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The Ford Mustang has been in continuous production for 50 years. A special display at the LeMay—America’s Car Museum in Tacoma, Washington honors the creativity, innovation, and hard work of the Mustang. According to the museum display:

“Looking across 50 years and six generations it’s hard to fathom what a radical idea it was back then. With more than nine million sold, Mustang continues to captivate Americans with an enthusiasm that dates back to 1964.”
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Welcome to the Tuesday edition of the Coffee Hour at Street Prophets. This is an open thread where we can discuss what’s happening in our lives, what we’ve been working on, and our opinions on current events. I thought we’d start off today with a look at river surfing.

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The first species to be classified as human, designated as Homo habilis, appeared in Africa over two million years ago. While similar in many physical features to the earlier Australopithecines, Homo habilis exhibited significant behavioral changes.

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While cities are a relatively recent phenomenon, for most of their existence most people have not lived in them. In the past decade, however, city populations have grown to the point where most people in the world now live in cities. This raises the interesting question: Are cities really livable? Every year, a number of different groups attempt to produce a list of what they consider the most livable cities in the world.

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Sat May 16, 2015 at 07:39 AM PDT

Origins of English: Phony Bigwigs

by Ojibwa

I suppose there may be a few people out there who have encountered people they considered to be bigwigs or phony or perhaps phony bigwigs. The etymologies of these words are shown below.  

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During the second decade of the twentieth century, American automobile manufacturers were beginning to catch up with and even surpass their European counterparts. During this period, cars looked less and less like horseless carriages and began to develop a style of their own. With hundreds of companies vying to get into this new business, there were cars powered by the internal combustion engine, steam engines, and electric motors. Steering wheels began to replace steering tillers, though they could be on either the left or the right.

Harold LeMay, a Tacoma businessman, loved cars and managed to collect more than 3,000 automobiles, trucks, and motorcycles over forty years of collecting. A number of the vehicles from his collection form the nucleus of the LeMay—America’s Car Museum. This collection of more than 300 cars, motorcycles, and trucks is displayed in a four-level building in Tacoma, Washington. Shown below are some of the automobiles from the 1910s which are on display in this museum.

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The Kootenai (also spelled Kutenai), whose homeland was in the area west of the Rocky Mountains in what is today western Montana, northern Idaho, and southeastern British Columbia, are generally divided into two groups: Upper Kootenai and Lower Kootenai, referring to their position on the drainage of the Kootenay River. The Upper Kootenai lived near the western face of the Rocky Mountains. The Kootenai had several politically independent bands. There was no political unity which tied all of the Kootenai bands together. Kootenai unity was linguistic, cultural, and emotional rather than political.

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Welcome to the Tuesday edition of the Coffee Hour at Street Prophets. This is an open thread where we can discuss what’s happening in our lives, what we’ve been working on, and our opinions on current events. Today’s question: What’s your hot favorite beverage?

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The Oregon coast is a part of the larger Northwest Coast culture area which stretches from the Tlingit homelands in Alaska to the Tolowa homelands in northern California. The cultures along this coastal ecotone (an area between two biomes) share a number of common features, including a subsistence pattern which is centered on sea and littoral (shore, estuary, and headlands) environments. In the northern portion of this culture area (the Alaska Panhandle and British Columbia), the coastline is highly convoluted with many offshore islands and is bordered with steep, high mountains. The coasts of Washington, Oregon, and Northern California, on the other hand are relatively straight which means they are unprotected and pummeled by unimpeded ocean waves.

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Sat May 09, 2015 at 01:06 PM PDT

Licorice: Street Prophets Saturday

by Ojibwa

For most Americans, the word “licorice” brings to mind a kind of candy which may come in various shapes, color, and flavors. In reality, many of the various forms of licorice are not really licorice at all, for licorice is actually a flavor which comes from the root of a legume, Glycyrrhiza glabra, which is native to southern Europe, India, and parts of Asia.

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There are a few Americans, such as the noted scholar and pseudo-historian Glenn Beck, who have declared that gay rights activists are modern Nazis leading an Inquisition that will turn into a Christian holocaust. Similarly, Mike Farris claims that gay rights will transform America into Nazi Germany. Beck and Farris, like many conservatives, are using emotionally-laden words without an understanding of the origins and deep meanings of these words.

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The LeMay—America’s Car Museum in Tacoma, Washington has a number of unusual cars on display. Some of these are one-of-a-kind cars, such as hot rods, movie cars, and prototypes. Others were novel car ideas which had limited production. Some of these cars are shown in the photographs below.

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