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Cross posted at the WakeUpWalMart.com Blog.

The first national survey of public attitudes and opinions about Wal-Mart by Zogby International finds American adults hold an increasingly negative view of Wal-Mart.  The poll found 38 percent, or nearly 4 in 10 Americans, hold an unfavorable opinion of Wal-Mart, and 46 percent of Americans believe Wal-Mart's public image is worse than it was 1 year ago.

The poll found that 56 percent of American adults agreed with the statement - "Wal-Mart was bad for America. It may provide low prices, but these prices come with a high moral and economic cost." In contrast, only 39 percent of American adults agreed with the opposing statement - "I believe Wal-Mart is good for America. It provides low prices and saves consumers money every day."

"Despite two high-priced image makeovers, Wal-Mart's public image is in a tailspin.  Over the last year, Wal-Mart's image has declined at an alarming rate with the American people.  Unless Wal-Mart addresses these growing concerns, the company will face a mounting public backlash," stated Paul Blank, campaign director for WakeUpWalMart.com.

The Zogby poll, commissioned by WakeUpWalMart.com, was a national telephone survey of 1,012 adults conducted by Zogby International from 11/15/05 through 11/18/05 and had a margin of error of +/- 3.2%.

The effect of the WakeUpWalMart.com campaign over the last year can be best assessed by comparing several questions from the new Zogby poll to results from a similar national poll conducted by Lake, Snell, Perry in January 2005.

To see survey results, Click here. [Adobe PDF]

Originally posted to Another Ex Kerry Staffer on Thu Dec 01, 2005 at 11:02 AM PST.

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Poll

Does your opinion of Wal-Mart stop you from shopping there?

88%154 votes
4%7 votes
7%13 votes

| 174 votes | Vote | Results

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Comment Preferences

  •  Wal Mart Blows (none)
    My favorite thing to say about Wal-Mart is "What's so Mom & Apple Pie about Wal-Mart!?"
  •  I Wonder (4.00)
    How many of those 56% of Americans that say "Walmart is bad for America" shop there anyway.  I know a lot of people who think Walmart blows ass but they shop there anyway because they will save $0.11 on potato chips.


    "The aging process has you firmly in its grasp if you never get the urge to throw a snowball." - Doug Larson

    by karateexplosions on Thu Dec 01, 2005 at 10:58:45 AM PST

    •  Lots of people (none)
      don't have much choice.  I don't think accusing them of hypocrisy helps the cause much-- if they are waking up to the ways Walmart is hurting them and their communities, so much the better.
      •  I'm Not Necessarily Accusing Them All of Hypocricy (none)
        The ones I know have other choices, however, in a large metropolitan area.  But I fully realize that Walmart is the only choice for some, and I'm sure that they are represented in that 56%.  

        My point was that even as approval for Walmart goes down, that won't necessarily equate to a corresponding drop in sales or revenue for Walmart.


        "The aging process has you firmly in its grasp if you never get the urge to throw a snowball." - Doug Larson

        by karateexplosions on Thu Dec 01, 2005 at 11:29:26 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Take them to Costco, a local store etc. (none)
          Show them what else is out their.  Walmart is often a sick addiction to these people.  However, it is easy to get them hooked on something else if they see it.  

          Boycott Citibank/Citicards. They are corporate thieves and terrorists.

          by tri on Thu Dec 01, 2005 at 12:04:25 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Easier (none)
            said than done. My parents live in an area where the small business have been put out of business by Walmart and wally world is the only place to shop for a lot of stuff. To go to the places you describe would take a lot of driving. Of course, they could go some where else on occasion but most of the time they are stuck going to Walmart.

            I'm too disgusted right now to think of a sig.

            by Ga6thDem on Thu Dec 01, 2005 at 12:15:24 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  I was responding to the post above mine (none)
              regarding people who live in urban areas and who shop at Walmart despite having many other chooses in these areas and despite being aware that shopping at Walmart is not a good thing.  

              Boycott Citibank/Citicards. They are corporate thieves and terrorists.

              by tri on Thu Dec 01, 2005 at 12:18:25 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

          •  There Aren't Any Costcos Here in Louisville Yet (none)
            (Though one is slated to come here eventually)

            But there's Meijer, Kroger, Beuhler's, Target, various smaller stores, mom & pops, malls, etc. nearby.  They can take their pick but they always seem to choose Walmart, even though they hate the place.  


            "The aging process has you firmly in its grasp if you never get the urge to throw a snowball." - Doug Larson

            by karateexplosions on Thu Dec 01, 2005 at 12:18:46 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  There were two ways (none)
              in which I meant some don't have much choice: one is the way you mention, in rural areas where there are simply no other stores available.

              The other consideration is those low, low prices.  Low-income people may not be able to afford the alternatives.  Even Target costs significantly more.

              There are other access issues too, now that I think about it.  For instance, I'm aware (b/c my husband drives senior citizens' transport) that many low-mobility folks choose Walmart because of its one-stop-stopping attributes.  You could call this a kind of social ill based on the fact that these people no longer have friends or family able/willing to do their shopping for them, or to drive them about.

              Don't get me wrong, I am quite violently anti-Walmart, and try never to go there myself (I nearly succeed).  But it is good to realize all the direct and indirect ways in which people are railroaded into using Walmart.  I don't want to entirely blame the victims.  (After all, I know very few people who actually enjoy shopping there...)

  •  Plus it's Fucking Depressing (none)
    who picked gray and pale blue as colors?

    Everybody talks about John Edwards' energy, intellect and charisma -- Bill Clinton

    by philgoblue on Thu Dec 01, 2005 at 11:00:56 AM PST

  •  It's about time (none)
    for the public to wake up to Walmart.  The thing is, they have soooo many horrible practices (labor violations, child labor, bait and switch, health benefits, low wages, etc) that some reason has to resonate with everyone.  Plus, it's just a miserable experience shopping there.  We haven't shopped there in 3 years, but we're lucky-we have tons of stores right next to us.  It's the rural people who suffer more.

    There's no point for democracy when ignorance is celebrated...insensitivity is standard and faith is being fancied over reason.-NoFx

    by SairaLV on Thu Dec 01, 2005 at 11:01:00 AM PST

    •  my parents are.. (none)
      ...moving to North Carolina in the next couple years. They're going to have to drive half an hour to 45 minutes to shop at something not named Wal-Mart.

      Daily Kos: turning unanimity into discord since...well...I frickin got here

      by AnnArborBlue on Thu Dec 01, 2005 at 11:06:41 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  coming home to roost (none)
    I think that all the stories about the members of the Walton family being billionairs, while they pay shit wages to their employees is starting to have an effect. Good!
  •  It's about time (none)
    I only hope people's attitudes are reflected in the way they spend their money. Of course, wal-mart's whole strategy is to take away peoples' choices about where they can shop.
  •  Wal-Mart & GM (none)
    are both suffering for the same reason:  Bad Products.

    Why would you shop and Wal-Mart when you can go to Target, pay a nickel more and get stuff you'd actually be proud to own?  On top of that, it is depressing to actually go into Wal-mart.  Bad layout, ugly displays, dirty and cluttered isles.  The stores feel cheap.  Target doesn't.  My moral objections to Wal-Mart keep me from shopping there, but the feeling that Wal-Mart was designed in some parallel universe where Coldwar Communists design big-box retail stores in America make it easier.

    JESUS SAVES! Republicans run up the debt.

    by DCArchitect on Thu Dec 01, 2005 at 11:14:47 AM PST

    •  Oh God Yes... (none)
      Why would you shop and Wal-Mart when you can go to Target, pay a nickel more and get stuff you'd actually be proud to own?  On top of that, it is depressing to actually go into Wal-mart.  Bad layout, ugly displays, dirty and cluttered isles.  The stores feel cheap.

      Wal-Mart is a horrible shopping experience. I can't understand why so many people choose to shop there.

      •  Well Target has issues too (none)
        After all, they are letting their pharmacists refuse to fill birth control prescritions "for reasons of concience."  I would go to Costco if I could, but since I can't, I patronize local merchants and do a lot of online shopping.  I have not been to Wal-mart in over a year, and I don't think I've missed a thing.

        "Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition" - Monty Python

        by MadRuth on Thu Dec 01, 2005 at 11:57:43 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Agreed (none)
          Target is definetly not the anti-walmart.  It can be viewed as Walmarts slight less evil cousin.  Home Depot another story that definetly isn't the anti-walmart either and often uses Walmart like tactics to place their stores in communities, that don't want them their.   Both of these companies are also red companies that take up ridiculous amounts of space.  

          Boycott Citibank/Citicards. They are corporate thieves and terrorists.

          by tri on Thu Dec 01, 2005 at 12:11:07 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  P.S. (none)
            Sears/Kmart are also not the anti-walmart and Sears is a nightmare from a consumer perspective.  

            Boycott Citibank/Citicards. They are corporate thieves and terrorists.

            by tri on Thu Dec 01, 2005 at 12:13:04 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  There is no "Anti-Wal-Mart" (none)
            The Mom n' Pop shop is gone.  

            I'm not suggesting that Target is ethically better (well, a little, maybe, but not by much) so much as I'm suggesting they have nicer stuff in a nicer store.  When it comes down to it, you have to buy wrapping paper somewhere and I want to feel good about the environment I buy it in.  Aethetically, Target is better.  Maybe it's that I'm an architect and I'll support anything that doesn't slavishly follow some antiquated Rivivalist Aethetic, immitating the 19th century.  

            JESUS SAVES! Republicans run up the debt.

            by DCArchitect on Thu Dec 01, 2005 at 12:43:01 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

    •  Don't compare the two. (none)
      GM makes cars in the US, but makes shitty cars. They  pay their workers well, and are suffering from increased costs for health care coverage.

      Walmart doesn't make anything. They are not suffering from increased health care costs, because they don't provide health care to many of their employees. Most of their products come from China, and are of surprisingly high quality. But the prices are not necessarily any lower than you might find at an alternative store, if you can find one in your town.

      •  I meant no disrespect. (none)
        My family has strong Union ties and roots.  I'm merely suggesting that GM isn't providing a good product and is therefore in financial trouble (which they wrongly blame on the unions.)  They could support themselves if they made cars people would actually want to buy.

        Likewise, Wal-Mart's product (shopping experience) isn't one that people are flocking to experience.  Wal-Mart would be impervious to our ethical boycotts if it was providing something people wanted.  Yes, people want cheap stuff, but they want to feel good buying it.

        JESUS SAVES! Republicans run up the debt.

        by DCArchitect on Thu Dec 01, 2005 at 12:36:51 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Which leads to the next question... (none)
      Why would you one choose to shop at Target for most things when you can go to Costco (providing you have one available), and because your buying in bulk get stuff cheaper than both Walmart and Target and see your money go to a blue company instead of red ones?

      Boycott Citibank/Citicards. They are corporate thieves and terrorists.

      by tri on Thu Dec 01, 2005 at 11:44:05 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Problem (none)
        is that a lot of areas don't have a Costco. I just recently got one in my area. Many of these places have a Sam's but that is just Walmart too.

        In rural areas, people just don't have a lot of other choices. Ever been in a Walmart in a rural area on a Friday night or a Saturday? It's a nightmare.

        Target is at least clean. Their produce is fresh. Walmarts produce is rotten etc.

        I'm too disgusted right now to think of a sig.

        by Ga6thDem on Thu Dec 01, 2005 at 12:21:36 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Keep up the fight! (none)
    We, as citizens, need to lead the fight against Wal-Mart. Please join in the fight. Here are some suggested actions you can participate in to keep Wal-Mart from expanding even further and destroying even more small businesses and communities.

    And if you want to find actions specific to NYC, NJ or VA, you can find sections in my most recent newsletter covering fighting Wal-Mart in these places.

  •  Keep up the fight! (none)
    We, as citizens, need to lead the fight against Wal-Mart. Please join in the fight. Here are some suggested actions you can participate in to keep Wal-Mart from expanding even further and destroying even more small businesses and communities.

    And if you want to find actions specific to NYC, NJ or VA, you can find sections in my most recent newsletter covering fighting Wal-Mart in these places.

  •  I don't shop at Walmart if I can help it. (none)
    But since they put K-Mart, Brand Names, Ames, and Service Merchandise out of business in my town, they are the only store left that sells certain merchandise items, for example baby high chairs. (We don't have a Babies R Us closer than a 35 mile drive either.)

    I'll almost always drive the extra miles to avoid Walmart, though.  If people really are beginning to have unfavorable attitudes, that's good news to me. Perhaps other businesses will be able to better compete in spite of the bully on the block.

    "You have to accept whatever comes and the only important thing is that you meet it with courage and with the best you have to give." -- Eleanor Roosevelt

    by marylrgn on Thu Dec 01, 2005 at 11:21:25 AM PST

  •  finally convinced my husband! (none)
    I haven't gone to walmart for a year, but it was kind of a hollow victory, because my husband continued to shop there.  He finally stopped.  Now whenever he comes home from the local Riteaid or the K Mart in the next town he kvetches about how much more difficult or more expensive it is.  But I think he means to make the change permanent.

    Talk doesn't cook rice.

    by sophiebrown on Thu Dec 01, 2005 at 11:25:32 AM PST

  •  Walmart (none)
    I do shop there from time to time. I also shop their competition. I don't wish for a company that employs over a million people and is an economy unto itself to go belly up. I would like to see them shift their behavior towards pay and benefits. As the largest employer in the country they are the standard setter and they should be setting the bar higher. That said, I don't trust the majority of corporations that would take over Walmart's spot to behave any better. It's why I'm an advocate of regulating corporate behavior rather than personal behavior.
    •  If walmart vanishes (none)
      someone else will take their place.

      Walmart doesn't produce anything.  They don't even create jobs.  They are a retailer which means that they get the the things other companies make to market.  They don't occupy any niche or fill any special need.  Walmart is generic, almost brandless.

      If Walmart vanishes tomorrow, no one will mourn the loss of culture.  At least some arts organizations in Texas were well funded by the ripoff artists at Enron.  They were sad when Enron went bust.

    •  That Walmart "creates" jobs is a myth (none)
      If you go to sites such as http://www.wakeupwalmart.com what you will find is that walmart actually destroys more jobs than it creates.  Not only that, the jobs that they do create are often lower paying and involve the mistreatment of their employees in numerous ways.  

      However, I do agree that we need to legislate labor practices.  

      Boycott Citibank/Citicards. They are corporate thieves and terrorists.

      by tri on Thu Dec 01, 2005 at 12:29:17 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  The day-after-thanksgiving Wal-Mart stampedes ... (none)
    ... were especially upsetting to see. Maybe a few personal liability lawsuits will help them to stop dangling freebies as inducements (at least until they provide sufficient security).
  •  Don't shop at Walmart- (none)
    Use the internet instead. There is nothing at Walmart that I can't buy cheaper on Ebay. If Ebay doesn't have it, then I Google the item and look for closeouts. Remember, at Walmart you are paying retail.

    I am proud to say I haven't stepped into a Walmart since 1990. Their culture was obvious to me even then. I took a lot a grief and people thought I was crazy. But if you have one family making that much money in that short a time, they have to be stealing from somebody.

    Turns out they were stealing from their employees. If a million people are working even three hours a week off the clock, which is probably conservative, that's over one billion a year assuming $7.50/hr. If they have all employees work one hour a day off the clock, that's almost two and a half billion a year. And they have been doing that for at least 20 years. The Waltons are nothing more than modern day robber barons. They were to the 20th century what the Rockefellers were to the 19th century.

    And it's time to unionize them. They have a spy network in the stores that would have made the KGB proud. That can't be legal, can it? There is no way they have kept the unions at bay for 35 years in a legal manner. What I can't understand is why the tobacco attorneys et al haven't figured it out and sued.        

  •  oh oh wal-mart (none)
    The reality is that Wal-Mart is becoming a political/social issue because the American people are sick and tired of hearing about a company with 10 billion in  profits cry about how they cant pay their workers better, or how they cant provide healthcare...

    ....they should be embarrased...and its heartwarming that the American people are listening...

    If anyone ever doubted the power of the grassroots...then look at what wakeupwalmart.com is building...its incredible...

    kudos

    drotto

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