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Originally published at Acting in Faith, The American Friends Service Committee

How do we keep our hearts soft in a world so hard and full of violence and hatred?

This question haunts me as we witness horrifying violence from Palestine and Israel. I am a Palestinian. This is my family. Seeing the faces of children abducted, killed, tortured, and burned alive has shaken me. It has shaken us all.

I admit shame to feeling more agony for Palestinian Mohammad Abu Khdeir, the 16-year old abducted from in front of his Jerusalem home, burned alive and murdered than I did for Naftali Fraenkel, Gilad Shaer and Eyal Yifrah, the three Israeli teenagers who were abducted and murdered. Why? They are all children caught up in a system of violence.

Why do I cry for one and not the other?  

The answer: All blood is equal. The bloodshed is not.

 photo Libertyweeps450.jpg

The US media's disproportionate focus on the tragedy of the loss of Israeli life and its minimum attention to the Palestinian loss of life harden me. While President Obama, “as a father,” mourned the tragic murder of the three Israeli boys, it was left to Secretary of State John Kerry to condemn the murder of Mohammad Abu Khdeir. At no time has the US President condemned the murder of the more than 1500 Palestinian children killed by Israel since 2000. That is one Palestinian child murdered every 3 days for the past 13 years. My heart hardens. A part of my humanity becomes another casualty of the structural violence in Israel.

Israel’s insistence on Jewish nationalism and Zionist supremacy has required the dispossession of Palestinians beginning with the Nakba of 1947-48 where Israeli militias forced 750,000 Palestinians off their land and destroyed over 500 Palestinian villages and towns to create a Jewish majority in the country. It continues through the legal discrimination against Palestinian citizens of Israel. It is most dramatic in the military occupation of the West Bank, including East Jerusalem, and Gaza where the Palestinian population has been living under siege for seven years. Israel has resorted to collective punishment with mass arrests and raids in the West Bank and a deadly campaign of airstrikes against Gaza.

The power differential between Palestinians and Israeli Jews is vast and is maintained by US military assistance to Israel totaling more than $3 billion per year. At the same time, there can be no justification for the murder of any human being, including children.  Through boycott, divestment and sanctions (BDS) campaigns, the international community seeks to close the power differential between Palestinians and Israelis by using economic tactics to compel Israel to abide by international law.

In this past week, it became clearer to me how BDS supports nonviolent efforts in Palestine. Residents of Shu’fat in Jerusalem-- where young Mohammad lived-- dismantled the Jerusalem Light Rail station that runs through their neighborhood.

The tram line in Shu’fat was built to enable settlers from the illegal Jewish settlement of Pisgat Zev to reach West Jerusalem, serving mostly Jewish areas with one or two stops only in Palestinian neighbourhoods. Residents of Shu’fat had heard Mohammad’s mother lament that she hoped the train would never run in Shu’fat again, so that settlers would no longer pass through the neighbourhood. Palestinians directed her anger toward destroying a symbol of Israeli oppression, leaving only the tracks behind.

In one of the biggest BDS wins in the United States, a group of dedicated activists in St. Louis successfully shunned in 2013 a city contract with Veolia, one of the companies that built and maintains the Jerusalem Light Rail. Veolia has lost over $16 billion in business because of BDS efforts. I was proud to be a part of the St. Louis campaign to Dump Veolia. The efforts of Palestinians and Israelis co-resisting for justice and equality are supported by our efforts here to take the profit out of occupation.

Together, we will end Israel’s occupation and oppression of the Palestinians. In the process, we will soften the hearts of the oppressor, the oppressed and ourselves. We will reclaim our humanity and proclaim that equality and justice are possible.

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Comment Preferences

  •  ABC News last night (11+ / 0-)

    Showed a photo of a woman standing next to a bombed building in Gaza and flatly stated it was an Israeli.

    "Come to Sochi, visit the gay clubs and play with the bears" - NOT a Russian advertising slogan.

    by Lib Dem FoP on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 09:36:10 AM PDT

    •  I've noticed this a few times recently (5+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      corvo, Brecht, JoanMar, Assaf, Anorish

      Sometimes it's more subtle where they'll linger on an image for too long wrt the dialogue, or insert the image at the inappropriate time.

    •  Great commentary on an important issue (8+ / 0-)

      Americans much like the Israelis have been fed racist anti-Palestinian propaganda for decades. The media's spin is largely the result of ownership of both the media and congress by the 1%.

      While thousands of Palestinian women and children die of poor health, and nutrition as a result of the massive imprisonment of the entire population, the American media looks the other way and we never hear the name of a single Palestinian victim of the Israeli inhumane policies.

      soysauce, thanks to the AFSC and to you for all the critical work that you do for peace and justice. Most of the world is aware and object to the criminal occupation of Palestine. Let's hope that one day the light of truth will come to the USA.

      War is costly. Peace is priceless!

      by frostbite on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 10:57:32 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Good post. (10+ / 0-)

    Join us on the Black Kos front porch to review news and views written from a black pov—everyone is welcome.

    by TomP on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 09:44:12 AM PDT

  •  I don't know how many photographs are (14+ / 0-)

    published in US media. These are from Turkish media.

    Don't look if you can't handle it.

    http://fotogaleri.hurriyet.com.tr/...

    If I find more I will add them. There are several published sets but I can't find them right now.

    The world is bad enough as it is, you have no right to make it any worse.
    Lamb chop, we can quibble what to call it, but I think we can both agree it's creepy.

    by InAntalya on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 10:04:45 AM PDT

  •  Because of the way the US media reports (12+ / 0-)

    the news from the region, history always seems to start with the Jewish tragedy.

    The news outlets keep saying that this "latest round" started with the killings of the three Israeli teens. It's crazy--when all these same news outlets covered the indiscriminate murder to the two Palestinian teens outside Ofer prison, caught on camera, which came before, in May. How could they forget so soon?
    http://www.cnn.com/...

    This is how Israel, the nuclear, occupying power, maintains the perception that it is the victim, while the occupied Palestinians, with stones and unguided "rockets," are the aggressors.

    The easily offended deserve to be easily offended.--God

    by Flyswatterbanjo on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 10:14:54 AM PDT

  •  Won't change anything (9+ / 0-)

    The BDS movement will not change anything.  It will not cause Israel to change its position on settlements.

    The only thing that will change the situation in Israel/Palestine is a negotiated two-state agreement.  That will probably require leadership changes on both sides, but I hold out hope that the current leadership can agree to sit down at the table and work out a negotiated peace that results in two autonomous states.  

    Each side will have to give up its historic grievances.  Did Israelis steal Palestinians' land, or vice-versa?  Was the 1948 partition a mistake?  Who started the wars in 1948 and 1967?  None of those questions matter now.  The past is gone -- it is up to the living to create a future, not to continually re-litigate the past.

    Each side will have to accept "half a loaf", and will have to convince its people to peacefully accept that bitter deal.  Palestinians will have to give up the "right of return".  Israel will have to give up many, if not most, of its settlements on disputed land.  Palestinians will have to accept some kind of oversight over its security apparatus (either by the UN, Israel, or someone else) in order for Israel to feel secure.  A creative solution will have to be implemented for Jerusalem, whereby neither side has full control over the city.

    My two cents.  I remain hopeful that it can happen.  If it doesn't, they are doomed to endless conflict.

    •  I disagree. (10+ / 0-)
      The BDS movement will not change anything.  It will not cause Israel to change its position on settlements.
      I believe some people said boycotts wouldn't work in South Africa as well.

      IMO, effective BDS will come to pass quicker than an effective change in leadership in the region.

      The easily offended deserve to be easily offended.--God

      by Flyswatterbanjo on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 10:27:36 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  How about this? Hamas, Hezbollah, and PLO (5+ / 0-)

        all recognize Israel's right to exist, stop firing rockets, and demand multilateral peace talks towards trading land for peace, removal of most settlements, and East Jerusalem as the capital of an independent Palestine.

        I lament the death of ALL in the region equally.  A Palestinian life is equal to a Jewish life. Period.

        Hate begets hate, violence begets violence.

        And the key to Mandela's success was non violence, not anti white ravings, conspiracy theories, and random bombings and murders.

        •  How about this? You recognize that Hamas (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          WattleBreakfast

          by proposing a ceasefire this evening in return for a stop to Israeli bombing is de facto recognizing the Israeli government? How about Israel recognizing the right of Palestine to exist within internationally agreed borders?

          Hezbollah has absolutely nothing to do with the Israel/Palestine dispute. They are a Lebanese Shia organization which became militant after the Israeli invasion of  Lebanon. The PLO does recognize Israel and has since the Oslo Accord.

          What none do is recognize Israel as consisting of the area of land which the Israeli governments claim which have been occupied by force since 1948 and subsequently.

          Mandela was not non-violent. His conviction was in connection with the destruction of power lines by Spear of the Nation (Umkhonto we Sizwe in Zulu) in 1961

          when he lost hope that passive and non-violent resistance to the apartheid government would bear fruit
          (quote from the right wing Daily Telegraph.)

          Madeba was a noble visionary who saved hundreds of thousands of lives by unifying the rainbow nation. He was not a committed absolute pacifist like Gandhi. What he saw was that the non-white and white tribes were all oppressed by the system of Apartheid. The white guards on Robben Island were from the poor white communities and were equally condemned to endure its conditions.

          "Come to Sochi, visit the gay clubs and play with the bears" - NOT a Russian advertising slogan.

          by Lib Dem FoP on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 04:14:27 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  No 'de facto' recognition...real recognition... (0+ / 0-)

            the borders are to be negotiated, as there will have to be significant land swaps to form a contiguous Palestinian state and give Israel some measure of security.  

            Hezbollah has a lot to do with the Israeli-Palestinian quagmire as many of its adherents are in refugee camps that have festered for nearly 70 years.

            Mandela may not have been purely non violent but he was much more non violent than Hamas or the PLO, and his rhetoric was never as blatantly inflammatory as what has been spewing out of the Arab and Palestinian press and governments for the past 70 years.

      •  I don't support BDS ... (6+ / 0-)

        because it is not coupled with similar pressures on the Palestinians to clean up their own house (i.e., stop rocket attacks, take political control away from Hamas or force Hamas to sit down at the negotiating table).  As such, it can only solve half the problem.  And, I'm afraid that if one-sided pressures on Israel are successful, that one-sided success would only cause Palestinians to be more recalcitrant in resisting the internal reforms that are necessary for a negotiated peace.

        I think the BDS movement would have a lot more credibility, and success, if it also actively campaigned for reform on the Palestinian side.  If that happened, I could get behind it wholeheartedly.

    •  That is unrealistic (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      frostbite, Brecht
      None of those questions matter now.  The past is gone -- it is up to the living to create a future, not to continually re-litigate the past.
      This is the middle east we are talking about.

      "The oppressors most powerful weapon is the mind of the oppressed." - Stephen Biko

      by gjohnsit on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 10:44:46 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  The US government disagrees. (9+ / 0-)

      Remarks as Prepared by White House Coordinator for the Middle East, North Africa, and the Gulf Region Philip Gordon at the Ha'aretz Israel Conference for Peace

      ...Israel confronts an undeniable reality:  it cannot maintain military control of another people indefinitely.  Doing so is not only wrong but a recipe for resentment and recurring instability.  It will embolden extremists on both sides, tear at Israel’s democratic fabric, and feed mutual dehumanization.

      As the President has said, neither occupation nor expulsion is the answer.  Just as Israelis built a state in their homeland, Palestinians have a right to be a sovereign, free, and secure people in their own land.  Or to quote one of your own leaders, Ariel Sharon: “It is impossible to have a Jewish democratic state, at the same time to control all of Eretz Israel.  If we insist on fulfilling the dream in its entirety, we are liable to lose it all.”

      Reaching a peace agreement with the Palestinians would help turn the tide of international sentiment and sideline violent extremists, further bolstering Israel’s security.  We know all too well the troubles that can arise for Israel internationally when there is no movement on the political track, especially when settlement activity continues to make the potential peace map more difficult and to undermine international support for Israel.  On this, I should also be clear of the United States’ longstanding position: we consider settlements illegitimate and an impediment to progress on peace negotiations. Settlement announcements would be a counter-productive reaction to the kidnapping and murder of the three Israeli teenagers.

      Ehud Barak once warned of a ‘tsunami’ [of international sanctions] in New York, and as we speak here today, we’re seeing signs already that pressure may be building. Progress on peace holds international challenges at bay.  But it also opens up new possibilities for Israeli participation across the international system, particularly with Israel’s Arab neighbors, who face common threats.

      In contrast, if we fail to come back to peace talks, renewed efforts to isolate Israel internationally and legitimize Palestinian statehood unilaterally are all but certain.  The United States will do all it can to fight boycotts and other delegitimization efforts.  But in many of these realms, particularly outside the Security Council, our ability to contain the damage is limited, and becoming more and more challenging.  This is what American friends of Israel mean when they express concerns about the potential for Israeli isolation if peace talks do not succeed.  Let me be absolutely clear that these are not threats.  The United States will always have Israel’s back.  That’s why we fight for it every day at the United Nations, where we have worked diligently to ensure Israel is treated fairly and on par with all other states.

      But as Israel’s greatest defender and closest friend we owe it to you to ask fundamental questions—which in fact many Israelis are asking themselves: how will Israel remain democratic and Jewish if it attempts to govern the millions of Palestinian Arabs who live in the West Bank? How will it have peace if it is unwilling to delineate a border, end the occupations and allow for Palestinian sovereignty, security, and dignity?  How will we prevent other states from isolating Israel or supporting Palestinian efforts in international bodies if Israel is not seen as committed to peace?

      We also believe that the growing turbulence in the wider Middle East is not a reason to downgrade the priority of peace with the Palestinians, but quite the opposite.  Not only would a viable peace agreement boost Israel’s standing internationally, it would provide the platform for Israel to be an integral and active part of a regional strategy and solution.  It would boost trade and expand business and investment opportunities with Arab states…

      Given where we find ourselves, it is understandable that some on both sides are looking at other options, some of which were presented at this conference today.  But most of these are stop-gaps at best.  At worst, they are a recipe for continued or increased conflict or isolation.  A “one-state solution” is implausible, and would effectively mean an end to the Jewish and democratic nature of your state. Unilateral annexation of West Bank territories populated by Israelis is wrong, illegal, and a recipe for Israel’s isolation.  The United States could never support it, and I doubt any of Israel’s other friends would. Other unilateral or interim measures may appear tempting alternatives, but they do not solve Israel’s and the Palestinians’ long-term problems.  In fact, they could deepen them.  The fact remains, only a negotiated solution – two states for two peoples – can give Israelis and Palestinians the futures they need and deserve.

      http://www.whitehouse.gov/...

      The easily offended deserve to be easily offended.--God

      by Flyswatterbanjo on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 10:50:15 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Fly this is government double talk (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ybruti, ZenTrainer, WattleBreakfast

        If we truly believe that Israel should stop the illegal settlement and come to the peace table we would take some action to make that possible. Like cutting all aid to Israel.

        We are complicit in a criminal occupation that is condemned throughout the world.

        Why is it the Israel security is always a primary issue, yet, Palestinian security is never even mentioned? Israel is the only rogue nuclear power in the region and has the most advance high-tech military in the region. Especially with the US backing, there is no way any country would ever attack Israel.

        War is costly. Peace is priceless!

        by frostbite on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 11:15:27 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Of course it's government double-talk. (3+ / 0-)

          But the tone and part of the substance is changing.

          They can only do what is politically possible. That is part of how BDS comes into play. The more that Americans become engaged in the issue, and reject our unqualified support of Israel, the more space our politicians have to change policy. Right now, the only active groups lobbying congress on the issue are the pro-Israel ones.

          The easily offended deserve to be easily offended.--God

          by Flyswatterbanjo on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 11:31:16 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  No sane person claims this. (4+ / 2-)

      did Israel steal Palestinians' land or vice versa?

  •  It is understandable why your heart (13+ / 0-)

    has hardened. But there are Israelis who feel the same way: their hearts have been hardened after the deaths of friends, family members and other Jewish people killed by terrorism.

    Here's the thing: hardened hearts are understandable, but ultimately an impediment to peace. The grief of a parent who has lost a child is universal: it knows no religion, no ethnicity, no nationality.

    http://forward.com/...

    See the common humanity. It's much more real than the politics that divide.

  •  Thanks for putting the tragedy in such a human (15+ / 0-)

    perspective, showing how disproportionate the death of innocents is on the Palestinian side, how our government and media tilt the scales against the Palestinian cause, and the reasons for your own sympathies for the trod-on underdog.

    Thanks especially for pointing out the positive way forward, the non-violent solution that boycott, divestment and sanctions (BDS) point towards - and for showing us how that campaign is making a difference in public opinion and company's bottom lines, from St. Louis to Jerusalem.

    What's going on today is such a deadly, explosive, utterly useless and unnecessary clusterfuck. A thousand things went wrong to lead us here, and Netanyahu is a horrible leader and warmonger for doing so much to fan the flames and give the orders. My heart goes out to all the innocents, on both sides, caught up in this mediaeval bloodbath with brutal modern weapons. May peace come soon, for all their sakes.

    "Every man has a right to utter what he thinks truth" Samuel Johnson

    by Brecht on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 10:28:08 AM PDT

  •  Unfortunately, the Palestinians (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    too many people

    are destined to be the losers in this struggle.

      Might makes right is how this is playing out, and Israel is by far the strongest.
       Unless Palestinians learn to accept living in an apartheid state, they will be the victim of ethnic cleansing. Those seem to be the only two choices for them.

    "The oppressors most powerful weapon is the mind of the oppressed." - Stephen Biko

    by gjohnsit on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 10:43:01 AM PDT

    •  Say it this way. You're talking to a Palestinian. (7+ / 0-)
      Unfortunately, you are destined to be the loser in this struggle.

      Might makes right is how this is playing out, and Israel is by far the strongest.

      Unless you learn to accept living in an apartheid state, you will be the victim of ethnic cleansing. Those seem to be the only two choices for you.

      The easily offended deserve to be easily offended.--God

      by Flyswatterbanjo on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 10:53:49 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Are they destined for sub-human status Israel (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      frostbite

      imposes on them in the West Bank and Gaza?

      "The end of democracy and the defeat of the American Revolution will occur when government falls into the hands of lending institutions and moneyed incorporations." ~ Thomas Jefferson

      by Lefty Coaster on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 11:11:10 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Probably (0+ / 0-)

        It's a crime against humanity. But all the great powers of the world are lined up against them.
           There is no present-day comparison to this situation of multi-generational discrimination and oppression outside of a few African countries that few Americans could name. It's medievil in many ways.

          With the entire American political establishment solidly behind Israel in every case regarding the Palestinians, it's hard to see this situation changing for another generation.

        "The oppressors most powerful weapon is the mind of the oppressed." - Stephen Biko

        by gjohnsit on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 11:21:52 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  I understand your compassion for the brutality (6+ / 0-)

    committed against Khdair, and I agree.  What horrible cruelty.

    What we need is peace.  I have some important questions for you:

    Do you condemn the rockets sent by Hamas and others from Gaza into Southern Israel?  Those rockets are intended to hit random civilians and are a war crime.  Do you think that Israel should be forced to endure those rockets?

    Do you support a "two states for two peoples" solution that would allow Palestinians to "return" to the Palestinian state in the West Bank and Gaza, but not to Israel?

    In other words, are you committed to a peaceful resolution of the conflict, or some idea of Palestinian "justice" that probably can't be achieved without a war?

    I'm for peace.  I certainly hope that you are too.

    •  I see you use the word 'peace' a lot, (4+ / 0-)

      especially in sentences like these:

      What we need is peace....

      I'm for peace.

      But you never define your understanding of peace.

      There are quite a few towns in Syria that are extremely 'peaceful' because they are occupied by ISIS(IS). I can, and have many times, observed one just across the Turkish-Syrian border.

      The town is extraordinarily 'peaceful'; no fights, no arguments, no resistance, no objections, and no complaints. Just keep your head down and stay quiet.

      Is this something like your idea of 'peace'.

      The world is bad enough as it is, you have no right to make it any worse.
      Lamb chop, we can quibble what to call it, but I think we can both agree it's creepy.

      by InAntalya on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 11:23:25 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Not sure I understand your point (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        DeeDee001, RedsFanForever

        Two states for two peoples would mean Palestinians have their own state.

        I agree with you that any Palestinian state is unlikely to respect basic freedoms like free speech, so you might be right that residents of the Palestinian state might have to keep their heads down.

        •  Oh, nice, but feeble, try to avoid the question. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          WattleBreakfast

          I'll ask again.

          As you use the term 'peace' often, without any elaboration, what is your definition, your understanding, of the term 'peace' in sentences such as these?

          What we need is peace....

          I'm for peace.

          The world is bad enough as it is, you have no right to make it any worse.
          Lamb chop, we can quibble what to call it, but I think we can both agree it's creepy.

          by InAntalya on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 11:52:31 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I think I've been pretty clear (4+ / 0-)

            Two states for two peoples.

            Palestinian state in the West Bank and Gaza.  Israel, which continues as a Jewish homeland, in Israel.

            If that does not answer the question, I'd be glad to try if you want to be more specific in your question.

            •  You could be more specific about how much (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Lib Dem FoP

              of the West Bank:

              Palestinian state in the West Bank and Gaza
              and about how sovereign the Palestinian state would be. For example would it have a military?

              The world is bad enough as it is, you have no right to make it any worse.
              Lamb chop, we can quibble what to call it, but I think we can both agree it's creepy.

              by InAntalya on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 12:10:31 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Of course, I'd let the parties negotiate that (4+ / 0-)

                Wouldn't you?

                Maybe a good starting point would be the 67 lines with mutually agreed land swaps.

                I'd expect that there would be at least some temporary period where Israel would have some greater level of security protection where the Palestinians would prove their ability and willingness to control their extremists (i.e., Hamas).  Israel wouldn't need to go into Gaza to stop rocket fire if the PA today had the ability and willingness to stop it themselves.

    •  The difference (0+ / 0-)

      The change this time is that the militant groups in Gaza have acquired more longer range missiles which can reach the main population centers in Israel. That's what is causing the panic in the Israeli government. Previously the smaller home made rockets were just about capable of reaching the edges of the area of the Gaza strip designated for "Arab" use in the UN resolution expropriated by the Israelis during the Nakba. The town most commonly shown and targeted also has a smaller than average Jewish population and is where the Israeli government gives "refuge" to Palestinian informants.

      The USA gives billions to the Israelis to co-develop anti-missile systems. One could very well question why then there are so many reports of the smaller ones landing - answer is that it is ineffectual against missiles with limited guidance and control systems which render their flightpaths unpredictable.

      The Israelis have at the most a couple of weeks to step back to prevent a new Intifada. It could be as short as two days, with the passions inflamed after Friday prayers. Many wrongly see a particular kudos in becoming a martyr during Ramadan.

      I'll remind you that asymmetrical warfare techniques defeated the USA in Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan. The Palestinians have already defeated the Israeli governments in the court of public opinion outside of the USA. Israeli companies like Sodastream can no longer claim that their products from the OPTs are "made in Israel" and tourist publicity maps outside of the USA and Israel are forbidden to show "Greater Israel".

      "Come to Sochi, visit the gay clubs and play with the bears" - NOT a Russian advertising slogan.

      by Lib Dem FoP on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 11:32:14 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  You're probably right that public opinion (5+ / 0-)

        across the world supports "two states for two peoples"  and not settlements.  

        There is little support that I can see for rockets that can potentially hit civilians within the Green Line.  

        What you call "asymmetrical warfare," most others call "terrorism."  There's little support for that except among extremists.

        •  Ah, the old declined noun (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          too many people

          "I am a freedom fighter"
          "He is a guerilla"
          "They are terrorists"

          You do realize that you described the techniques used by the colonists in the American War of Independence as terrorism..

          "Come to Sochi, visit the gay clubs and play with the bears" - NOT a Russian advertising slogan.

          by Lib Dem FoP on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 12:54:35 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Not sure what point you're making (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            livosh1, RedsFanForever

            I don't think most people around the world support terrorism, and I don't think they really care that those techniques were used in 1776.  

            Murders of teenagers and rockets fired toward kindergartens don't get much support today.

            •  More round the world (0+ / 0-)

              Do not support the use of terrorist tactics by the Israeli government forces  or the organized Settlers on the West Bank.

              Both the firing of missiles from Gaza and the supposed "precision" bombing of Gaza are War Crimes. In the first case it is because the weapons are incapable of being targeted solely against only civilian locations. In the latter it is because the geography of the Strip makes it impossible not to hit civilian locations. In some cases protected places under the Geneva Conventions have been deliberately targeted in Gaza. The blockade is also arguably an act of Genocide as defined in that convention.

              The Settlers are by definition war criminals for being complicit and even initiating War Crimes defined in the Conventions by the act of moving sectors of the Israeli population onto occupied territories. They also terrorize those living near their illegal settlements and even in areas where they take over apartments above souks and throw chemicals and household and human waste down onto the Palestinians below.

              Since the Israelis do not accept the Third Protocol to the Geneva Conventions themselves, why should Hamas as a "non state body" respect it? In fact they do as the moving of Gilad Shalit to places of safety so he survived Israeli attacks on Gaza demonstrate.

              "Come to Sochi, visit the gay clubs and play with the bears" - NOT a Russian advertising slogan.

              by Lib Dem FoP on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 03:33:51 PM PDT

              [ Parent ]

          •  So were the Jewish fighters in the (0+ / 0-)

            Warsaw Ghetto terrorists?

  •  Israeli leaders thumbed their noses at Peace (9+ / 0-)

    for the last 13 years. Its Israelis who insist on prolong this conflict NOT the Palestinians. Israeli leaders only want more Palestinian land and making peace would halt the IDF's slow motion ethnic cleansing of Palestinians in the "occupied' West Bank.  

    Americans are getting fed up with Israeli intransigence.

    "The end of democracy and the defeat of the American Revolution will occur when government falls into the hands of lending institutions and moneyed incorporations." ~ Thomas Jefferson

    by Lefty Coaster on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 11:07:28 AM PDT

  •  It is sad. (5+ / 0-)
    Why do I cry for one and not the other?  

    The answer: All blood is equal. The bloodshed is not.

    It is sad that you have lost your empathy for innocent children killed because of who they are.

    Truly sad that you can only find compassion for those innocents of your own and have none for any other innocents killed.

    It is sad.

    "Stay close to the candles....the staircase can be treacherous" (-8.38,-8.51)

    by JNEREBEL on Wed Jul 09, 2014 at 11:46:27 AM PDT

  •  I am.......... (0+ / 0-)

    an American Jew living in the NY area who has NEVER agreed with all of these years of Israeli policies of oppression.

    What can be done in order to dissuade our elected officials from taking money from the American Israeli Political Action Committee, better known as AIPAC?

    I would also like to know what I can do to help.  Are there any Israeli businesses, or businesses doing business with Israel, or importers of Israeli goods in the New York metro area that can be boycotted?

    Thanks for the post.

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