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I never envisioned that I'd see the sight of a Republican circular firing squad before I saw this piece about a religious right group attacking the GOP for trying to pressure Todd Akin out of the Missouri U.S. Senate race.
After reading the story that appeared in the Huffington Post, something told me that it was just a matter of time before some in the religious right began to doubt their loyalties to the GOP. Yes, lots of them had lots of hesitancy about Mitt Romney given his Mormonism, but who could have imagined that this big time spat would come up about an issue Republicans have used for years to woo evangelicals-- abortion.
Yes, the majority of Americans (including me) believe in a woman's right to make reproductive choices. But watching how the GOP establishment (especially Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan) have botched the Akin situation, it seemed to me a matter of time before there would be a breaking off among some evangelicals that could make things more difficult for the GOP.
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I don't know if there has been any diaries on the Texas primary runoffs, but here's a start.
I realize it's early, but it looks pretty good that we'll have a teanut as the GOP U.S. Senate nominee as Ted Cruz is winning with two percent of the vote in, 54 percent to 46 percent.
In the Democraticrace, Paul Sadler is leading, 63 percent to 37 percent, again with two percent of the vote in.
I realize this diary is short, but if these results hold up, I hope the prophecy of a Republican I heard about holds up-- that Cruz's nomination could turn Texas from red to purple.

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I never thought I'd see this-- my state's teahead governor, Rick Perry, calling on Mitt Romney to release his tax returns.
If you didn't think the Romney campaign was already in trouble, you really have to wonder after what Perry had to say.
(Mitt still is making excuses on why he still won't release more tax returns. See update below)
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I don't know if anyone has diaried about this, but I couldn't help but noticing this piece about a U.S. Supreme Court decision that was easily overshadowed by the actions on President Obama's Affordable Healthcare Act and Arizona's "Papers Please" law.
Here's what pr watch reported:

In a little-noticed ruling amidst clamor over the healthcare decision, the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday rejected an Arizona law requiring proof of citizenship to register to vote, holding it was preempted by the National Voting Registration Act (NVRA). The law was adopted as a "model" bill by the American Legislative Exchange Council [ALEC] in 2008.
It may not have received the notice "papers please" and the Affordable Healthcare Act ruling got, but the significance of this ruling cannot be overrstated.
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I got rather depressed last night as I watched the PBS weekly show that I used to watch when I was young -- "Washington Week in Review," or something like that. It seemed from watching that at least one of the pundits seemed so obscessed with pointing out President Obama's campaign weaknesses that she forgot to mention the proven weaknesses of his opponent.
The pundit cited unnamed Democrats and claimed that they felt a deepening gloom about the president's campaign chances. I would have like to know WHO were the Democrats the pundit spoke with in drawing her conclusion.
The pundit (and the other panelists in the clip I saw), while claiming that the Obama campaign was hurt by recent economic news and what she called "off-message" gaffes by surrogates, failed to mention the continued problems of Mitt Romney when it comes to his mendacity and his extremist positions.
Her failure to mention Romney weakesses clearly illustrated one thing to me-- the mainstream media is far more interesting in creating a so-called "horse race" that really isn't. These pundits aren't interested in asking the probing questions needed about positions both the President and Romney have taken but are trying (I think falsely) to portray a "doom and gloom" feeling among Democrats.
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Why does Mitt Romney feel he needs to keep as many of his contacts away from the public?
Is it because he's afraid that the American people are going to catch up with his constant fits of mendacity?
Is it because he's afraid that if the American people heard what he was saying during these closed-door meetings, it would prove that he is so badly out of touch that he doesn't deserve anyone's vote?
These are questions that should have been asked of the Romney spokesman who is quoted in this Yahoo! account.
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I don't know if anyone has diaried about this so far, but this is great news.
Here's part of what the Miami Heraldis reporting:

In a much-anticipated decision, U.S. District Judge Robert Hinkle on Thursday struck down some provisions of a Florida elections law that imposed new restrictions on third-party groups that register new voters.
It may not necessarily be a perfect decision, but I sure hope this is the start of new voter registration activity in Florida that will bring new voters into the system and signal the beginning of the end of the Republican party's war against democracy in Florida and nationwide.
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You'd think that anyone who has run for president for the last six years would know something about how to talk to voters of all kinds.
Not Mitt Romney. Not even to a hand-picked group of voters in Pennsylvania.
On his show last night, Ed Schultz showed a segment of such a meeting Romney had. The only responses Romney could come up with was um-hum and things similar.
He had nothing else to say beyond that.
He had plenty to say to wealthy donors earlier this week about where he wanted to take the country during the next four years. When he came before this group of hand-picked folks in Pennsylvania, Romney couldn't say a word.
It's bad enough that Romney, the candidate of, by, and for the 1 percent at the expense of everyone else, can't stand up to the nuts of his party like Ted Nugent and Rush Limbaugh. It's also bad enough that his campaign has been forced to compare his irresponsible decisions as an adult on transporting his dog to those of an 8-year-old regardless of who it was.
He can speak complete sentences to his donors and softball-lobbing questioners like Larry Kudlow of CNBC. But when ordinary folks talk to him, he can't say a word?
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David Dewhurst isn't the only Texas Republican U.S. Senate candidate who has announced support for the voter disenfranchisement laws the state's GOP legislature passed and Rick Perry signed into law before the U.S. Justice Department blocked its enforcement.
Ted Cruz on his web siteproclaimed support for the above-mentioned law on the very front page of his web site.
Like Dewhurst, Cruz thinks it's a cool idea to campaign for votes while calling for the disenfranchisement of those whose only crime is that they don't have a valid state-issued picture ID. I don't see how anyone can campaign for any office while trying to deny otherwise eligible voters the right to vote just because they are in no position to venture to a state DMV office where they may have to stand in line or go through a series of legal hoops just to obtain such an ID.
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While I was watching the 10 p.m. news last night on our local NBC affiliate, I couldn't help but notice the advertisement presented by Republican U.S. Senate candidate David Dewhurst.
In his ad, Dewhurst makes the usual Republican proclamations about being for low taxes (assumably for millionaires at the expense of everyone else) and for "balancing the budget." What he doesn't discuss in his ad but trumpets loudly about on his website is his support of our state's voter disenfranchisement (what he calls "voter ID") law that the Justice Department has righly contested.
How can Dewhurst or any other Republican claim to represent all Texas when he is working so hard to disenfranchise many who don't look, think, or talk like him?
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As a husband, I continue to be offended by the despicable and vile campaign waged by Rush Limbaugh against a Georgetown University law student whose only crime was her desire to testify before Congress about the anti-contraception laws that were being considered.
I am also offended by the weak-kneed (at best) response by Republican politicians who insist on continuing to seek the favor of Limbaugh while ignore the evil of his attacks.
I believe Rush Limbaugh must be brought down. In addition, further action must be taken against media outlets who have aided and abetted Limbaugh in spreading his vile and disinformation against the law student. That list includes the fraud of a "news" organization called Fox.
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If we have learned anything by now about Willard "Mitt" Romney, it is this-- he's a candidate of, by, and for the 1 percent who has no interest or concern about the concerns of the 99 percent.
If anyone needed any more evidence that Willard is tone deaf to the concerns of average Americans (and anyone else who doesn't look like, think like, or has as much money as he does, check out this Crooks and Liars post.
Putting it mildly, the post made me sick. Then again, this kind of conduct from Mitt Romney and his supporters shouldn't come as too much of a surprise given what we have seen these past few days.
Here is the video:

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