Skip to main content

Night Owl
Jamelle Bouie at Slate writes, The Case for Marijuana Reparations:

Marijuana legalization has a new, influential advocate: The New York Times.
On Sunday, the Times editorial board began a six-part series on marijuana legalization with an op-ed titled “Repeal Prohibition, Again.” “It took 13 years for the United States to come to its senses and end Prohibition,” writes the Times. “It has been more than 40 years since Congress passed the current ban on marijuana, inflicting great harm on society just to prohibit a substance far less dangerous than alcohol.” […]

An element that looms large in the Times analysis is the disparate impact of marijuana enforcement on blacks and Latinos. From 2001 to 2010, according to a 2013 report from the American Civil Liberties Union, blacks and whites had roughly equal rates of marijuana use, with small variations from year to year. Among young people ages 18 to 25, usage rates were higher for whites, and overall, more blacks than whites say they’ve never tried marijuana.

Nevertheless, blacks are 3.73 times more likely than whites to be arrested for marijuana possession, with an arrest rate of 716 per 100,000 for blacks to 192 per 100,000 for whites (compared to a national average of 256 per 100,000). What’s startling is that the total marijuana arrest rate has increased by nearly one-third since 2001, while at the same time, the rate for whites has remained constant, a sign that blacks account for the bulk of new arrests. […]

It’s true that few marijuana arrests result in prison time. Roughly 40,000 state and federal inmates have current marijuana convictions, and the majority of those are for sale and distribution. “Less than 1 percent … are serving time for marijuana possession alone—and in many of those cases, the possession conviction was the result of a plea bargain involving the dismissal of more serious charges,” write drug policy scholars Beau Kilmer, Jonathan P. Caulkins, Mark A.R. Kleiman, and Angela Hawken in Marijuana Legalization: What Everyone Needs to Know.

But even if they don’t lead to prison, these arrests bring people into the criminal justice system. “A simple arrest for marijuana possession can show up on criminal databases as ‘a drug arrest’ without specifying the substance or the charge, and without clarifying even whether the person was convicted,” notes law professor Michelle Alexander in The New Jim Crow, “These databases are then used by police and prosecutors, as well as by employers and housing officials—an electronic record that will haunt many for life.” […]

We can’t always heal injury, but we can acknowledge and compensate for it. Any plan for legalization should come with a plan for reparations for those communities most damaged by our misguided war on marijuana. That doesn’t mean individual payments—the logistics are too difficult—as much as it does policies for affected communities, from job training and educational services to something like My Brother’s Keeper, all funded by a surtax on marijuana sales and distribution.


Blast from the Past. At Daily Kos on this date in 2003Afghanistan slipping back to warlordism:

Afghanistan is slipping back into the hands of warlords because the US refused to extend international control outside Kabul, keeps two brigades there when 10 are needed and have underfunded reconstruction across the country. We expected an Afghan national army to solve our problems when that is years away from being anything close to reality.

Afghanistan is a place were we could easily wake up one morning, find the President assassinated, the Army in revolt and US troops stuck in the Kindu Kush fighting tribesmen from both sides of the border. Things are so desperate that the 25ID, trained to fight in the Pacific and Korea, will send the next brigades to Afghanistan.

Our ob[s]ession with Iraq, trapping whole divisions there, leaves Afghanistan exposed and ripe for an election year failure.


Tweet of the Day
The logic of Liz Cheney's argument is strange: Torture is cool. The only crime is calling it "torture".
@andrewadastra


Every Monday through Friday you can catch the Kagro in the Morning Show 9 AM ET by dropping in here, or you can download the Stitcher app (found in the app stores or at Stitcher.com), and find a live stream there, by searching for "Netroots Radio."


High Impact Posts.
The Week's High Impact Posts. Top Comments

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  1,073,424 registered users on dKos now. (23+ / 0-)

    Here are the 10 newest registered users on dKos.  Hope to see their comments and diaries here soon!  (If they're not spammers.)

    Joseph0258kym7
    Erniepq652
    dariafan
    William8258jxl7
    Royceqib50
    Logan616r1xt2
    stoptheabuse (user #1,073,421: already banned)
    Clarkzs38
    Chariscf
    Jean2642d


    And since our society is obsessed with numbers that end in a lot of zeros as milestones, here's a special shoutout to users:
    #1,072,600: Chung701 (already banned)
    #1,072,700: Lynwood005 (already banned)
    #1,072,800: Lelahch (already banned)
    #1,072,900: Joshua6036esf5
    #1,073,000: Anthony815f5cr0
    #1,073,100: William4172hhp5
    #1,073,200: KatelinGullickson7505 (already banned)
    #1,073,300: Joshua2974qtw6
    #1,073,400: John482w2ti7

    We've added 883 more users in the last 24 hours.  There's definitely been a recent increase in spammers in the last couple weeks, and it seems to be getting even faster now.  This is insane.


    And for your Diary Rescue music pleasure, here's "Suddenly, Seymour" from the musical Little Shop of Horrors.

  •  I confess to comparing MB to an Auror ... (10+ / 0-)

    from Harry Potter in tonight's TC diary.

    Is that bad? :)

  •  the continuing curse of background checks (13+ / 0-)
    But even if they don’t lead to prison, these arrests bring people into the criminal justice system. “A simple arrest for marijuana possession can show up on criminal databases as ‘a drug arrest’ without specifying the substance or the charge, and without clarifying even whether the person was convicted,” notes law professor Michelle Alexander in The New Jim Crow, “These databases are then used by police and prosecutors, as well as by employers and housing officials—an electronic record that will haunt many for life.” […]

    Warning - some snark may be above‽ (-9.50; -7.03)‽ eState4Column5©2013 "If we appear to seek the unattainable, then let it be known that we do so to avoid the unimaginable." (@eState4Column5)

    by annieli on Sun Aug 03, 2014 at 08:18:37 PM PDT

  •  Well, that happened. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    annieli, paradise50, high uintas

    UCLA "fan" site BruinsNation is under new management, as the longtime editor has stepped down and handed over the reins to two other longtime members.  He'll still be there as a commenter.  Of course, no change in editorial content, which is why most Bruin fans refer to that site as a "cesspool" of hatred.  I'd compare them to UCLA as the FDL of the progressive movement, but that would be unfair to FDL.  They're more like the PUMAs back in 2008.

    On another board I read, someone tried to defend them, and got wholly ripped by just about everyone else on all sides of how we feel about our coaches and administrators.  One comment in particular got props from longtime Kossack patsburgh along with several others, explaining just why the place is so loathesome.

    BN intentionally politicizes the fanbase. It's unhealthy.

    The problem I have with BruinsNation is not their content, which is variable in quality, but unquestionable in quantity. It's not even their message, as it's easy to ignore the nonsense - it's a necessary element of doing anything on the internet. It's not their enthusiasm for UCLA athletics - I think that's pretty unquestionable, even if I disagree with how they choose to express it.

    The problem I have with BruinsNation is that they have made it their mission to intentionally divide the fanbase. They hold a number of positions that are at least of arguable validity - they may be right, but it's certainly not unreasonable to disagree. However, if you even suggest a whiff of divergence with the party line, you are given a silly nickname and driven away. It's intentionally political (unsurprising given its founder's background) and done to empower the site's founders as demagogues at the expense of inclusiveness. They have made it their mission to effectively oppose the UCLA athletics administration in every way possible, and any viewpoint that doesn't follow along is considered unacceptable.

    They're not engendering community, they're enforcing conformity. It's churlish and frankly embarrassing given that BN is the highest-profile UCLA fan-site by far (I'd wager BN traffic is more on the order of 10x that of BruinZone, not 2-3x). I can assure you that pretty much every other online fan community from other schools mocks it when the occasion arises, and every single mention of BN comes with some sort of joke at the expense of UCLA fans while reinforcing the inaccurate stereotype of us as unreasonable, ignorant, and self-important.

    Because I think creating divisions within a group for personal gain is entirely negative, I believe the UCLA fan community would be better off without BN. Yes, it's free. But pageviews generate advertising revenue, so I choose not to patronize their site and encourage their divisive nature. Most BN denizens (in particular, the most fervent) tend not to venture outside that space because once they no longer have unlimited editorial control, their ability to hold up in debate evaporates - it's a lot harder for them to win an argument when they can't just delete the opposition's posts and ban them.

    My question is - why are you here evangelizing the site? BN does just fine on its own as far as I can tell. They don't need or truly want, despite their protests to the contrary, those of us who disagree with them (their most hilarious claim has always been that 'reasonable dissent' is tolerated - I've seen numerous very reasonable posts be shot down with a combination of flames and deletions). I spent a lot of time over there, years in fact (I was around when it was "Fire Karl Dorrell" and hosted on Blogspot), so am intimately familiar with what they say and how they say it.

    I can honestly say I don't think they make the web a better place, especially for UCLA fans as a whole.

    You can see other fan sites for other schools mock them for their negativity now and then as well.  When you become a running joke....  And every diehard student I've known that's gone to UCLA in the past 8 years has been banned from that site after trying to explain their point of view sooner or later.  Freedom of thought is not tolerated there, despite what they constantly claim.

    And despite the founder being one a progressive Democratic operative, he's allowed one key front-pager to continue over the years to make homophobic comments about our coaches and administrators without ever stepping in.

  •  Election Diary Rescue Needs Volunteers! (14+ / 0-)

    ALL roads (and waterways!) lead to a Democrat victory in 2014 as more of us join to GOTV for Democrats!

    EDR needs your help! Please join the fun of working with lovable, dedicated community members to highlight your election diaries and take-action work during our 2014 election season.

    VOLUNTEER ALERT! As the election approaches we will be switching back to our traditional daily schedule for producing this blog. We will need a few good Kossacks to join the team.

    Please e-mail us if you would like the opportunity to contribute to this legacy project. DKosEDR@gmail.com.

    New website: NDN Silver by Wings "Beauty, magic, and the mysteries of the earth and sky connect" in his jewelry art. Please visit his silverwork galleries, share with friends. Gifts from the heart.

    by Patriot Daily News Clearinghouse on Sun Aug 03, 2014 at 08:25:21 PM PDT

  •  More R&B for Night Owls -- GREAT Sax solo. (4+ / 0-)

  •  What I would give for just one more Monday (10+ / 0-)

    My dear, sweet T. (August 2, 1968 – September 8, 2006)

    Photobucket

    Miss you.

    Alison Lundergan Grimes for Senate!

    by noweasels on Sun Aug 03, 2014 at 08:28:53 PM PDT

  •  George Carlin sez, you're not part of the ... (8+ / 0-)

    club. And I think he's correct.

  •  I need all the time back I spent worrying about (15+ / 0-)

    arrest and losing my job due to partaking of the evilest of weeds.

    My entire adult life, essentially.

    I need to go into my elderly years able to access the finest herb and concentrates without fear of arrest of losing my spot in the old folks home.

     

  •  what happened to personal responsibility? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    paradise50

    What about rule of law?

    Marijuana is illegale in all but two states.  Period.  That it might become legal in the future makes no difference.

    55 used to be the maximum speed limit across the nation.  Now it isn't.  That doesnt change reality for anyone who got a speeding ticket for going over 55.  

    This is not about some life or death matter.  This is not a law that denies a human right.  This is about taking chemicals into your body for recreation.  No different than speed junkies doing 90 mph.  

    So please, stop talking about "reparations" for people wanting to get high.  They broke the law.  If its a bad law you change it.  But people don't get to pick and choose which laws are valid or not.  Society can't allow individuals to choose which laws are worth following.  

    It is well that war is so terrible -- lest we should grow too fond of it. Robert E. Lee

    by ksuwildkat on Sun Aug 03, 2014 at 08:47:21 PM PDT

    •  Thankfully bad spelling is not (2+ / 0-)

      illegal

      It is well that war is so terrible -- lest we should grow too fond of it. Robert E. Lee

      by ksuwildkat on Sun Aug 03, 2014 at 08:48:15 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  What year is this? (9+ / 0-)

      Is J. Edgar Hoover still running a war on reefer madness?

      Sunday mornings are more beautiful without Meet the Press.

      by deben on Sun Aug 03, 2014 at 09:10:59 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  Check your authoritarian credentials at the door (10+ / 0-)

      The law used to prohibit inter-racial marriage too.

      Driving drunk or on speed at 90 mph is a serious danger to life and limb of innocent bystanders, as well as the intoxicated offender. In my experience, people who have smoked a bit of marijuana drive extremely carefully, mostly at or below the posted speed limit. Generally though, they avoid driving entirely after having toked a joint. The same can not be said for those who got pounded on alcohol down at the local bar, or those who are speeding way beyond natural limits on various "speed" drugs.

      All drugs are not the same. All laws are not written on tablets given to us by some old guy with a white beard who lives in the sky.

      In terms of personal responsibility and the rule of law, have you always called the cops on anyone you saw doing the slightest little thing against the law? I do not think you have. That makes you a scoff-law and a hypocrite, if I am right.

      Carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is now 401.25 ppm. That is "Climate Cluster Chaos". (hat tip to JeffW for CCC)

      by Zinman on Sun Aug 03, 2014 at 10:07:22 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Did you really say that? (0+ / 0-)

        You really think people drive BETTER while stoned?  Maybe you and your friends should get in cars sober either.  

        By the way, I never said ANYTHING about drunk drivers or driving on meth.

        Rule of Law is not about individuals enforcing the laws on others, it is about accepting the validity of the law and the consequences for violating it.  I love driving fast.  Give me an open stretch of I-70 where I can see 30 miles in each direction and I want to peg the speedo.  But the difference between me and the pot smoker is I KNOW its against the law and I KNOW there will be consequences (felony reckless driving) and no one is going to feel sorry for me or demand reparations.  When I was younger the "need for speed" overcame my common sense and I got one or two tickets and got lucky a LOT.  Now that I have GROWN UP I just set my cruise on 85 and think about the next track day.  

        It is well that war is so terrible -- lest we should grow too fond of it. Robert E. Lee

        by ksuwildkat on Mon Aug 04, 2014 at 05:58:42 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  At least in Maryland, speeding tickets (0+ / 0-)

      are automatically expunged from your record after 3 years: http://www.mva.maryland.gov/...

      warning: snark probably above

      by NE2 on Sun Aug 03, 2014 at 11:48:23 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Do 130 on the freeway (0+ / 0-)

        and you get a felony.  It doesnt go away.  

        It is well that war is so terrible -- lest we should grow too fond of it. Robert E. Lee

        by ksuwildkat on Mon Aug 04, 2014 at 05:59:57 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  Speed = Jail just one state away (0+ / 0-)

        It is well that war is so terrible -- lest we should grow too fond of it. Robert E. Lee

        by ksuwildkat on Mon Aug 04, 2014 at 02:23:10 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  93 in a 55 on a surface road? (0+ / 0-)

          Not sure about jail, but he shouldn't be driving.

          warning: snark probably above

          by NE2 on Mon Aug 04, 2014 at 02:35:07 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  perspective (0+ / 0-)

            funny because I would much rather share the road with a well trained attentive driver doing 93 than a stoner doing 55.

            Over the years between driving close to 1 million miles I have taken multiple drivers training courses that ranged from the simple class in my high school to "defensive driving" that involved PIT maneuvers, running roadblocks, dead man takeovers and driving a car until it tipped over.  Ive driven everything from a 70 ton tank down to a motor scooter in conditions ranging to city streets to desert to mountains to the Autobahn to a one mile banked oval race track and a 2 mile flat road track with every imaginable road/no road surface.  In Iraq, Afghanistan and Saudi Arabia I routinely drove over 90mph just inches off the bumper of the vehicle in front of me.  In all that time I have have caused TWO accidents - both in less than a year and both backing up the exact same extended bed truck (M1008 CUCV) both times going about 2 mph (but about 1 foot too far).  Driving fast is not inherently evil.

            It is well that war is so terrible -- lest we should grow too fond of it. Robert E. Lee

            by ksuwildkat on Mon Aug 04, 2014 at 03:17:06 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

    •  It was a law used to persecute particular (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      US Blues, NoBlueSkies

      populations. Hence the reparations.

      I've never left a blank space on a ballot... but I will not vote for someone [who vows] to spy on me. I will not do it. - dclawyer06

      Trust, but verify. - Reagan
      Vote, but Occupy. - commonmass

      by Words In Action on Mon Aug 04, 2014 at 01:47:31 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yeah (0+ / 0-)

        the breaking the law population.  Not a single person who DIDNT break the law was persecuted.  

        It is well that war is so terrible -- lest we should grow too fond of it. Robert E. Lee

        by ksuwildkat on Mon Aug 04, 2014 at 06:18:28 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Meaning (0+ / 0-)

          the abuse of the "enforcement" of this law to persecute certain people should be ignored because, you know, other people are persecuted sometimes, too?

          I've never left a blank space on a ballot... but I will not vote for someone [who vows] to spy on me. I will not do it. - dclawyer06

          Trust, but verify. - Reagan
          Vote, but Occupy. - commonmass

          by Words In Action on Mon Aug 04, 2014 at 06:24:51 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  Oh come on (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      US Blues, NoBlueSkies

      Laws can be wrong.  And even setting that aside we are talking about a system where black and latino people are far more likely to pay the consequences of breaking this wrong law than white people are.  So what are you going to do: track down a bunch of white people who used marijuana and did NOT pay the consequences, and hand them a nice shiny arrest record just to be fair?  Or does the lack of fairness simply not matter to you?

      •  Yes, laws can be wrong (0+ / 0-)

        but the answer is to CHANGE THE LAW not ignore it.

        There will be at least one diary on this site this week about Republicans claiming some justification for ignoring some Federal law or regulation.  They will be roundly criticized and reminded of the Supremacy Clause in the Constitution.  Yet some how when Colorado and Washington do the same thing with marijuana they are heroes.  

        Missouri tries to claim "freedom" from federal gun laws and that is pointed out as unconstitutional and stupid.  Colorado does the same thing for pot and that progress.  Really?

        As for fairness - people break laws all the time.  Most of do the mental math on the chances of getting caught and the consequences of getting caught and decide.  Some times we get lucky.  I drove from Lexington Kentucky to St Louis Mo AVERAGING 87mph because starting early on a Saturday morning I just happened to encounter no traffic (heck no cars at all) and no law enforcement.  No doubt someone else got a ticket on that road for going over the speed limit but slower than me.  Fair?  Probably not.  But we both knew we were breaking the law and we both knew the consequences and at least in my case I accept responsibility for my PERSONAL DECISION to break the law.  Lots of people smoke pot every day and never get caught while others can't go two days without being busted.  But both are breaking the law.  The not caught people just do a better job of not getting caught.  

        It is well that war is so terrible -- lest we should grow too fond of it. Robert E. Lee

        by ksuwildkat on Mon Aug 04, 2014 at 06:16:13 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  So, in order to change a b/s law you...what? (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          NoBlueSkies

          When black Americans decided to "take the beating" and violate the rule of law by having a soda pop, moving forward on the bus, voting their conscience, speaking their mind, crossing the street, what they should have done was be good law abiding citizens and trust their fellow white voting Americans and their elected officials  to do the right thing? And when states of the union began to allow these terrible criminals some latitude in spite of what the rule of law was out of sheer embarrassment for allowing those things to exist out of pure indifference, those states should have been reminded that if they didn't like the laws they should change them, not break them?

          It seems to me that your argument was likely resounded around the country as the reasonable thing to do versus such lawless behavior. I mean....how dare they? We have laws and people should adhere to them whether they like them or not.

          Something that really pisses me off is the vacuum of understanding that pot prohibition was never....NEVER about THC, but rather a successful campaign to rid the country of the notion that hemp was soon to be the death of the environmentally repulsive and completely unnecessary petrochemical and lumber textile industry.

          And, that the only way to make that pesky, God given, miracle hemp plant go away was to make you believe that by it's association with a mildly medicinal plant that has been used for thousands of years was actually created by Satan himself for the express purpose of turning teenage boys into hormonal anarchists bent solely on finding out what sex is all about.

          What will be the argument when entrepreneurs decide to grow harmless hemp plants and start building houses with them? That it is too difficult to determine the sex of a crop plants? That hardcore criminals are hiding cannabis in the rows?  

          •  wow (0+ / 0-)

            did you really just equate the civil rights movement with legalizing the "right" to be stoned?  Did you really equate the suffering and oppression of millions based on nothing but the color of their skin with restricting the number of chemical intoxicants deemed acceptable by society?

            Funny thing - of the 190+ countries in the world recreational pot is legal in how many?  That's a pretty successful campaign

            It is well that war is so terrible -- lest we should grow too fond of it. Robert E. Lee

            by ksuwildkat on Mon Aug 04, 2014 at 09:14:08 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  No, I just aksed you how it is possible to change (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              NoBlueSkies

              a b/s law by simply trusting that elected officials will someday concede that laws they know are contrary to all reasoning and are, in fact, not even supported by the majority of their constituency.

              And as I said, these laws were never about the right to be stoned or some b/s classification of a "chemical intoxicant" infinitely less dangerous than the celebrated and now legal chemical intoxicant, alcohol. They were about textile companies maintaining their competitive edge.

              Just as jim crowe laws were never about anything BUT "the suffering and oppression of millions based on nothing but the color of their skin" for the sole purpose of perpetuating the myth that Michelangelo and da Vinci had it right when they depicted Christ as a white person.

              If you have a beef about weed then don't smoke it. No biggy. It is cool to be different. But don't suggest that a corrupted decision in congress will ever be changed without actually challenging that law in the public sphere. I'm sure you know better.

        •  Funny, that's my solution too (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          nutherhumanbeing

          Don't break the law.  That's why you don't see me smoking pot every weekend despite my intense political opposition to narcotics laws and their effects.

          That doesn't make the "it's the law, silly" argument any less brutal.

          •  Amen. It really is that easy. (0+ / 0-)

            Consensual crimes are, by definition, a crime against yourself for the alleged benefit of saving your moral soul or preventing you from victimizing yourself and influencing others victimizing their selves. And since the law prevents me from refusing to charge myself of said offense or arguing that I'm responsible for my own health and eternal salvation I am left only with complying with that law or lose my freedom in order to protect the notion that if I want to change that law I need to find and vote for a representative that has the courage to admit that virtually nobody really agrees with the law and it needs to be changed because it is straight up bull**.  

      •  check this out (0+ / 0-)

        http://jalopnik.com/...

        3 days in jail for speeding.

        It is well that war is so terrible -- lest we should grow too fond of it. Robert E. Lee

        by ksuwildkat on Mon Aug 04, 2014 at 02:23:49 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  What about rule of law? (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      US Blues

      Tell it  to your anti-choice buddies.

    •  Human Rights (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      NoBlueSkies
      This is not a law that denies a human right.
      Yes it is, it denies me the right to freely explore my own consciousness, and it denies me the right to a safe and helpful herbal medicine. Freedom in my own consciousness and my health are Human Rights.

      As for personal responsibility and this herb I do not harm anyone, including myself, and have vowed never to do so.

      A society that makes a plant illegal is insane. Cannabis always causes insanity in politicians and cops (aka. power freaks).

      "Things are not as they appear to be, nor are they otherwise." - Buddha

      by US Blues on Mon Aug 04, 2014 at 06:13:20 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Yes, all cannabis convictions should be completely (14+ / 0-)

    expunged from everyone's criminal record and the DEA should be completely disbanded. Cannabis convictions have ruined many people's future and the DEA has been a completely redundant and completely unnecessary federal agency since they were created in the Nixon Administration.

    Really don't mind if you sit this one out. My words but a whisper -- your deafness a SHOUT. I may make you feel but I can't make you think..Jethro Tull

    by RMForbes on Sun Aug 03, 2014 at 08:50:51 PM PDT

  •  For reparations I would settle for getting back my (13+ / 0-)

    favorite little glass bong the cops took from me in '78.  Can't find those anymore!

    We are all made of star stuff, so please be kind to dust bunnies.

    by jwinIL14 on Sun Aug 03, 2014 at 09:14:43 PM PDT

  •  Off the weed topic, but.... (9+ / 0-)

    ...this ad has been ticking me off:

     photo badad_zpse6bb4f82.jpg

    It keeps showing up for me.  I have written Google Ads about it, but to no avail.  I think this comes too close to suggesting violence against the president.  Why are there arrows leading from the gun to a smug-looking Obama?  Why do the flag's red stripes just happen to lead from the gun to Obama?  This ad is in questionable taste, to be very generous.

  •  It is a very good move not just because it rejects (7+ / 0-)

    ..the racist basis of the so-called 'war on drugs' and would take a huge chunk out of the overcrowding in prison that the US is notorious for.

    The US has 5% of the worlds population yet 25% of the prison population

    It would also save billions going to an "industry" that no civilized nation should have in the first place.

    Same thing with Medical need/Healthcare insurance cartels. Both have reverse/negative incentives working against purpose

     Jamelle Bouie (from the posted link | page 2):

    We can’t always heal injury, but we can acknowledge and compensate for it. Any plan for legalization should come with a plan for reparations for those communities most damaged by our misguided war on marijuana. That doesn’t mean individual payments—the logistics are too difficult—as much as it does policies for affected communities, from job training and educational services to something like My Brother’s Keeper, all funded by a surtax on marijuana sales and distribution.
    .. And this initiative,, My Brothers Keeper' (video @ link), sounds like it would help reduce crime by affording opportunities where resources for education and opportunities are scarce

    Plus Ta-Nehisi Coates is correct - the decades long systematic targeted gutting of wealth from AA communities was a crime in itself and those communities should be made whole again - fair is fair

    When something is stolen it remains stolen until it is returned to the rightful owner

    This is a win win idea - imo

    Thx MB

  •  In case you missed it earlier: (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Zinman, jan4insight, eeff

    Please swing by and check out the pictures when you have the chance.

    July White House Photo Diary

  •  BTW, the end of Prohibition... (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    OCLefty, jan4insight, NoBlueSkies
    “It took 13 years for the United States to come to its senses and end Prohibition,” writes the Times.
    According to the book Last Call (basis for the Ken Burns documentary) one of the reasons Prohibition ended was because there was talk of raising taxes on the wealthy.  A few of the wealthy then spearheaded the drive to end Prohibition, so that alcohol could be taxed instead.

    (One more Prohibition Fun Fact - the entire cruise industry owes its existence to Prohibition.  Originally, cruises were set up to take people outside into international waters and then crack open the hooch.  Then someone had the bright idea to actually go somewhere...)

    When you punch enough holes through steerage, the first-class cabins sink with the rest of the ship.

    by Roddy McCorley on Sun Aug 03, 2014 at 10:05:06 PM PDT

  •  One can only imagine... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ksuwildkat

    ...the reparations due to those convicted of crimes where some law that was, thirty or forty years ago or up until today, in violation of an enumerated right (under which I'm pretty sure marijuana, cocaine, meth, ricin et al are not protected), a factor. Awesome.

    Not sure, but I'd guess that funding would first go to, lamely, remedy violations of enumerated rights.

    (See Heller, Chicago, likely Peruta et al)

    Perhaps victims of the 55 MPH speed limit would be next in line?

    I've got my popcorn.

    Come on. I have always thought all drugs should be legal (including therapeutic drugs that haven't quite made it through FDA approval but people who are dying want access to). However, if we start the reparations game for ill advised public policy, I'd bet that street drugs are pretty far below so many others over the past 200 years that there will be nothing left over for folks who were convicted of moonshining or marijuana trafficking or possession.

  •  Yo, MB, Don't you get tired of being right all the (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    eeff

    time? Stop it, its getting boring. ;-)

    You might very well think that; I couldn't possibly comment.

    by MikePhoenix on Sun Aug 03, 2014 at 11:18:15 PM PDT

  •  I have caught 1 pot charge, (0+ / 0-)

    When I was 18, simple pos. Didn't go to jail, didn't get bracelets put on. Could have more than just then. I was born with a privledge, and I have used it as needed, but I can see what the point of such laws are and it ain't pretty.

    Some people do not argue in good faith. Their only purpose is to disrupt and cause strife. Best to not engage them.

    by Drewid on Sun Aug 03, 2014 at 11:36:43 PM PDT

  •  We're told ... (0+ / 0-)

    that Israel is the United States' greatest ally in the Middle East. I ask, for what purpose?


    I cast a shadow, therefore, I am. You stand on my shadow, therefore, you are.

    by glb3 on Sun Aug 03, 2014 at 11:49:07 PM PDT

  •  re nyt. jus remembered my friend who lived here (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    US Blues

    but still kept a cabin in Puerto Rico. where he invited me.
    and his morning ritual of then included rolling a giant joint using tbe front page of the newyorktimes. he felt it was a terrific way to start the day. I always thought he was very well informed.

    decent wages don't eliminate jobs. Republicans eliminate jobs; and workers, and prospects, and then excuse it all and call for more austerity. there is no end to their ignorant, arrogant avarice. only political dinosaurs support their treachery.

    by renzo capetti on Sun Aug 03, 2014 at 11:55:33 PM PDT

  •  the 'less than 1% convicted via plea bargains' (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Words In Action

    that's the tip of the iceberg.

        I believe that MJ prohibition was a class and raciist warfare vehicle and was applied as such.
        The 3.x:1 people of color vs whites convictions is perhaps a measure of the class divisions, a racist element that is as much convenience perhaps as it is racial and class animosity.

     'It seemed like a good idea.'...then it began to pay.

    I think many convictions, certainly many arrests were/ are an attempt by police to ensnare people they 'know' via cop 'intuition' that someone is bad and needs some hardship...that instinct to fuck someone up  via instinct will never go away, but the vehicle of mj prohibition absolutely should.

    Cops will have to try harder for convictions, this prohibition always was a tool of class repression and class warfare if you prefer...and in truth some would be arrests of people we here would want to see detained for what they actually did do..but unproveable, so 'there's always pot' even if planted.

    The convictions for simple mj sales hopefully will be reviewed, some low level stooge desperately hoping for the $500 he'd get for delivering a load of norcal weed to LA is not necessarily a dangerous criminal, but he has traveled with such, now has been exposed to them in prison and may or may not be a worse person than we he first stumbled into it.
          Probation/generous parole terms, careful review...some of these innocents are in fact pretty innocent, lacking the brain power to even check their license plate tags for current registration, u-turns in front of cops, all manner of dumbass behavior and no predictor of public danger.
      This is a good place to spend some public money, and money it will take to turn this around.

    Others were sent up for mj violations and perhaps deserved worse. What a mess...I hope their is repeal asap and quick but careful review and release on generous terms those in for this...class warfare.

    And the other huge injustice is the difference between a federal sentence and a county or state sentence, that's just nuts and must be resolved now in favor of state sentencing asap..

     One last rant,  the environmental and cultural losses due to MJ prohibition is huge and profound, a permanent damage. Repair of that will only begin via overturning prohibition.

         Recently I added another to my long list of environmental degradations caused directly via prohibition: the trespass grows that plague poor rural communities done by actual criminals that also booby trap the perimeter and nearby trails: homes were lost when a firefighting crew had to stop an attack on a fire's flank that had exposed a trespass grow with booby traps, at night. Homes were lost because of it. Add danger to firefighters to the long list of horrors. Add that to the list that includes killing off salmon runs by stealing ALL the water from a watershed, or a community water storage, or a fire suppression water storage facility.

    This machine kills Fascists.

    by KenBee on Mon Aug 04, 2014 at 12:45:14 AM PDT

  •  Legalize marijuana and prohibit private prisons... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    US Blues, NoBlueSkies

    Legalize marijuana and prohibit private prisons. Private prisons love non-violent petty drug offenders, they tend to be younger, healthier, and require fewer Correctional Officers to oversee them. It's a great way to maximize profits, much like a modern day slave trade.

    •  Money. The root of all crap laws. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      JeffW, NoBlueSkies

      Harvard study has a conservative estimate of 14 billion in extra revenue if weed is legalized. If private prisons continue to grow, they get half that just getting paid to handle your incarceration. That and all the nuisance laws created to fill them up, like being a crime to be homeless.

      Next....farming criminals out to private business for labor.

      Worked great before.

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site