Skip to main content


In an interesting diary from a few days back, one amazing fact was quoted by Ned Lamont: the administration currently spends $250,000,000 per day on the war in Iraq.

Most of us are already opposed to the war, but I figure this might be a nice speculative thread to discuss ways of using the money.

Continue Reading

Sat Apr 08, 2006 at 08:19 PM PDT

A world without abortion

by lone1c

Among the articles in this week's edition of The New York Times Magazine is a study of the effects of the total abortion ban in El Salvador:

http://www.nytimes.com/...

The portrait painted isn't pretty--and should be a warning to anyone who thinks "it can't happen here."

Poll

When should abortions be permitted?

60%42 votes
21%15 votes
7%5 votes
4%3 votes
5%4 votes

| 69 votes | Vote | Results

Continue Reading
Hey, anybody interested in being FEMA director? It looks like the job's still open.

According to a new article in the Times (subscription required):

Unconvinced that the administration is serious about fixing the Federal Emergency Management Agency or that there is enough time to get it done before President Bush's second term ends, seven of these candidates for director or another top FEMA job said in interviews that they had pulled themselves out of the running.
Poll

What would it take for you to accept a position in the Bush administration?

11%2 votes
5%1 votes
0%0 votes
5%1 votes
23%4 votes
0%0 votes
52%9 votes

| 17 votes | Vote | Results

Continue Reading

Sat Oct 29, 2005 at 12:43 AM PDT

Who does Bush nominate next? (w/poll)

by lone1c

So, now that Miers's nomination has been pulled, Bush appears to be faced with a number of choices, none of them particularly desirable. Who does he nominate next?
Poll

Who does Bush nominate next?

55%32 votes
10%6 votes
1%1 votes
12%7 votes
12%7 votes
8%5 votes

| 58 votes | Vote | Results

Continue Reading

Wed Aug 03, 2005 at 06:34 AM PDT

Government by blog?

by lone1c

Once again, Thomas Friedman proves why he's one of the most inconsistent opinion writers in the history of the known universe. Today's op-ed piece is actually useful: he points out that our model of having network connectivity paid for by the utilities is actually hampering our growth. Moreover, we can actually harness technology to improve government.
Continue Reading
Seeing the promoted diary entry regarding the Ohio investigation shut down as a result of the Miller brouhaha leaves me wondering: should the freedom of the press be absolute? For example, we have doctor-patient confidentiality, yet also require suspicions of abuse and criminal behavior to be reported to legal authorities. Freedom of speech is certainly not absolute--why should freedom of the press be any different?

Although the ability to hold confidentiality for the press is important, I'd like to think that there should be exceptions to that rule. For example, if the purpose of the leak is to commit a crime intentionally, then the right not to name sources shouldn't really be applicable. I'd also argue that whistleblowing is a fundamentally different behavior [which, even if technically illegal, should be viewed differently, as its intent is stop an illegal action, not promote one].

So, while I certainly enjoy the Schadenfreude associated with the Miller case, I am disturbed by its implications in the long run. Where do we draw the line?

Poll

Where do we draw the line?

10%1 votes
0%0 votes
10%1 votes
10%1 votes
60%6 votes
10%1 votes

| 10 votes | Vote | Results

Discuss

Thu Oct 14, 2004 at 10:51 AM PDT

For once, Tom Friedman gets it

by lone1c

I suppose this would be a candidate for ShrillBlog, but today's editorial by Tom Friedman actually does a good job of summarizing what's wrong with Bush's response to 9/11. The best quote comes right at the end.
I want a president who can one day restore Sept. 11th to its rightful place on the calendar: as the day after Sept. 10th and before Sept. 12th. I do not want it to become a day that defines us. Because ultimately Sept. 11th is about them - the bad guys - not about us. We're about the Fourth of July.
Our country indeed changed on 9/11; but it also changed on December 7, 1941, and on April 12, 1861. Yet we do not make such a huge deal about either of those days in our calendar--our lately, any day other than 9/11, including July 4.

By making 9/11 the centerpiece and raison d'être of his entire agenda (with the possible exception of NCLB), we are no longer the land of liberty, but a terrorist-fighting vigilante squad. We won't be able to completely erase the association of 9/11 with the horrific events of 2001, but at least we may have a chance--under a different administration--to remember the loss as an important chapter in our nation's history, and not as a terrifying and integral part of our daily experience.

Discuss
You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.

RSS

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site