage was devastating. Millions suffered. Many still do.

We’re making the same mistake today with climate change. We’re staring down a climate bubble that poses enormous risks to both our environment and economy. The warning signs are clear and growing more urgent as the risks go unchecked.

...

Some members of my political party worry that pricing carbon is a “big government” intervention. In fact, it will reduce the role of government, which, on our present course, increasingly will be called on to help communities and regions affected by climate-related disasters like floods, drought-related crop failures and extreme weather like tornadoes, hurricanes and other violent storms. We’ll all be paying those costs. Not once, but many times over.

I'm impressed that Paulson, along with his fellow former Secretaries, put this out there... though taking economic advice from Paulson, even when he's saying things I agree with, seems vaguely like asking Rumsfeld for advice on Iraq.

Steven Rattner  welcomes our robot masters.

Just  over 50 years ago, the cover of Life magazine breathlessly declared the “point of no return for everybody.” Above that stark warning, a smaller headline proclaimed, “Automation’s really here; jobs go scarce.”

As events unfolded, it was Life that was nearing the point of no return — the magazine suspended weekly publication in 1972. For the rest of America, jobs boomed; in the following decade, 21 million Americans were added to the employment rolls.

Throughout history, aspiring Cassandras have regularly proclaimed that new waves of technological innovation would render huge numbers of workers idle, leading to all manner of economic, social and political disruption.
...

So far, of course, they’ve all been wrong. But that has not prevented a cascade of shrill new proclamations that — notwithstanding centuries of history — “this time is different”: The technology revolution will impair the livelihoods of millions of Americans.

They've also been right. The original Luddites weren't worried that technology was going to eliminate jobs, they were worried that it was going to eliminate good jobs, replacing skilled craftsmen with low-wage machine operators. The machines generated profit for factory owners and the skilled workers were out of luck. It's a scenario that's been repeated many times, and while each new round of technology brings it's own skilled positions, the number of such positions tend to be much smaller than the area just replaced.

Ross Douthat accuses the US of  building gingerbread houses.

For years now, one side of the immigration debate — the side of billionaires, professional bipartisans, and all the great and good — has argued that an amnesty of some kind for illegal immigrants isn’t just a sensible policy choice but a crushingly obvious one: self-evidently wise, morally farseeing and a win for almost everyone, from corporations to labor unions to Republican politicians to the immigrants themselves.

Nested inside that debate has been a smaller one, over the Dream Act, a measure opening a path to citizenship for illegal immigrants who arrived as minors. If comprehensive reform has been cast as a no-brainer, the Dream Act has been portrayed as a test of basic moral fitness: To oppose welcoming these young men and women is to oppose all that’s decent, humanitarian and just.

And now we're seeing more young immigrants, clearly because we harbored a momentary thought of being decent.
The young migrants are not, obviously, deeply familiar with the ins and outs of U.S. politics; they’re following smuggler-spread rumors, for the most part. But the rumors exist for a reason: They’re fueled by a sense that “if you want to get into the U.S., now is the time,” a scholar of Latin America told The Washington Post. And the Obama White House has conceded that a “misperception of U.S. immigration policy” is playing a role — one significant enough to dispatch Vice President Joe Biden to Central America to clarify that we are not actually opening our borders to any minor who reaches them.
See, they're coming because of rumors, and don't understand that we're actually not being decent.

Dana Milbank says that at least the Republican establishment can count on the establishment.

If this week’s House Republican leadership elections told us anything, it’s that we should put to bed this tired meme about a civil war between the tea party and establishment Republicans.

On June 10, when House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.) was toppled by a libertarian challenger in the Republican primary, the word went forth throughout the land that the tea party was resurgent and that House Republicans would tack even more to the right.

Nine days later, Cantor’s colleagues held an election to replace him, and the winner was California’s Kevin McCarthy — who has a voting record more liberal than Cantor’s. McCarthy became majority leader by clobbering a tea party challenger, Raúl Labrador (Idaho). A more reliable conservative, Steve Scalise (La.) won the No. 3 leadership slot by beating not only a more moderate challenger but also a tea party opponent who regarded him as too cozy with the establishment.

How to explain the contradiction? Simple: Ideology had little to do with the elections.

Ruth Markus on Elizabeth Warren.
Some politicians know they want to be in public office and scramble to come up with the reason why. Sen. Elizabeth Warren is an accidental, improbable politician — a self-described “outsider” — who knows exactly what she wants to accomplish on the inside.

The Massachusetts Democrat insists that she’s not running for president, and there’s little reason to doubt her — although, interestingly, Warren sticks doggedly to the present tense to describe her intentions.

I asked Warren about this phrasing the other afternoon over iced tea mixed with lemonade at a restaurant near her Capitol Hill office. In these precincts, senator sightings are commonplace but, even here, Warren enjoys celebrity status; the manager promptly presented Warren with a copy of her memoir, “A Fighting Chance,” to sign.

Why not simply declare that she will not run for president in 2016? “I am not running for president in 2016,” Warren responded. Yes, I pressed, but why not say, I am not running and I will not run ?

“Because we can’t get so deeply involved in the politics of 2016 that we miss the importance of the issues in front of us today in July of 2014 and the 2014 election,” Warren replied, jumping slightly ahead of the calendar. “It is absolutely crucial to stay focused right now on this set of issues and that’s what I’m doing.”

We can all stay hopeful.

Paul Greenberg  Goes fishing for reasons that we outsource fish.

In 1982 a Chinese aquaculture scientist named Fusui Zhang journeyed to Martha’s Vineyard in search of scallops. The New England bay scallop had recently been domesticated, and Dr. Zhang thought the Vineyard-grown shellfish might do well in China. After a visit to Lagoon Pond in Tisbury, he boxed up 120 scallops and spirited them away to his lab in Qingdao. During the journey 94 died. But 26 thrived. Thanks to them, today China now grows millions of dollars of New England bay scallops, a significant portion of which are exported back to the United States.

As go scallops, so goes the nation. According to the National Marine Fisheries Service, even though the United States controls more ocean than any other country, 86 percent of the seafood we consume is imported.

But it’s much fishier than that: While a majority of the seafood Americans eat is foreign, a third of what Americans catch is sold to foreigners.

The seafood industry, it turns out, is a great example of the swaps, delete-and-replace maneuvers and other mechanisms that define so much of the outsourced American economy; you can find similar, seemingly inefficient phenomena in everything from textiles to technology. The difference with seafood, though, is that we’re talking about the destruction and outsourcing of the very ecological infrastructure that underpins the health of our coasts.

This is a story of unique local resources turned into international commodities not just at the expense of jobs, but to the detriment of whole ecosystems, and of fish criss-crossing the seas... in boats.
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Comment Preferences

  •  I have hope, but... (27+ / 0-)

    ... this "America" of evil conservative "No! Nothings!" in the service of the pettiest, meanest evil can fuck off.

  •  South American feudalism is what this is (13+ / 0-)

    In SA I am told, if you have a housekeeper you are expected to help pay for her kids schooling and other things, so if the rich get their way, we will all be beholding to what they decide to "give" the rest of us who work for them.

    "The poor can never be made to suffer enough." Jimmy Breslin

    by merrywidow on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 04:21:23 AM PDT

  •  Thanks for the excellent roundup this morning, (39+ / 0-)

    Mark!

    This:

    The really sad thing is that so many Americans don't expect any better. In fact, people have developed a perverse pride in the meanness of the support we give our citizens. Many of them aren't worried about how we might fill basic gaps, they're fixated on stopping the little that we do.

    This really is a kind of American exceptionalism — a burning desire, expressed loudly and often, to be exceptionally vile, exceptionally stingy, exceptionally heartless toward our fellow citizens.

    Unfortunately, so true. I'm seeing it in my own state of Virginia. Governor McAuliffe is doing his best to expand Medicaid but the hateful Rethug legislature is actively trying to circumvent his efforts. They hate the Black Man in the White House even more than they hate the poor.

    "Religion is what keeps the poor from murdering the rich."--Napoleon

    by Diana in NoVa on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 04:33:39 AM PDT

  •  Nail, meet hammer (5+ / 0-)

    You're spot on, Diana -
    So sad.

  •  The only problem with relying on corporations (21+ / 0-)

    is that these are the same entities that have chosen to make American workers "compete" with Thai and Bangladeshi workers instead of those in Germany (economics), Finland (education), the Netherlands (social policy), Switzerland (health care), etc.etc.etc.

    The corporate overloads want us in debt, afraid and subservient.    

     

    "The opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.”" -- Paul Dirac

    by Rikon Snow on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 04:43:26 AM PDT

    •  Please do a little more research into (6+ / 0-)

      Switzerland's health care system.  It's more like ours than any other country in Europe; it's more expensive than any other country in Europe and it's less effective - its insurance system is privatized, like ours, although much more extensively regulated than ours.

      If you want to cite the world-wide health care winner in Europe, pinpoint France.

      "All that is necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing" - Edmund Burke

      by SueDe on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 05:43:53 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Will do. Thanks. (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        SueDe, ER Doc

        I was relying on conversations with a Swiss friend.  

        "The opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.”" -- Paul Dirac

        by Rikon Snow on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 05:51:22 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Did a little reading. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          SueDe

          It's better than what we have.  :-)  
          Wikipedia here.

          "The opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.”" -- Paul Dirac

          by Rikon Snow on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 05:57:12 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Like I said, (4+ / 0-)

            Switzerland has no problem heavily regulating their private insurance companies, including premium costs., which also indirectly serves to hold down costs of care.  Such regulations keep their marketplace from being the free-for-all in both cost and coverage we have here.

            No doubt the Swiss system is better than what we have here, even with implementation of the ACA, but your other examples cited the countries with the most liberal, most efficient systems of providing services for their populations.

            "All that is necessary for evil to triumph is for good men to do nothing" - Edmund Burke

            by SueDe on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 06:30:07 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  From the Too Little Too Late Department (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    StrayCat, Nowhere Man, Laconic Lib
    US Secretary of State John Kerry is in Cairo and expected to travel to Iraq soon to press for a more representative cabinet, hoping this could ease tensions between the Sunni and Shia communities.
    from the BBC: Iraq crisis: Rutba latest western town to fall to Isis

    Sigh.

    "The opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.”" -- Paul Dirac

    by Rikon Snow on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 04:52:45 AM PDT

  •  One of the main problems with college tuition of (37+ / 0-)

    course is its rapid rise, far outstripping any other good or service.  The Republicans laughably claim (including my own brother) that the reason for this is that government grants and loans are allowing too many kids to go, forcing up demand. I asked him, but for some reason hardly anybody else is asking, if that is the case, then how is it that when millions of people had their tuition fully paid by the GI bill after WWII, that there weren't big tuition hikes then? Funny how rapid inflation in college tuition didn't begin until the 1980's, coinciding with the debut of Reaganomics.

    Most other developed countries are laughing at us as we unilaterally disarm in the global economic competition by limiting the ability of bright middle class kids to attend college, and destroy our future economy by allowing those that do to be hopelessly saddled by debt - so that they never can be a source of economic growth.

    "The only thing we have to fear - is fear itself." - Franklin Delano Roosevelt

    by orrg1 on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 04:53:16 AM PDT

    •  And the debt will endure for decades (14+ / 0-)

      while the opportunities for employment with one's education diminish, thanks to globalization and outsourcing. More and more we see that the jobs being relocated overseas are not just the un/low-skilled kind, but what we used to think of as good longterm careers for well trained or educated workers like programmers, graphics designers, accountants, and more.

      The Powers That Be keep saying people need to get trained/educated for the jobs of the future. But whenever they do, and the future jobs come around, they find a way to get skilled workers in those fields doing the jobs in a foreign land at a fraction of the wages paid in the U.S. So, the cycle of job loss, despair, and retraining gets rinsed and repeated...accumulating ever more public or private debt.

      At some point, the whole system is going to collapse as unsustainable. Either we go full on feudal, with a few rich lords and masses of teeming, starving peasants, or we implement some kind of basic grant to cover a decent life for every citizen. The 1% and multinationals aren't going to like that idea, since they will be the only ones in any position to pay for it. So, maybe our retraining programs will have to focus on skills like tugging one's forelock, muttering "thank ye, milord", and how to queue up properly outside the baronial manors when the kitchen staff distributes the table scraps.

    •  It has nothing to do with (8+ / 0-)

      supply and demand or any other normal reason for such things.  It has all to do with the structure of our economy specifically the investment side and Wall Street.  There is money to be made when there are large pools of money!  Even though that money is for something other than investment and money making they talk the overseers into believing there will be a windfall and the scam begins. Look how they are trying so damn hard and for so long to get into the Social Security pool.  The salivating continues but they already have their hands into everything they should not be into, healthcare, education, everything.

      Everyone! Arms akimbo! 68351

      by tobendaro on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 05:50:52 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  We have lost the idea that education (4+ / 0-)

      Is a public good that should be supported by all of us. That is the majority of the reason tuition has gone up so quickly. States used to pay much more of a student's costs. At public universities , a system that allowed people from all walks of life all over the country to get an education. I would think that many of the things that also cost money, the need for technology and air conditioned dorms (which is largely new in the last 20 years) and several other things put a strain on resources. Yes there are craziness eps in athletics and administration growth that should be looked at and adjunct issues are horrible exploitative. But if there was any concept of raising taxes to pay for what we used to have in education, this country would be a lot better off. But who is willing to raise taxes outside of California (where it has been working well)?

  •  Greenburg's article on the perversity of the fish (21+ / 0-)

    and seafood industry should be read by everyone.
    An abject lesson taking 1 specific, little understood industry in how 'the wunders of globilizashun' and 'da miracle of da free markit' will sink us all long before a band of dusky wild eyed jihadists ever do.

    •  True But the Greater Reality is That Jihadists are (5+ / 0-)

      ice cubes; the ship of state can hit one or a billion ice cubes and it's never going to be taken down by ice cubes.

      We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

      by Gooserock on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 05:39:09 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I read the whole article and it's not clear to me (0+ / 0-)

      why what he describes is bad or "perverse".

      Given that we won't stop filling the globe with humans and that these humans need some, and increasingly expect a lot of, protein, an efficient distribution network of farmed fish seems to me like something to welcome not to bemoan.

      •  Because 'an efficient distribution network' (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        wonmug, Mark Sumner

        isnt whats been created. More like a jury rigged hodgepodge with maximum opportunities built into it for fraud and other abuse.

        To quote " Globalization, that unseen force that supposedly eliminates inefficiencies through the magic of trade, has radically disconnected us from our seafood supply."

        He's also suggesting the availability of farmed products has desensitized us to the ongoing destruction of wild fish populations and their habitats.

        •  Desensitized how? (0+ / 0-)

          Without farmed fish the collapse in wild fish populations would be far worse.

          Mind you, I'm not saying we aren't destroying wild fish populations and their habitats.  But the problem is relentless population growth, not fish farming.

          I'm amazed at the article's apparent suggestion that it would be better if Americans were eating more locally caught salmon and less imported tilapia.

  •  Not exactly uplifting. (14+ / 0-)

    But then, that's been the state of play, hasn't it?
    I shake my head. What is the point of government, if not to take care of it's people?
    It really is not that difficult a concept to grasp. Yet, one political party says to the American people, loudly and repeatedly, you get nothing, or as close to nothing as we possibly can. Because, if for no other reason we can invent, Obama.
    It is maddening, in fact, it is so frustrating, you really can't look directly at it, somewhat like looking into a light bulb. At conservatives, you have to glance sideways, look away or it will hurt your eyes, as well as your intellect.
    At least they could be honest about it: "I got mine, you get yours".

    •  They've been playing that same card to justify (7+ / 0-)

      cuts in social services and the economy for thirty some years now.  The reason it's the "Obama" card now and not "Sister Souljah" or "welfare queens" or "Black Panthers" is because he's the most visible target right now.

      It's the same agenda it's always been, steadily drifting whiter and righter.

      Just IMO, of course.

      "The opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.”" -- Paul Dirac

      by Rikon Snow on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 05:21:06 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I can see how affluent people fall for the Repub (11+ / 0-)

        scam, but I continue to be astounded by the number of working class people, which is most of us, who buy in and continue to vote them into office. Most of it appears to be ignorance -- they get all their news from a few snippets on TV or radio and never dig deeper. And they continue to wonder why they work and work and never seem to get ahead.

        •  Fear of ruinious taxes and deficits (4+ / 0-)

          Crime and declining morals.

          "Look at all them Gays and twerking Pop Tarts those Liberals are inflicting on us poor decent regular people!"

          "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

          by Stude Dude on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 06:25:39 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  SD, those twerkers are not a product of liberalism (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Dirtandiron, Stude Dude

            They are products of capitalism.  The sensationalistic performers would not be so were it not for the profit motive at play, especially among their agents and other handlers.  Same thing with porn; it sells.

            Building a better America with activism, cooperation, ingenuity and snacks.

            by judyms9 on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 07:50:25 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  It really does come down to (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          willrob, Teiresias70, Dirtandiron

          education.  If you understand economics, the flow of money; sociology, the way groups interact; psychology, how personalities work; history and how it repeats itself because of sociology, economics and psychology you can then see how people are not thinking and using what they have learned.  My pet wingnut thinks his college degree gives him license to spout and he can justify anything saying he has a degree.  He may say he knows sociology because he took soc 101 in school.  He justifies his fears and meaness by saying he has a degree but he is really just stupid and ignorant of what was taught.

          Everyone! Arms akimbo! 68351

          by tobendaro on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 06:30:35 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Have you had this experience? (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          judyms9, dandy lion, Dirtandiron

          I'm not one of them, but I've been in homes where the television is turned on early, kind of a background noise placebo. If it's a Fox News household, that steady propaganda hum has a devastating impact on reason and reality, curtailing the basic ability to think.

        •  I see people who are otherwise (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Dirtandiron

          liberal or moderate deliver anti-welfare and SNAP screeds, and it boggles my mind. We are not better than these people. Mitt Romney's friends roll out of the wrong side of bed tomorrow, and we're out of a job. This is our economy. Can you imagine a Kennedy, a Hilton, and Trump sitting around and saying, "Man, it should be illegal for an LLC and an LP to form a banking trust offshore, you know? Lazy bums." That's never going to happen.

          I'm living in America, and in America you're on your own. America's not a country. It's just a business.

          by CFAmick on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 07:34:24 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  And the news snippets are often false bits (6+ / 0-)

          of propaganda.  On NBC news a couple of days ago, the newsreader stated that the usual price direction of gasoline was down, but this year it was going up because of the fear of crude shortages.  Well, if my memory serves, the price of gasoline went up just before Labor Day each year because, it was claimed, the cost of the summer blends was higher.  So, one there are new reasons for higher prices, and the historical price directions have been reversed by the news.  The younger people have no memory, and unless they do some research, no clue as to the false claims so casually inserted into the national nightly news.

          Patriotism may be the last refuge of scoundrels, but religion is assuredly the first.

          by StrayCat on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 07:34:33 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Much of what they've got has been provided (8+ / 0-)

      by taxpayers, including public education, roads, clean water and sewers, recreational facilities, libraries, etc.  From what I read in our little rural newspaper people want their taxes to go down but any services they use to be maintained.

  •  Great post this morning Mark Sumner..... (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skillet, Hoghead99, on the cusp, StrayCat

    Reading your post is a great way to dust off the old brain cells and have hope for the day to come.....

    "A weed is a plant whose virtues have not yet been discovered." Ralph Waldo Emerson

    by Yo Bubba on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 05:12:30 AM PDT

  •  "For those of you traveling with your children- (9+ / 0-)

    why?"
    Hysterical pre-flight safety announcement on SWA:

    Since it's Sunday, I thought I would lighten the mood a bit...

    If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

    by skohayes on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 05:15:27 AM PDT

  •  Exceptionally good APR this morning, Mark. (6+ / 0-)

    I appreciate the exceptionally hopeful items sprinkled in among much of the greedily selfish mindset of those aligned with the right.

    Hope is a good thing.

    As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. John F. Kennedy

    by JaxDem on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 05:15:59 AM PDT

  •  I am surprised about Starbucks (0+ / 0-)

    being cited as a force for good.

    Really, sending their employees to Arizona State comprises that?

    Strange, strange stuff!

    but I guess it's a marketing / PR triumph, for sure!

    •  Why? (3+ / 0-)

      Although I've never investigated further, Starbucks has always tried to maintain an environmentally friendly image, and have been given many awards for their contributions to their local communities:

      Their goal to be a responsible company has led them to undertake numerous initiatives that benefit local communities, including Create Jobs for USA, which helps develop and sustain small-business jobs and empowers individuals to obtain employment; Starbucks Foundation, which provides financial support to nurture young leaders, develop sustainable access to clean water, foster education here and abroad, and much more; and Community Stores, which donates a portion of each transaction in local Starbucks stores to organizations in their surrounding area that are dedicated to revitalizing the neighborhood and improving the standard of living.
      http://blog.freeshipping.com/...

      It's really a shame more companies don't invest in their employees this way.

      If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

      by skohayes on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 05:35:01 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  My point is that as far as the education (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        a2nite

        initiative is concerned, which is the new thing that Starbucks is being megapraised for, is a lot more smoke than fire (or whatever the saying is).

        Maybe the diary wasn't referring to that, who knows.

        •  Really? (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          tobendaro, Khun David, SoCalSal

          Starbuck's is paying part of the costs, ASU is paying part, and the student pays part.

          Workers who are admitted will receive a scholarship from the college that will cover 22% of their freshman and sophomore year’s tuition. The remaining balance will have be paid out of pocket by the student or through traditional financial aid.

          Workers completing their junior and senior years will get a 44% scholarship from ASU. The rest of the cost will be taken out in student loans which Starbucks says it will pay off after students complete each semester.

          Students who leave school or Starbucks mid-semester will be responsible for paying back the loan. Starbucks says research, provided by ASU, shows that funding the semester up-front increases the drop-out rate. Tuition for ASU’s online program is about $15,000 per year.

          Read more: http://q13fox.com/...

          I don't see any other corporations doing this.

          If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

          by skohayes on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 06:07:15 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Fifteen thousand? That's worse than the value (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Stude Dude

            billing that law firms adopted so that they could charge high fees for work already done for previous clients.  I remember 500 dollar per semester college costs that included room and board in the sixties. Books were about 60 bucks per semester, and the used bookstores in town could cut those costs considerably.  Even with inflation, the costs might reasonably be 5000 per year, especially as the lectures are all recorded.

            Patriotism may be the last refuge of scoundrels, but religion is assuredly the first.

            by StrayCat on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 07:55:05 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  State college costs are rising (0+ / 0-)

              because state legislatures keep slashing their funding, but even when I went to school in the 70's, tuition and books alone cost me almost $7000 per year, room and board about another $3000 at least. And that was at a state university.

              If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

              by skohayes on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 02:45:51 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  It's "online" education (0+ / 0-)

            which is to say, very shoddy education from the get go.

            And then:

            Under the program, students must first complete 21 credits at ASU — or seven courses — before they are eligible for a payout.

            For online students, ASU undergraduate tuition ranges from $480 to $543 per credit hour, regardless of residency status and without additional program fees. That means 21 credits would cost at least $10,000.

            On its website, Starbucks said it is offering automatic, upfront scholarships to cover part of tuition. It turns out this scholarship is more like a discount ASU is offering to Starbucks employees in the program, according to The Chronicle of Higher Education.

            link

            Get back to me when Starbucks offers tuition from Day 1 at * any * university - and then maybe I'll start being impressed.

            As of now, this totally stinks as being yet more education bashing in a way tat will benefit corporate America (which is the point of MOOCs).

  •  Hank Paulson... (11+ / 0-)

    He of the three page ransom note to congress in Sept., 2008?

    Give me all your money, and unfettered control in distribution of that money, or I crash the economy.
    He might as well have stormed up the steps of Capitol wearing a mask and dragging Timothy Geithner into the building at gun point.

    I don't want to hear what he has to say about climate change or anything else, because I know there has to be a financial angle in it for him (and his patrons), not remorse.

    No amount of remorse, penance, or change of heart could or can make up for the suffering he inflicted on hundreds of millions of people only to protect the TBTF - banks and individuals (yeah, I'm looking at you, Jamie).

  •  Ruth Markus (18+ / 0-)

      Almost accidentally, she encapsulates the pathetic state of the American media.  It's not, "Senator Warren, what policies are you pursuing, and how will they affect Americans' lives?" It's "Are you running in 2016? But are you really? But why don't you say so?" On and on and on.

      Journalism has become a wasteland.

    "Le ciel est bleu, l'enfer est rouge."

    by Buzzer on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 05:32:58 AM PDT

  •  I want to thank Kos and Sumner and all the staff (26+ / 0-)

    for putting together the "Round Up" every day. I used to start my day with the NY Times ( back in junior high in 1960  you could get a copy delivered to your homeroom for 50 cents a week {or maybe it was a quarter?} and the habit stuck with me for decades). Now I start my day with the "Round Up" and then move on to the Times and my various other news sources. These things are so diverse and so well captured and so timely and the opportunity to comment myself and get feedback from other folks out there in cyber space is a wonderful addition to my life and one that I could not have envisioned a few decades ago. So just thanks, thanks a lot.

  •  For the thousandth time, (8+ / 0-)

    they're not coming for college educations. They're not coming for jobs.

    They're coming to save their lives.

    "Test of moral fitness?" Okay, Ross, you choose. Who dies?

    I live under the bridge to the 21st Century.

    by Crashing Vor on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 05:43:22 AM PDT

    •  ^Yes!! (0+ / 0-)

      When Douthat wrote:

      The young migrants are not, obviously, deeply familiar with the ins and outs of U.S. politics; they’re following smuggler-spread rumors, for the most part. But the rumors exist for a reason: They’re fueled by a sense that “if you want to get into the U.S., now is the time,” a scholar of Latin America told The Washington Post.
      ... he was referring to the very recent influx of young immigrants from Central America, unaccompanied minors who began arriving long after the conception of the Dream Act, and who have come here as a matter of life and death in many cases.  The impetus behind The Dream Act was to provide a pathway to citizenship to young people who, upon immigrating here with their parents, had spent a significant portion of their lives here.  The idea, as I understood it, was to give the children of hard-working, contributing members of society, illegal though they may be, a shot at "the American Dream".  These would decidedly not be children unfamiliar with the "ins and outs of US politics" (at least anymore so than any other public school-educated youth).  Tying the plight of these poor children from Central America and their (obvious) need for aid or amnesty of some kind to The Dream Act is, IMO, just a stunt to gin up opposition to The Dream Act.
  •  The Only Reason We Ever Could Provide for Our (7+ / 0-)

    citizens is BECAUSE we rode herd --hard-- on the corporations and their rich owners.

    Left and right today both agree --both being largely too young nowdays to have seen it work-- that this was done by taking from the rich and giving to the masses. Hence the radical extremist impression of policies that actually worked. The ONLY ones that worked, in fact.

    Mostly no. Mostly it tilted the market so the market gave less to the rich and gave more to the masses at the outset.

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 05:43:35 AM PDT

    •  It was really taking from the rich, who by the way (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Silencio, codairem

      used the lion's share of the commons, the roads, the public safety elements and the natural resources, and gave it to the whole society, which sometimes used it wisely to provide security for all people.

      Patriotism may be the last refuge of scoundrels, but religion is assuredly the first.

      by StrayCat on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 07:59:09 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Shocking. Republicans dominate AZ politics. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    a2nite, hulibow, skohayes
    While some credit hard work, perhaps the biggest factor for success is party affiliation. In the Arizona Legislature, where Republicans dominate, conservative Republicans were most effective in getting their bills through, according to an analysis done for The Arizona Republic.
    In other news, today is Sunday.

    http://www.azcentral.com/...

    It is ridiculous to pretend that firing teachers based on student test scores, starting charter schools, giving out vouchers or implementing merit pay will overcome the challenges facing a child living in poverty. -Jersey Jazzman

    by Desert Rose on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 05:47:20 AM PDT

  •  Paulson making sense (4+ / 0-)

    admitting he's not a scientist, but willing to accept we have a problem. Climate change is now purely political, just like returning prisoners of war and healthy food in schools and health care for our citizens and....

    •  other common sense measures that one would (0+ / 0-)

      assume would have majority support, and actually do have support outside of the beltway.

      It is ridiculous to pretend that firing teachers based on student test scores, starting charter schools, giving out vouchers or implementing merit pay will overcome the challenges facing a child living in poverty. -Jersey Jazzman

      by Desert Rose on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 06:32:36 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Closer to home, (7+ / 0-)

    James Gill, like the rest of us, scratches his head at David Vitter's unlikely success:

    Getting elected governor is much easier if you have a winning personality, a sterling record in another public office and no known vices.

    Two out of three will take a candidate a long way most of the time, one might do in a weak field, but a zero should be the kiss of death.

    If you are rated “least effective” in your current job, have never been accused of charm or wit, played a central role in a prostitution scandal and concede you need to do “more homework” on crucial issues, the smart money says stay home.

    I live under the bridge to the 21st Century.

    by Crashing Vor on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 06:14:20 AM PDT

  •  Leanings (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    maryabein, tobendaro, StrayCat, judyms9

    "Leaning on" someone has more than one meaning.  One major meaning is for a weak, dependent person  to need and be maintained by another stronger party.  

    By default, we have no choice but to lean on our corporate overlords.
    I take that to be the meaning implied here.  We are to admit our helplessness and depend on the kind heart of capital, corporate caring?  Haven't we lived long enough to know that to place ourselves in  such a position is to invite a kick in the teeth, or more nether regions?

    But there's another meaning to "leaning on" them, isn't there?  To pressure, make demands, even intimidate.  This is a leaning on corporations we might pursue beneficially, but we must be organized for ourselves (not some pol that's gone the second week in November), in our own self-interest.  This doesn't exist in any meaningful fashion in today's America.  Our culture of rugged individualist, of "don't bother me, I'm texting about the deal at Olive Garden" has no time or place or even means of happening.  We are thoroughly shattered and atomized, with no sense of connection or community any longer.  Twitter is NOT a community.  

    Without three things, class consciousness, social solidarity and a sense of enduring community, we will forever be limited to the first sort of "leaning".  And exactly where are those things to come from in an atomized society?

    Pay no attention to the upward redistribution of wealth!

    by ActivistGuy on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 06:17:04 AM PDT

  •  Warren will be out in Kentucky soon. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    on the cusp

    I'll be very interested in seeing what she does.

  •  Douthat proves the bankruptcy of "enforcement" (5+ / 0-)

    Immigration enforcement doesn't reduce the flow of illegal immigration. Border fences don't. Border guards don't. INS doesn't. Even treating captured immigrants terribly has no noticeable effect.

    The Great Recession was a model lesson in how to slow (or even reverse) the flow of illegal immigration. If we just ruin our economy badly enough, people will stop wanting to live here.

    (Which might be the reason that the Republican party platform seems so well suited to undermining economic growth and destroying the middle and working classes.)

    It's maddening that for the sake of finding common ground (or perhaps just naïve appeasement) the President has embraced "increased enforcement" as part of his administration's immigration policy.

  •  Steve "Strawman" Rattner (0+ / 0-)
    The technology revolution will impair the livelihoods of millions of Americans.
    I have seen him time after time do this on Mourning Joe.
    He makes the occasional perfectly sensible and cogent remark, then spends all the rest of his air time diverting and distracting , spouting this or that statistic, tut-tutting the President, etc.

    You can't make this stuff up.

    by David54 on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 06:56:20 AM PDT

  •  Dick Cheney is on This Week. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    mjd in florida, SoCalSal

    This makes me really, really angry.

    It is ridiculous to pretend that firing teachers based on student test scores, starting charter schools, giving out vouchers or implementing merit pay will overcome the challenges facing a child living in poverty. -Jersey Jazzman

    by Desert Rose on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 07:15:31 AM PDT

  •  We are a mean people (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    StrayCat, Silencio, LemmyCaution

    Don't you work with people who are downright mean, but think themselves nice and everyone else mean? That's our political atmosphere writ small.

    I'm living in America, and in America you're on your own. America's not a country. It's just a business.

    by CFAmick on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 07:24:53 AM PDT

  •  This is concerning. (0+ / 0-)
    They've also been right. The original Luddites weren't worried that technology was going to eliminate jobs, they were worried that it was going to eliminate good jobs, replacing skilled craftsmen with low-wage machine operators.
    Surprising how often people advert to the "you're a luddite!" charge to neuter legitimate argument.  Any criticism of technology = being-a-luddite.

    There's a study, a few years old now, suggesting that by 2030 47% of jobs could be (which is not a prediction they will be) fully automated.  Course, with the profit motive and endless drive to control workers...

    "It ain't so much the things we don't know that get us in trouble. It's the things we know that ain't so." (Artemus Ward)

    by Silencio on Sun Jun 22, 2014 at 08:37:48 AM PDT

  •  Speaking of the "robots" thing, (0+ / 0-)

    I just saw a good documentary about the lost art of sign painting. Thirty years ago, sign painters could make a decent living. Now, thanks to technology, sign painting is going the way of the dinosaur.

  •  The GOP is god at the Mouth game ... (0+ / 0-)

    mouth mouth mouth any topic... actually doing anything they are miserable.

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