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The 2014 Political Typology: Polarized Wings, a Diverse Middle

The two-party system tends to force us to think about the political spectrum as an either/or proposition. Team Red versus Team Blue; two massed armies fighting over the 50-yard line. There's at least some truth to that, with steadily increasing polarization, fewer ticket-splitters and more people buying entirely into liberal or conservative agendas instead of picking and choosing policies.

However, each of the two parties is still a big tent, composed of people with a variety of world views. Traditionally, it's the Democratic Party that's been the fractious one, barely holding together a coalition of unionists, people of color, educated professionals, elderly New Dealers and more. Lately, though, it's the various wings of the Republican Party that have been at each other's throats, usually depicted as a struggle between the country-club establishment versus the tea-partying rabble. And even the ill-defined independents have their diverse camps, with some more libertarian, some just angry and disengaged.

The Pew Research Center has been the expert chronicler of these divisions for many decades, through their "Typologies," which break the nation's voters down into eight or nine groups. Several times a decade, they revise the categories to keep up with the evolving electorate, and this week they released the newest edition. (The previous version dates back to 2011.)

This time, there are eight categories, each representing between 10 and 15 percent of the general public. Two are reliably Republican (Steadfast Conservatives and Business Conservatives), one is reliably Democratic (Solid Liberals). Four groups are less partisan, although two lean considerably in the Democratic direction (Next Generation Left and Faith and Family Left), one leans more in the Republican direction (Young Outsiders), and one is split right down the middle and angry at everybody (Hard-Pressed Skeptics). Finally, there's the group of Bystanders, who represent 10 percent of the population but 0 percent of the registered voters; they're the ones who simply aren't participating in the political process.

If you're hanging out here at Daily Kos (and aren't here for trolling purposes), most likely you're a Solid Liberal; you can find out which of the categories you're in by taking their quiz. Solid Liberals, who represent 15 percent of the population, are not only the most consistently liberal group (taking the left position on a wide array of policy questions), but they're also the most politically engaged and informed of the Democratic-leaning groups. They're one of the best-educated and most affluent of the groups, and, interestingly, also the most optimistic about the country's future (something you wouldn't necessarily guess by reading the comments here, but, of course, it's a wider sample than just us). Seventy percent of Solid Liberals say the United States' best days are "ahead of us" and only 22 percent say they're "behind us"—that's an even better ratio than the more millennial-heavy Next Generation Left. As you might expect, the Staunch Conservatives have the most dour attitude, opting 76/20 for the choice that our best days behind us.

There's more over the fold...

Strains in the Democratic Coalition over Morality, Homosexuality, Expanding the Social Safety Net

The rest of the Democratic coalition is composed of the Next Generation Left and the Faith and Family Left. The Next Generation Left is, as the name implies, more distinguished by their age (52 percent under 40, compared with 41 percent under 40 for Solid Liberals). They agree with Solid Liberals on cultural and scope-of-government issues, and are particularly favorable toward immigration, but also tend to be more credulous of one's ability to get ahead if one works hard, and they're more skeptical of government's ability to help the needy.

On the other hand, the Faith and Family Left tend to be older, but also more likely to be non-white and characterized more by social conservatism. They're with the Solid Liberals on economic issues, but less tolerant of homosexuality and generally more religious. (Among Solid Liberals, only 5 percent are evangelical, while 41 percent are "unaffiliated." Fifty-nine percent of Faith and Family Left are some variety of Protestant, while only 7 percent are "unaffiliated.")

Interestingly, there were nine typologies in Pew's previous version from 2011: the group that seems to have been axed is the "Post-Moderns," who were a young, diverse and tolerant, but economically laissez-faire, group. The more upbeat members of the Post-Moderns seem to have been added to the previous mostly minority group New Coalition Democrats to form the current Next Generation Left, while the more hands-off Post-Moderns seem to have been parceled out to the former Libertarian typology to form the broader Young Outsiders group. The Young Outsiders aren't uniformly libertarian or Paulist in outlook, but they are generally characterized by being socially tolerant and in favor of an isolationist foreign policy, hostile to both parties, but skeptical of government to the extent that they're a Republican-leaning group.

The last independent group is the Hard-Pressed Skeptics (formerly called the Disaffecteds)—the least-educated and least politically involved group and perhaps the most hard-hit economically. This may be the most changeable (or incoherent, if you prefer) group; the majority of them voted for Barack Obama, but now have nearly Republican level of disapproval for him. And while they believe in the unfairness of the economic system and have similar levels of dislike for Wall Street as the Solid Liberals, they also have deep distrust of government, and a level of dislike for immigrants similar to Steadfast Conservatives.

Which brings us to the two groups of consistent, politically engaged conservative, and, hoo boy, the battle lines in the Republican civil war show up clearer than ever in the new typologies. On the one hand, you have the affluent and educated Business Conservatives (formerly the Main Street Conservatives last time), who are most strongly motivated by economic issues, and the Steadfast Conservatives, who add a more socially conservative element.

Steadfast, Business Conservatives Differ over Immigration, Homosexuality

While the Steadfast Conservatives are nearly as aggressive as the Business Conservatives in their disdain for spending on a social safety net and a tendency to blame the poor for their condition, that's the main glue holding them together. While Business Conservatives love the market (they say Wall Street "helps" more than "hurts" the economy by a 74/17 margin), Steadfast Conservatives express skepticism (they break down 49/41 on that question, which in fact puts them to the left of Next Generation Left, who say "helps" by a 56/33 margin). Similarly, 71 percent of Steadfasts say that "too much power is concentrated in hands of too few companies," which puts them much closer to, well, everybody else rather than the Business Conservatives (only 35 percent of whom agree). It would give us some hope of actually pulling them away from the Republican coalition ... if it weren't for their attitudes on religion and race.

The Steadfast Conservatives also break with the Business Conservatives on foreign policy. (Steadfasts say, by a 71/24 margin, that we should "focus more at home," while Business Conservatives say, by a 67/28 margin, that it's best "to be active in world affairs.") The split is even stronger on immigration; Steadfasts say, by a 81/13 margin, that newcomers "threaten American customs/values," while Business Conservatives say, by a 72/20 margin, that newcomers "strengthen American society."

Really what sums up the divide, though, is simply how they feel about compromise itself, which is ultimately what the recent primary eruptions in Mississippi and Virginia were about, more than any one policy. Steadfast Conservatives opt 62/33 in saying they like elected officials to "stick to their positions," while Business Conservatives prefer, by a 52/43 margin, those who "make compromises." (As we discussed several weeks ago, when Pew's polarization study came out, Solid Liberals make up the group most favoring compromise: 84/11! That, of course, undercuts their ideological consistency when it's down to brass tacks at the negotiating table.)

So while we've already seen the impact of the different typologies on the recent primaries, what does this all mean for the upcoming general election in November? Luckily, Pew asks its respondents not only how they voted in 2012, but also what they plan to do in November. Unfortunately, it shows us what we're up against: while 52 percent of the respondents voted for Barack Obama in 2012, only 44 percent plan to vote Democratic in 2014. (Democrats still lead on the generic ballot; the GOP is at only 42 percent. So it's less a case of people switching, and more the typical curse of the midterm: a case of the less-motivated groups in the Democratic coalition simply planning to stay home.)

As you can see from the chart above, there's no fall-off at all among the solidly Republican groups, and very little fall-off among Solid Liberals. However, you can see the big disparities between 2012 and 2014 when you look at the less partisan groups. The Hard-Pressed Skeptics—the type who tend to blame whoever's in power—are rather actively switching, with little attrition. They went 65-25 for Obama in 2012, but plan to go for Democrats by only 51-37 this year.

However, the Next Generation Left and the Faith and Family Left are, ideologically speaking, more solidly in the Democratic camp. These are the young and/or non-white voters who just tend not to show up for midterms, and that's exactly what they're saying they'll do again. The GOP isn't gaining shares among them, but the overall participation is down. Among the Next Generation Left, who voted 70-26 for Obama in 2012, they're coming in 61-27 for Democrats in 2014. And among the Faith and Family Left, who voted 75-21 for Obama in 2012, they're coming in 63-27 for Democrats this year. In case you needed one more piece of evidence for the Democrats' need to focus on micro-targeting and face-to-face GOTV contacts to get these once-every-four-years voters to turn out this year, there it is.

As always, Pew's write-ups are some of the most information-rich material you'll read anywhere, and I encourage you to click through to read the whole thing; there are literally dozens more fascinating charts that I don't have the room to reproduce. And of course, I encourage you take the quiz (which, granted, is somewhat frustrating in the either/or nature of the questions), and, if you'd like, report below what group you fall into.

Originally posted to Daily Kos Elections on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 03:15 PM PDT.

Also republished by Daily Kos.

Poll

So what are you?

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| 5611 votes | Vote | Results

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Comment Preferences

  •  Born that way (19+ / 0-)

    Solid liberal.  Actually, I wish I lived in Finland.  

    the dog you have, is the dog you need. - Cesar Millan

    by OregonWetDog on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 03:22:09 PM PDT

  •  I've always thought it is (6+ / 0-)

    "fundamentalist" to simply ascribe a binary conservative or liberal label to most people. One may be more liberal or conservative on more issues but most people have a wide array of beliefs on different issues. I am pretty liberal on most issues but pretty conservative on some. With a libertarian influence on many of those as well.

    •  Unfortunately you'll not really see (7+ / 0-)

      where your views align with others unless you believe in the validity of the questions PEW asks under the guise of which black and white position do you "most agree with" hinkiness.

      The art of listening is the ability to pay attention to that which is most difficult to hear

      by dRefractor on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 04:47:51 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  yeah, but they have to have a manageable (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        dRefractor, MetroGnome

        set of terms to use for data. I'm sure they use well researched definition of the various domains and relevant demographic information to form their surveys.

        •  I don't think it would be so hard (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          raynmakr, Justanothernyer

          to add more options to the answers. However, doing so would make it harder to "group label" the results because more options would expose complexities (and in many cases, apparent contradictions) of thought that most academics/think tanks seem loath to tackle. Because so little effort is made to get nuance, we get poll results that are just not that informative because they insist on trying to lump people together into categories built on sand.

          Ill formed personal labels continuously damage the quality of our public discourse. I'd much rather see how people align on well defined options to issues, then align our political representatives to those... But then, there'd be no hiding, and what's the fun in that ;)

          The art of listening is the ability to pay attention to that which is most difficult to hear

          by dRefractor on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 06:28:08 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I do nit think PEW (0+ / 0-)

            is trying to advance an agenda - just some social science.

            •  not by polling the internet-it's not a valid poll (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              houyhnhnm

              it's not a valid poll, there is no assessment of bias in the population sampling method because there is no method

              no conclusions can be drawn, other than that they had a bunch of people with time on their hands sitting around ... which is inherently biased

              what's more they don't admit this, they claim the results are representative of the statistical population, they know better than that

              •  It's not an internet poll (5+ / 0-)

                Read the methodology page:

                Most of the analysis in this report is based on telephone interviews conducted January 23-March 16, 2014 among a randomly selected national sample of 10,013 adults, 18 years of age or older, living in all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia (5010 respondents were interviewed on a landline, and 5003 were interviewed on a cellphone, including 2,649 who had no landline telephone). The survey was conducted under the direction of Abt SRBI. A combination of landline and cellphone random digit dial samples were used; both samples were provided by Survey Sampling International. Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish. Respondents in the landline sample were selected by randomly asking for the youngest adult male or female who was at home at the time of the call. Interviews in the cell sample were conducted with the person who answered the phone, if that person was an adult 18 years of age or older.
                The poll at the end of this article is an internet poll with all the attendant self-selection problems that go with it, but I wasn't going to write a research paper about the results.

                Editor, Daily Kos Elections.

                by David Jarman on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 07:33:58 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  Thanks for re-publishing the results, (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  AaronInSanDiego

                  but (for reasons I discussed earlier) I really don't agree that the results are "much deeper than liberal and conservative" (be the respondents representative of a phone survey or an internet survey). While the results point out some surface contradictions in "liberal" vs. "conservative" positions, these are simple minded additions to the already simple minded social liberal, fiscal conservative labels that have been used for quite a while.

                  Politics as usual, I'm afraid. I really wish DKos would create a polling process that really digs into issues. We could tally results by registered users vs. lurkers and really begin to get a real pulse on the american electorate and what active "Democrats" really think. Being as most politicians don't seem to have a mind of their own, wouldn't it be nice to give them one (sorry, you'd think that with my attitude I'd have qualified as a skeptic in the PEW poll, alas, I'm just a solid lib).

                  Anyway, thanks again, the poll was an interesting nibble beyond traditional polling, if ultimately frustrating in its assumptions.

                  The art of listening is the ability to pay attention to that which is most difficult to hear

                  by dRefractor on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 09:55:24 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

                •  sorry I was getting yours and a different (0+ / 0-)

                  diary's comments all messed up, co-mingling results as it were, wonder if I'm the only one

                  even the next comment is talking about the 'poll' as if it were a valid 'thing'

                  it's so completely confusing I'm going to ignore it, Pew seems increasingly easy to ignore

    •  Of course, the term "conservative" has been (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Stude Dude, raynmakr

      completely corrupted by the corrupters of most things here in the US. Conservative, e.g., might mean that you wanted to conserve the state of the environment, conserve social customs and respect those who are different, conserve American manufacturing and businesses, conserve traditional, nominal American values of fairness and equality...

      Theodore Roosevelt might be the classic example of a true American conservative with whom I might disagree over many things but at least held to the above AFAIK.

      Well, if you're a modern, corrupt conservative, you want none of that stuff.

      Every human being has paid the earth to grow up. Most people don’t grow up. And you find out what it costs us to love and to lose, to dare and to fail. And maybe even more, to succeed. What it costs, in truth.—Maya Angelou

      by TerryDarc on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 05:07:54 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  A correction (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    verso2, MetroGnome

    "Hard-Pressed Skeptics plan to vote Democratic by 51% to 37%" according to Pew. That's hardly "split right down the middle" as you describe it.

    I haven't even read the rest of your post. I might comment further.

    Looks like there's more..I better not comment further.

    “Conservation… is a positive exercise of skill and insight, not merely a negative exercise of abstinence and caution…” Aldo Leopold

    by ban nock on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 03:36:10 PM PDT

  •  Is this a joke? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    dfarrah, HarryTurtledove
    more people buying entirely into liberal or conservative agendas instead of picking and choosing policies.
    In the universe that I live in, Barack Obama has made it socially acceptable and commonplace for self-described liberals to back a variety of policies that were considered batshit crazy right-wing stuff in 2008.   And Tea Party conservatives include a faction that is far to the left of the Democratic Party leadership on civil liberties and foreign policy.   The left-right lines are more jumbled than ever.   The premise of the diary is 100% wrong.
    •  loss of faith versus realignment (6+ / 0-)

      It seems to me that what's driving this is less a genuine realignment or sea change in Americans' politics than a simple loss of faith in the ability and/or willingness of the government to actually do what we want it to do.  Attacking Republicans from the right and Democrats from the left aren't new; what's changed is how many people are doing it now.  

      You have large numbers of Americans who sincerely doubt the US government's commitment to civil liberties, the rule of law, and the intelligent and humane stewardship of the economy.  Absolutely what was once the domain of fringe ideologies and figures is now increasingly mainstream.  It appears incoherent because the focus of the rhetoric varies with the identity and interests of the speaker and his or her audience, but the overall themes are very consistent.

      The "center" is now occupied only by the socially left-leaning but fiscally right-leaning or just plain right-wing 1%ers, which makes sense since they're the only people who are doing well and therefore don't want things to change much if at all.

      Domestic politics is the continuation of civil war by other means.

      by Visceral on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 04:01:31 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  It sounds like (12+ / 0-)

      you were so outraged by the first paragraph that you proceeded straight to commenting instead of reading the rest of the article, which, much as you contend, describes the ways in which the left-right lines are jumbled, in different ways among different groups. There are, in fact, parts of the Democratic coalition that believe some things that we'd consider right-wing (i.e. opposition to abortion or same-sex marriage), in other words, the Faith and Family Left, and there are parts of the Republican coalition that are libertarian on privacy and FP issues, in other words, who fall under the Young Outsiders category.

      The first paragraph that you found objectionable was something of a foil to the rest of the article (you can tell because the first word of the second paragraph is "However"), in reference (if you click on the link) to a different study that came out several weeks ago on increasing polarization. What that increased polarization means, however, is that there are fewer people today who might choose, say, 5 liberal answers and 5 conservative answers on a 10-item list of policy statements. Even though that's doubled in two decades (from 10 percent of the population choosing "consistently liberal" or "consistently conservative" positions in 1994 to 21 percent of the population in 2014), clearly that still leaves almost 80 percent of the population who still pick and choose somewhat. Hence the need for the Pew typologies discussed in this article, to try and better describe all those other people.

      Editor, Daily Kos Elections.

      by David Jarman on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 04:36:11 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  David, where did those magical "typologies" come (0+ / 0-)

        from? I read them at face value and could not align them with the America I understand.

        Did Pew pull them out of a hat or some other part of their physicality? There must have been a major psychological profile done on each polled person before adding their data to the d/b.

        Every human being has paid the earth to grow up. Most people don’t grow up. And you find out what it costs us to love and to lose, to dare and to fail. And maybe even more, to succeed. What it costs, in truth.—Maya Angelou

        by TerryDarc on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 05:13:17 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  There's a (6+ / 0-)

          Q&A page, with Pew's director of survey research, attached to the summary, which might help you out. They've done this a number of times since 1987, and the basic framework doesn't change much each time they do it, so that's probably a schema that colors their perceptions. But it sounds like they do a regression-type analysis and look for what responses tend to cluster together in the most statistically significant way:

          And so we use a statistical technique to identify groups of people who hold similar values and opinions across a large set of questions asked in the survey – 23 in the current typology – each of which gets equal weight in the process. This technique is called “cluster analysis....” Instead, we run numerous versions of it (e.g., asking it to produce different numbers of clusters) and judge each result by how analytically practical and substantively meaningful it is.

          Editor, Daily Kos Elections.

          by David Jarman on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 05:29:16 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Thanks! I guess that makes sense, but... (0+ / 0-)

            I think maybe the characterization of them with one of 8 typologies or labels, after their cluster analysis, is somewhat magical. I think that was judgmental and not simply some artifact that fell out of the analysis.

            I'd agree - and most here would I expect - that Dem v. Rep is incomplete, inaccurate and misleading. I frankly had problems with some of the questions but came out the other end, as expected, solid lib. Have not voted for a Rep candidate in my memory and I come from a state with a respectable Rep tradition.

            Like Pew says, it's human nature to categorize and interesting. Thanks for the post.

            Every human being has paid the earth to grow up. Most people don’t grow up. And you find out what it costs us to love and to lose, to dare and to fail. And maybe even more, to succeed. What it costs, in truth.—Maya Angelou

            by TerryDarc on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 06:00:36 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Commenting on the technique, not the example (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              David Jarman, Garrett, Square Knot

              The clusters in the technique are real, and the identification as principally D or R should be. But the names for the clusters are of course a combination of convenience and possibly cleverness or amusement.

              The technique plots the responses in (in this case) a 23-dimensional binary space, and uses distances between points to create clusters. The clusters will typically contain most of the points; if there are too many outliers, the analysis will not be statistically significant.

              The points in a cluster should ideally be closer to one another than any point in the cluster is to outside points. In practice, this will probably not be quite true.

              The number of clusters is not completely fixed, and the clusters do not always have the same diameter or cohesion. If you ask for more clusters, it may partition existing clusters, and/or possibly make clusters out of outliers, if there are enough of them and they are not too far apart.

              •  Well said (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Odysseus, jncca

                What's arbitrary in all this is the use of 8-9 groups. I'm sure if you doubled or tripled that, you could still draw statistically significant connections, and do it with more nuance. I think they settled on 8-9 just because that's a manageable number for casual readers (and for the poor person who has to write the report); this is for a mainstream media general audience, not a PhD dissertation. The Patchwork Nation project, which does something similar (using demographic criteria to sort at the county level) used the similar number of categories, for instance: 12. (Claritas Prizm uses 66 categories to sort people, but that's a for-profit system oriented toward helping marketers sell stuff, so there it makes sense to use a higher level of granularity.)

                Editor, Daily Kos Elections.

                by David Jarman on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 07:11:44 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  It's somewhat arbitrary, but it may also be (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Garrett

                  driven by the data. It may be that trying to go to the "next level" of cluster is just too fuzzy. In other words, the lines between any two subclusters of the ones they chose are too indistinct. At some point you have to literally "draw the line". Otherwise, your classifier is no longer generalizing -- it is just "memorizing" the input data, and when someone on the internet takes the quiz, she is told, "You are a Jeannie-from-Poughkeepsie-New-York," because her answers exactly match those of one of the original survey participants -- Jeannie, from Poughkeepsie, New York.

                  To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

                  by UntimelyRippd on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 08:12:52 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

              •  actually, i'm pretty sure the clusters are based (3+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                libera nos, Garrett, jncca

                on far more than these 23 questions. if you examine the report, you'll note that the characteristics listed as identifying some of the categories come from questions that weren't in the 23 given in the quiz.

                what happened was, after they did the clustering, they were able to build a classifier that reliably classified all of their samples using only those 23 questions -- so they don't need to ask the others in order to place a new sample in the most likely cluster ...

                To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

                by UntimelyRippd on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 08:07:24 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

  •  Not only a solid liberal but a "God Damned Proud" (8+ / 0-)

    one as well. there isn't any current alternative.

    UID 35,098 Nov. 12, 2004. Seems like yesterday.

    by flatford39 on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 03:41:35 PM PDT

  •  got me.... (6+ / 0-)

    I don't know if I'm a 'solid liberal' or a 'hard-pressed skeptic'. It used to be easier to be a liberal; now it's more that I tend to disbelieve all politicians, because they've lied to us so many times. I'm certainly not excepting the last two 'democratic' presidents, both of whom are far closer to the pre-Reagan GOP.

    (Is it time for the pitchforks and torches yet?)

    by PJEvans on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 03:43:53 PM PDT

    •  The link (7+ / 0-)

      on the word "quiz" above will take you to the quiz if you want to see where you fall according to the Pew People.

      ban nock wrote a diary on this. Most of us -- but not all -- are screaming red bleeding heart big government commie liberals according to the quiz.

      The questions are very black and white though. With better options, I bet that we could easily break down "solid liberal" into at least a few more categories that would make sense to us...

      I thought about snarkily suggesting some categories. But at the last second, my wiser, more prudent brain decided not to.

      ;)

      © grover


      So if you get hit by a bus tonight, would you be satisfied with how you spent today, your last day on earth? Live like tomorrow is never guaranteed, because it's not. -- Me.

      by grover on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 03:52:05 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yep (0+ / 0-)

        I failed to see much nuance (pick something the "most closely aligns" with your thinking is pretty weak when there are very significant identifiable distinctions to be made) in any of the questions; these types of polls (or almost any poll for that matter) dumb down the discussion of issue politics and create new categories from flawed inputs. More tribes with identities barely more distinguishable than the liberal v. conservative tribes , woo-hoo!

        The art of listening is the ability to pay attention to that which is most difficult to hear

        by dRefractor on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 04:41:42 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  actually if you take the quiz (0+ / 0-)

        and then click on the other 'types' you can see where your answers fall within those groups. For example it placed me in "Solid Liberal" catogery it also shows where my answers place me in the other catorgeries.

        Der Weg ist das Ziel

        by duhban on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 05:42:02 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Obama and Clinton are/were more like Nixon with a (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      nimh, Mark27

      dash of Eisenhower which includes a large portion of pandering to Wall Street.  I'm yearning for the economic policies of FDR to get the country moving again.

      Putting the fun back in dysfunctional.

      by hawkseye on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 04:52:03 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Sorry. I LIVED through Nixon (9+ / 0-)

        Nixon was not a friend of mine, but Barack Obama is no Richard Milhouse Nixon with a touch of DD Eisenhower.

        Nor is Bill Clinton of whom I am less a fan. But please...BHO has his faults but being in the same political universe as Nixon is ridiculous.

        Eisenhower, though a true gentleman and fine general, was proof that we did not actually need a president during his 8 years in office. Neither Clinton nor Obama remotely resemble Ike.

        Not.even.close.

        Every human being has paid the earth to grow up. Most people don’t grow up. And you find out what it costs us to love and to lose, to dare and to fail. And maybe even more, to succeed. What it costs, in truth.—Maya Angelou

        by TerryDarc on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 05:19:06 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  agreed! (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Odysseus, TerryDarc

          Nixon was a red baiter, an anti-semite and inherently a crook who thought if he talked fast enough he could squirm out of anything. A nasty specimen.

          Blessed are the hearts that can bend; for they can never be broken Albert Camus

          by vcmvo2 on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 06:10:16 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  I think s/he was talking about economic policy (5+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Stude Dude, fenway49, hawkseye, Mark27, jncca

          Nixon was a deeply flawed person, but were his economic policies significantly to the right of Obama's? I mean, for example, he supported rent control, didn't he? You'd have to go as far left as the Green Party to find that now...

        •  I was talking about economic policies. Nixon was (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          nimh

          in favor of a national health care program that Teddy Kennedy said he wished he had taken him up on.  Another commenter below says that Nixon was in favor of rent control---for another instance.  
          Nixon surely was a terrible President in most, but not ALL ways.  Eisenhower was indeed mediocre, but he was far to the left of current Republicans on the economy.  We need something like his highway program now to put people back to work.

          Putting the fun back in dysfunctional.

          by hawkseye on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 11:47:49 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Then we have Nixon's domestic chops (0+ / 0-)

            Nixon lied about a secret plan to end the Vietnam war and took 6 years to get his and our asses thrown out. Thousands more died, two countries nearly destroyed including our economy which did not fully recover until Bill Clinton.

            He did more deliberately to destroy our democratic system with the Watergate break in, plumbers units, supporting J Edgar Hoover to spy on and discredit Martin Luther King Jr. and Hoover's cointelpro was a work of Faustian mania to do anything, everything possible to destroy protests against an evil war.

            The Watergate travesty was in a presidential election Nixon won by a landslide. Nothing need have been done against the very decent Geo. McGovern. Imagine what Nixon might have done if he'd been in danger of losing.

            I think Nixon did what he thought he needed to in terms of winning the hearts and minds of Americans  - his  economic policy came from his conniving soul, not his shriveled up heart.

            Every human being has paid the earth to grow up. Most people don’t grow up. And you find out what it costs us to love and to lose, to dare and to fail. And maybe even more, to succeed. What it costs, in truth.—Maya Angelou

            by TerryDarc on Mon Jun 30, 2014 at 08:29:58 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  All of which is irrelevant to hawkseye's point (0+ / 0-)

              ... which was merely that Obama's economic policy is similar to that of Nixon or Eisenhower, when something more like FDR's is really needed. Why Nixon's economic policies were as centrist as Obama's, and a far cry to those of today's GOP -- and if it came from the heart or the conniving mind -- doesn't much matter to that point.

              •  Gee, thanks (0+ / 0-)

                Let me tee it up for you.

                I think Nixon did what he thought he needed to in terms of winning the hearts and minds of Americans  - his  economic policy came from his conniving soul, not his shriveled up heart.
                I hate quoting myself but I will. I cite the other items because they were consistent with Nixon's total vile behavior as president. The idea that Nixon is in any way more progressive than BHO is total bullshit in the Fox News "they all do it" false equivalency.

                Every human being has paid the earth to grow up. Most people don’t grow up. And you find out what it costs us to love and to lose, to dare and to fail. And maybe even more, to succeed. What it costs, in truth.—Maya Angelou

                by TerryDarc on Mon Jun 30, 2014 at 07:07:36 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

  •  I'm actually kind of curious (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ban nock, La Gitane, James Allen, Odysseus

    why the Next Gen Left doesn't think racial discrimination is a thing.

    30, white male, TX-07 (current), TN-09 (born), TN-08 (where parents live now)

    by TDDVandy on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 03:47:52 PM PDT

    •  I think because they are more white (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      duhban, raynmakr

      The two groups with minorities are Faith and Family and the Hard Pressed Skeptics. From memory F+F is majority minority and skeptics have twice as many AA as liberals. Dont' remember percent for Next Gen but it was only slightly more than Liberals.

      “Conservation… is a positive exercise of skill and insight, not merely a negative exercise of abstinence and caution…” Aldo Leopold

      by ban nock on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 03:52:28 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Not compared to solid liberals (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Stude Dude, raynmakr

        That was more what I was wondering.

        The "Young Outsiders" group is the weirdest.

        30, white male, TX-07 (current), TN-09 (born), TN-08 (where parents live now)

        by TDDVandy on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 03:55:36 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I've been reading this for 2 days and haven't even (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Stude Dude, duhban, raynmakr, Odysseus

          cracked the "young outsiders" yet.

          Somewhat amazed at places where two groups will agree or score highest and one is liberal and the other conservative and all the other groups are on the other side of things.

          Liberals and Business are the two most affluent, it colors ones perceptions.

          “Conservation… is a positive exercise of skill and insight, not merely a negative exercise of abstinence and caution…” Aldo Leopold

          by ban nock on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 03:59:58 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  The funny thing is (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Stude Dude, raynmakr, fenway49, memiller

            the Young Outsiders and the Next Gen Left actually sound pretty similar to one another.  I guess the Next Gen Left just happens to place more emphasis on social issues?

            I think, really, a lot of people in the 30-and-under generation have just kind of given up on Social Security because we've heard the fibs about it all our lives.

            30, white male, TX-07 (current), TN-09 (born), TN-08 (where parents live now)

            by TDDVandy on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 04:04:17 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  Jim Crow is long gone & Archie Bunker was a clown (3+ / 0-)

      Institutionalized discrimination is ancient history to them while the vulgar and malicious attitudes that animated it are seen as absurd.  Differences between individuals and groups are simply accepted and have lost almost all of the moral baggage that was attached to them, other than the obligation to simply accept them.  Even as inequality is increasingly seen as something that transcends race, the concept of inequality itself is weakened by the belief in the normality of difference and the unwillingness to pass any kind of judgment on that difference.

      Domestic politics is the continuation of civil war by other means.

      by Visceral on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 04:17:36 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  It's not that (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Patango, Square Knot, Justanothernyer

      I took the quiz and it put me in Next Gen Left.  It's less of a "racial discrimination isn't a thing" and more "we've made a hell of a lot of progress, and my cohort and I don't participate in racial discrimination, so this will solve itself as the old racists die out."

      We're skeptical of things like affirmative action because it looks unfair to us.  We don't see the residual effects of institutionalized racism as vividly as the previous generation of liberals did.

      I'm not quite all the way on that side of the issues, personally, but the way the questions were phrased put me there.  I was trying to strike a balance in my responses between hard-core "racism is still an enormous problem" and "racism isn't a problem at all".

    •  At least in part (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      nimh, Square Knot, Justanothernyer

      Because the two questions on the topic were, you should pardon the expression, black-and-white.

      And because the concerns of the younger generation, especially college-age and white, tend to be different.

    •  As someone who was characterized as Next Gen Left (0+ / 0-)

      but is aware that racism is a thing, I suspect you are seeing the binary and limited nature of the questions.  

    •  it's because they're more or less all white. (0+ / 0-)

      I would have figured I'd be in "NextGen Left" given I'm in that age group but...I'm not white. This country has not nearly progressed far enough. Seems those answers are what pushed me into "Solid Liberal."

      Dawkins is to atheism as Rand is to personal responsibility. uid 52583 lol

      by terrypinder on Mon Jun 30, 2014 at 04:33:55 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  The term "Progressive"... (0+ / 0-)

    and variations on that particular theme are missing from the poll, rendering it useless...at least for me..

    •  "Progressive" is becoming a weird word. (6+ / 0-)

      Hillary Clinton calls herself a progressive.    If it truly applies to her then I don't think it means what is used to.

      •  "Progressive" seems to me either... (6+ / 0-)

        ....a cowardly way to call one's self a "liberal", or a way to try to distinguish themselves from "liberals", who aren't liberal enough in their opinion.

        You can't spell "Dianne Feinstein" without "NSA".

        by varro on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 06:20:38 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  I think you're exactly right (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          varro
        •  I'll take (b). 25 yrs ago, when I started calling (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          memiller

          myself 'progressive', the term 'liberal' hadn't been thoroughly demonized yet by the right; to me a liberal had mostly decent politics but was a bit too propertied and genteel to really want significant social change (at least more than glacially incremental).  I was also very aware of the 17th-18th century roots of liberalism in a very individualistic (rather than collectivist or communitarian)ideology--a distinction that was still visible up till about 20 years ago in the British Liberal vs Labor parties.  Of course, "labor" (or "working class") hasn't had a lot of traction in the US of A for a while, so actual Lefties had to call ourselves something else.  

          But PEW says we're Solid Liberals, so ok then.  All I'll say is: I teach a basically Western Civ course to students who are mostly Hard-Pressed Skeptics and F and F Left, and when we get to "The Communist Manifesto" almost everyone is like, hell yeah, I'm with THIS guy.  They have no idea that Marxism is a dirty word...  

          •  That is a very interesting thing to hear. (0+ / 0-)

            I would not have predicted it, growing up doing 'duck and cover' drills, but I can see how it could be.

            Could it be that a new socialism under a new name can take root among this rising generation?

            Thanks for the comment.

            Mark E. Miller // Kalamazoo Township Trustee // MI 6th District Democratic Chair

            by memiller on Mon Jun 30, 2014 at 09:35:15 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  This Pew quiz is coming up in a few diaries (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tardis10, indres

    In another diary, Mokurai made this comment:

    I questioned the entire methodology of the poll, and in particular the choice and wording of questions. I stated objections to many of them, and to the complete lack of questions on some essential topics. There are many other ways to slice and dice the US electorate. Depending on the questions asked, the groupings can be expected to come out quite differently.
    And I made this one:
    I tried to answer the first few questions and then stopped because I recognized that the entire survey itself appears to be a propaganda tool from the right.  The questions are written with a conservative bias, which is obvious with the first question having to do with 'government regulation'.  Remember, "He who asks the questions controls the conversation"
    Coincidentally, I just published a related diary about what it means to be 'on the left' or 'on the right.'  It's currently in the Community Spotlight, if anyone is interested.

    My conclusions: Folks on the left are most interested in the welfare of the common people (in other words, those with the least money and power in the land, the schmucks).  During the French revolution, these people were called the Third Estate.

    Folks on the right are those who benefit from the status quo and therefore want to keep things just the same, whether others starve or not.  During the French revolution, these people were called the Second Estate, or nobles.

    I wonder if coming up with a bazillion different subcategories isn't just a way to simultaneously entertain and confuse the masses.

    If a small minority of people is now stealthily ruling what was previously a democratic country, and "the people" don't seem to realize it, should anyone bother to tell them?

    by Older and Wiser Now on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 03:51:33 PM PDT

    •  um...there are right-wing 'revolutionary' groups (0+ / 0-)

      and movements throughout the last hundred years at least, including in the good ol US of A.   In fact that's sort of our specialty of late.  It's fine if you want to say that the Tea Party is pure corporate astroturf, but where do you put skinheads and Bundy-types?  They don't seem to be very supportive of the status quo.  But I also don't want them in my party.  Or at my party...

  •  discouraging homosexuality (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    mrsfixit, Patango, indres, jncca

    interesting quiz, but i thought the phrasing of the question "homosexuality should be encouraged/discouraged by society" was an odd choice of wording.  it's really not something that you encourage or discourage... that makes it sound like people are out there waiting to make a choice, and the encouragement (or lack thereof) from society will affect their decision.

    seems like "should accept" vs "should not accept" would be a better choice of options.  or perhaps a choice between "deserve to be treated equally" vs "do not deserve to be treated equally".

    i dunno... encourage/discourage just seems odd and vaguely biased.

    •  Ummm... (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ChadmanFL, memiller

      I would call what the Texas GOP is doing (recognizing the "legitimacy" of reparative therapy) discouraging homosexuality.

      30, white male, TX-07 (current), TN-09 (born), TN-08 (where parents live now)

      by TDDVandy on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 03:56:42 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I'll bet it was worded that way on purpose (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Odysseus, memiller, jncca

      For all of us who support gay rights we only have one answer anyway, they might be trying to tease out the anti gay sympathies of a certain segment without scaring them away.

      “Conservation… is a positive exercise of skill and insight, not merely a negative exercise of abstinence and caution…” Aldo Leopold

      by ban nock on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 04:02:51 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Are you serious? (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Patango, GoUBears, USA629, memiller

      There is a large swathe of people in this country who would send all homosexuals forcibly to re-education camps to "sort out their illness" if they had a chance to.  Some state GOP platforms actually include "reparative therapy" for gay people.

      •  They know that already, what's unknown is what (0+ / 0-)

        percentage of Faith and Family Dems don't approve of gay marriage say, that's what they are trying to find out, or liberals for that matter.

        There are fully what, 10% of liberals that vote R?

        “Conservation… is a positive exercise of skill and insight, not merely a negative exercise of abstinence and caution…” Aldo Leopold

        by ban nock on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 04:49:00 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Boy that poll sure is interesting (4+ / 0-)

    there's 390 plus solid liberals, and 5-10 of each of the other group...

    Hilarious.

    "Ronald Reagan is DEAD! His policies live on but we're doing something about THAT!"

    by leftykook on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 03:52:46 PM PDT

    •  Just goes to show how people who consider (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      nimh, Odysseus

      themselves liberal figure things out. Do you think 400 plus people took the Pew poll? I don't. They probably skimmed the diary and said to themselves, "I don't even understand what those other choices are but I'm a liberal" click.

      “Conservation… is a positive exercise of skill and insight, not merely a negative exercise of abstinence and caution…” Aldo Leopold

      by ban nock on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 03:56:31 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  You're wrong. (7+ / 0-)

        People love to take these kinds of tests.

        You're description according to Pew may be Hard-Pressed Skeptic, but maybe it should be Disbelieving Cynic.

        "Bob Johnson doesn't have special privileges, because really, why would I entrust that guy with ANYTHING?" - kos, November 9, 2013

        by Bob Johnson on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 04:02:27 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  I'm glad you kept this dickish comment out of your (5+ / 0-)

        own diary on this subject. I couldn't have properly answered it there. So.. You think the poll above

        Just goes to show how people who consider themselves liberal figure things out.
        You are apparently unable to believe that other people might be as interested in Pew's questions as YOU were,
        Do you think 400 plus people took the Pew poll? I don't.
        despite you writing a diary which invited us all to do so. But the most amusing (and telling, considering your diary's title) part of your comment is the last sentence.
        They probably skimmed the diary and said to themselves, "I don't even understand what those other choices are but I'm a liberal" click.
        Psychologists call that Projection.

        Enough fossil fuel remains on Earth to warm it 6 degrees C by 2100 AD if it is all used. A +6 C planet will only sustain half a billion humans. Human population will rise to 9 billion by 2050. Any questions?

        by davidincleveland on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 04:34:18 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  P. S. Despite your *own* confusion on the subject, (4+ / 0-)

          I doubt if most of us liberals on this site ever mistook you for one of us.

          Enough fossil fuel remains on Earth to warm it 6 degrees C by 2100 AD if it is all used. A +6 C planet will only sustain half a billion humans. Human population will rise to 9 billion by 2050. Any questions?

          by davidincleveland on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 04:37:34 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  from many of the replies it seems quite a few (0+ / 0-)

            didn't take the quiz.

            From your reply and from many comments from others on this site I wonder how many who test out as liberal are just giving the answers that will get them the results they hope for. There is a very strong authoritarianism streak here and a fair amount of bigotry.

            I'd be hard pressed to predict who is the more liberal between us.

            “Conservation… is a positive exercise of skill and insight, not merely a negative exercise of abstinence and caution…” Aldo Leopold

            by ban nock on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 04:46:32 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  What replies in this diary are you using to (4+ / 0-)

              ... support this comment?

              from many of the replies it seems quite a few didn't take the quiz.
              As for questioning the beliefs of many folks who post here...
              From your reply and from many comments from others on this site I wonder how many who test out as liberal are just giving the answers that will get them the results they hope for.
              Even though you tested out as Hard-Pressed Skeptic, maybe you should be labeled Bitter Cynic.

              "Bob Johnson doesn't have special privileges, because really, why would I entrust that guy with ANYTHING?" - kos, November 9, 2013

              by Bob Johnson on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 05:50:48 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

            •  ban nok says (5+ / 0-)
              There is a very strong authoritarianism streak here and a fair amount of bigotry.
              White victimhood strikes again , and of course this " bigotry " he speaks of probably only happened right here on this blog , oh the horrors

              And it is " projection " indeed , here is what ban nok had to say about "DK liberals" in his diary on this subject  

              ban nok

                  I noticed that here on DK we would need about five categories over to the left of Extreme  Liberal.Probably somewhere to the left of Mao  in order to include all.

              My Response

                 

              Mao Zedong

                  The U.S. State department in 1976 estimated that there may have been a million killed in the land reform, and 800,000 killed in the counter-revolutionary campaign.[170]

                  Mao himself claimed that a total of 700,000 people were killed in attacks on "counter-revolutionaries" during the years 1950–52.[171] However, because there was a policy to select "at least one landlord, and usually several, in virtually every village for public execution",[172] the number of deaths range between 2 million[172][173] and 5 million.[174][175] In addition, at least 1.5 million people,[176] perhaps as many as 4 to 6 million,[177] were sent to "reform through labour" camps where many perished.[177] Mao played a personal role in organizing the mass repressions and established a system of execution quotas,[178] which were often exceeded.[168] He defended these killings as necessary for the securing of power

              wiki

              This comment is insulting towards most members on this blog , why would a person post in a place they hold in such disdain ?

              DK

              So according to conservadems like ban nok , The Democratic Party is steadfastly "right" of bill clinton in 2014 , and DK liberals are Maoists  

              Beer Drinkers & Hell Raisers

              by Patango on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 05:51:21 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

        •  Projection. Thanks. What a relief to see it said. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          davidincleveland
      •  I took the quiz a couple days ago. (2+ / 0-)

        I'm not at all surprised by the diary poll results, and I think it's probably close to accurate in this case.

        Gondwana has always been at war with Laurasia.

        by AaronInSanDiego on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 04:50:54 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Still they should know better than to claim any (0+ / 0-)

          internet poll is scientific. And they do, by claiming their results constitute valid population statistics (in the answers).

          That's really wrong. Even if they had massive responses there's population and statistical bias inherent with this method.

          Blow them a raspberry but do not take this seriously.

          •  are you talking about the Pew study (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            i saw an old tree today, jncca

            or the poll in this diary? Obviously the diary poll isn't scientific and doesn't prove anything. But as far as I'm aware, the Pew study isn't a self-selected internet poll.

            Gondwana has always been at war with Laurasia.

            by AaronInSanDiego on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 08:28:59 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  good question! (0+ / 0-)

              I'm not sure this could have been more 'conundrumized' to coin a word

              The bug here is that the results of one are used in the results of the other

              No matter, with the 'pointing to itself' approach the while thing is sort of lame, to me, it's like Pew advertising itself

              I also want to mistrust the results—based on the typification and the questions, eg, the 15% population as liberal based on those questions, is disappointing—and for these reasons I do, and am happy to ignore it and move on

  •  Can't resist a quiz (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    raboof

    Though given that so many of us (self included) are in the solid liberal camp -- and given how we fight on here -- that's one swirly solid.

    The quiz it reminds me -- in a purely subjective way -- of Adorno and Rokeach and the short form inventory for dogmatism, packed up the same way to be a sort of asshat catcher and tuned to a question or two per category of asshattery.  The fact the categories are so neatly distributed seems the best argument for the typology -- look, we're getting at something.

    Very interesting set of somethings and very interesting article, but also really depressing.

    ...j'ai découvert que tout le malheur des hommes vient d'une seule chose, qui est de ne savoir pas demeurer en repos dans une chambre.

    by jessical on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 03:53:46 PM PDT

  •  As a democratic socialist/environmental radical... (0+ / 0-)

    rigorously pragmatic progressive, I don't identify fully with any of the pigeonholes.

    I am liberal in the sense of supporting civil liberties, free expression & lifestyle, multi-party representative democracy, independent media and judiciary etc, but NOT in the sense of economic liberalism, letting private corporations make the main decisions about where, how, to whom resources are allocated.  

    There's no such thing as a free market!

    by Albanius on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 03:58:12 PM PDT

    •  American liberals traditionally (0+ / 0-)

      are more skeptical of economic liberalism, and that's mostly reflected in the Solid Liberal category, with the notable exception of free trade, where Steadfast Conservatives are opposed and Business Conservatives and Solid Liberals are both in favor.

      Gondwana has always been at war with Laurasia.

      by AaronInSanDiego on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 05:01:52 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  well, that's exactly why some of us above were (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        AaronInSanDiego

        looking for a "progressive" category (or screw it, just a DFH category)--because, while American liberals may not be British capital-L Liberals, as in the Liberal Party, I've always thought American liberalism was still too implicated in economic liberalism of the John Stuart Mill variety.  

        Not that JSM was a bad guy, but as he was an exact contemporary of Marx I can safely say that he was no Marx.  Old Labour Party vs Liberal party.

  •  Poll option missing (5+ / 0-)

    "Wild Eyed Radical Fanatic"

    And my impression of the "quiz" was "great Cthulhu, the political spectrum has really moved to the right."  

    The thing about quotes on the internet is you cannot confirm their validity. ~Abraham Lincoln

    by raboof on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 04:04:12 PM PDT

  •  Imbecility cubed (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ChadmanFL, Older and Wiser Now

    People who continue this "liberal vs conservative" kabuki do so at the peril of what's left of civilization.  Conservatism is the belief that things should change gradually if at all; its proper antonym is "radical."  Liberalism, as any dictionary will tell you, is essentially the belief that people are qualified to govern themselves in their own interests.  Or, as wikipedia puts it:

    Liberalism is a political philosophy or worldview founded on ideas of liberty and equality.  Liberals espouse a wide array of views depending on their understanding of these principles, but generally they support ideas such as free and fair elections, civil rights, freedom of the press, freedom of religion, free trade, and private property.
    Most people in the United States are liberals, yet this idiotic, imaginary "contest" goes on.

    A media that reports issues fairly and intelligently, and that holds power accountable, is an inherently liberal institution.

    by Dinclusin on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 04:09:36 PM PDT

    •  WTH? (0+ / 0-)

      Look, we may not like conservatives but your description isn't even historically correct. Conservatives don't believe in slow change. They believe that the government has little right or reason to inhibit the individual in society. They believe that the collective group should not have more power than the individual. A lot of people, left or right, believe this. Your most people are liberal point misses a lot of degrees.

      I don't think it helps our cause to be intellectually dishonest by lazily quoting dictionaries. We need to based our arguments on empirical results and sound policies.

      Is modern day conservatism rooted in lazy simple mindedness and paranoia? Sure. However, our history and ideals could be considered questionable as well.

      •  Historically, Dinclusin's definition seems more .. (0+ / 0-)

        ... correct than yours. The conservatives who were driven by a fear and revulsion of the French Revolution were no fans of uninhibited individualism, and did believe that government, along with clergy and nobility, had a moral duty to restrain "the individual in society".

        When it comes to the present time, of course, your definition is definitely the more accurate and relevant one, at least regarding how the label conservative is used - and identified with - in US politics. So if you had criticized Dinclusin's post for perhaps being historically correct, but pedantic and politically irrelevant, you'd have a point.

        But you specifically argue that his/her "description isn't even historically correct", and that seems odd. The conservatives of 100-250 years ago - arguably the birthing era of conservativism as modern political movement - did not "believe that the government has little right or reason to inhibit the individual in society". In fact, those in many non-Western countries still don't.

  •  I'm a solid liberal (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ChadmanFL, Odysseus

    yet I think BO is a disaster.

    I'm also not optimistic at all about turning the US around.  

    I think the US is sliding into 3rd world status.  Politicians refuse to face up to what needs to be done - and that is raise taxes and support large increases in workers' wages.

    And environmentally?  pffffft. I don't even know where to start on that topic.

    The banks have a stranglehold on the political process. Mike Whitney

    by dfarrah on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 04:15:17 PM PDT

    •  Why the "yet?" (0+ / 0-)

      Obama is a conservative.  To any real liberal, BO's presidency is a disaster.

      •  Pew conducted a random sample poll (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        nimh

        The link in the diary is to "take the quiz yourself." But Pew first ran a random sample poll using the same questions and derived the various categories from those results.

        According to their report on the random sample poll, those whose answers placed them in the solid liberal category also endorsed support for President Obama. This information pops up if you score as solid liberal in the self-quiz.

        I think dfarrah is saying that he or she scored as solid liberal ... yet does not share some of the other views endorsed by the random sample solid liberals.

        Just because you're not a drummer doesn't mean that you don't have to keep time. -- T. Monk

        by susanala on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 05:23:55 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  truly a foolishly wrong comment (0+ / 0-)

        Der Weg ist das Ziel

        by duhban on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 06:51:21 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  um (0+ / 0-)

      Politicians and the people who elect them refuse to face up to what needs to be done - and that is raise taxes and support large increases in workers' wages.

      FIFY

  •  I love this place! (6+ / 0-)

    I am a conservative with a strong libertarian side.  I read this same article on another site and the comments were filled with anti right and anti left NOISE!
    I am thrilled to be in a place with people that think with their brain and not their party affiliation!
    I actually think there is room for a conservative Republican on the Kos!

    •  I think we have a few here that seem to want to... (0+ / 0-)

      I think we have a few here that seem to want to discuss rather than troll and bash. I know that I never mind discussing issues with anyone of any political leaning as long as they are here to talk and also listen.

    •  Depends on whether you can think. (0+ / 0-)
      I actually think there is room for a conservative Republican on the Kos!
      If all you want to do is parrot talking points, you're going to have a really rough time here.

      If you can actually think and argue why specific policies are a good idea or a bad idea, you'll fit in fine.

      -7.75 -4.67

      "Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose."

      There are no Christians in foxholes.

      by Odysseus on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 11:25:55 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Talking points (0+ / 0-)

        I have a hard time using words created by someone else.  It's like having someone else think for me.  Both parties create the talking points to express their thinking and achieve their goals.  Some I may agree with but I still prefer my own thought process.

  •  "hard-pressed skeptic" seems to fit (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ban nock, Odysseus

    Creaking along and far from convinced that anyone is willing or able to help out or solve the big problems that would help most everyone out without picking and choosing.

    Domestic politics is the continuation of civil war by other means.

    by Visceral on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 04:22:43 PM PDT

  •  The "faith and family" left doesn't trouble me (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Pope Buck I, nimh, Bailey2001, USA629

    By and large that group is composed of minorities who by and large are fine with voting in liberal Democrats each election in spite of being more religious and at least somewhat more socially conservative.  For the most part they base their vote on progressive economic issues rather than social conservative issues.  Most of the minority-majority districts wind up electing people pretty progressive across the board.

  •  Business Conservative (4+ / 0-)

    Which kind of surprised me. But it's around where I figured I was close too.  

    22, Male, NC-02 home, SC-04 School. Majoring in Piano Pedagogy. Not your typical DKE junkie!

    by aggou on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 04:38:36 PM PDT

  •  Those labels don't really cover other positions (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    River Rover, Odysseus

    such as Anarchists, Syndicalists, Social Democrats etc.

    I took the quiz and I came out as a "solid liberal". In reality I am a village-communitarian with a Syndicalist economy and free land redistributor.

    A million Arcosantis.

    by Villabolo on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 04:43:00 PM PDT

    •  They want to roughly categorize the US population (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      David Jarman, Garrett, Odysseus, jncca

      in chunks of 10-15% each. There's no way on earth that anarchist, syndicalist, etc convictions are shared (even without invoking the label) by anywhere near such a share of Americans. To get labels that kind of fine-grained they'd have to split the population a hundred different ways, which would make the study fairly useless in terms of broader strategic insights.

      And I say that as someone who, if pressed, would use a self-invented label (Anarcho-democrat) to describe my beliefs. :-) Instead, I got "solid liberal", which feels weird considering what "liberal" stands for in my country, but I understand how it works. The ideological placement chart showed my position about where the Y-axis should be - there is apparently no statistically significant number of Americans to the left of me - so what use would it be to come up with a dozen finely grained labels to describe positions in that edge of the spectrum?

      •  With proper phrasing those questions (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Odysseus

        could have found out if there were a certain number, let's say 15% or more, of people who ascribe to those beliefs even if they weren't aware of the labels.

        For example, if you ask workers whether they believe that the companies they work for should be owned, operated and managed by the workers themselves you would probably get more than 10-15% agreeing to that. That would automatically make those respondents Syndicalists regardless of whether they even knew the word.

        A million Arcosantis.

        by Villabolo on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 07:19:28 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  You are more optimistic than me. (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Bailey2001, jncca

          I get what you are saying - it's what I was referring to when I wrote "even without invoking the label". But 10-15% of Americans agreeing that "the companies they work for should be owned, operated and managed by the workers themselves"? You are far more optimistic than I am, I'm afraid.

          •  I'm w/Villa on this & I don't think it's a ? of (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Villabolo

            'optimism'.  I've taught a Western Civ course for the past 16 quarters at a university that caters to working-class adults, and whenever we get to the Communist Manifesto--the freakin Communist Manifesto--the reaction is overwhelmingly positive.  These are adults who (by that point in the term) are not at all afraid to state their opinions on any and all matters; most of them are probably in PEW's Faith and Family or Hard-Pressed Skeptic categories.  But except for 1 or 2 who, from RW radio, still know that Marxism is a dirty word, everyone else is like, hell yes--who is this guy again?

  •  It's a bad indicator. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    brooklynbadboy, post rational

    It only accepts the extreme position on each issue.  Either / Or.  Most of us fit somewhere in the middle of those extremes.  Despite answering a few of those questions with the extreme RW response I somehow managed a "Solid Liberal" score.  In all of the other internet quiz es I've taken over the years [that score from -8 (extreme Left) to +8 (extreme Winger)] I've scored between -1.6 to -2.0, or somewhere around "Solid Dem that leans Left," which is closer to actual than, say, a -6.8 "Solid Liberal."

    Follow Connect! Unite! Act! MeetUp events! For live podcasting of your Event contact winkk to schedule.

    by winkk on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 05:06:50 PM PDT

    •  Exactly. I dont know how to answer (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Patango, winkk

      'do I encourage homosexuality' because why would I do that? I dont discourage it nor encourage it. I just feel it isnt any of my business and everyone ought to be treated fairly and with tolerance. I wont be going to any rainbow rallies nor trying to prevent people who love each other from getting married or serving in the military. I teach my children they will be accepted no matter what, but im not saying to them 'lesbian....fuck yeah!'

      •  Test doesn't ask if you encourage homosexuality (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Odysseus

        You're the second commenter complaining about being asked whether you'd "encourage" homosexuality, which is odd, considering the test doesn't actually do that.

        The options are "Homosexuality should be accepted by society" or "Homosexuality should be discouraged by society". Seems like the answer should have been pretty straight-forward to answer, considering how you describe your position.

        •  Confusing for me. (0+ / 0-)

          I dont even know what that means actually. Does accept mean 'approve of it?' I mean, I dont approve of it for myself. The sexual acts part of it definitely is a sin in my religion. But we got all kinds of sins going on. Who am I to judge shit like that for someone else? I just have to mind my own sins.

          What society does have to accept is fair treatment of everone. To not do that is a collective sin and on that I can definitely form a view against unfairness.

          •  no, accept means society doesn't try to stamp (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            nimh

            it out.

            i agree with nimh, i don't think there is any ambiguity in which of the two options is closer to your worldview.

            To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

            by UntimelyRippd on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 08:35:34 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  In your own comment here, you used the word .. (0+ / 0-)

            In your comment above, you wrote: "I teach my children they will be accepted no matter what". So what is confusing about the quiz asking you whether you think "homosexuality should be accepted by society"? Presumably, the word "accept" means the same when they use it as when you use it.

    •  I explained elsewhere that you shouldn't (0+ / 0-)

      read too much into the specifics of the questions. Their classification scheme was based on clustering analysis of a large survey that had many more than just 23 questions. After the clustering analysis "revealed" these 8 general categories, they were able to select 23 questions from the survey whose answers reliably classified most -- maybe even all, I haven't carefully perused the methodology -- of their respondents.

      So the reason you managed a "Solid Liberal" score is because they aren't measuring on a one-dimensional line, they are measuring in a multidimensional space. They decided to call one of the clusters in that space "Solid Liberal", and maybe they should not have; but also, it's quite possible that nowhere in their dataset was there a survey whose responses were quite like yours, making you an "outlier", and a sample that "breaks" the classifier. Classifiers often can't handle new cases that are significantly different from any of the "training" set.

      On the other hand, I know of one research project whose classification came down to that: one category (benign tumor) consisted of the samples whose data values looked similar to each other, and the other category (malignant) consisted of samples that didn't look like any of the other samples.

      To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

      by UntimelyRippd on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 08:32:51 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  not surprisingly to me at least (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Bush Bites

    the biggest drop off on voting is among the 'hard pressed skeptics' which certainly is how it seems around here.

    Der Weg ist das Ziel

    by duhban on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 05:18:31 PM PDT

  •  I don't get how I ended up a "young outsider" (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Odysseus

    I am kinda an outsider but I ain't no kid.

    well maybe in my mind

    Rivers are horses and kayaks are their saddles

    by River Rover on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 05:44:04 PM PDT

  •  i got hard pressed skeptic n/t (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Odysseus

    idiosyncratic, slightly anarchist, darwinist, moral relativist, fan of satire

    by bonzo925 on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 05:44:30 PM PDT

  •  What I found interesting about the quiz, was that (4+ / 0-)

    although it contained questions about poor people, homosexuals, immigrants and blacks, there was not a single question about women.

    •  Agreed! (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Susan from 29, Odysseus

      It also seemed that many of the questions repeated themselves, instead of exploring new ground.  Nothing about guns; nothing about women; nothing about education; nothing about the media; people of color were grouped into first-generation immigrants or "blacks"...and the questions in general seemed very backward-looking.  What about asking, Do you feel it is acceptable to synthesize life? or other questions that assess one's values but point toward future concerns.

      •  i'm not sure how many times i should post (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        memiller, jncca

        an explanation of this but ... it isn't that questions like that didn't go into Pew's original survey and classifier. there's a fairly detailed discussion above of how the classifier worked, but the main point is this: Pew didn't select the categories a priori, they did a statistical clustering analysis that gave them 8 main clusters. they then named the clusters based on an examination of the survey samples that fell into each cluster.

        finally, they identified a 23-question subset of the original survey questions that reliably classified all (or nearly all) of the samples into the correct cluster. the point being, they don't need to ask you about guns to predict which cluster you'll belong to -- in fact, based on you answers to the 23 questions on the quiz, they can probably predict most of your answers to most of the other questions that they left out of the quiz.

        To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

        by UntimelyRippd on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 08:41:16 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  That makes sense in theory, (0+ / 0-)

          and I'd be interested to learn more about the "behind-the-scenes" work to develop the questions to see how it actually plays out.

          For example: watching my Facebook feed today, it seems that the contraception decision has cut across political lines in interesting ways that more clearly follow gender than politics.

          •  I would certainly word the questions much more (0+ / 0-)

            ... sophisticatedly.

            However, the main thing to realize about these clustering algorithms is that (with real-world data) there are always samples that don't fit well in any of the clusters -- some of them lie near the boundaries of two or more clusters, rather than near the heart of any cluster; others lie even farther from any other clusters than they do from the distant heart of their assigned cluster; in other words, they're not much like any of the other cases, but they had to be put somewhere.

            It's possible to write your algorithm so that such cases are just considered "unclassifiable", and in the context of something like a political-typology classifier, they'd maybe go into a group called "iconoclasts": Samples that don't resemble each other, or any other samples.

            To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

            by UntimelyRippd on Mon Jun 30, 2014 at 07:56:20 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  sorry, i said guns because of jake's comment (0+ / 0-)

        immediately below yours -- but the same would apply to women's issues.

        To put the torture behind us is, inevitably, to put it in front of us.

        by UntimelyRippd on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 08:42:28 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Or their reproductive rights, that I recall any... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Susan from 29, Square Knot

        Or their reproductive rights, that I recall anyway.

    •  Or guns (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Susan from 29, Bailey2001

      If be very interested to see where the gun issue would break down among these groups- probably another "Business Conservative vs. Hardened Conservative" split. Also probably some split among Dem groups, and Outsiders vs Next Gen Left

    •  Almost certainly because (0+ / 0-)

      their polling showed that those questions did not further disseminate their sample. While I'm sure there are a few non-"Faith and Family Left" individuals who oppose both abortion and racial inequality, there aren't many. You can clearly see that the groups are gender-biased, and their choice of questions (as few as possible, much shorter than their actual survey) just uses what gets their quiz-takers their answer fastest.

      ME-01 (college) ID-01 (home) -4.75, -2.10

      by GoUBears on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 11:53:29 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I am significantly relieved (3+ / 0-)

    that Steadfast Conservatives comprise a measly 4% of sub-30s and Business Conservatives only 6% (22% of the population, 10% of the young). Ten years ago it would have seemed correct to assume that more people would fall into the latter category as they became better-off financially, but the Next Generation Left (18% of sub-30s) seems to have put an end to that assumption, just one more dagger in the Reagan-worshiping GOP's coffin.

    ME-01 (college) ID-01 (home) -4.75, -2.10

    by GoUBears on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 06:11:06 PM PDT

  •  The young moderates could evolve. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Odysseus

    I know this because I started out a moderate conservative who evolved all the way to a solid liberal. Honestly, it's coming to the point that there's two sides. You pick the one that better suits what you believe, even if it isn't perfect.

  •  Well...Closer than some others. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Square Knot, Odysseus

    The put me down as business conservative, although it's a bit of a forced fit with questions where I agreed with 5,9,10,22,35% of the group.  I guess you've got to draw the line somewhere, but I question the the use of a series of either/or questions to divide the populace.   It's sometimes hard to determine which statement is closest when neither lines up very well with anything you believe.

    On the bright side, I did one that had me as a talk-radio conservative and one as a bleeding-heart liberal.

    Hard to deal with shades of purple, I guess.

    LG: You know what? You got spunk. MR: Well, Yes... LG: I hate spunk!

    by dinotrac on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 07:04:36 PM PDT

  •  Hard-Pressed Skeptic AND Solid Liberal here. n/t (0+ / 0-)
  •  Jeebus!!!!!! Half of those questions are (0+ / 0-)

    completely assinine in the way they're worded.  
    They need a "Worded too stupidly to answer," or "Part of each of the above and none of some of either."

    Stupid.  Seriously.

    "Just because your voice reaches halfway around the world doesn't mean you are wiser than when it reached only to the end of the bar." ~ Edward R. Murrow

    by CJB on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 07:51:29 PM PDT

    •  These folks know what they are doing. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      UntimelyRippd, GoUBears

      The questions have been tested for validity and reproducibility for a long time. They may be frustrating to you, and perhaps to many here who care about politics and have nuanced and specific views; but Pew doesn't care about that, but about getting useful clusters that can make useful predictions about political behaviour.

      Mark E. Miller // Kalamazoo Township Trustee // MI 6th District Democratic Chair

      by memiller on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 08:18:15 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  They pushed me into "solidy democrat" (0+ / 0-)

        or whatever the label was A)  because their questions were shitty and B) because I kept playing their ridiculous game.  The result they got from me didn't really "predict" anything other than the fact that they needed a "you suck at writing alternatives" option.  And please don't think I'm not used to these surveys.  I've taken a ton.  I'm 54.  I think that we should all bitch long and loud about the poorly worded, leading choices.

        Just because Pew cares about their "validity and reproducibility" and "useful clusters," doesn't mean we don't need to point out that their questions are crappily worded and fairly useless.

        "Just because your voice reaches halfway around the world doesn't mean you are wiser than when it reached only to the end of the bar." ~ Edward R. Murrow

        by CJB on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 10:29:01 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  It is interesting to compare the 2011 and 2014 (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    GoUBears

    typologies side-by-side:

    Pew Typology               

    2011            2014   

    Mostly Republican               
    Staunch Conservatives    9        Steadfast Conservatives    12
    Main Street Republicans    11        Business Conservatives    10

    Mostly Independent               
    Libertarians    9        Young Outsiders    14
    Disaffecteds    11        Hard-Pressed Skeptics    13
    Post-Moderns    13           

    Mostly Democratic               
    New Coalition Democrats    10        Next Generation Left    12
    Hard-Pressed Democrats    13        Faith and Family Left    15
    Solid Liberals    14        Solid Liberals    15

    Bystanders    10        Bystanders    10

        100            101

    Now the cluster boundaries will not be exactly the same, that is the whole point of re-doing the typology every few years.

    But it is interesting to see the Dem-leaning groups have gone up 5% over three years, and the R groups up 2%. Of course, two of the Dem-leaning groups have been put in the middle category now, so they are not as strongly Democratic, but still, the most noticeable trend here is the increasing polarization of the electorate.

    Mark E. Miller // Kalamazoo Township Trustee // MI 6th District Democratic Chair

    by memiller on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 08:25:14 PM PDT

    •  Their new labels (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      memiller

      are much more descriptive, except for the "Young Outsiders", but that is because it no longer houses just libertarians. I rather agree with that change, as it portrays most of them as what they are: people whose brains are on the verge of emerging from their parents' shell of zealotry.

      I can see the Post-Moderns dispersing into the Outsiders, the Skeptics, NextGen Left and Liberals, but the Steadfast Conservative and Faith and Family increases don't seem to fit. While there was probably a bit of trading between categories due to their change in definitions, I would guess that the first is a result of some people being convinced by the wool that has been pulled over their eyes, and the latter reflecting the demographic influence of Hispanic Catholicism.

      ME-01 (college) ID-01 (home) -4.75, -2.10

      by GoUBears on Mon Jun 30, 2014 at 12:17:41 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  At first glance (0+ / 0-)

    I could have put myself in Faith and Family, but since my denomination is so liberal it's in the category of being in league with the Antichrist according to Pat Robertson, I went with Solid Liberal. And glad I did because my views match theirs pretty solidly.

    There's only one rule that I know of, babies -- goddammit, you've got to be kind. -- Kurt Vonnegut

    by Cali Scribe on Sun Jun 29, 2014 at 09:10:04 PM PDT

  •  A better read is "Our Patchwork Nation" (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    memiller, David Jarman, verso2

    In that book, the authors divided the nation into twelve community types at the county level.  They gave an example of each type of community.  The list of their community types is below with an example community along with a brief description (my interpretation of what the author said);

    Boom Towns Eagle, CO (Eagle County)
    High growth.  Politically and culturally changing.  Hit hard by the great recession because of the outsized impact of the housing bubble.

    Campus and Careers Ann Arbor, MI (Washtenaw County)
    College towns.  High educational attainment and a lot of supporting cultural institutions.  Politically liberal favoring environmental/social equality.

    Emptying Nests Clermont, FL (Lake County)
    Aging communities.  Politically and socially conservative, but demanding a lot of government services.

    Evangelical Epicenters Nixa, MO (Christian County)
    Rural south and some Midwest.  Very conservative and poor.

    Immigration Nation El Mirage, AZ (Maricopa County)
    Large influx of recent, mostly Hispanic.  Changing rapidly with a lot of resistance.  Currently swinging between Democratic and Republican support.

    Industrial Metropolis Philadelphia, PA (Philadelphia County)
    Major city centers.  Higher education attainment and income than a lot of areas, despite the presence of poverty, crime, and poorer schools when compared to other areas.

    Military Bastions Hopkinsville, KY (Christian County)
    Counties depending on the presence of a military base for the local economy.  Lots of military retirees settle here, too.  Politically conservative, but will listen to NPR since that is the only place on the radio that talks about world events.

    Minority Central Baton Rouge, LA (East Baton Rouge Parish)
    Traditional "black belt" communities, but can also be found in Native American areas.  Strong division between the haves (usually white) and the don't haves (usually minorities).  Very even split politically, but along racial lines.  Race is a major factor here.

    Monied Burbs Los Alamos, NM (Los Alamos County)
    Wealthy suburbs with the highest income and educational attainment.  Quickest to recover from the great recession because of high stock ownership.  Politically swingy, but some conservative (Douglas County, CO), swing (Loudon County, VA) and liberal counties (San Francisco, CA(?!?!)) in the mix.

    Mormon Outposts Burley, ID (Cassia County)
    A lot like Evangelical Epicenters politically, culturally and socially except for the fact that one church (the Mormon church) dominates.  More welcoming of immigrants, so long as they conform to the community norms.

    Service Worker Centers Lincoln City, OR (Lincoln County)
    Rural counties with one dominant industry or function such as tourism, mining, or a local service such as a community college.  Politically conservative, but they can go Democratic.

    Tractor Country Sioux Center, IA (Sioux County)
    Similar to Evangelical Epicenters except Tractor Country communities are more likely to support local projects such as schools and libraries (this is why Sam Brownback is struggling as governor of Kansas).

    •  Lincoln County is one of the most Democratic (0+ / 0-)

      counties in the state, and more liberal than the state on just about everything.

      We no longer ask if a man has integrity, but if he has talent. - Rousseau, Discourse on the arts and sciences

      by James Allen on Mon Jun 30, 2014 at 12:47:17 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Next Generation Left (0+ / 0-)

    (probably - with some traits from "Young Outsiders": more liberal on social issues then on economy, while generally - with very cynical approach to politics)

  •  Based (0+ / 0-)

    on the ideological placement graph, I am just barely in the "solidly liberal" category.  I'm hard-hard left when it comes to social issues, but not so much economically.  I'm really not anti-business at all, but I AM anti unregulated business.  The idea that businesses will self-regulate is just delusional.  And I am against the current BS of paying CEO's about 10 times more than they are actually worth.

    Those shouldn't be considered left-wing concepts, but somehow over the past 35 years they've become that way.

  •  I scored Solid liberal, BUT--Pew needs to drop (0+ / 0-)

    this assumption that "solid liberals" and "educated" people are "affluent".

    Too many people out there with degrees are struggling financially.

    And honestly I didn't finish my degree. So as far as any employer is concerned, I am a yokel with no college edu, which affects how much I can get paid and what positions I qualify for.

    Also, they need more questions about women's rights.

    "It were a thousand times better for the land if all Witches, but especially the blessing Witch, might suffer death." qtd by Ehrenreich & English. For Her Own Good, Two Centuries of Expert's Advice to Women pp 40

    by GreenMother on Mon Jun 30, 2014 at 04:53:00 AM PDT

  •  My poll answer, Socialist! (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    verso2

    In every deliberation we must consider the impact on the seventh generation... even if it requires having skin as thick as the bark of a pine. -The Great Law of the Iroquois

    by BrianCricketRakita on Mon Jun 30, 2014 at 05:05:12 AM PDT

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