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Anjam Sundaram reports on the dearth of actual reporting... Ross Douthat tells how Republicans became the party of the working poor (in his mind)... Doyle McManus explains the Paul Ryan hop to the left... a trio of pundits on why no one is in a hurry to get in Putin's way, no matter what he does... but first...

The New York Times calls for a second end to prohibition.

It took 13 years for the United States to come to its senses and end Prohibition, 13 years in which people kept drinking, otherwise law-abiding citizens became criminals and crime syndicates arose and flourished. It has been more than 40 years since Congress passed the current ban on marijuana, inflicting great harm on society just to prohibit a substance far less dangerous than alcohol.

The federal government should repeal the ban on marijuana.

We reached that conclusion after a great deal of discussion among the members of The Times’s Editorial Board, inspired by a rapidly growing movement among the states to reform marijuana laws.

There are no perfect answers to people’s legitimate concerns about marijuana use. But neither are there such answers about tobacco or alcohol, and we believe that on every level — health effects, the impact on society and law-and-order issues — the balance falls squarely on the side of national legalization. That will put decisions on whether to allow recreational or medicinal production and use where it belongs — at the state level.

There's a nice restaurant and micro-brewery in downtown St. Louis pattered after the Congressional dining room.  At each table is a small brass plaque, inscribed with the name of a representative or senator who voted to repeal prohibition.

As it happens, I don't smoke marijuana (or drink alcohol... yes, I am that boring) but I'd still chip in to buy a new set of plaques so we could honor every congressperson who votes to end the disastrous war on pot. It would be a great triumph of common sense over fear in a time when we're all too often going the other way.

Now, grab whatever makes you feel mellow on Sunday morning and join me inside...

Ross Douthat engages in a favorite word game of Republicans--redefining "populism."

When Barack Obama won the White House in 2008, he did so in an unusual way for a Democrat: As the candidate of the rich. He raised more in large-dollar donations than any of his rivals and raked in more cash from Wall Street than John McCain. In November, he won the upper class’s votes: By 52 percent to 46 percent, according to exit polls, Americans making more than $200,000 cast their ballots for Obama.
In case your BS meter has hit 11 already, you're not wrong. Despite Douthat's heavy-duty cherry picking, contributors giving less than $200 accounted for almost twice as much of Obama's funds (47 percent) compared to McCain (26 percent).  !00% of Obama's funding also came from individual donations, while McCain fattened up on PAC money.  And that 52 to 46 percent pro-Obama vote among those making over $200k? That's pretty well exactly how the electorate as a whole voted. But, Douthat doesn't have to be insightful, otherwise he'd have been canned long ago. So, let's go back to the RoDoSpinZone as Ross tells us how Republicans are no longer the party of the rich.
So haltingly at first, and then with increasing seriousness, Republicans began to look for a different path back to power — one tailored to the party’s growing dependence on working-class votes, and one designed to deliver populist substance as well as style.

Thus far they have circled around two broad approaches. One, dubbed “reform conservatism,” seeks to make the welfare state and tax code more friendly to work and child-rearing and upward mobility — through larger wage subsidies, bigger child tax credits, and a substantial clearing-out of the insider-friendly subsidies and tax breaks and regulations that drive up costs in health care, real estate, energy and higher education.

Ah yes, closing tax loopholes. Which is exactly the thing that the GOP has said is completely off the table in every negotiation. Not every candidate slinging around the term populist needs to be Huey Long, but there are limits. The GOP attempts to appropriate the term over the last eight years have only succeeded in making it meaningless. Which may have been the intent all along.

Doyle McManus has a clearer take on Paul Ryan's working man's conversion.

...last week, Ryan unveiled a 73-page domestic policy plan that broke with Republican orthodoxy on several counts — mainly by affirming that the federal government has an obligation to fund programs to help poor people and that sometimes that will mean spending more money, not less.

Ryan proposed bundling federal spending on poverty programs into what were once called "block grants" to states, to allow them to experiment with new approaches to helping the poor — but at current spending levels, without the cuts he demanded only a few months ago.

And he endorsed a proposal from President Obama (a daring move for anyone in the GOP) to expand the Earned Income Tax Credit for people without children. That would increase federal spending on the tax rebate for low-income earners, a program some tea party conservatives loathe.

It isn't that Ryan has abandoned his previous views entirely, but he's changed his focus from merely trying to shrink the federal government to making existing federal programs work better, too.

The secret of Ryan's change? Poll numbers. Just because the GOP counts on winning 90% of the stupid vote doesn't mean that their candidates aren't capable of reading a chart. Core Republican voters may like the idea of kneecapping the government at every opportunity, but running on the themes of a Congress with a 19% approval rating does not result in getting to pick new silver patterns for 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

Anjam Sundaram on the crisis in crises.

The Western news media are in crisis and are turning their back on the world. We hardly ever notice. Where correspondents were once assigned to a place for years or months, reporters now handle 20 countries each. Bureaus are in hub cities, far from many of the countries they cover. And journalists are often lodged in expensive bungalows or five-star hotels. As the news has receded, so have our minds.

To the consumer, the news can seem authoritative. But the 24-hour news cycles we watch rarely give us the stories essential to understanding the major events of our time. The news machine, confused about its mandate, has faltered. Big stories are often missed. Huge swaths of the world are forgotten or shrouded in myth. The news both creates these myths and dispels them, in a pretense of providing us with truth.

I worked in the Democratic Republic of Congo as a stringer, a freelance journalist paid by the word, for a year and a half, in 2005-06. There, on the bottom rung of the news ladder, I grasped the role of the imaginary in the production of world news. Congo is the scene of one of the greatest man-made disasters of our lifetimes. Two successive wars have killed more than five million people since 1996.

Yet this great event in human history has produced no sustained reporting. No journalist is stationed consistently on the front lines of the war telling us its stories.

Read this. We've exchanged news coverage that was short, but meaningful for coverage that is constant but empty. This is not a healthy bargain on any number of fronts.

Peggy Orenstein on appropriate treatment for breast cancer.

One of the nastier aspects of breast cancer is that it doesn't have the five-year sell-by date of some other malignancies: you’re not considered “cured” until you die of something else. Although it becomes less likely, the disease can come back eight, 10, even 20 years after treatment. I fell on the wrong side of those odds.

I had a tiny, low-grade tumor in 1997; 15 years later, in the summer of 2012, while I was simultaneously watching “Breaking Bad,” chatting with my husband and changing into my pajamas, my finger grazed a hard knot beneath my lumpectomy scar. Just as before, time seemed to stop. ...

According to a study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology in 2009, among those with ductal carcinoma in situ — a non-life-threatening, “stage 0” cancer — the rates of mastectomy with C.P.M. jumped 188 percent between 1998 and 2005. Among those with early-stage invasive disease, the rates went up 150 percent between 1998 and 2003. Most of these women did not carry a genetic mutation, like the actress Angelina Jolie, that predisposes them to the disease.

Researchers I’ve spoken with have called the spike an “epidemic” and “alarming,” driven by patients’ overestimation of their actual chances of contracting a second cancer.

The conflicting, constantly changing advice on the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer has to be painfully frustrating and frightening for all women. But there's a good case to be made that what's seen as taking the "safe route" is actually no safer, while demanding a large physical and psychological toll.

Anne Applebaum explains why Europeans are less than anxious to challenge Putin.

David Cameron, the British prime minister, led the attack: It would be “unthinkable” for the British to sell a warship to Russia, he declared. Almost immediately, the French president, François Hollande, confirmed his intention to do precisely that: He would, he said, deliver a Mistral amphibious assault ship to the Russian navy, as contracted — and then he hit back hard. “This is a false debate led by hypocrites,” one of his party colleagues declared. “When you see how many [Russian] oligarchs have sought refuge in London, David Cameron should start by cleaning up his own back yard.”

Which is worse? France sending Russia a ship that could be used against NATO allies in the Baltic or the Black Sea? Or Britain’s insistence on its right to launder Russian money through London’s financial markets? It was an amusing spat, not least because it plays into the stereotypes: Britain vs. France, crooked bankers vs. cynical politicians. The dispute dominated headlines as Europeans debated the right response to Russian aggression in eastern Ukraine.

But in some sense, it also disguises the real nature of Russian influence in Europe. For Russia’s strongest political influence is not in relatively large countries such as Britain or France, where at least these things are openly discussed, but rather in weaker countries that barely have a foreign policy debate at all.

Giving up an empire doesn't mean giving up your skills in bullying the neighbors.

Carl Hiaasen hits more or less the same note.

Even if it accomplishes nothing else, calling Vladimir Putin nasty names makes us feel a little better. Thug, megalomaniac, liar, war criminal, mass murderer — those are just the printable ones.

If only the Russian president cared what the rest of the world says (or thinks) about him. He doesn’t, and why should he?

Among global leaders, only President Obama, British Prime Minister David Cameron and Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott have expressed anything that resembles outrage over the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 by pro-Russian rebels in Ukraine.

Even in the Netherlands, which lost more than 150 citizens on that plane, the government continues referring to the missile strike as an aviation “disaster” instead of the reckless massacre it was.

All across Europe, the politicians in power have stated their obligatory shock and dismay, but there’s scant enthusiasm for enacting the sort of economic sanctions against Moscow that the United States initiated months ago.

...

“The Russians have paid [for the ships],” said President Francois Hollande, which was basically a shrug. Halting arms sales to the Kremlin would result in the loss of jobs at French weapons factories and damage the national economy, officials there said.

Other countries fear that Russia would respond to sanctions by cutting their supplies of gas and oil, as is happening in Ukraine.

Did they figure in the jobs added for building a new plane to replace Malaysia Airlines Flight 17? That's worth millions! ('scuse me, time to go yell at clouds).

Timothy Ash has some Putin memories of his own.

Sometimes, just sometimes, you should pay attention to annoying things said by tiresome people at worthy conferences.

In 1994, I was half asleep at a round table in St. Petersburg, Russia, when a short, thickset man with a rather ratlike face — apparently a sidekick of the city’s mayor — suddenly piped up. Russia, he said, had voluntarily given up “huge territories” to the former republics of the Soviet Union, including areas “which historically have always belonged to Russia.” He was thinking “not only about Crimea and northern Kazakhstan, but also for example about the Kaliningrad area.” Russia could not simply abandon to their fate those “25 million Russians” who now lived abroad. The world had to respect the interests of the Russian state “and of the Russian people as a great nation.”

The name of this irritating little man was — you guessed it — Vladimir V. Putin, and I know exactly what he said back in 1994 because the organizers, the Körber Foundation of Hamburg, Germany, published a full transcript. For the phrase that I have translated as “the Russian people,” the German transcript uses the word “volk.” Mr. Putin seemed to have, and still has, an expansive, völkisch definition of “Russians” — or what he now refers to as the “russkiy mir” (literally “Russian world”). The transcript also records that I teased out the consequences of the then-obscure deputy mayor’s vision by saying, “If we defined British nationality to include all English-speaking people, we would have a state slightly larger than China.”

This piece actually ran last week, and I accidentally left it out of my round-up. Worth a read if you want to understand where Putin is heading.

Robert Rubin continues on his recent trend of saying things I agree with and making me wish they were being said by someone other than Robert Rubin.

The scientific community is all but unanimous in its agreement that climate change is a serious threat. According to Gallup, nearly 60 percent of Americans believe that global warming is caused by human activity. Still, for many people, the effects of climate change seem like a future problem — something that falls by the wayside as we tackle what seem like more immediate crises.

But climate change is a present danger. The buildup of greenhouse gases is cumulative and irreversible; the pollutants we are now emitting will remain in the atmosphere for hundreds of years. So what we do each day will affect us and the planet for centuries. Damage resulting from climate change cuts across almost every aspect of life: public health, extreme weather, the economy and so much else.

What we already know is frightening, but what we don’t know is more frightening still. For example, we know that melting polar ice sheets will cause sea levels to rise, but we don’t know how negative feedback loops will accelerate the process.

Science has the low-down on the Earth's sixth great mass extinction: the one we're causing right now.
In a new review of scientific literature and analysis of data published in Science, an international team of scientists cautions that the loss and decline of animals is contributing to what appears to be the early days of the planet's sixth mass biological extinction event.

Since 1500, more than 320 terrestrial vertebrates have become extinct. Populations of the remaining species show a 25 percent average decline in abundance. The situation is similarly dire for invertebrate animal life.

And while previous extinctions have been driven by natural planetary transformations or catastrophic asteroid strikes, the current die-off can be associated to human activity, a situation that the lead author Rodolfo Dirzo, a professor of biology at Stanford, designates an era of "Anthropocene defaunation."

Wait a second, I have to visit my Republican sources and start lining up my conflicting information from the Institute of Pollution And Overcrowding is Supergood.  They've concluded that the number of species is actually going up, it's just the way that we're measuring them that's wrong. Or, at the very least, there haven't been any species lost since 1980.  Also scientists are clearly just trying to get in on sweet, sweet grant money by making these dire predictions, and Mars is losing species, too, so it can't be us.
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Comment Preferences

  •  Do you need a prescription to buy pot or not? (6+ / 0-)

    I am not a user but can see a time when I need to use it. Can I buy it over the counter in California? What happens if I travel across State lines?

    •  I realize you're new here, but seriously? (4+ / 0-)

      On what planet do you spend most of your time?

      •  Check out his first diary n/t (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        reflectionsv37

        If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

        by skohayes on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 04:31:24 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  it looks like perhaps (0+ / 0-)

          ajcbm jumped right in the fray, instead of lurking a while, like most of us did.

          Cut him/her some slack.  Not certain that this is a troll.


          "I want to die in my sleep like my grandfather ....... Not screaming and yelling like the passengers in his car ..." - Emo Philips

          by AlyoshaKaramazov on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 08:41:46 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Trolls live under bridges (0+ / 0-)

            and do not have access to the internet. Thus you get questions like this:

            Finally... can someone explain to me why these Palestinians are even fighting at all? I don't know much of the particulars in this conflict. Isn't Palestine a province of Israel?
            I'm willing to give the commenter some slack.

            If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

            by skohayes on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 09:37:55 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

      •  what's wrong with ajcbm's question? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        askew

        I don't see what prompted this kind of response.

        Gondwana has always been at war with Laurasia.

        by AaronInSanDiego on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 09:02:10 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  If he identified himself as, let's say... (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          codairem

          a Japanese soldier from WWII who just stumbled out of the jungle last week to find an internet café on the beach that just happened to be logged on to DKos, then I would have to agree with you that my comment was a little harsh. But, I seriously don't think that is what happened. And he's made no attempt to explain his situation.

          Unless you've been in the jungle, or living under a rock for the past 40 years, who doesn't know that marijuana is illegal in all but 2 states? And one of them is not California.

          I mean really? Over the past decade nearly a million people a year have been arrested for marijuana offenses. Who would be posting on a political blog site that doesn't know this?

    •  I don't want to be unfair here (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      reflectionsv37

      Are you perhaps posting from outside the US?

      If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

      by skohayes on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 04:32:44 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  there are so many non users on the intertubes (5+ / 0-)

      who want to know the details of the demon weed. I would imagine you could work the google and find the answers to your questions....oh and I am not a user either but my cousin knows someone who is....

    •  New York just legalized medical marijuana. (4+ / 0-)

      But you cant smoke it, and there will only be 20 distributors state wide.  It may take 6 months to get a prescription.
      What is wrong with these legislators?  I really do think that they are so out of touch with humanity that they have no right to represent us.

      •  That's just straight-up politics (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Laconic Lib

        The NY GOTP is basically a leisure service of Michael Long's Conservative Party, which already has a No Tolerance policy on anything remotely liberal (Right to Choose, Gun Control, Mandatory Minimum Sentences). So even if the stats do show that tax revenue would go up, GOTP legislators wouldn't go for it, anyway, because Vahhlyewwws!

        Theoretcially, themes should go for legalization -- the downstate Dems, anyway -- but they only have a majority in the Legislature after various moderate State Senate Dems threw in with the GOTP; the traitors are currently fighting a battle against Cuomo, who enabled their "bipartisan goals" from the jump but had to promise to "get tough" with them in order to get the Working Families Party line this November.

        "If you're going to go down with the ship, make it a submarine." - Wayne Shorter

        by Oliver Tiger on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 08:04:07 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  I think the smoking ban is fair. (0+ / 0-)

        Nothing more annoying than your neighbor stinking up your apartment with MJ at all hours.

        Sinbad on dodging sniper fire in Bosnia - "What kind of president would say, 'Hey, man, I can't go 'cause I might get shot so I'm going to send my wife...oh, and take a guitar player and a comedian with you.'"

        by askew on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 11:12:21 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Faux News (16+ / 0-)

    As soon as the TV News execs realized Fox "News" was gaining traction in ratings, the deal was sealed for "real reporting", as they all jettisoned costly reporting in favor of Fox's model of opining.
    Another bit of fall-out from Roger Ailes' little experiment with political propaganda.

    "Inequality is the root of social evil." ― Pope Francis

    by GoodGod on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 04:12:37 AM PDT

  •  It's so scary (17+ / 0-)
    my finger grazed a hard knot beneath my lumpectomy scar. Just as before, time seemed to stop. ...

    A young family that works for me is being devastated by breast cancer.  Too very young daughters and loss of income, the massive bills that insurance doesn't cover.  It's so sad.  They've had to start a "internet campaign."

    Which feels like the 21st century equivalent of begging in the streets.  Which I guess it is.

    If you're so inclined . . . here's the link.

    I hope I'm not breaking some rule.  If I am, I'm sorry.

    A drowning man can not learn to swim. -- Chris Lonsdale

    by Rikon Snow on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 04:23:55 AM PDT

    •  As far as I know (14+ / 0-)

      APR is an open thread, there are no rules. In treatment now and can't imagine what it would do to my family without my platinum insurance from work. One shot I get after every chemo costs over $7,000 - what the hell. Not only that, it's years (at least 5) of follow up tests and scans and appointments. One may never recover financially.

    •  One of the points of the article (17+ / 0-)

      is that many women are getting over-treated -- mastectomies and reconstruction (on both sides) when there is no medical evidence that it's preferable to a simple lumpectomy. When I was diagnosed, I said "no thank you" to chemo because the statistics, explained by the very patient oncologist and his nurse, were that there was only a 4% chance that it would make any difference at all. He confessed that oncologists knew they were inflicting chemo on millions of women who didn't benefit from it -- the problem was that they didn't have good ways to figure out which 4% or even 25% would benefit. That's changed some in the 15 years since, but there is still a lot of treatment that is neither necessary nor effective but is done "just to be sure." (But it doesn't guarantee anything, even so.)

      It's devastating to think of so many people spending their life savings -- and quarters from jars at the gas station, and money raised by 5k races and selling pink ribbons -- for treatments that are brutal, and that may not be either necessary or effective in treating/preventing cancer.

      But of course in any individual case it's difficult to know that, so I would not fault any individual patient for the choices she's made. And it takes a huge amount of courage and backbone to say "no thank you" to the recommended treatment. I was fortunate in having a strong push-back instinct, and a rational oncologist willing to discuss and debate. And I've never regretted my choice, even though I had a small recurrence some years later. (I was offered a mastectomy at that point, but turned that down too -- again, with a surgeon willing to discuss and debate who supported either choice.)

      BTW tell your friends about the Women's Cancer Screening and Treatment program -- they should ask the hospital social worker or cancer navigator about it, and about any local foundations that help pay bills. Breast cancer is one of the diseases that has attracted a lot of fund-raising, not just for research, but also for individual treatment costs. Support groups, which many hospitals run, are also very useful in reducing the stress and helping with problem-solving -- and laughing about things that only another survivor understands.

  •  Doss Dowhat is to the NYTimes like the kid who (9+ / 0-)

    weights 90 pounds and has two left feet is to the high school football team that let's all kids who want to be on the team join. The difference is on the high school team the 90 pound kid doesn't get to play in the games never mind play linebacker.

  •  Here's why marijuana should be legalized (26+ / 0-)

    We can't afford this ridiculous "drug war" anymore.

    Nearly three-quarters of Americans, 72 percent, say government efforts to enforce marijuana laws cost more than they are worth. Even Republicans, who tend to be more skeptical of legalization, overwhelmingly hold that opinion: 67 percent. And a shrinking share of the population believes marijuana is a “gateway” substance that leads to harder drugs (38 percent in 2013 versus 60 percent in 1977), or that marijuana use is “morally wrong” (32 percent in 2013, down 18 points since 2006).
    http://www.nytimes.com/...

    There's an excellent documentary available on Netflix, iTunes and the internet called "The House I Live In", about the actual cost of the drug war- to other countries, to our environment, to us as a nation, and to our citizens, particularly the poor ones:

    As America remains embroiled in conflict overseas, a less visible war is taking place at home, costing countless lives, destroying families, and inflicting untold damage on future generations of Americans. Over forty years, the War on Drugs has accounted for more than 45 million arrests, made America the world’s largest jailer, and damaged poor communities at home and abroad. Yet for all that, drugs are cheaper, purer, and more available today than ever before. Filmed in more than twenty states, The House I Live In captures heart-wrenching stories from individuals at all levels of America’s War on Drugs. From the dealer to the grieving mother, the narcotics officer to the senator, the inmate to the federal judge, the film offers a penetrating look inside America’s longest war, offering a definitive portrait and revealing its profound human rights implications.

    While recognizing the seriousness of drug abuse as a matter of public health, the film investigates the tragic errors and shortcomings that have meant it is more often treated as a matter for law enforcement, creating a vast machine that feeds largely on America’s poor, and especially on minority communities. Beyond simple misguided policy, The House I Live In examines how political and economic corruption have fueled the war for forty years, despite persistent evidence of its moral, economic, and practical failures.

    http://www.thehouseilivein.org/...

    If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

    by skohayes on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 04:42:13 AM PDT

    •  I don't like weed. (7+ / 0-)

      I think it makes people do stupid things, it smells bad, and there are probably health consequences we don't know about (because it has been illegal to do a proper study).

      I was always in favor of prohibiting it, but now I've changed my mind. All the cops, jails, fines, courtrooms, etc., don't stop people from smoking. It just costs a lot of money and makes people hate government.

      The enforcement is also selective. They seem to target Black people more.

      All I ask is that when it's legalized, people should be required to have air filters because it stinks really bad. In an older building, the smell can seep through brick walls.

      Oh, and one more thing. Foreign-grown weed should still be illegal. Only 100% American-Grown marijuana should be smoked in this country. If we must put up with the smell, let's at least try to create some jobs...

      •  Doesn't stop people? (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ManhattanMan
        All the cops, jails, fines, courtrooms, etc., don't stop people from smoking.
        Are you sure?  How do you know?

        Certainly, they don't stop everyone from smoking. But surely they stop some people.

        •  Hasn't stopped me for 45 years (7+ / 0-)

          I started smoking it when I was 17. I'm now 62, so "All the cops, jails, fines, courtrooms, etc." didn't stop me from smoking it.  But yeah, sure, I'm sure it must have stopped some people - those incarcerated, it's hard to get pot in prison. But that doesn't mean they'd jump at the chance if they could.

          David Koch, a teacher and a Tea Partier sit down a table with a plate of a dozen cookies. Koch quickly stuffs 11 cookies in his pockets, leans to the bagger and says "watch out, the union thug will try to steal your cookie".

          by Dave in AZ on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 05:53:19 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Won't be as much fun when its legal ;-) (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Dave in AZ, claude, skohayes, side pocket

            I'll miss that thrill of the chase and the feeling its still a revolutionary act.
            But I don't smoke it for medicine, I smoke it to get high----for the last 50 years

            Happy just to be alive

            by exlrrp on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 06:13:04 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  The thrill is gone? (7+ / 0-)

              That wasn't my thought the first time I enjoyed cannabis legally. In 2001 I visited some friends in Holland, who lived in a small town outside Amsterdam. Friday night we walked to the town center for the evening. The town operated the only pot shop. I was impressed with the selection, and selected an enticing looking sativa strain. We walked over to the city park, rolled a joint, and began to enjoy. I felt panicked as a policeman started walking toward us, but he just smiled and nodded and continued on his way. I wasn't thinking "the thrill is gone", I was thinking "way cool, this is the way it should be."  We then enjoyed some drinks at a club, a very nice dinner, and then enjoyed another joint on the walk home.

              We have medical marijuana here in AZ, but I hope I never qualify, you have to have some really awful medical conditions to get a MM card -  AIDS/HIV, cancer, chronic severe pain, etc. But, I'm planning on driving up to Colorado this fall, very much looking forward to strolling into legal recreational shop, looking over their selection, and enjoying it legally. I can promise I won't pull a Maureen Dowd.

              David Koch, a teacher and a Tea Partier sit down a table with a plate of a dozen cookies. Koch quickly stuffs 11 cookies in his pockets, leans to the bagger and says "watch out, the union thug will try to steal your cookie".

              by Dave in AZ on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 06:57:36 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  Here’s 30 recent studies on the effects of (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                ColoTim

                Marijuana from SFGate. Might surprise you.

                It's not a puff piece (sorry) but real research which

                seems to be falling in favor of marijuana with each passing day.
                Such as less head and neck sarcomas? Less obesity? WTF is that about? But also a couple of the studies show sleep impairment and not good for young adults.

                Every human being has paid the earth to grow up. Most people don’t grow up. And you find out what it costs us to love and to lose, to dare and to fail. And maybe even more, to succeed. What it costs, in truth.—Maya Angelou

                by TerryDarc on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 07:46:35 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

          •  Wait... You Didn't Move on to (4+ / 0-)

            the heavier drugs like heroin long ago... you know, weed being the "gateway drug" and all?

            "We are beyond law, which is not unusual for an empire; unfortunately, we are also beyond common sense." Gore Vidal

            by Superpole on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 07:21:07 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I never did... (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Superpole, side pocket, ColoTim

              ...and I was smoking half of Colombia when I was doing it on a regular basis.

              I don't now because (a) I like the feel of semi-sobriety (I'll still have wine from time to time), and (b) the stuff that's out there now is WAY stronger than it was back in the day -- thanks, herbal eugenics! That said, legalizing it (and taxing the crap out of it) is the way to go. I just wish Obama would Cowboy Up and hit the trapdoor on the Bush mole that runs DEA and is still going after medical-marijuana dispensaries despite Holder telling her to knock it the fuck off!

              "If you're going to go down with the ship, make it a submarine." - Wayne Shorter

              by Oliver Tiger on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 07:43:18 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  From what I have read in the Denver Post, (4+ / 0-)

                Colorado has been working very hard to regulate properly.  Several articles have indicated it's one of a very few examples where all sides of a controversial issue have worked together for reasonable solutions and policies.

              •  Careful w/ "Taxing the Crap Out of It" (0+ / 0-)

                I'm not sure we're out of the woods yet in terms of the black market for weed.

                if the tax for legal weed makes it significantly more expensive than street bought variety, why should users use the legal shops?

                Two: and this could a much larger problem-- if the feds or states try to monkey with (reduce) the THC level of legal weed, this could force users to purchase street weed, because you're correct; weed today is wayyy stronger than back in the day due to herbal eugenics.

                "We are beyond law, which is not unusual for an empire; unfortunately, we are also beyond common sense." Gore Vidal

                by Superpole on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 09:50:45 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

        •  Yes, you're right... (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Dave in AZ, skohayes

          ...it stops some people. But millions and millions still smoke.

        •  Sort of stopped me since '89. (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          TerryDarc, on the cusp, Naniboujou

          I just didn't want to lose a job or even an opportunity for a job because of a failed pee test.

          The last time I smoked was outside of Greenfield with Pat Pat Moriarity. He had a comic WiP called "Popcorn Pimps" and he wasn't sure he was going to make it as a cartoonist. I had my WiP comic called InterStellar OverDrive and I was sure I was. He went on to be Rolling Stone's Hot Cartoonist of 1996 and "a giant of alternative press". I'm an electronic technician for the USPS fixing mail sorters.....

          "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

          by Stude Dude on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 06:15:26 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  It stopped me (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ColoTim, LtPowers

          For a couple of reasons. One is that I am disgustingly law-abiding and risk-averse, so intend not to intentionally break laws. The bigger reason is, as I told my children, we have no idea where that stuff came from unless we grew it ourselves. Colombian drug lord?  Disgusting, rat-infested basement?  We have no clue. Oh, and I don't want to smoke it.

          Of course. I am slowly realizing that this is true of most of the food I buy, but that's another story.

          Anyway, I may wander up to Washington when they get the retail business together and pick up a few brownies.

          Be bold. Be courageous. Americans are counting on you. Gabby Giffords.

          by Leftleaner on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 12:16:54 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

      •  I'm an emt. I've never been called for (20+ / 0-)

        a person who's stoned on pot.  
        On the other hand, I've been called for Alcohol so many times that I believe that if there's a substance that should be banned, it's alcohol.
        Pot doesn't make you unresponsive.  Booze does.  I'd rather have some moron drive a car stoned on pot than someone who just had 8 drinks, that's for sure.

        •  And contrary to what the idiot politicians say.... (9+ / 0-)

          pot is not addictive.  I'll say it again....Pot is not addictive.  Anyone who tells you it is is lying.  

          •  "I can quit anytime".... (0+ / 0-)

            Really....

            "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

            by Stude Dude on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 06:16:24 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  Anything and everything is potentially addictive (3+ / 0-)

            It's the person, not the drug. We've spent all this money on clamping down on the product and putting users in prison -- while manufacturers get off scot free, by and large -- but we've never fully addressed why people do drugs (or drink like fishes, or eat a whole McDonald's menu). And that will never happen in the current environment, because addressing issues like poverty, education and jobs would simply be "helping the takers." :p

            "If you're going to go down with the ship, make it a submarine." - Wayne Shorter

            by Oliver Tiger on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 07:47:20 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Then you don't know what addictive means (3+ / 0-)

              Nobody goes through withdrawal with pot.  It's not even like caffeine.  Yes, they may have the desire to light up and get stoned again, but it is not a physical addiction in that sense of the word.

              •  There is such as thing as mental or psychological (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                ColoTim

                addiction in addition to physical addiction.

              •  Agreed (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                Blue Intrigue, side pocket

                Back around '98 I decided to quit smoking pot, and did so cold turkey (great 1970 satirical comedy btw, worth looking for) even though I'd been getting high since my college days decades earlier.

                There were a few moments I felt nostalgic for getting high when something in particular reminded me of those days, and quite a few times when I was hanging with friends while they lit up, but never felt compelled to indulge.

                I resumed having the occasional puff a few years back, and enjoying it without strings... word to Oliver Tiger: yeah, the stuff is super-strong nowadays: you don't have to smoke half a joint to get a buzz - a tiny bit in a pipe is all it takes. Much easier, quicker and a lot less wear & tear on the lungs too

                Why are the Republicans so obsessed with Ben Gazzara? Let the man rest in peace!

                by Miscweant on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 09:05:01 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

            •  I'm addicted to eating. (0+ / 0-)

              Won't someone help me stop? It's a very costly addiction. We'd certainly save money on food stamps as a country if we could just get rid of this crippling calorie addiction. A low intake of maybe 100/day would be a good start so perhaps we can get it down to 0. I mean, I'm not going to just quit cold turkey. That would be crazy.

          •  Pot is not physically addicting (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            freshwater dan

            That is certainly true. There's no need for a maintenance dose to avoid withdrawal symptoms. I'm not that much an expert on it but unlike actual dangerous drugs there's little to no need to smoke (or otherwise consume) more in order to obtain the desired effects. It does what it does quite efficiently and predictably, unlike booze or heroin.

            To the extent there is an addiction it is to the feeling of being high and possibly to the ritual of using itself. I certainly have personal experience with that which is why I haven't smoked it in 35 years. The fact is that while I enjoyed it for a number of years I ceased doing so long before I stopped smoking it. If that isn't a form of addiction then what is? In the end I found the euphoric experience of being high very pleasant for a few minutes, the accompanying depression and paranoia that lasted another several days, not so much. My experience with psychedelics was much the same. Not physically addictive but I came to crave the high even after it ceased to be enjoyable.

            This having been said, I fully support legalization for the usual reasons plus an additional one or two: my experience and my personality problems shouldn't be made the basis of public policy and should certainly not be the basis for continuing to incarcerate millions of people for no good reason.

            One of the more interesting facts in the polling cited upthread is this:

            And a shrinking share of the population believes marijuana is a “gateway” substance that leads to harder drugs (38 percent in 2013 versus 60 percent in 1977), or that marijuana use is “morally wrong” (32 percent in 2013, down 18 points since 2006).
            "Morally wrong?" What would make using or not using a substance immoral? How does that even make sense? To the extent that someone may cause harm to oneself or to others while intoxicated, that is a moral question. For example, committing a crime while under then influence is no less immoral than doing so while not under the influence. But that is about the criminal action; it is not about being drunk or high. Certainly nobody should be given a pass on their behavior because they happen to be intoxicated while they did it. But being intoxicated is neither moral nor immoral. It is simply one among many possible ways of being sentient.
        •  Well, there was that one cop (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          side pocket

          If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

          by skohayes on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 06:04:11 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

        •  Me too (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          ColoTim

          Studies show cannabis drivers "know" they're a bit impaired---read signs (all of them), don't tail-gate, drive slower--- etc.
          That said-I do Not advocate driving while under the influence of anything-Including, while Ill, Stressed, Sleep Deprived etc. Driving hazards are not just measurable by "something consumed" because there are a lot of things that cause one to not be attentive behind the wheel and I believe the most familiar example is Texting.
          Yep, I'd happily take my chances - if I had to choose - with a driver under the influence of cannabis over anything else.

      •  I much prefer cannabis smoke over (7+ / 0-)

        cigarettes, and there's no second hand smoke effect. Your neighbors must be smoking ditch weed.
        While the US government wallows in stupidity regarding cannabis use, there are plenty of other countries doing research. Far from being deleterious to your health, it's been discovered that certain ingredients in the plant can treat things like nausea, seizures, pain and lack of appetite.

        If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

        by skohayes on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 06:01:54 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  As you say, each to his own. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          askew

          Spouse and I detest both pot and cigarette smoke. We worked hard to get smoking in public places banned.

          We once lived down slope from a large, empty property.  High school kids gathered there to smoke pot before they went to their first class.  For nearly a year until they stopped coming there, we awoke early each morning to pot smoke drifting into our bedroom.  It was disgusting.  And I would have been just as unhappy if it had been cigarette smoke.

      •  What are these "stupid things" of which you speak? (10+ / 0-)
        I think it makes people do stupid things, it smells bad, and there are probably health consequences we don't know about (because it has been illegal to do a proper study).
        I've smoked it for 45 years, and can't recall a single stupid thing I did while under its influence. Sadly, I can't say the same for alcohol. In fact, I'm very lucky some of the stupid things I did under the influence of alcohol didn't turn out much worse.

        As for the smell, I love the aroma of burning pot, but to each their own. As for health consequences, inhaling anything but pure air into your lungs is not a good idea. Fortunately, pot is a comparatively small amount, with negligible consequences. And their are better ways of enjoying pot: edibles, and they're now coming out with concentrates, which you inhale with e-cigarette type devices - it's a steam vapor, so no smoke and no odor. And former New Mexico Gov. & 2012 Librarian Presidential candidate Gary Johnson has signed on as the CEO of a marijuana company called Cannabis Sativa, which markets  lozenge-like drops laced with cannabis oil for recreational use. Johnson says: "Couple of things hit you when you try the product. One is, wow, why would anybody smoke marijuana given this is an alternative? And then secondly, it's just very, very pleasant. I mean, very pleasant."

        I can't wait to try it.

        David Koch, a teacher and a Tea Partier sit down a table with a plate of a dozen cookies. Koch quickly stuffs 11 cookies in his pockets, leans to the bagger and says "watch out, the union thug will try to steal your cookie".

        by Dave in AZ on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 06:07:13 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  IF... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        ColoTim

        and that's a big if, there are 'health consequences" that we don't know about, [from smoking weed],then they will probably all be of the beneficial kind.
        You do realize that most pharmaceuticals are derived from plants...

        "These 'Yet To Be' United States" --James Baldwin--

        by kevinbr38 on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 07:25:13 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  I would rather have weed grown outside the US (0+ / 0-)

        The US still uses pesticides that have been banned worldwide (thanks Shrubya). We spray the shit out of everything, shove animal DNA into every plant, and chemical additives are ridiculously energy consumptive.

    •  And here's the argument against legalization (9+ / 0-)

      The primary argument against legalization comes from the lobbyists for the for-profit prison industry.  For the prison industry, every drug arrest is a potential profit.  And the for-profit prison industry wants more people in prison to create greater profit for themselves.

      The arguments get stated in public in terms of health and safety ("MJ is dangerous"; "MJ is a gateway drug"; etc).  But the real concern is for greater profits for the business of putting people  in prison.

      And of course the reality is that we as a nation are going broke trying to pay for all the people the prison industry wants to put in prison.

      The for-profit prison industry makes money by doing things that are bad for Americans individually and for our country as a whole - like the tobacco industry, the gun industry, and the health insurance industry.  Such businesses should be allowed to seek profits, but not lobby law-makers to perpetuate policy that is harmful and expensive.

      "The fool doth think he is wise: the wise man knows himself to be a fool" - W. Shakespeare

      by Hugh Jim Bissell on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 06:53:23 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I find Hollande's reasoning very cynical (10+ / 0-)

    in 1973 France refused to release to Israel gunboats it had paid for, and the Israelis got them only because French dock workers helped them "steal" them.

    What's the difference?

    Could it be energy?

    Is not France now a major purchaser of Russian natural gas?

    In 1973 the Arab countries threatened an oil boycott on any nation that supported Israel

    "Don't ask what the world needs. Ask what makes you come alive and go do it, because what the world needs is more people who have come alive." - Howard Thurman

    by teacherken on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 04:47:00 AM PDT

    •  The oligarhcs don't (7+ / 0-)

      have much national loyalty. They wheel and deal for their own profit.

      A true craftsman will meticulously construct the apparatus of his own demise.

      by onionjim on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 05:02:18 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  IIRC (0+ / 0-)

      Wasn't France cynically opportunist in not supporting Israel in OPEC 1 and didn't have their oil cut off?

      Meanwhile, in the good ol' USofA, a bonehead jockeying for president like John Conner was like if we drop support for Israel, then the Arabs will play nice and give us cheap gas.

      "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

      by Stude Dude on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 05:31:42 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  I'm a tad confused (3+ / 0-)

      France has a massive nuclear power infrastructure. It supplies the nation with roughly 75% of its electricity demand. I have no love for nuclear power, but on the surface France would seem to be less vulnerable to Russian natural gas leverage than most of Europe.

      I suspect the underlying answer is the amount of Global Financial Elite reliance on all Carbon Assets. Devalue the importance of Carbon flows and a lot of spreadsheet wealth disappears, along with its corrosive influence on not just our politics, but the entire planet's.

      That's why true renewable energy is so dangerous to the Financial Elites. Future anticipated income streams impact current stated wealth and power.

      Change does not roll in on the wheels of inevitability, but comes through continuous struggle. --Martin Luther King Jr.

      by Egalitare on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 07:05:39 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Unfortunately... (0+ / 0-)

      ...almost EVERYONE in the EU is a consumer of Russian oil. The only countries making noise about anything Putin does or influences (US, UK, Australia) get their oil from different sources. And as much as renewables are taking off as energy sources in the EU, there are still a shitload of cars on the road in those countries that are not electric or hybrids. It's the same situation here, obviously, so that's the primary GOTP argument ("How'm I gonna drive down Highway 40 in mah big ol' pickup truck?") against renewables -- other than the fact that "King Obama" hates profit and wants to destroy the Koch brothers because they're Caucasian.

      (A Socialist Monarchy! Who knew?)

      "If you're going to go down with the ship, make it a submarine." - Wayne Shorter

      by Oliver Tiger on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 07:55:56 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Hey Douthat....the GOP response to the Obama (13+ / 0-)

    is irrational and self-destructive.....But thanks for the fish.

  •  We won't stop extinctions, maybe slow them. (6+ / 0-)

    There are more signs for optimism on the climate change front. Here's another indication that the pendulum is finally starting to swing away from the global warming deniers.

    http://www.thenation.com/...

    And once that pendulum swings, we will start taking serious action to reverse it. Perhaps the US will take the leadership position, which the world really needs it to do on this issue. In addition, the fossil fuel companies, who are in a similar position as the tobacco companies when the pendulum swung towards real science on smoking's health effects, will ultimately be forced to start footing some of the bill.

    "Inequality is the root of social evil." ― Pope Francis

    by GoodGod on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 04:55:01 AM PDT

    •  I live in a farming/ranching area (3+ / 0-)

      These guys know about the changing weather patterns. It's hard to deny climate change when it's affecting your bottom line.
      The Defense Department is also a strong supporter of climate change action.

      If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

      by skohayes on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 06:23:28 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  NOTHING done now to mitigate (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Heart of the Rockies, Naniboujou

      climate change will have any effect that will be noticed by any adult.  Everything we will do has to taken on the pure faith that it will make a difference to the people who are not yet born. Maybe.

      What we have set in motion by mass industrialization (far too much of which is simply done so that Paris Hilton can have a new gown each year, metaphorically speaking) is not going to be reversed overnight, or even in our lifetimes.  We will, in fact, see things get far worse before they begin to get better.

      don't always believe what you think

      by claude on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 06:44:31 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Changing from defense to offense (0+ / 0-)

        Perhaps you are right. However, it's not simply the defensive policy of slowing down the introduction of CO2 into the atmosphere, but rather determining technologies to reverse greenhouse gas instigated climate issues that could truly change things. There's some promising scientific "concepts". However, a worldwide "moon landing" plus scale political effort will be required. We seem nowhere near that point. And there is much to discourage us from believing that we ever will get there. However, I expect that to change over the next few years.

        "Inequality is the root of social evil." ― Pope Francis

        by GoodGod on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 08:06:59 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Paul Ryan would do much better (8+ / 0-)

    developing his plans/policies/views into a line of wallpaper - he'd get far more coverage that way.

    Anti-Poverty Plan for the Kitchen
    Upward Mobility Plan for Family Room
    Economic Strategies for the Home Office

    As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them. John F. Kennedy

    by JaxDem on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 05:00:02 AM PDT

  •  Everyone says turnout is key. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Superpole, salmo

    So why does it keep going down?
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/...

    Be the change you want to see in the world. -Gandhi

    by DRo on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 05:08:06 AM PDT

    •  Because the Disgust-O-Meter (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      claude, wintergreen8694, DRo

      regarding congress' performance and our political/economic system in general is off the scale.

      As Velma Hart stated at one of Obama's (short lived) Town Hall meetings: "I'm not feeling the change yet".

      "We are beyond law, which is not unusual for an empire; unfortunately, we are also beyond common sense." Gore Vidal

      by Superpole on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 05:28:00 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  This concerns me too. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      wintergreen8694, DRo

      Are there enough women and minorities mad at the GOP to swing things our way, or at least cut losses?

      "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

      by Stude Dude on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 05:33:05 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Only women and minorities are mad? (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Stude Dude, DRo

        The entire thinking populous of the USA is mad at the GOP.

        See:  The GOP if you need further information.

        Someone once asked me why do you always insist on taking the hard road? and I replied why do you assume I see two roads?

        by funluvn1 on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 05:41:36 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Everyone is mad, but mad may not lead to votes (7+ / 0-)

          Anger only leads to more engagement with electoral politics -- starting with showing up to vote -- if you believe that voting makes a difference. Does it? What can we point to that might convince people that it matters? (Well, marriage equality, perhaps -- except where judges did that instead of legislatures.)

          If voting doesn't make any difference -- the thugs, banksters, and big businesses are still in full control, and manage to get around any law that sneaks through that might rein them in -- then people express their anger in different ways, like posting death threats against the President on the Internet, or showing up to force the BLM off of public property. Or, on a more positive note, showing up for "living wage" protests outside fast-food restaurants.

          •  The difference between driving at the cliff 70mph (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            DRo

            and 20mph, perhaps. We can always get to total disaster quicker and remove the possibility of ever getting it right. Old lesser of two weevils.

            I prefer my disasters in slo-mo.

            Every human being has paid the earth to grow up. Most people don’t grow up. And you find out what it costs us to love and to lose, to dare and to fail. And maybe even more, to succeed. What it costs, in truth.—Maya Angelou

            by TerryDarc on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 07:59:57 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  Hmmm.... Surely voting makes a difference (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Naniboujou, DRo

            Or where did all those Republican restrictions on birth control  and worker organizing come from? And if voting doesn't matter why are Republicans passing all those restrictions on voting?

            Clearly, THEY think it matters.

            Help us to save free conscience from the paw Of hireling wolves whose gospel is their maw. ~John Donne

            by ohiolibrarian on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 09:30:04 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  Link to Hiaasen story is wrong. (0+ / 0-)
  •  Prohibition arguments (6+ / 0-)

    Prohibition was certainly a mess, but a bit more complex than popular histories suggest. For example it was never illegal to possess or drink alcohol.  The situation was very much like that in jurisdictions which decriminalise personal possession of marijuana while cracking down on supplier.

    One reason the 18th amendment was repealed was that income tax payers realised that New Deal type legislation would mean big hikes for them. So there was a huge Fox-network level news-management operation to stress all the negative points about prohibition. Legal alcohol sales meant that the New Deal could be financed by taxes on the less wealthy.

    The Club For Growth has nothing on the tactics used by the industry-funded Association Against the Prohibition Amendment (AAPA) backed at Koch-Brothers type level by the DuPont family.

    There is a very nuanced discussion of this in Griffith Edward's book 'Alcohol, the worlds favourite drug'.

    Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent.

    by saugatojas on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 05:10:17 AM PDT

  •  "Now, grab whatever makes you feel (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    TerryDarc

    mellow on Sunday"
    Heh, This post and a Hot Steaming cuppa... :)
    This is Awesomely Great news.

    •  OTOH.... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Fredamae

      I'm thinking about Weird AL and "I'll be Mellow When I'm Dead".

      I sympathized to that and a lot of '80s Alt Rock because I was in my '20s, with what would now be 18-19 out of 20 bullet point sypmtoms of ADD back before that stuff was figured out, and bristled at being at the receiving end of cruelty to oddballs because of my unmellowness.

      "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

      by Stude Dude on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 05:27:32 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Or Zorba the Greek (0+ / 0-)
        “Life is trouble. Only death is not. To be alive is to undo your belt and look for trouble.”
        ― Nikos Kazantzakis, Zorba the Greek

        Every human being has paid the earth to grow up. Most people don’t grow up. And you find out what it costs us to love and to lose, to dare and to fail. And maybe even more, to succeed. What it costs, in truth.—Maya Angelou

        by TerryDarc on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 08:02:07 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Somebody was talking earlier this year (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    salmo, askew

    About a revival of activism happening this summer. Summer is almost 2/3s over and nothing seems to be happening.

    It's sort of like have Occupy was supposed to regroup and revived after Christmas '11 break and all through '12 and beyond, a whole lot of nothing happened. I felt disappointed.

    "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

    by Stude Dude on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 05:20:55 AM PDT

    •  You must not live where I live (8+ / 0-)

      There has been a steady (growing?) series of living wage protests, immigration protests (both sides), a successful well-organized pushback (including street protests) against a high-stakes test as a high school graduation requirement and in favor of providing free bus transportation to high schools, and students, churches, and others pressing hard -- with some success -- for institutions to divest from fossil fuels.

      The media does not provide much coverage of all this, but that doesn't mean it isn't happening.

    •  What are you doing? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Stude Dude, Ohkwai

      Why wait for someone else to get something started?
      There's a lot of activity to get voters registered in southern states, or you could look for a local group in your area and volunteer.

      If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

      by skohayes on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 06:25:54 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Okay (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        skohayes, Naniboujou

        I got zero organizing skills and negative charisma. I can't even get my comics published....

        I do have regrets about not getting involved in the Farm Movement 30 years ago, and instead drew up my goofy Sci-Fi parodies because I wanted to be lightyears away. Besides the Farm Movement didn't go anywhere. Plus one of my big sore points is why was the Left just so conveniently absent over that?

        I'm a lot spooked by Talk Radio, especially after it took only a weekend to get everyone hating on Sandra Fluke or the Twinkies union. I've been through what Dr. Olweus would call a mobbing in a couple of smallish fan scenes. I'm no no mood to go through it nation wide.

        OTOH, I'm about ready to start working up a cold sell for a "Ladies Aid" or "Labor Aid" anthology comic after work. I'll pitch it to Friends of Lulu, Gary Groth, Art Spiegelman, and the Kossack cartoonists. Actually, I think this shold have been done a year or three ago. Any help on how to write this up?

        "If this Studebaker had anymore Atomic Space-Age Style, you'd have to be an astronaut with a geiger counter!"

        by Stude Dude on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 09:35:37 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  DON'T SHOOT ME! Read Maureen Dowd's column (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    TerryDarc, snazzzybird

    is what I called this piece in which  I explore her tribute to the great Roger Angell

    I hope to convince you that this is one Dowd column well worth reading.

    Promise

    "Don't ask what the world needs. Ask what makes you come alive and go do it, because what the world needs is more people who have come alive." - Howard Thurman

    by teacherken on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 05:32:10 AM PDT

    •  Wow! Great piece (0+ / 0-)

      I understand your reluctance to rec MoDo. I'm unfamiliar with Roger Angell and in general the New Yorker bores me to tears as does New York Sports but that is fine writing.

      Thanks, Ken!

      Every human being has paid the earth to grow up. Most people don’t grow up. And you find out what it costs us to love and to lose, to dare and to fail. And maybe even more, to succeed. What it costs, in truth.—Maya Angelou

      by TerryDarc on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 08:20:36 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Prohibition (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Stude Dude

    The biggest problem I have with legalization is the continued severe societal issues we have with legalized alcohol.

    I completely understand that Prohibition produced highly undesirable outcomes, and that the same is true of marijuana.  But there are just so many people who can't drink responsibly, and there are going to be people who can't smoke responsibly.  How do we deal with that huge cost?

    We are losing too many lives to alcohol use.  There has to be a better way.

    •  Compared to the huge costs now (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      claude

      Which is less desirable to you?

      I think it's pretty clear that irresponsible alcohol use causes far more problems than irresponsible pot use does/will.

      And why do so many people think there will some major increase in pot use if it were legalized?  Seems to me that 1) most people who like to smoke pot already find it, and 2) once something is legal is loses its luster to the youth...forbidden fruit syndrome, if you will.

    •  There is no real (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      skohayes, claude, Choco8

      similarities between the two. Alcohol is Highly addictive, it causes violence, Alcohol is a Deadly drug.
      Evidence of cannabis use do not fall under Any of these consequences.
      Will there be "irresponsible use"? Of course. There is a continued propensity with-in a certain segment of our population that will always cheat, lie, and steal...not to mention behave irresponsibly-with their homes, their cars, their families, their jobs, their behavior etc. (look at congress)
      What every state needs to develop and fund along with laws, rules and policies governing its use is-Comprehensive Harm Reduction Programs...not just for cannabis but as a preventative effort towards Nutrition, All Drug use from OTC to Prescriptions to Street Drugs, Risky Behaviors etc. When people are empowered with knowledge they always make better decisions.
      Think about how we reacted when we began to lean about GMO's. People ate that crap when they didn't know better but now that we are becoming more informed? That has changed Dramatically.

      Please share your reasons for having similar concerns regarding cannabis.

      •  GMOs? (0+ / 0-)

        You lost me at the GMOs.  What have we learned about GMOs that puts you off of them?  I'm not aware of any scientific consensus that GMOs are nutritionally or safety-wise distinguishable from non-GMO foods.

    •  Although Colorado is but one small example (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      snazzzybird

      all the bad things that were anticipated by the anti crowd have yet to materialize.
      There were some issues early on with edibles, either with children taking them to school or people "overdosing" (see Dowd, Maureen), but proper labeling and dosage instructions should help that.
      Crime rate is down in Colorado, as are marijuana arrests (it's still illegal to smoke in public, for example).
      Not one store in Colorado has been cited for selling marijuana to minors, though some stores were closed that were being used by gangs to launder money. Legal sellers want this kind of enforcement.
      And your last sentence, while true (I lost my mother and sister and almost myself to alcoholism) has nothing to do with marijuana- talk to emergency room personnel and EMTs- they don't see things like "marijuana poisoning" or overdosing on marijuana. It doesn't happen.

      If trees gave off WIFi signals, we would probably plant so many trees, we would save the planet. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.

      by skohayes on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 06:36:41 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  climate feedback loops (0+ / 0-)

    Robert Rubin's comment about "negative feedback loops" is, I believe, confused.  Loops that self-reinforce, the kind he is talking about here, are usually referred to as "positive feedback loops", even if they have an effect we regard as undesirable, i.e., "negative".

  •  The Economist...though conservative editorially (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Superpole

    and expensive.....still gives a pretty good wrap-up of world events.

  •  The federal government (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Stude Dude, Dave in AZ, skohayes
    The federal government should repeal the ban on marijuana
    I'll toke to that!

    "Given the choice between a Republican and someone who acts like a Republican, people will vote for a real Republican every time." Harry Truman

    by MargaretPOA on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 06:01:45 AM PDT

  •  Inequality for first offenders. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    skohayes, snazzzybird, Naniboujou

    Decriminalizing is one of the best things we can do. Many have documented the poor languishing in our jail system. Far too common are people that can't afford diversion or first time offender programs. They are those with limited resources. We hear about a grandmother desperately trying to find a few thousands of dollars to release a family member. They can't match a middle class or wealthy kid to skip out of a cruel prison system.  

  •  Ain't nothin' wrong or boring w/sobriety, Mark (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mark Sumner

    I've tried it a time or two myself.

  •  Perhaps Douthat Should Have Written: (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    orlbucfan, tb mare, Choco8, Buzzer

    "Obama won in 2008 because he was a candidate who did not in any way threaten the rich".

    I'm no fan of Douthat but it's more than slightly disingenuous to claim he is bogusly attempting to "redefine populism" when we can all see exactly what Obama and the democrats in congress did with their populist mandate after the 2008 election:

    Hundreds of Billions of dollars were given to Wall St., to the very banks/companies who drove our economy into the ditch because of their stupidity and greed. The rescued banks, in return for having their fat asses pulled from the burning theater of their greed, were supposed to loan money to Main St. and assist with the recovery of our economy.

    But they did not do that-- instead they paid out enormous bonuses to themselves (for failing), acquired other companies, straightened out their books to some degree, and sat on the rest of the cash they received.

    The populist response to this travesty, OCCUPY, was apparently seen as a threat to the wealthy. and what happened? Occupy was spied on by agencies working under the current administration. Their right to Free Speech was predictably taken away via blocked access to public spaces, the streets and that was the end of that.

    The response from the Obama admin? Crickets...

    Thus pardon me if I don't jump on board with the democrats are more credible populists than the repugs meme.

    "We are beyond law, which is not unusual for an empire; unfortunately, we are also beyond common sense." Gore Vidal

    by Superpole on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 06:35:03 AM PDT

    •  You do know that the bank bailouts were (0+ / 0-)

      Enacted in 2008? And yes, Obama agreed with it. Many people thought allowing the banks to fail at that time would have been disastrous.

      But to your main point, do you really think Sherrod Brown and Mike Lee are indistinguishable? Jeff Merkley and Ted Cruz? If so, I think you've got a problem.

      Help us to save free conscience from the paw Of hireling wolves whose gospel is their maw. ~John Donne

      by ohiolibrarian on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 09:50:27 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  You Do Know Part of the Deal (0+ / 0-)

        again: the bailed out banks were supposed to do something in return for the financial largesse extended to them by the federal government (we the taxpayers).

        the massive failure of the TARP and HAMP programs is detailed in Neil Barofsky's book Bailout . The main culprit blocking the successful implementation of these programs after Obama was elected-- was the Obama appointed Wall St. insider Mr. Geithner.

        These Main Street-oriented goals were not, as the Treasury Department is now suggesting, mere window dressing that needed only to be taken “into account.” Rather, they were a central part of the compromise with reluctant members of Congress to cast a vote that in many cases proved to be political suicide.

        The act’s emphasis on preserving homeownership was particularly vital to passage. Congress was told that TARP would be used to purchase up to $700 billion of mortgages, and, to obtain the necessary votes, Treasury promised that it would modify those mortgages to assist struggling homeowners. Indeed, the act expressly directs the department to do just that.

        But it has done little to abide by this legislative bargain. Almost immediately, as permitted by the broad language of the act, Treasury’s plan for TARP shifted from the purchase of mortgages to the infusion of hundreds of billions of dollars into the nation’s largest financial institutions, a shift that came with the express promise that it would restore lending.

        In addition, Obama and the early on democratic controlled congress did nothing in regard to exacting criminal penalties in regard to what is lately, quietly been determined to be securities fraud with the usual financial slap on the wrist for the guilty bankers.

        Regarding which political party is the more credible "populists"-- as I've stated before, it's not me needing to be convinced and act on that conviction-- it's the millions of eligible voters out there who according to most here, must vote for democrats this fall.

        What I do need to be convinced of is a huge number of democratic/progressive voters are in fact going to be motivated to vote this fall, given millions lost their jobs and homes and there's still no real economic recovery. and whether the blame is "justified" or not, I need to be convinced voters are not going to blame the incumbent President for our current sad state of affairs.

        http://www.nytimes.com/...

        "We are beyond law, which is not unusual for an empire; unfortunately, we are also beyond common sense." Gore Vidal

        by Superpole on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 02:20:04 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  And You do know that (0+ / 0-)

        The banks were supposed to do something in return for the financial largesse they received from the federal government (we the taxpayers).

        the massive failure of the TARP and HAMP programs is well delineated in Neil Barofsky's book Bailout. the person who thwarted/blocked the full implementation of these programs? the Obama appointed Wall St. insider Mr. Geithner.

         

        These Main Street-oriented goals were not, as the Treasury Department is now suggesting, mere window dressing that needed only to be taken “into account.” Rather, they were a central part of the compromise with reluctant members of Congress to cast a vote that in many cases proved to be political suicide.

        The act’s emphasis on preserving homeownership was particularly vital to passage. Congress was told that TARP would be used to purchase up to $700 billion of mortgages, and, to obtain the necessary votes, Treasury promised that it would modify those mortgages to assist struggling homeowners. Indeed, the act expressly directs the department to do just that.

        But it has done little to abide by this legislative bargain. Almost immediately, as permitted by the broad language of the act, Treasury’s plan for TARP shifted from the purchase of mortgages to the infusion of hundreds of billions of dollars into the nation’s largest financial institutions, a shift that came with the express promise that it would restore lending.

        In addition to this failure, Obama and the early on democratically controlled congress did not exact criminal penalties from the bankers in regard to what has been only recently, finally determined to be securities fraud; with the usual slap on the wrist financial penalties exacted from the perpetrator banks.

        Regarding who is the more credible "populist" party, as I've stated before, it's not me needing convinced, it's the millions of eligible voters out there who according to many here, MUST vote for democrats this fall.

        Given the above malfeasance and the loss of millions of jobs and homes, I'm not convinced voters are going to be motivated to show up and vote for democrats this fall-- or in 2016.

        http://www.nytimes.com/...

        "We are beyond law, which is not unusual for an empire; unfortunately, we are also beyond common sense." Gore Vidal

        by Superpole on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 02:37:51 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Not that this is THE reason to legalize pot, but A (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Ohkwai, Naniboujou, Gator Keyfitz

    reason is the massive amount of money that would be saved by the government (state and fed) and generated for the government (state and fed).  The revenue piece is what always seems to get the majority of attention, but imagine the money saved if police forces didn't have to spend time and resources arresting pot possessors.  Imagine the money saved in our court systems.  Imagine the money saved from our prisons.  Imagine.

  •  Do they need to deliver? (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    orlbucfan, Superpole, tb mare
    The GOP attempts to appropriate the term over the last eight years have only succeeded in making it meaningless. Which may have been the intent all along.
    My thought was always that they could win the White House on a populist wave of bullshit.  In other words, talk populist, but continue to serve the same corporate overlords.  Their game is all the easier if dems nominate a wall street tool like HRC.

    "When I was an alien, cultures weren't opinions" ~ Kurt Cobain, Territorial Pissings

    by Subterranean on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 07:14:27 AM PDT

  •  One thing I never hear, (0+ / 0-)

    pertaining to discussion of "gateway drugs" is that the single #1, undefeated, reigning champion of gateway drugs is......................ALCOHOL!!!!!

    Well, at least before kids started taking their parents prescription pills for fun.


    "I want to die in my sleep like my grandfather ....... Not screaming and yelling like the passengers in his car ..." - Emo Philips

    by AlyoshaKaramazov on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 08:39:45 AM PDT

  •  Wish I'd been there (0+ / 0-)
    We reached that conclusion after a great deal of discussion among the members of The Times’s Editorial Board, inspired by a rapidly growing movement among the states to reform marijuana laws.
    "Pass that joint, this way buddy."

    [long inhale]

    "Uhh, yeah... what were we talking about"

    "I forgot - but man these Doritos are something else!"

    "Yeah, you just ate the entire bag all by yourself - and the bag too."

    (Okay, now I'm just getting silly - bye folks!)

    Why are the Republicans so obsessed with Ben Gazzara? Let the man rest in peace!

    by Miscweant on Sun Jul 27, 2014 at 09:21:37 AM PDT

  •  Russian buying warships from France.....what (0+ / 0-)

    really got my attention was that Russia was BUYING warships not building their own.  They no long have the technology to build their own.

  •  The origins of the word ‘marijuana’ (0+ / 0-)

    When ever I hear the "M" word, I can't help but think of Steve King's "calves the size of cantaloupes" slur toward immigrants. It harkens back to Harry Anslinger's use of the "M" word to caste aspersions upon the same immigrant population. The "M" word has a quite a derisive history in the American lexicon.

    As Walter Sobchak would say to 'The Dude': "Also, Dude, [marijuana] is not the preferred nomenclature, please, [cannabis].

    The origins of the word ‘marijuana’.

  •  If they're going to do studies (0+ / 0-)

    with marijuana and need heavy users, I would be a good subject. I started smoking at eleven. Not proud of the fact, but not ashamed either. I smoke everyday and have for over 46 years now, minus a few exceptions. Boot camp, 30 days for a joint, but smoked three times in the county, and when I went out with one girl for half a year. I'll never do that again.
      I discovered a medical benefit when I was 16. It helped with nausea. I started to have serious stomach issue's due to drinking. Alcohol was my gateway drug by the way. I was in and out of the hospital from this point on up to this day. I quit drinking over 30 years ago. I use everyday to be able to eat, and to keep the food down afterwards. I'm 5' 7 1/2" and am down to 115 lbs. so I can honestly say that cannabis is keeping me alive. Also, cannabis works better for nausea than anything else out there. Trust me, I know. Not one thing from big pharm works as well.
      I was in a motorcycle accident back in Oct. 2000 and lost my right leg below the knee. I also suffer from back issue's due to that wreck. I'm on Fentanyl patches and have been for 14 years. Can't take pain pills because of the stomach. First, from a long time patient on Fentanyl. I have never had to ask for my medicine early. I know there are problems associated with pain meds and I felt the need to clarify the situation that not all people abuse their pain meds. I see people are dying from pharmaceuticals and it gives folks who depend on their meds a bad name.
      Didn't mean to get off track, and I can't stress enough how much better cannabis works for the nerve pain in my leg. There was no fat or muscle to fold over to cushion the skin from the bone and I have a permanent bruise there. I'm on the skinny side. Smoking does very little for the pain, whereas edibles works better than the opiates. The problem is I only get two ounces a month from my caregiver and that's not enough to make a months supply of edibles. So I'm stuck on the Fentanyl but the good news is smoking cannabis and taking opiates together are more effective than the opiates alone.    
       I used to get my meds through the mail and when I had to have my patches on Friday, and they weren't going to be delivered until Monday changed all of that. After suffering withdraw a couple times, my DR and I decided it would be best to get my meds from the pharmacy. I know what withdraw is and no one goes through withdraw from pot. With no withdraw, there's no addiction. One can stop smoking today and be fine tomorrow and so on.
     I've smoked with hundreds of people. You never know who'll end up being friends with and chances are, I would have had nothing to do with that person otherwise. The way I see it, Cannabis brings people from all walks of life together.
      I know so many people who use pot for sleep. That study is a bunk! I am not implying I'm an expert because I smoked for most of my life, I am an expert. I have to laugh when I see studies I know to be a lie. And how are folks who don't smoke supposed to  know? They don't know anything about weed except for what the government tells them. They laugh and say wtf duh, marijuana don't cure cancer, duh.
      Get an education starting with the Endocannabinoid System. http://norml.org/.... There are other more scientific based websites about the Endocannabinoid System if Normal is too pro marijuana for some of you "non users."
      This is the reason cannabis has such wide medical uses for the human body. Also, look up Rick Simpson cannabis oil, the video on youtube run from the cure will also educate you. The vultures in the medical field will suck you dry and will do nothing towards finding a cure as long as they're making huge sums with the system that's in effect now. If you get cancer, you just become a valuable commodity to the medical cancer community.
      Dr. Raphael Mechoulam along with two colleagues discovered THC in cannabis and is now calling for clinical trials into cannabis and cancer. http://www.unitedpatientsgroup.com/...
    Plus, our own government has a patent on cannabis as a neuro protectant.  US Patent #6630507. and yet our own government refuse to allow any research. The United States is going to be left in the dirt when all of these other countries take the lead in medical research into marijuana. Germany, Spain Great Britain even and of course Israel. Uruguay is going to use all 5 of their Universities to research everything they can about the medical uses of this wonderful plant.
     Cannabis does NOT make you lazy. What a bunch of crap. If you are naturally lazy, then weed will emphasize your laziness, the same as if you're a hard worker, pot will bring that out too. I worked my whole life from the time I could deliver papers. I joined the Navy at 17 and served my country, always held down a job up to my accident. I was a rollman in a printing shop making big money when some guy, in a hurry to get home from work ran that red light and destroyed my life. I would still be in that printing shop to this day. Again, pot does not "make" you lazy.
      The one great benefit of legal states for medical use is that all of the money spent on weed by Americans is now staying in this country. The commercial weed from South America is dirt cheap but not too bad for quality compared to when I was buying it.
      Weed is stronger today? That's strange, because I remember Panama Red, and real Colombian Gold that would knock you on your ass! Not to mention Thai weed and other exotic strains. There's more of it today, but there were strains that were just as potent. I know, I was there and have the t-shirt to prove it. lol
     Enough said!

  •  Another thing I wish to address (0+ / 0-)

    about marijuana. You cannot OD off of marijuana. Marijuana is one of the  safest therapeutically active substances known to man, according to Francis Young, the DEA’s administrative law judge back in 88'. Yeah, that god damned anslinger was a racist for sure and that should be reason enough to repeal prohibition. Who ever thought that the politicians of that time would be so stupid to not know the difference between cannabis and marijuana? Let's not forget w.r. hurst too had a big part in marijuana prohibition, christ, he had 100's of thousands of acres of timber and with a new and faster way to process hemp, he would have faced fierce competition from the hemp industry. So instead of saving that old growth forest, and vamp up the hemp industry for paper, his greed caused him to kill all those trees. I love trees. I walk in the woods all the time. It's one of my favorite places to be. It's good it pisses people off when they hear or see in print the word marijuana. Everyone should be educated about the racist origins of the word marijuana. Marijuana as a word should be struck from the books with extreme prejudice. I've used cannabis for years now and avoid using the word marijuana, but I was in such a marijuana mood today, I couldn't help myself. Further more, there is not one documented case of anyone ever dying from cannabis, ever!

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