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That WaMo piece mentioned below rankled many of you for claiming that most of the audience is "under-35".

Several Blogads surveys have proven this myth wrong (30-40 dominates, but the distribution above and below that age group is fairly equally represented. See the survey results on this page), but let's do a quick poll and see what the results show.

How old are you?

Update: As of 2:30 p.m., 63 percent of respondents (over 2,000) are over the age of 35. Sounds about right. This myth that blog readers are all youngsters is clearly not true.

Originally posted to Daily Kos on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:00 PM PST.

Poll

How old are you?

0%47 votes
2%358 votes
7%1000 votes
8%1148 votes
9%1260 votes
12%1661 votes
13%1735 votes
13%1753 votes
12%1667 votes
9%1193 votes
4%614 votes
3%397 votes

| 12834 votes | Vote | Results

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Comment Preferences

  •  Wow (4.00)
    I'm 100% of the poll. Everyone is just like me.

    You didn't do it.

    by Earl on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 01:59:16 PM PST

  •  asdf (4.00)
    i'm the guy who proves the WaMo right - i'm 24

    but i bet there are more people here in their 40's than their 20's

    Isn't a centrist just someone who doesn't have the balls to be a fanatic? -- Stephen Colbert

    by Muboshgu on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 01:59:31 PM PST

    •  me too, 23 (none)
      though lately i've been feeling like i'm 50

      /sigh

      •  take a break girlfriend [n/t] (none)
      •  whaddya know (none)
        for some reason i thought you were older than that

        ive been feeling 50 too lately, but now that finals are done im feelin 21 again!

        Isn't a centrist just someone who doesn't have the balls to be a fanatic? -- Stephen Colbert

        by Muboshgu on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:03:54 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  boy, I thought you were younger... (none)
        you know, like 10 :P

        SoapBlox Colorado - The Daily Kos of Colorado
        (-5.38/-4.36)

        by pacified on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:22:37 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  CyberMom wants to know (none)
        if all of you 20-somethings have surpressed your data on the big, bad JAMRS database?
        According to the Pentagon Public Affairs office (at 703-428-0711), JAMRS is the organization formed by the Pentagon to oversee the development of a database of 30 million 16-25-year-olds, including name, address, email addresses, cell phone numbers, ethnicity, social security numbers and areas of study. This database is updated daily and distributed monthly to the Armed Services for recruitment purposes. You may "opt out" of this list in writing at the address above, and your child's information will be moved to a "suppression file." The Pentagon retains the information, but does not release it.

        If not, please visit LeaveMyChildAlone to download your form.

        •  I have found being honest more effective (4.00)
          When approached by a recruiter asking "how would you like to see the world and serve your country in the US Army?" I replied "You're f-ing kidding, right?"

          He stalled, turned, and walked away.

          As for the mailings, throw them out. It's no different from the millions of private university propaganda every kid who takes the SAT gets. Is it?

          --- "All I want for Xmas is some art from Alp Ozberker..."

          by opendna on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:05:03 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  Georgia, Georgia..... (4.00)
        Sweetie, I am, according to some idiots, 53.  However, every woman worth her salt hits 39, and starts going backwards.  I am now 14.  Considering that I have finished college and law school, as well as practiced for 24 years, Doogie Howser, MD, eats my dust.

        As for going white, my dear, if you are it is genetic.  I went gray in my 20's.  My paternal aunts (tough cookies, both - worked outside the home eons before the norm) also went gray in their 20's.  They were white at 35.  They never colored their hair.

        I am now a golden white. It's actually rather pretty.  So no color for me either.  You should wear it like the badge of honor it is.

        Oh, and I prefer it to my brothers' dilemma - they are bald.

        We do not rent rooms to Republicans.

        by Mary Julia on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:29:40 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  MJ (none)
          You are lucky. I got "premature" grey from my father's side, and long-lived color from my mom's. Unfortunately, for me, that means half-a**ed grey, and so I have been coloring for quite some time.

          I could not deal with the faded look of half-grey. I have known some older women with wonderful white hair. It's not going to happen here.

          BTW, you are in SYR, right? I am an hour down-and-off RT81.

          Oh, and I have been 39 for 13 years now. Not that anyone is counting.

        •  This year I celebrated.... (none)
          the fourteenth anniversary of of my 39th birthday.

          We're not old, cupcake, we're vintage!

          8^)

          "Folly is wont to have more followers and comrades than discretion." -Cervantes-

          by Don Quixote on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:43:33 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  Feeling old? (none)
        I hear you.

        Watch these movies and check my blawg.  

        http://www.christopherkingesq.com/...

        Peace.

        (40 feeling 60).

        "You've gotta hit King's blog-he is totally entertaining, and he is pissing off everyone in New Hampshire and anywhere else. It's amazing." (Legal Underground)

        by Christopher King on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:58:11 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  40 feeling 97 (4.00)
          thanks to my toddler who's just been having a tantrum (no nap today!). Whoever said "kids keep you young" has never stayed home with them 24/7.

          First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win. -- Mohandas Gandhi

          by trueblue illinois on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:04:30 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  So true, blue! I hear ya. (none)
            I'm 46 and have a 5 year old daughter and a 2 year old nephew. Both of them are, literally, running in circles around me as I type. There's mac 'n cheese on my laptop.

            So the secret has been revealed: Dora is a big sister to twins!

            •  This looks like the spot (none)
              for us old folks with young ones.I'm soon to be 45 with a 2 year old. Love every minute of it.
            •  Yeah, isn't it fun (none)
              to try to craft a coherent response to some of these posts while your kids are asking for juice or wanting you to play Candyland? My 3-year-old now wants to "make letters" all the time on the computer, so I can't even get online anymore when I want to. Many's the time when I want to chime into a dKos discussion but am interrupted by a little one wielding a copy of "Good Dog, Carl!" or "Clifford's Christmas." Ah well, as they say, "they don't stay young forever." Unfortunately, neither do we!

              First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win. -- Mohandas Gandhi

              by trueblue illinois on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 04:22:20 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  My daughter used to hit me with the book (none)
                if I didn't want to read "Moo Baa La La La" for the hundredth time.  I learned not to say no when she wanted a story read to her (luckily we had mostly soft cover books.)  I also clearly remember one day I just sat on the couch in a daze while the four year old ran around the living room in circles, yelling "Look out Toto, the flying monkeys are chasing us!" to the two year old, who was following her while wearing her pants on her head.  Ah, to be the mother of toddlers again.  Now they are preteens and want their own cell phones.  I know this is a cliche and also hard to do sometimes, but enjoy these days while you can (if you aren't too exhausted.)
                •  LOL, big time! (none)
                  Especially the sitting in a daze part! They are such hilarious tyrants, aren't they. The reason my toddler was screaming was because I was singing Christmas carols and she wanted me to stop. Now, I know I don't have the greatest singing voice ... but I had no idea it could evoke that degree of anguish. Geez, I guess I'll keep my mouth shut next time!

                  First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win. -- Mohandas Gandhi

                  by trueblue illinois on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 09:00:38 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

          •  The keep you young part (none)
            comes later.  If you pay attention you'll have some idea of what the younger generation is up to.  Many have no clue.
            •  Thanks for the reassurance (none)
              My oldest is only 7 so I still feel like a relative newbie when it comes to parenting. Sometimes it's hard to see the big picture, especially after a day like today!

              First they ignore you, then they laugh at you, then they fight you, then you win. -- Mohandas Gandhi

              by trueblue illinois on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 05:32:00 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

      •  you write like a wise old gal (none)


        He may look like an idiot and talk like an idiot but don't let that fool you. He really is an idiot - Groucho Marx

        by AlyoshaKaramazov on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:13:30 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  I took you as being... (none)
        ... older than that, too. Something about your writing style, and knowledge of the issues.

        Not that I'm saying that someone in their early 20s can't be knowledgeable and write well. But jeez, when I was in my early 20s, I was an idiot.

        Lately, though, I think I've elevated myself to somewhere just above "functionally retarded." ;-)

        -8.25, -6.26 ...it ain't "schadenfreude" if the bastards deserve it. this is infidelica...

        by snookybeh on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:21:06 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  dude... (none)
        im 24 going on 55...politics will do that to ya.  + bush admin will add another dozen years...and all the injustice, add a few more.  unjustified war? eh 6 - 8 yrs...spying on americans?  2 yrs...torture?  6-8 years...shit.

        im getting old.

  •  27 baby (4.00)
    and lovin' it. Father of two - a 10 year old, and now a 1 month old, both boys. Lovin it, lovin it, lovin it!
    •  one can dream. (none)
      Wow, I'm 27 as well. Father of none. Single (mostly). Working from home. Writing, reading, painting, playing guitar. I think i'm operating at 19 still. I'm always so impressed with people my age, many even younger, who have accomplished so much more — whether its a family, a great career, or something else tangible like that. Congrats. When I'm in my mid-40s and a "how old are you" diary pops up again, I'll be pleased to note how I've moved up to the responsibilities and lifestyle of a 27 year old. One can dream.
    •  I'm 27 (none)
      and having the time of my life.  Although, I have to admit, maturity is a little boring sometimes. (that's why I often reject it).

      "In a time of universal deceit - telling the truth is a revolutionary act." - George Orwell

      by Five of Diamonds on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:24:50 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  27, too (none)
      I must admit my 25th birthday scared me.  I kept thinking I was closer to 30 than I was to 20.  

      Now though, not so bad.

      "But sanctuary never comes without some kind of risk" - Bob Seger

      by YukonJack on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 05:26:53 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  I had to ask my wife... (4.00)
    if I was 40 or 41.

    A failed President= August 6 PDB, Bin Laden? DSM, WMD's? Abu Ghraib, Rove/Plame, Katrina

    by Gator on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 01:59:50 PM PST

    •  What did she say? (4.00)
      ...

      Visit Satiric Mutt -- my contribution to the written cholesterol now clogging the arteries of the Internet.

      by Bob Johnson on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:00:35 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  41 (4.00)
         and a 1/2 dammit.

        A failed President= August 6 PDB, Bin Laden? DSM, WMD's? Abu Ghraib, Rove/Plame, Katrina

        by Gator on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:02:14 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Dayum (4.00)
          Did she have to get that specific? Have you pissed her off lately?

          Stock up on flowers and candy, and you best hope the "Holiday" presents you picked out go over well.

          ;)

          Bush - the ultimate example of the Peter Principle.

          by PatsBard on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:04:41 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  She lied (4.00)
          and I'm cherishing my 42 in honor of Dougie Adams for as long as it lasts.

          So long...

          You didn't do it.

          by Earl on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:05:31 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  You as ticked-off as me? (4.00)

           42.

           And before us -- the "Real Baby Boomers" were marketed heavily to.

           And after us -- the "Gen X'ers" were heavily marketed to.

           But we between, say 40-45, we're in this demographic limbo . . .   Nobody cares if we buy Diet Coke or Diet Pepsi.  It's lonely being between generational milestones.

           Further proof:  when we were in our 20s the Big Show on tv was "30-something"; one of the Big Movies was "The Big Chill" -- for 40-somethings, and another was "The Breakfast Club":  for teens.  And when we were in our 30s the Big Show was "Friends" -- for 20-somethings.  Now we're in our early 40s and . . . crickets chirping.

           BenGoshi
          ___________________

          . . . religion is not a syllogism, but a poem. H.L. Mencken

          by BenGoshi on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:12:17 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Just finished posting the same thing below (none)
            maybe it gives a chance to actually do something, after all, we've got to live down the shame of bringing disco to the charts. (Sorry to repeat myself peat myself.)
            •  Truly an odd age (4.00)
              Too young for Nam, too old for MTV and video games (at least I was and am). Took me until late 90s to get what computers were about.

              We are the tweener generation.

              You didn't do it.

              by Earl on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:19:45 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

            •  Disco was a little before me. (4.00)

               That is, I was 13-16 when it was really big.  And it was the late teen-to-late-20s who really made it happen (think of The Limelight in NYC -- not many 15 year olds there).  And I was into Little Feat at the time (and Steely Dan).  But I digress.

               BenGoshi
              ___________________

              . . . religion is not a syllogism, but a poem. H.L. Mencken

              by BenGoshi on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:22:15 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  at 44, I'm... (none)
                ... a shade older than you, so I do remember the height of disco. But by that time, my friends and I had discovered punk, and were making fun of both disco and what is now referred to as "classic rock."

                I'd always figured that, chronologically anyway, I was born at the very tail end of the baby boom, but I always related more to the X'ers.

                The thing about music now is, we're 50 years past the advent of rock and roll and its various bastard offspring. And unlike in the 50s, and to a lesser extent the 60s and 70s, there's no huge gulf between the music and pop culture of the parents and the kids. Differences, sure, but... young people today are as likely to be listening to Zeppelin, Hendrix, the Ramones and so forth as they are Jay-Z or Eminem or Bright Eyes or whoever.

                And a lot of them dress more or less like I did when I was a teenager. (Though my pants weren't QUITE big enough to fit three people into, like what I see a lot of kids wearing these days.)

                -8.25, -6.26 ...it ain't "schadenfreude" if the bastards deserve it. this is infidelica...

                by snookybeh on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:38:10 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  Oh, I *remember* it like yesterday! (none)

                   All I was saying was that as a 13-16, maybe even 17 year old, I wasn't among those who made it "big".  Basically, I'm shirking responsibility.  And, besides, I hated it, too.  But I certainly remember it, like a hot poker bored into my brain.

                   BenGoshi
                  _________________

                  P.S. -- I was fortunate enough to have a brother 12 years my senior, therefore, at age 6 I was hearing Doors and Big Brother & the Holding Company, and at age 16 driving around with old 8-tracks of Workingman's Dead, Feats Don't Fail Me Now, and Royal Scam playing on the player that'd been hammered into the dashboard of a jalopyfied Subaru.  So, I was lucky.

                   When I got to college, those 1-5 years ahead of me turned me on to things as diverse as the Ramones, Eno, and this brand new band out of Athens . . .  I discovered X (the band, that is) and Mojo Nixon on my own, thank you.

                   BG

                  . . . religion is not a syllogism, but a poem. H.L. Mencken

                  by BenGoshi on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 05:04:17 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

          •  Lonely? (4.00)
            I dunno, I happen to like it when none of the advertising is for things I am even remotely the target market for. Makes it a lot easier to ignore.

            conscientious objector in the battle of the sexes.

            by plymouth on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:17:44 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Not just advertising though (none)
              BenGoshi used movies and television series aimed at certain generations too, and I don't know about you, but the constant use of 50's themes used to irritate me.

              Democrats -- Progress for the Working Class

              by rogun on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 05:11:44 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

          •  You got that right! (none)
            It always seems that I was to young for what they were marketing and now I'm to old. BAH! I retaliate by not paying attention to their marketing. ;-P
            BTW I'm 42 forever!

            I may not agree with what you say, but I'll defend to the death your right to say it. -Voltaire

            by baracon on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:28:21 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  you say it like it's a bad thing (none)
            must be nice not to be marketed to ;-)

            That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it

            by johnny71 on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:47:15 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  As in . . . (none)

               . . . did you buy that new "Tommy Hilfinger" shirt and "Do the Dew" while buying those Usher tickets online because you really wanted to, or because    You.   Cannot.    Resist.   ???

               I can deprogram you.  But it'll cost you.

              BenGoshi
              ___________________

              . . . religion is not a syllogism, but a poem. H.L. Mencken

              by BenGoshi on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:30:04 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

          •  It's a little larger than 40-45 (none)
            I'm 48, and I'm part of the same age demographic you're talking about. Not a "real" boomer, and not an X-er either. I think it really goes up to about the people born in 1955.

            We were the first punk rockers, not the first hippies.

            But we'll shout from the bow "Your days are numbered" / And like Pharaoh's tribe they'll be drownded in the tide / And like Goliath they'll be conquered

            by zerocrossing on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 04:59:41 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  You're truly a "cusp" person. ( nt ) (none)

              . . . religion is not a syllogism, but a poem. H.L. Mencken

              by BenGoshi on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 05:06:25 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Yeah (none)
                I've always thought it was a big mistake to create generational boundaries based on a demographic event. The Baby Boom period lasts 20 years, but the kids born 10 years into it are vastly different from the kids born in the earlier years of the Boom. And the early Boomers actually have more in common with the folks born in the early 40s than they do with us second-decade Boomers. They all shared the 60s together. We didn't.

                Some friends and I figured out what to call the folks in our age group: BoXers (Boomer / X-er). Technically, we're Boomers. But we have a lot in common culturally with the X-ers.

                If I were to draw generational lines, I'd probably draw them more like this:

                1940-1954: WWII babies and early Boomers
                1955-1965: BoXers (or Tweeners)
                1966-1980: X-ers

                But then, I'm not a sociologist, so what do I know? :-)

                But we'll shout from the bow "Your days are numbered" / And like Pharaoh's tribe they'll be drownded in the tide / And like Goliath they'll be conquered

                by zerocrossing on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 08:12:44 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

          •  I'm 45 and can relate Ben (4.00)
            I didn't like the music from the 1970's.  I liked the jazz and bigband standards.  I also liked punk too.  Almost anything but disco.

            The clothes were ugly then too.  Now I see teenagers were those retro ugly '70 fashions. UGH!

          •  You mean "Gen Y'ers" (none)
            I think you mean "Gen Y'ers" were heavily marketed to "after us", because I think you classify as a "Gen X'er" youself.

            I'm a "Gen X'er" also and it ticked me off as well. While growing up, I was so tired of everything having either a 50's or 60's theme, although I'd probably have appreciated the 60's themes if I'd understood them better at the time.

            I'm 4 years younger than you and the thing I find really sad about my age group is that it has no identity. I guess I'm part of the true MTV generation, but all that basically means is that the newly-corporate-owned recording industry stuffed garbage down our throats and told us what we wanted to hear. I guess that's pretty cool if you like Madonna and Michael Jackson, but I don't. Because of this, everyone in my age group seems to identify with some other age group, because they have nothing of their own to identify themselves with.

            Democrats -- Progress for the Working Class

            by rogun on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 05:40:08 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  asdf (none)
            My generation would have to be generation Nomad (I've been across the continent and back 3 times this year!
          •  Are you dying to be marketed to? (none)
            It's overrated.
        •  41 and 360 days (none)
          Counting down....

          "I have a philosophy about elections. I believe issues divide and values unite."--Gov. Brian Schweitzer

          by Joan McCarter on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:14:18 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  [Hint] (none)
        Your response is supposed to be, "I can't remember."

        Visit Satiric Mutt -- my contribution to the written cholesterol now clogging the arteries of the Internet.

        by Bob Johnson on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:02:53 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Senior moments, here you come! (4.00)
      I've been calling myself "damn near forty" for so long, I forget I'm still 39.

      Are we still routinely torturing helpless prisoners, and if so, does it feel right that we as American citizens are not outraged by the practice? -Al Gore

      by soyinkafan on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:01:26 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yesterday's Senior Moment (none)
        I could remember all the important cast members of "Singin' in the Rain," but I couldn't remember Gene Kelly's last name. I could remember lots of people named Gene (or Jean), Hershold, for instance, and even another tap dancer named Gene (Nelson), but Kelly would not come to me. This morning, when I woke up, Gene KELLY suddenly popped into my head, and I had to ask myself, "How hard was that?" Then I had to ask myself, "Why were you trying to remember that, anyway?"

        How we elderly manage to waste so much time:-).

        "That story isn't worth the paper it's rotten on."--Dorothy Parker

        by martyc35 on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:05:41 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Now you've done it (none)
          Lena is back in my head 24/7:

          "Widdiya think Iyam, dumb or something?!"

          "If we can bring some joy into your humdrum lives, it makes us think all our hard work ain't been in vain for nothing.  Bless you all!"

          Are we still routinely torturing helpless prisoners, and if so, does it feel right that we as American citizens are not outraged by the practice? -Al Gore

          by soyinkafan on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 10:22:28 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  Men (4.00)
      One year my husband keptb telling people he was 33.  A month before his birthday I asked him what he wanted for his 33rd birthday.  He corrected me, "I'm going to be 34."  Um...no sweetie.  You're 32 right now and will be 33.

      He was so messed up by that--he felt robbed of a year.  So his 33rd year was actually his 32nd and when he turned 34, he was back on track.  The saddest part, is that he was born in 1970, so it's not like the math is hard.

    •  Just realized I must be 47 (4.00)
      I was thinking I was 46, but then I realized it's 2005, so my age can't be even.  It's bad when you have to do the math to figure out how old you are.
  •  Acting or true age? (4.00)
    My juvenile behavior is not representative of my true age.

    Visit Satiric Mutt -- my contribution to the written cholesterol now clogging the arteries of the Internet.

    by Bob Johnson on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 01:59:56 PM PST

  •  I'm 44, but.. (4.00)
    ..I would love to see that most of those who come here are young. That would bode well for the future!!!

    Hey, time to start the "dailykos for kids" site! I mean, if O'Reilly can instruct kids, so can we!

    •  yeah, and knowing us...... (none)
      the very first post would be about whether or not swearing was allowed.


      He may look like an idiot and talk like an idiot but don't let that fool you. He really is an idiot - Groucho Marx

      by AlyoshaKaramazov on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:17:58 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Instruct (none)
      or brainwash?

      I'm surprised there aren't McDonald's-like GOP playgrounds for early programming.

      "In a time of universal deceit - telling the truth is a revolutionary act." - George Orwell

      by Five of Diamonds on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:27:06 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  dfgdhgfhdhg (none)
      im all of 22 years old.

      i have to be engaged and then married before i begin saving up and planning for children.  i am already a force to be reckoned with (i guess? :); my school wanted to train a revolutionary and by god, they got me.  by the time my children come of age, i know they will be an even greater influence than i can be.

      but that is all the future, and this is now, and i should get to sleep.

  •  would there be any use... (none)
    to also do an ethnicity poll, and or employment status? Since we're all supposed to be young, white professionals.

    -8.25, -6.26 ...it ain't "schadenfreude" if the bastards deserve it. this is infidelica...

    by snookybeh on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:00:38 PM PST

  •  Here's one vote (4.00)
    from a creaky, well aged vintage.

    Let the great world spin for ever down the ringing grooves of change. - Tennyson

    by bumblebums on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:00:46 PM PST

    •  me too. (none)
      I was alive in the seventies.
      For seven months.

      ok.  I'm definitely creaky.

      •  I was alive in the 70s for 10 years. (none)
        I was alive in the 60s for 10 years.  I wind back all the way to 1958.  That was not so old not so long ago.

        Kossacks: a large population of Medieval exegetes who each day grapple with the fabulistic opportunities of the early third milennium.

        by DCDemocrat on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:07:12 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  I was alive in the 70s for 15 years... (4.00)
          ...Or was it fifteen minutes?

          Kinda hazy 'cause of all the drugs.

          I'm an old fogey of 44, but would be VERY glad to know that whippersnappers younger than me are the majority here.  That means progressive politics has a great future.

          •  I knew everything would be okay (none)
            some years ago when the anti-gay amendment in California won despite losing overwhelming among persons under age 30.

            Kossacks: a large population of Medieval exegetes who each day grapple with the fabulistic opportunities of the early third milennium.

            by DCDemocrat on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:13:25 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  I graduated from college in the '70s (4.00)
            I think I win!
            •  I graduated in '81. (none)

              Kossacks: a large population of Medieval exegetes who each day grapple with the fabulistic opportunities of the early third milennium.

              by DCDemocrat on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:32:14 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  wow (none)
                I graduated from high school in 1975 but I didn't graduate from college until 1995. I took some time off for Bad Behavior.

                Fair & Balanced: -7.38, -7.38 IMPEACH

                by lulu57 on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:03:22 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  Runs in her family (4.00)
                  all a bunch of late bloomers. Her sister did the same thing, and I suppose I have to admit to finishing college in 1956, having lulu57, then another, and finally going back to grad school in 1969, just in time to be a radical at SF State. I'm in the tiny 2% at the bottom of the poll:-(. Still kicking, though.

                  Thanks, Markos. We're never too young or too old, and we will prevail.

                  "That story isn't worth the paper it's rotten on."--Dorothy Parker

                  by martyc35 on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:20:17 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  At least we didn't wear bloomers (none)
                    Now that my mom is here on Kos, it's time to work on my mother-in-law. She was born in 1916. Been a Dem all her life and she still gets out to vote. She's not fond of computers, though. Damn newfangled contraptions!

                    Fair & Balanced: -7.38, -7.38 IMPEACH

                    by lulu57 on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:41:13 PM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                •  ohhh (none)
                  we seem to be living  along the same lines - HS in 76 and college in 94.  1957 produced good Chevy's and good folks

                  -6.25 -5.33 and damn proud of it

                  by dansk47 on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 05:00:08 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

              •  I graduated in 2007. (none)
                ...what do you mean, that hasn't happened yet?

                Yes it has; it's mid-2008.  The dark storm clouds have dissipated and everything.

                Jumping on the politicalcompass.org bandwagon: (-3.63, -3.03) - Does that make me part of the right wing here?

                by someone else on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 05:54:26 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

        •  It seems almost like yesterday, doesn't it? (4.00)
          Give me hippies over  Coaliton for the Family any day!
          •  The 70s were alive. (none)
            Have you ever noticed that the best rock is from the 70s.  I could drive back and forth from school for a week with $5.00 worth of gas.  

            Kossacks: a large population of Medieval exegetes who each day grapple with the fabulistic opportunities of the early third milennium.

            by DCDemocrat on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:34:14 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  I agree (4.00)
              Perhaps it's just because I spent most of my childhood in the '70's, but I consider it the best era for music in general. As bad as the '70's were supposed to have been, I sure do have a lot of great memories. I graduated from high school during the '80's, but I consider it the worst decade in my life.

              Democrats -- Progress for the Working Class

              by rogun on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:21:34 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

        •  Gotcha beat, sonny boy. (4.00)
          Now help me across the street before I beat the shit out of you with my cane.
      •  You've got a few months.... (none)
        ....on me. I lived in the 1970s for four months and five days.
  •  Hey how come they know and you don't (none)
    They wouldn't just make up shit
  •  20! (4.00)
    Whoo

    I think.

    "Our country right or wrong. When right, to be kept right; when wrong, to be put right" - Carl Schurz

    by RBH on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:01:12 PM PST

    •  Dang (none)
      You're a wee one.
    •  You think? (none)
      I know. So know.

      You didn't do it.

      by Earl on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:08:17 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Me too!!! (none)
      Turning 21 in two weeks.  Yay for me.

      Warner/Richardson '08

      by DemBrock on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:13:29 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Although I will admit that (none)
      I voted for Clinton twice, although it was in those mock classroom elections where the kids typically vote for the person they know of more (or the person that their parents support).

      From what I remember, a lot of the 1st graders in my class in 1992 did vote for Bush.

      "Our country right or wrong. When right, to be kept right; when wrong, to be put right" - Carl Schurz

      by RBH on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:18:08 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Parents (none)
        In most elections I can remember my parents voted for different candidates. Did a good job of teaching me to think for myself early on!

        They're both registered as Democrats but philosophically my dad is a lot more of a Libertarian and my mom is a lot more of a Green. My dad claims the democratic party left him behind but he won't reregister. It's very Zell Miller of him.

        conscientious objector in the battle of the sexes.

        by plymouth on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:22:52 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  I voted Dukakis (none)
        I remember being totally shocked that he didn't win in a landslide across the country.  You mean Bear Creek Elementary isn't the center of the universe???
        •  Well (none)
          I'm pretty sure Clinton won the mock election in 96.

          Although I'm technically in the age group that doesn't really remember much (if anything) about Ronald Reagan being President.

          "Our country right or wrong. When right, to be kept right; when wrong, to be put right" - Carl Schurz

          by RBH on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:30:28 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  I remember voting in that kind of election (none)
          when I was six. Somehow I didn't grasp the idea that the tally of our elementary school votes would not in fact decide the future of the country. It all felt very weighty and important. Even if the ballots were filled out in crayon.
        •  Perot won the mock election in 1992. (none)
          NT
        •  I was the Dukakis campaign manager (none)
          in our 4th grade election.
          The stickers I made said:

          Chopping down Bushes and hunting for Quayles.

          We made our Bush stand in cry.

          We won by a landslide.  

          "But sanctuary never comes without some kind of risk" - Bob Seger

          by YukonJack on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 05:45:35 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  When I was in 7th grade.... (none)
        ....in a fairly moderate Northern Virginia suburb of DC, we had a mock election in '92. Bush finished third, to my delight. I even managed to talk my one conservative friend into voting for Perot. Clinton finished with something like 55% of the vote, Perot got about 30% and Bush only got about 15%. It was pretty wild.

        Whereas, back in 1988, my 3rd grade class supported Bush over Dukakis 10 to 9, though I later talked two Bush voters into becoming Democrats.

  •  Just turned (4.00)
    47 on December 10th and feeling good about it!

    Barry Welsh Indiana 6th

    Indiana 6th District Congressional Candidate a campaign of three simple words "People Before Profits."

    by Barry Welsh on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:01:16 PM PST

    •  I turned 47 on November 23 (none)
      A memorable 17 days those were.  People who lived through them have never forgotten them.

      Kossacks: a large population of Medieval exegetes who each day grapple with the fabulistic opportunities of the early third milennium.

      by DCDemocrat on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:08:22 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I read up thread (4.00)
        that you were born in 58.  They were talking about the movies and being caught in a void, but it is worth noting that we had to live through DISCO! :o)  We deserve points for going through that!

        Barry Welsh

        Indiana 6th District Congressional Candidate a campaign of three simple words "People Before Profits."

        by Barry Welsh on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:20:23 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  How about that! (none)
        You are exactly one day older than I am!  
        •  The only reason I can remember (none)
          JFK's assassination is that he was killed on the day before my birthday.  As venal as it is, I guess it's understandable that the biggest crisis I faced in November of 1963 was the possibility of my birthday party's cancellation.  My mother didn't want to, but she went through it.

          Kossacks: a large population of Medieval exegetes who each day grapple with the fabulistic opportunities of the early third milennium.

          by DCDemocrat on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:37:41 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  You're older than me (none)
            By two months and a day.
            I don't remember the assasination, but I do remember being mad because my mum ignored me as she cried as she watched the funeral.  So mad I think I told her I didn't care that he had died.

            And Churchill died on my birthday a few years later.  I remember watching his funeral too.

            Don't forget, ePluribus Media isn't them, it's US. That means you too.

            by Bionic on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:57:40 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  I was 5 too, I was pissed there were no cartoons (none)
              I don't remember taking it out on my mom though.
              •  Rocky & Bullwinkle, baby. (none)
                Boris & Natasha. Fractured Fairy Tales. Happy times.

                Bullwinkle: Well, if you can't believe what you read in a comic book, what can you believe?

                •  I was watching (none)
                  cartoons from an Indianapolis public station when they broke in and said the President had been shot.  My oldest sister's husband was in Naval Intellegence in The Pentagon at the time, and we had just returned from a late October trip over teachers institute, so I knew who The President was, and had an idea of what this meant at that time, and I think that played a big part in how I eventually came around to being a Congressional Candidate.

                  I loved those cartoons too.  Mr. Peabody and Chumley.  Dudley Doright and Snidley Whiplash.

                  Barry

                  Indiana 6th District Congressional Candidate a campaign of three simple words "People Before Profits."

                  by Barry Welsh on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 10:24:48 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

              •  I had exactly that reaction. (none)
                I was in the first grade then and I was mad that the funeral coverage was the only thing on TV.
      •  Similar age to me (4.00)
        I will be 47 next March.
      •  hey, that's my birthday too! (4.00)
        i'm three years younger, but 11/23 for me. Happy birthday to us!

        -8.25, -6.26 ...it ain't "schadenfreude" if the bastards deserve it. this is infidelica...

        by snookybeh on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:47:36 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  I Turn 47 Next Month (none)
      God, where has the time gone?

      I still have people call me a "young man" even though I started graying at 36.  Go figure.

      Unfortunately for me, my birthday has been a bit melancholy for the last few years to the point where I don't celebrate it much, considering that my birthdate is the same day the Space Shuttle Challenger blew up.  (It was very personal for me since I work in the space biz and remember that day VERY vividly).

      But I soldier on.

  •  Some help needed (none)
    poll needs work
    http://www.chron.com/
  •  would the article be right (none)
    if we weren't in this stinkin war in Iraq?

    Blue is the most popular color

    by jalapeno on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:01:55 PM PST

  •  on the "older" side (4.00)
    but still kicking!

    "September 11, 2001, already a day of immeasurable tragedy, cannot be the day liberty perished in this country." Judge Gerald Tjoflat

    by SanJoseLady on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:02:01 PM PST

    •  50 on Sept. 11th (none)
      and glad to see (at the time I took the poll) that there are as many 51-55 as there are 30-35s here!
      •  51 on Sept. 8th - we're close! (nm) (none)

        Vision without action is a daydream. Action without vision is a nightmare!

        by 1040SU on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:11:23 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  How did you feel that day (none)
        when we were attacked?  that's kinda heavy.

        The beneficiaries are likely to be...large corporations and development firms. (O'Connor, J. dissenting in Kelo). God bless you, J. O'Connor.

        by xanthe on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 04:31:28 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Glad to see it too (none)
         I'm 52.  Talk about a middle-age bulge, look at that bulge in the poll!

        War is not an adventure. It is a disease. It is like typhus. - Antoine De Saint-Exupery

        by Margot on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 06:11:01 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  I'll be 50 Sept. 9, 2006 (none)
        My husband, who'll be 61 in May, and I date our different ends of boomerhood by the JFK assassination. I was in second grade, he was a freshman in college (he was actually not technically a boomer, being born while the war was still on). The age difference seems much less these days. I recall one of those "where were you?" water cooler conversations sometime in the late '80s. And one of the sweet young things in the office, who we all knew was younger but somehow it hadn't been so obvious, piped up with "You mean Bobby Kennedy? I was in kindergarten."
    •  25 here! (none)
      I'm a young 'un. I was actually surprised when I went to the DC protest in Sept at the range of ages among Kossacks. Probably because I work for a software company where 25 is "old" and 30 is "ancient"... not used to hanging around with people who didn't graduate college this decade.

      I re-did my website! See how pretty DailyGranola.com is now.

      by OrangeClouds115 on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:48:52 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  haha, opposite here (none)
        I am considered relatively young among my classmates and co-workers!  all my friends are 24-28 though, not much range.  i don't like hanging out with non-relatives (or parents of friends) over 35.
        •  LOL (none)
          my customers for work are older. They range from 28 to god-only-knows. We're buddies. We go out together.

          One of them has 20+ yrs in the industry and that concept is totally foreign to me!  I've been doing this for about 2 yrs and I feel pretty good. And at my office, i'm an old-timer :)

          I re-did my website! See how pretty DailyGranola.com is now.

          by OrangeClouds115 on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:30:03 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  Eeee Gads (none)
      that's the year I graduated high school.

      Where's my damn cane?


      He may look like an idiot and talk like an idiot but don't let that fool you. He really is an idiot - Groucho Marx

      by AlyoshaKaramazov on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:24:15 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Anthony, (none)
      I thought you were older - your posts and diaries are certainly mature.  I guess 24 year olds can be thoughtful.  It just seems such a long time ago to me.  I think I was dancing on tables in bars, not writing interesting posts - Yes, I know there was no internet - but I still may have been dancing on aforesaid tables.

      The beneficiaries are likely to be...large corporations and development firms. (O'Connor, J. dissenting in Kelo). God bless you, J. O'Connor.

      by xanthe on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:47:55 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  NightOwls vs. Dayowls (4.00)
    Might want to post this tonite also, just tell everyone that if they voted during the daytime poll not to do it tonite.

    Your demographics are bound to be different - maybe as different as night and day!

    (sorry, it's been a long day....)

  •  Only 21 y/o who's commented... (4.00)
    so far
  •  About to hit the half-century mark. (4.00)
    Recently empty-nested, about to become unemployed.  My only block to freedom may be the W misadministration.  In the market to practice my 2nd ammendment rights.
  •  I am six months away from being (4.00)
    30.

    (Screaming now)

    •  30's are the best decade of life (none)
      Seriously.

      Still feel physically young, no longer are wet-behind-the-ears stupid.

      •  I'd have to say (none)
        that so far (33), I find that statement to be true...

        But only because I didn't have enough fun while I was in my 20's.

        I would rather be exposed to the inconveniences attending too much liberty than those attending too small a degree of it. -- Thomas Jefferson [-4.25, -5.33]

        by GTPinNJ on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:15:49 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Gotta disagree, SG...nothin' like the 40s... (4.00)
        You know you're not going to accomplish half of what you'd hoped; takes the pressure off.

        Unfortunately, these are the years the eyes, ears, etc. begin to deteriorate.

        "Man will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest" - Diderot

        by Cliff Talus on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:10:05 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  No, I think the 40s are the best years for (none)
        women - So see Susan - it's only just begun.

        The beneficiaries are likely to be...large corporations and development firms. (O'Connor, J. dissenting in Kelo). God bless you, J. O'Connor.

        by xanthe on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:49:12 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  30's great for women (none)
        I'm 45 and '18' was my very best year, closely followed by the 30 - 35 years.  I had the time of my life after 30. I was 35 when I met my husband...who was 22 at the time.  I told him if I had a 22 year old son I would not be happy that he was marrying a 35 year old.  We're still together.  The age difference is PERFECT.
      •  30s are where it's at (none)
        gotta agree here. I'm 33, and this is when life starts taking off. The work you did in your 20s starts to actually bring results, and you're still young enough to enjoy it.

        Although I'm looking forward to my 50s and 60s, I must admit, when I fancy I'll be a respected veteran in my craft.

    •  I've only got 4 months! (none)
      Still trying to figure out how to celebrate that. Nothing I can come up with seems momentous enough.

      conscientious objector in the battle of the sexes.

      by plymouth on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:30:04 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  you have my sympathy (none)
      I was cool with turning 25 (I am renting my first rental car this January!!! In Kauai!!! For FREE!!! Oh so exciting!) ... but I think from now on I am going to lie about my age. I'm done aging. And I have so many skincare products its ridiculous. It's worth a try at least.

      I re-did my website! See how pretty DailyGranola.com is now.

      by OrangeClouds115 on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:50:36 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  OmiGod (none)
      you are a baby - I had no idea.

      The beneficiaries are likely to be...large corporations and development firms. (O'Connor, J. dissenting in Kelo). God bless you, J. O'Connor.

      by xanthe on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 04:33:57 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Yeah!! Go 41-45 year olds!! (4.00)
    -
    We're kicking everyone else's ASSES!

    Booyeah!!!

    We got spirit yes we do, We got spirit HOW 'BOUT YOU!!

    Oh...this isn't a competition?  Sorry.

    (But 41-45 year olds still kick all yer asses)

    Judge me on the content of my character, not the diaper on my head.

    by Bill in Portland Maine on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:03:49 PM PST

  •  Oh No. (4.00)
    I just "voted" and found that I was the oldest person there. Nice Christmas present, kids. Also goes a long way to explaining whay no one here agrees with me. My postings are almost all about economics. If I took politics as seriously as most of you do I would have gone insane a long time ago.

    Merry Christmas to all.

  •  MSM gets it wrong again (none)
    so what else is new ...?
  •  You Should Ask Another Question (4.00)
    There is a difference between people who mostly just read the site (like me) and people who comment (a lot) and write diaries (a lot).  I've got a pretty low number and have been reading this site for a long time.  I rarely participate.  I'm 45.  If I had to guess, I would say that the biggest participators are between 25 and 35 (and mostly men).  There's just this tone that the majority of diarists/commentators have.  They all sound like the litigation guys one floor down from me who are 35 and under.  (I'm a corporate lawyer).  Maybe I'm wrong.  Maybe its a lot of older people writing diaries sounding like young people.  I guess that would be a compliment.
  •  21 n/t (4.00)

    Bullshit, Jesus, those are obviously my footprints.

    by als10 on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:04:49 PM PST

  •  We've got ourselves (none)
    a right purty bell curve!
  •  nice bell curve going (none)
    after 497 votes
  •  Depends on the site (none)
    This is a more sophisticated and older site than say DU, where you will find a younger age.
    When all is said and done I predict the bulk of this site is 30-45.
    DU would be more like 20-35
  •  Im (none)
    old enough that sometimes I gotta do the math from yob. I think its a deliberate blocking action!

    it tastes like burning...

    by eastvan on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:05:58 PM PST

  •  My, that's a lovely bell-curve you have there... (none)
  •  As of my vote, the 41 to 45 age is first (4.00)
    and this is where I fall (45).

    We're not really baby boomers, not Gen-Xers, we're the cusp between.

    We grew up on the pap, peace love and freedom, of the '60's. We had the Vietnam war and Watergate in our child hood dreams and nightmares, or at least I did. One of my earliest memories is of the sadness that blanketed the world when Kennedy was assinated.

    We definitely feel like a middle child.

    And I'm not surprised that we're paying attention.

    And I'm glad we don't have a name and a brand, gives us opportunity to do something besides be the generation that brough disco music to the charts (God, I'm so ashamed of that).

  •  Let's just say (none)
    that I can still remember being on the bus that took us from our campus down to the Army recruiting station for our mandatory qualifying physical for a free trip to 'Nam.
  •  So far, it puts the lie to the theory (none)
    Under 35 = approximately 35% of the folks who have taken the poll so far (as of 526 votes).

    Under 35:  185

    36 and up:  341

  •  42 and feeling every year of it.... (none)
    There are people posting here who were born around the time I graduated high school. Does that mean I'm supposed to be an adult now? Maybe one day I'll make enough money to own my own home. When's that housing bubble supposed to burst? Early next year? I had better start counting my change.
  •  I'm 41... (none)
    ...but everyone tells me I don't act my age.  Maybe that's what the article meant?

    "Good night and god bless; now fuck off to bed." --- Shane MacGowan

    by asskicking annie on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:07:21 PM PST

  •  19.5 human years (none)
    And I actually feel my age now that finals are over.

    You must understand, Preston, that...it is not the message that is important, it is our obedience to it. -- DuPont, "Equilibrium"

    by DH from MD on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:07:33 PM PST

  •  what a beautiful bell curve (none)
  •  dKos readers diverse in many ways (none)
    In the early days (a couple of years ago) I remember we used to regularly post polls asking where we are all from, our gender, race, income, etc.

    I was always amazed that we were so diverse and representative.  Perhaps a bit more urban than the country as a whole, but not much.

    From reading over a period of years I can say that those who post and offer any personal info present an amazing range over the spectrum of identities.  We have every race, ethnicity, region, age group, profession, and even ideology (if you include our trolls).  Seriously, this place is not exactly in an echo chamber in that we have a lot of diverging opinions and philosophies.  

    We all pretty much loathe GWB and Darth Cheney, but beyond that we include libertarians and socialists, religious and secular people, hawks and doves (more doves, but still), interventionists and isolationists, and so on.

  •  I'm 37 (4.00)
    And as Dennis the Constitutional Peasant said in Monty Python and the Holy Grail, "I'm 37. I'm not old."

    A gin and orange, a lemon squash and a Scotch and water, PLEASE! -6.75, -4.36

    by zkg on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:07:56 PM PST

  •  I turned 35 on the 11th (none)
    so I'm at the end of the "under 35" crowd

    Does that mean I should be all moody and Goth like and go to Raves?

    I have sworn upon the altar of God eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man - find out who said it!

    by TheGryphon on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:08:14 PM PST

  •  Used to be I'd forget to zip my pants... (4.00)
    Now I forget to UNZIP my pants.

    rimshot

  •  April 17, 1953 (none)
    Last I checked, that made me 52.
  •  28 (none)
    but everybody's bossy older sis. :p

    "I'm a war president. I make decisions here in the Oval Office in foreign policy matters with war on my mind."

    by Avila on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:10:16 PM PST

  •  54 today (4.00)
    I am 54 today. The age distribution suggests that there are quite few other boomers out there.
  •  amazing (none)
    what a perfect bell curve

    i used to think that the idea that many things were distributed in the form of a bell curve was exaggerated , but this is certainly one example

    "When I gave food to the poor, they called me a saint. When I asked why the poor were hungry, they called me a communist." Dom Helder Camara

    by ira on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:10:52 PM PST

  •  First off, WTF does it matter (none)
    how old anyone here is? It's about the exchange of ideas. I've met plenty of 55 year olds who I wouldn't trust with the family car or a loaded gun, and plenty of 19 year olds whose judgement and thoughtfulness belies their physical age.

    I'm 38, btw. The photo in my profile shows more gray hair than I deserve, too.

    I am become Dubya, Destroyer of Words...

    by Swampfoot on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:10:58 PM PST

    •  Demographics matter, especially for ad revenue. (4.00)
      Also, when it comes to discussion as well as active participation in election efforts having a good age distribution helps get things done. Younger folks have more energy to post signs and do dor to door work.

      Slightly older folks have more money and some knowledge and experience that's helpful.

      Middle aged folks may have a great deal of money and authority, and all have a great deal of life experience available and personal connections as well.

      The elderly (like me) have an enormous amount of life experience available. I've been watching political campaigns since the 60's for example. We understand people's motivations and with our extensive experience can more easily see through subtle political scams. And we have real context in which to place whatever is happening in the world. Also there are a few of us with lifetimes worth of inside political, social and military contacts. Not to mention the fact that many of us simply don't have anything we feel is more important to do that what we're doing here, and we finally have the time to dedicate to it that younger folks do not.

      Having a balanced age demographic here is a very powerful thing.

      -6.88/-5.64 Attack, jihad, binLaden, bomb, airplane, Bush, Iran, Saddam, Allah akabar (Just giving the NSA some data to mine. You are what you eat. :)

      by John West on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:26:38 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I got the impression that the WaMo piece (none)
        was attempting to claim that a young demographic somehow de-legitimized the activism that takes place here, and attempted to paint the participants here as monolithic and short-sighted.

        Plus, much of the analysis just seems plain wrong:


        Of course, it's not just Moulitsas. The younger-than-35 liberal professionals who account for most of his audience seem an ideologically satisfied group, with no fundamental paradigm--changing demands to make of the Democratic Party. They don't believe strongly, as successive generations of progressives have, that the Democratic Party must develop more government programs to help the poor, or that racial and ethnic minorities are wildly underrepresented, or that the party is in need of a fundamental reform towards the pragmatic center--or at least they don't believe so in any kind of consistent or organized manner. As this generation begins to move into positions of power within the progressive movement and the Democratic Party, they don't pose much of a challenge on issues or substance. So the tactical critique takes center stage.

        You are correct, of course, that the diversity of experience here is very valuable in a tactical and strategic sense. Didn't mean to imply that it had no value at all; I wanted to opine that just because a movement may have a large youth component doesn't mean that its ideas can be ignored.

        I am become Dubya, Destroyer of Words...

        by Swampfoot on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:45:51 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Yep. The US military fits the demographic (none)
          mentioned, and I sure wouldn't discount its ability to make things happen. It's a brave new world. All bets are off, as they say. We'll just have to hang on for the ride. Fun, ain't it?

          -6.88/-5.64 Attack, jihad, binLaden, bomb, airplane, Bush, Iran, Saddam, Allah akabar (Just giving the NSA some data to mine. You are what you eat. :)

          by John West on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:56:57 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  I could've told you that (none)
          without ever reading the piece. The liberal-left was successfully stereotyped by the right as youngsters decades ago. The purpose was then, and still is now, to de-ligitimize the liberal-left by creating the meme that they're all just overly-idealistic children.

          Democrats -- Progress for the Working Class

          by rogun on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 04:42:53 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  well lets start the the meme (none)
            that the conservative rightwingers are uncritical selfish dupes

            i dont know how many times i had to hear the "happy holidays vs merry christmas" bullshit this week - fucking wake up dipshits, your government is illegally spying on you

            "Sometimes it's like his record skips or like some coke-dusted and liquor-glazed synapse is unable to fire and he's just stuck" RudePundit

            by christhughes on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 05:36:44 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

    •  Look at Any Discussion of Spying (none)
      and dirty trickstering over the last few days and see how few participants mention personal experience with it. Anyone in the 50-60 range who was active politically is likely to have had practical experience with this. Most other age groups haven't in similar proportions.

      We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy....--ML King, "Beyond Vietnam"

      by Gooserock on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:13:04 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  My age is classified (none)
    Let's just say I've been giving out the number as a hexadecimal ever since I turned Hex20.
  •  26 Going On 50... (none)
    Between work, life, and politics, you'd think I'd be living it up... instead, I'm like the single version of an old married guy.

    :)

  •  I'm (4.00)
    old enuff to apreciate the value of this site(and others like it) in light of everything we face these days. The net is so much better than the old stone tablets we used in school--and dont get me going about spear class during my basic training.

    it tastes like burning...

    by eastvan on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:13:16 PM PST

  •  16 (4.00)
    Only 504 days, 8 hours, 43 min and 10 second until I can vote
  •  51 with college expenses looming (none)
    Our first goes off next year with two more right behind her and then the fourth 2 years after that.  No retirement for a while I guess.

    "Do Iraqi children scream when the bombs fall if no one is in the White House to hear them?" Bernard Chazelle

    by dmac on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:14:18 PM PST

  •  30-50 year olds may dominate (none)
    But those of us in our early-20s are scrappy.

    "I think war is a dangerous place." - George Bush

    by Nameless Soldier on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:14:29 PM PST

    •  As Diane Feinstein Said (none)
      ( think it was her ) "That's why we send them to war."

      We're all counting on your energy!!

      We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy....--ML King, "Beyond Vietnam"

      by Gooserock on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:15:19 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  expect the results to be (none)
    a bit above average age distribution, because literacy is a requirement.

    And expect the income distribution a little above normal.

    And education distribution quite a bit above average.

    SOCIAL SECURITY: Invented by Democrats yesterday, Protected by Democrats today

    by mollyd on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:15:47 PM PST

  •  Hmm...is that a bell curve I see? N/T (none)

    Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has. -- Margaret Mead

    by ilona on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:16:12 PM PST

  •  Who cares how old we are (none)
    would you all please go to the recent diaries and recommend Rep. Louise Slaughter's diary before it falls off the page!!!!!!!!!!!

    Ahem, thank you.

    "Trying to make it real compared to what." Gene McDaniels/Les McCann

    by Sprinkles on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:16:15 PM PST

  •  I am assuming (none)
    the "Under 14" and "Over 66" really mean "14 and Under" and "66 and Over," otherwise the exact age values of 14 and 66 would not be represented.

    "He lives most life whoever breathes most air." Elizabeth Barrett Browning

    by SeattleChris on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:16:44 PM PST

  •  Looks Like (none)
    60% over 35 years old.

    "Everything that rises must converge"

    by jpgod on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:18:07 PM PST

  •  I am one year younger than Maryscott (none)
    O'Connor, who, in the diary discussing it months ago, then referred to us as "middle aged." So now I am agressively stalking the Harry Potter actor in a quest to relive my youth.

    Something's happening here today -- a show of strength with your boys' brigade. Paul Weller

    by jamfan on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:18:46 PM PST

  •  Yup, I'm one of those (none)
    I'm 21, although I certainly feel older.
  •  Exactly 1 week shy of 29. Argh. n/t (none)
  •  Hellllooooo... (none)
    bell curve.
    •  It Shouldn't Be a Bell Curve (none)
      The general population isn't, is it?

      We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy....--ML King, "Beyond Vietnam"

      by Gooserock on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:17:05 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Quite right... (none)
        It depends on what country you live in.

        "No, Danny, this isn't Russia.  Is this Russia?"

        Third-world countries have age graphs heavily weighted towards young people, due to high birth rate, low life-expectancy, etc.  The U.S. graph is much flatter, and has a big pregnant bulge representing the boomers, and an echo of it a generation later.  Nothing resembling a bell-curve.

  •  From an advertisers point of view (none)
    It's a shame that the average age seems to be over 35. We're a bunch of hard-to-persuade sticks-in-the-mud.
  •  I will be ten years younger (4.00)
    in January 2009

    "There is nothing more powerful than an idea whose time has come."

    by vanguardia on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:22:18 PM PST

    •  hahahaha (none)
      awesome!

      So will all of us I think.

      Can you believe how many years it will have been at that point? I can tell you the events of the week of the 2000 election like they were yesterday. It was a crazy and awful week.  Awful. And my birthday was that week. Nov 5. I didn't eat the whole week. I couldn't. I was in college. I would go to the cafeteria knowing that enough hours had passed that I should have food and my stomach didn't feel good so maybe it needed food... then look at everything there and just not be able to put it in my mouth. I can't believe it. I was a college sophomore at that point. I actually attended the town hall debate.  It was un-fucking-believable. I was there. I saw it with my own eyes what bad things W was promising to do. Al Gore clearly won. And then I came out of there and the media said W won. What?! I saw it myself. No he didn't!

      Oh, and I was on Finnish radio that day saying that I supported Gore. Very exciting :)

      I re-did my website! See how pretty DailyGranola.com is now.

      by OrangeClouds115 on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:59:14 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Yes and we probably thought (none)
        We could handle 4 dull years easily.
        Boy have we been wrong.

        I still don't understand how America could (s)elect a leader whose incompetence was painfully obvious back in 1999.

        How America could re(s)elect him... I think the Daily Mirror said it all on that day.

        It will have truly been the decade of the zeros.
        History will call it "The Lost Decade".

        If we survive this decade, that is. King George hasn't even messed with the big boys yet and look where we are.

        "There is nothing more powerful than an idea whose time has come."

        by vanguardia on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:26:30 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  are you kidding? (none)
          we didn't think it was going to be a boring 4 yrs.

          as i said, the debate was at my school and we were all there. we all saw it. you could just read between the lines (which wasn't hard). he was basically standing there saying that he was bought and paid for by big pharma, big oil, etc and he didn't give a flying fuck what happened to the bottom 99.9% of us so long as that other .1% made money and kept donating.

          I re-did my website! See how pretty DailyGranola.com is now.

          by OrangeClouds115 on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:32:40 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Yes of course (none)
            But at least I thought he couldn't ruin that much in four years...

            ..and that he would mean total victory in 2004

            Imagine Bush in 2003 without 9/11... sitting out his miserable term in Crawford?

            "There is nothing more powerful than an idea whose time has come."

            by vanguardia on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 05:26:55 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

  •  depends, what time of day is it ??? (none)
    before noon, I qualify as an infant. As the day progresses, I usually get older

    most days I'm in my mid forties, but I seldom act like it

    I'm old enough to know better, but young enough to still care

    time is a figment of your imagination, man

  •  I hate you, man. (none)
    I'm 49, and you had to go and make a "46-50" bin, instead of the usual and definitely more pleasing 45-49.

    Damn.

    -9.25, -7.54

    Yikes. Good thing I don't have guns.

    by Marc in KS on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:24:54 PM PST

  •  41 here (none)
    I expect to know the answer to Life, the Universe... and Everything... next years.

    cheers,

    Mitch Gore

    Nobody will change America for you, you have to work to make it happen

    by Lestatdelc on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:25:38 PM PST

    •  41 as well... (none)
      I think BIPM is 41.  So obviously, Kos's most important commentators are 41...

      "[A] 'Sharecropper's Society' [is] precisely where our trade policies, supported by Republicans and Democrats alike, are taking us." - Warren Buffet

      by RichM on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:27:15 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  I Remember Nixon Looking Me in the Eye (4.00)
    as we held up a banner reading "Abdicate With Honor" - his motorcade passing by in a rural Michigan town. That was 1973. Just turned 50.

    "We do not torture." - George Bush during recent Asian visit

    by Flippant to the Last on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:26:25 PM PST

    •  Nixon campaign in '68 (4.00)
      I shudder to think about the navieté of my youth.

      As a senior in high school I worked the polls for Nixon as a young Republican in '68. I cast my first vote for Nixon in '72. ... I didn't see the light until the late 70's when the right wing dominionist crowd began to take over the Republican party in Oklahoma.

      Anyway, given my history I NEVER give up hope for helping another Republican see the light.

    •  that's hilarious! (none)
      what was his expression like?

      -8.25, -6.26 ...it ain't "schadenfreude" if the bastards deserve it. this is infidelica...

      by snookybeh on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 04:12:13 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Nixon's Expression Was Frozen to His Face (none)
        his complexion of pasty consistency, vaguely some shade of orange. His eyes, fighting a squint, seemed to "dart" in their sockets without moving - like those of a frightened animal restrained against its will.

        "We do not torture." - George Bush during recent Asian visit

        by Flippant to the Last on Fri Dec 23, 2005 at 04:57:05 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  I held up a sign (none)
      that said "Agnew is the Spiro-chete of Degeneration" in a march on Judah Street, San Francisco, 1970.

      Can you believe this? I actually saw Wendell Wilkie (Repub presidential candidate) going by in a campaign convertible in a parade on Foster Road in Portland, Oregon. Hmmm. Calculate: omigod, that was 1940! I was five years old. Needless to say, Roosevelt won. Those were the days--Wilkie soon went to work for Roosevelt in the war effort, even though he had campaigned against Roosevelt and called him a war mongerer. Talk about flip-flopping!

      "That story isn't worth the paper it's rotten on."--Dorothy Parker

      by martyc35 on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 04:47:28 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  2% word (none)
    18, I'm sure none of you would have guessed that!
  •  I am 30 (none)
    that's what the word on the street is, at least. I beg to differ.
  •  Freep this poll! (none)
    Send a message to ... to ...
    Whatever.  A self-selected online survey of this type is absolutely meaningless, but I can't imagine the WaMo article was based on actual data, either, as opposed to some jerkoff pulling something out of his ass.
  •  16 heree (4.00)
    I can vote in next Presidential Election!
    Is anyone here from the original Dean campaign?
    •  my first was 84--Mondale/Ferraro (none)
       but when i was 16, it was 80 and Reagan and i remember trying in vain to persuade my parents to stick with Carter.

      41 now.

      •  Mondale/Ferraro (none)
        Damn. I have a photo of G. Ferraro (Liberty Leading the People--1984), a great poster made in Berkeley, CA, but I can't figure out how to attach a picture here (post an image). This sure shows my age--html is beyond me, I guess. I looked it up, but nothing I try seems to work. Any tips from you young computer savvy folks?

        "That story isn't worth the paper it's rotten on."--Dorothy Parker

        by martyc35 on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 05:51:53 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Deaniacs present (none)
      At least one 39 year old person is only here because of the original Dean campaign...
    •  curious (none)
      i see you have a pretty low UID, so you've been around for a while... some diaries that got a good amount of comments... lots of comments (some that show you'll speak whatever is on your mind)... my point is that you give a damn.

      i would like to know if you are an oddity among your peers.  what's the general level of attention to everything that's happening... at school, for instance?

      That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it

      by johnny71 on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:58:37 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Deaniac present and counted. (none)
      Boy, those were the days.  The bats -- when we raised all that money for Dean and everything changed.  Fighting over .. well nevermind.  All good memories, mostly, except the losing part.
    •  Cool (none)
      My first presidential vote was for Bill Clinton in 92. Good times, good times...
  •  62 ..You suckers are gonna pay my Social Security (4.00)
     Old enough to have been alive during WWII so don't make any historical leaps of faith that wartime President Bush is FDR. In Army during Vietnam. Chickenhawks outa my way. You've got no standing in patriotism sweeptakes. Iraq is Vietnam with better fashion sense. Plamegate is Watergate. Watched J Edgar Hoover spy domestically. No big news here.  
  •  I turned 24 recently (none)
    so according to that study on age they reported some time back, my brain has now started working and I'm an adult. I guess all those classes I took, bills I paid, and jobs I worked previous to this point are mere juvenalia.

    It's odd being right on the cusp of Generations X and Y, as neither one appeals to me. The Y kids are just... I dunno. Some of my political discussions with them seem to show they don't have a lot of context for things, like this is all happening in isolation for them. I don't want to bag on them, though, since a lot of this is how younger people always are.

    But I don't buy into the hype some people push about Generation X. I remember a bit of what they were like before the early 90s, and yes, they had brainless commercialized stuff appealing to them, too. MTV? Nintendo? The "Brat Pack"? Mall culture? Valley Girls? They partook in plenty of corporate things. In their adulthood, a lot of the Xers became very enthusiastic about the 90s tech bubble. So that's why I don't take it seriously when some members get down on the Generation Y for being commercialized. We all are.

    •  i can totally relate (none)
      Turned 25 a month ago. My mom went into labor with me while she was at the polls voting against Reagan.

      It does feel like the Gen Y'ers are commercialized... but maybe that's just the gap between me and my brother (he's 5 yrs younger). He can't deal with the fact that I don't have an ipod or a TV.

      I re-did my website! See how pretty DailyGranola.com is now.

      by OrangeClouds115 on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:02:51 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Cusp of a named generation (none)
      I can relate too, though it's a different generation I can't relate to.  I was born in 1960.  Technically I'm a boomer, but it depends on whose statistics (year ranges) you look at.  At one time boomers were postwar children and 1960 (and very early 60s) wasn't included.  I don't really relate to the baby boomer generation, and there's no name for my group.    I've been at the tail end of that generation for my entire life, which means I always seem to be late for, whatever event, and there's not much of anything left.

      I'm in the middle of two named generations too, or so I feel.

      "Let him that would move the world first move himself." --Socrates

      by joanneleon on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 04:07:24 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Great bell curve (none)
    Now we need a statistician to do a comparison to the age distibution of the population at large for purposes of comparison.
  •  36 - 40 (none)
    I'll be 36 on 1/2, so I picked this one.  And I damn proud of it!  :)

    Never say never... AND... I HATE being filled with this much hate and rage. I just want to love...

    by shermanesq on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:32:52 PM PST

  •  Now am I old? (none)
     I think I'm 29 sometimes, and 89 other times but I start getting social security in June, if there is any money left by then.
      But as my friend Spud says, "It's not the years it's the mileage.

    Peace & Impeachment in '06!

    billy

  •  So far the poll results are a perfect bell curve! (none)
    n/t
  •  Love the diversity (4.00)
    Depression baby here (1931).

    Can't keep up with the higher income; more education group.    That's why I usually just read and not post.

    But I spend a great deal of time on this site (more than I should).

    Hoping like mad for some good news tomorrow from Fitzpatrick and the G.J.

    •  Aha! (none)
      I was wondering if anyone here was old enough to be my parent and there you are.  ;-)  I'm 57 myself.  

      Robyn

      Teacher's Lounge opens each Saturday, sometime between 10am and 11am EST

      by rserven on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:37:46 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Xerico (none)
      Education is wonderful, but it does not guarantee smarts.  I believe everyone here understands that the opportunites for education weren't available then.  Post more often  - you have much to offer, I'm sure.  I'm 67 and just graduated from university.  We need to hear from you.

      What does Xerico mean?

      The beneficiaries are likely to be...large corporations and development firms. (O'Connor, J. dissenting in Kelo). God bless you, J. O'Connor.

      by xanthe on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:52:33 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  what a bunch of old fucks (none)
    :-)
  •  20 here (none)
    and I look forward to being a part of the DKos community for the indefinite future.

    The money is clean cause we scrub it good,
    with guns and gasoline we're gonna save the world.
    -7.38, -7.95

    by eliasjames on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:37:45 PM PST

  •  Refresh key addiction (none)
    Now I keep pushing the refresh key to see if the late 20's are going to overtake the early 30's.  Gotta get back to work.
  •  When I was young... (none)
    Before I turned 30 I knew exactly what age I was when asked...."I'm 18"..."I'm 26"..etc.

    Now when I'm asked my age I have to do the math..."Let's see...5 minus 9, carry the one....I'm thirty-somthing!"

    The future's here, we are it, we are on our own.

    by Frank Roberts on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:41:01 PM PST

  •  Why so few under 14s? (none)
    Don't they care about the state of the world they are about to inherit? Like they have better things to do.
    •  They are all standing behind... (4.00)
      ...those here, saying, "Mo-om! When do I get to use the computer?"

      Robyn

      Teacher's Lounge opens each Saturday, sometime between 10am and 11am EST

      by rserven on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:44:31 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Had to laugh. (4.00)
        when my grandkids come over we fight for computer time.  Often they are on the bed behind me and read books while I am on the computer.  That was until the older one (12) was found to be reading what was on the screen and she repeated some of the 'bad' words.  

        Actually she does read along with me for a while and she is in training, politically, to care about the other people around her.  she has become quite the champion on her bus when some of the boys tease the other girls.  she just tells them to shut up or else -- and they believe her.  Atta girl.  A dem in the making if I have something to say.  

    •  We haven't emo'd up the place enough (none)
      ;)

      j/k

      "Our country right or wrong. When right, to be kept right; when wrong, to be put right" - Carl Schurz

      by RBH on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:46:08 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  WaMo couldn't be... (none)
    ...more wrong.

    Kos and the netroots site are for people who remember what politics was like before the radical right disenfranschised everyone.

    Where does this ridiculous meme that we're all skateboarding failed web designers who can easily be ignored come from anyway?

    "Be kind" - is that a religion?

    by ThatBritGuy on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:52:20 PM PST

  •  looks like the 41-45 (none)
    group is catching up..  41 1/2 on Christmas day here..  vote early and often..

    Voldemort is a Republican

    by cgvjelly on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:56:42 PM PST

  •  I just turned 48 on election day (4.00)
    while on active duty in Kuwait(still here). Retirement '06 along with all the goopers!!!!

    [-5.13,-5.63http://www.politicalcompass.org/] IMPEACH...IMPEACH...IMPEACH...

    by rickeagle on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:57:38 PM PST

  •  Looking at the distribution (none)
    We need to get the message out to the Senior Citizens who vote in a much higher percentage (and therefore influence) in the non-presidential cycles.

    Anyone have any ideas how?

    ... the watchword of true patriotism: "Our country - when right to be kept right; when wrong to be put right." - Carl Schurz; Oct. 17, 1899

    by NevDem on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 02:58:04 PM PST

    •  New Deal Mom is Active in W. FL (none)
      She's intrigued by the blogs too and is likely to begin reading, but probably won't participate.

      I think the nature of discourse on blogs may clash with New Dealers and some ethnic groups to keep participation below population proportion.

      Boomers are underrepresented here, given the size of their population bulge. They're easier to find in some other places. I seem to recall a stronger boomer presence on the Dean blog at least early on.

      We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy....--ML King, "Beyond Vietnam"

      by Gooserock on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:06:55 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Most of the boomers I know (none)
        are involved in the local old style political parties.  And the local dems are still doing politics the old style.  Still alot of 'can't believe anything you read on the internet' belief out there.  I ask them, since when can you believe anything you read in the newspaper since they are a wholly owned subsidiary of the republican party.  

        Last special election, I was the 'go to' person re internet activity.  And I forwarded many good articles to our candidate, a fellow Deaniac, re what other candidates are doing, but not much response for more activity on the net.

  •  the reality-based community (4.00)
    The difference between the blogosphere and mainstream journalism like the Washington Monthly...

    We test our conclusions!  Informally, maybe, but we don't just parrot conventional wisdom here.  The question of the average age of Kossacks comes up.  The SCLM says "Under 35" because it fits their preconceived notions.  Kos runs a poll to find out.

    And THAT is why we'll win, in the end.  All fantasies face reality sooner or later.

    Why are there no dinosaurs in the Bible?

    by Leggy Starlitz on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:01:37 PM PST

  •  i like this thread (none)
    makes me wish there was some button that would let me give the current 284 comments a 4.

    That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it

    by johnny71 on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:02:14 PM PST

  •  I'm 47... (none)
    ...which in dog years is...er, dead for like four generations...

    "...the big trouble with dumb bastards is that they are too dumb to believe there is such a thing as being smart." -- Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.

    by Roddy McCorley on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:03:47 PM PST

  •  wow, nice bell curve! n/t (none)
  •  Currently the median (none)
    Currently the median is age 40-41.

    That means that over half of the people on dKos are over 35.

    -6.00/-7.18 The revolution starts now--in your own back yard, in your own home town

    by TarheelDem on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:05:54 PM PST

  •  69% of the people blogging here ... (4.00)
    ... have known only Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton, and George W. Bush as their president (assuming one is 10 years old or older before he or she starts paying attention to such things). That means that most folks here have not lived through the years when Democrats like FDR, Truman, JFK, RFK, LBJ, and even Jimmy Carter were winning elections and governing. In other words, most bloggers here are unfamiliar with the daily dynamics of the great struggles that have traditionally defined our party. It's no wonder we are neglecting our roots. That's not an accusation, by the way. How can any of you younger Democrats be expected to know in your heart of hearts what you haven't lived? I do think it explains why we Democrats are having such a hard time formulating policy nowadays. We have lost contact with our heritage, it seems, and we have forgotten those things that should make us most proud to be Democrats.
    •  Actually, I was 8 when I paid attention... (none)
      ...to my first election.  I was Madly for Adlai.

      Robyn

      Teacher's Lounge opens each Saturday, sometime between 10am and 11am EST

      by rserven on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:11:24 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  There is always an exception ... (none)
        ... to every generalization.
      •  I was five years old (4.00)
        on a gray day in November and walking home from Kindergarten when I saw a television in the local store where I stopped to buy some penny candy talking about the assassination of JFK.  I knew from the fact that adults on TV and in my world were upset that this was a big deal.  From that point forward the President was someone that I knew was important and whenever I heard "President Johnson this" and "President Johnson that" I knew it mattered.  

        By the time of the 1968 election, it was too late for me.  I had heard Sgt Pepper and Jimi Hendrix.  The uncle that I worshipped was being sent to Vietnam.  I gave a shit about who the president was--as immature as my opinion was.

        For the record, Jimmy Carter had the honor of receiving my first presidential vote.

        "It's been headed this way since the World began, when a vicious creature made the jump from Monkey to Man."--Elvis Costello

        by BigOkie on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:39:52 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Too Many Decades of Hearing we lost cuz (none)
      we were soft on criminals, or communism, or national defense ... or gays, or abortion ...

      or or or

      and we got painted into a corner,

      and the middle got scared,

      and we lost.

      we are getting painted into corners cuz we don't have people with the spine to stand and fight for the big and little picture - including fighting lies?

      and since we don't have people who will stand and fight for enough, our "party" is a collection of go it alone cats?

      rmm.

      Grassroots Organizing Should Be for The Community, By The Community - NOT for "Leaders" http://www.liemail.com/BambooGrassroots.html

      by rmdSeaBos on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:23:57 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  It's why we need histories ... (4.00)
      personal histories and stories of the older crowd here (me included ... I'm 47). We need to reconnect to the trememdous ideological roots of the Democratic Party, especially those manifested in the New Deal. We take care of our our own. Public works programs. We're all in this together.

      And ultimately, the true power of this site and this community is the diversity of experience of its contributors, and our abilities to pool our passions and bring them to bear on the real world.

      •  I did mention sometime ago (none)
        that we should have a living history of the Depression and World War II for instance from our posters.  Both diaries and videos -- I understand that these diaries would be from the children of those living thru that time but that is the closest we can come. Wonder who the oldest Kos member is?

        Are you up for it, Susan?

        The beneficiaries are likely to be...large corporations and development firms. (O'Connor, J. dissenting in Kelo). God bless you, J. O'Connor.

        by xanthe on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:55:48 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  The DFA blog did something along those lines. (4.00)
          There were some threads like this where everyone chimed in about who they were, and how they came to DFA.  Inspirational beyond words.  Finally someone set up a link and one could do a more formal paragraph or page with everyone's bio in there.  It was great, and a good reference for new people coming to the site.
          •  Plus it could be a tribute (none)
            to our parents and grandparents -- and a living historical record for our younger Kos members.

            The beneficiaries are likely to be...large corporations and development firms. (O'Connor, J. dissenting in Kelo). God bless you, J. O'Connor.

            by xanthe on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 04:22:05 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

        •  Great idea (none)
          Could be a portion of dkospedia too, couldn't it? Like a permanent archive?

          I don't have the time to undertake it personally, but I'd love to see someone take it on (hint hint).

          •  I wouldn't mind but I am (none)
            technically inept.  But if someone wanted to help out there -- I could try -

            The beneficiaries are likely to be...large corporations and development firms. (O'Connor, J. dissenting in Kelo). God bless you, J. O'Connor.

            by xanthe on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 05:37:16 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

    •  Agreed. On the other hand ... (none)
      ...let's not forget that it took until the 1960s before the Democratic Party really stood up for civil rights and women's rights, and not until the 1970s before a majority of the party's elected national representatives opposed the war in Southeast Asia. Heritage is important, but it can also hamper a progressive future. Those of us raised in the South, especially if we're "of color" remember that some of the most powerful Democratic supporters of traditional struggles were dyed-in-the-wool segregationists.

      We Democrats of today, of whatever age, can meld heritage with new progressive causes. In this day and age - when Medicare and Food Stamps and college loans and pensions and union rights and other great efforts of Roosevelt Dems are under grave assault - we must, of course, remind people of those great struggles, and probably fight some of them again. That doesn't mean ignoring the continuing inequalities and injustices that have not yet been addressed.

  •  the demographic (none)
    It doesn't matter if they are all 15. they are the future
  •  We are getting older... (4.00)
    ...compared to the survey I did back in May.

    In May 2004: 38% of us were 35 years old or younger.

    This time it's around 31% as of this posting.

    7% percent drop in 35/under crowd.

    (-9.13, -8.10) Political violence is a perfectly legitimate answer to the persecution handed down by dignitaries of the state. - Riven Turnbull

    by Florida Democrat on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:09:25 PM PST

  •  Wow! (none)
    As of 6:12 pm Pacific time...the breakdown has what they call a Normal distribution in stats! I though it might be skewed one way or the other.

    Russ

    Maryland School of Public Policy Master of Public Policy Candidate

    by magicrusslc on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:10:40 PM PST

  •  Statistical Proof! (none)
    You can't trust anyone over 30.

    Better to be a heathen liberal than a thievin' conservative. - me

    by slackkey314 on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:12:32 PM PST

  •  HOLY (4.00)
    couldn't get a more perfect curve without using a protractor or compass!

    US Constitution; Article II, sec. 3 [the President] "shall take Care that the Laws be faithfully executed."

    by Joon on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:12:35 PM PST

  •  Born in '79 (4.00)
    I remember my first political experience was telling this girl in my kindergarten class that her parents were stupid for voting for Reagan and not Mondale. I also distinctly remember watching the Bentsen-Quayle debate when I was in 3rd grade and cheering along with my parents when Bentsen said "Believe me, Senator, you are no Jack Kennedy."

    I grew up in the 1980s, but I wasn't terribly culturally connected until the 1990s. It's odd, because now I'm a fan of hair metal (amongst other genres), but when Poison and Bon Jovi and Motley Crue were big, I didn't care about popular music. Watching Wayne's World changed all that and then I wanted to rock out. So, around 1992, I got into music and I was all about Pearl Jam and Nirvana at the height of their powers. I grew my hair long when it was cool to cut it short. It's still long now, which rocks.

    Spent Junior high and high school during the Clinton years and I turned to left-wing politics while in college and I continue to hold those views now in law school, though I'm generally back in the Democratic fold.

  •  I'm not a senior! (none)
    I'm in the upper category :) and do not consider myself a "senior citizen" at all.....

    I aim some of my blogs at my age group altho not all of my blogs are politikal..  I link to those that are and get readers but they will not post!

    Some of my "even older than me" friends are slowly learning about blogs but are more inclined to FW emails they get - most are not interested in learning about blogging or reading blogs - I keep them all informed with clips from kos and mine and am making slow progress -

    Lynn

    Outlive the righties - with science! http://lynn.myglycostore.com/dk

    by LynnD on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:14:02 PM PST

  •  Don't forget LJ (none)
    There's a hella big bunch of kiddies out there with LJ diaries. Odds are that skews the age average for all blogs downwards.
  •  The grandma/granpa crew... (4.00)
    Please notice there is a pretty significant bunch of people here that are age 50 and above.  And I have seen more than a few with "names" that discuss being a grandparent.  For instance, there are two Grandma Jo's and a GrandmaJ.  

    We care desperately about the future we are leaving to our children and grandchildren.  And we, as a group, VOTE.  

    Interesting distribution of ages.  Actually, a pretty powerful distribution of ages represented.

  •  How Long Have They followed politics (none)
    is my next question.

    I get so much crap for not having "facts" in my potshots at the Dems, BUT

    IF you've been following politics since ... 1980?, what b.s. do the Dems use to describe any of the most recent losses is any different than the b.s. they used 20+ years ago?

    unfortuneately all the nonsense from Raygun's day isn't online for free and for easy access, BUT, I recall all kinds of "good" reasons to compromise with the thugs in 1982

    (cuz they had the senate, cuz raygun had a mandate, cuz we'll get them next time...)

    and I keep hearing it today on why we won't fight on bankruptcy or ... ugh.

    I am 45, why do so many seem to need so much reminding that today is almost groundhog's day of bad politics, except what the thugs are getting away with today has a 20+ year long run of losses to build upon?

    rmm.

    Grassroots Organizing Should Be for The Community, By The Community - NOT for "Leaders" http://www.liemail.com/BambooGrassroots.html

    by rmdSeaBos on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:15:47 PM PST

  •  My online profile (none)
    is always the same for any poll or inquiry that comes my way.  I'm a 91 year old female, daily Catholic Mass attendee, divorced Lawyer working part time in a law firm.  I vote straight democratic party ticket and call myself a liberal.

    I'm really a 55 year old male defense/aerospace company professional employee, moderate to conservative straight Democratic party voter.

    Or I could be a college male freshman using my fathers computer.  Or his sister, a college senior.  Both budding voters on the liberal side.

    Never believe blog or internet polls or comments..be skeptical to the point of cynical.  Check data claims.  Double check quotes. Wait for an hour and confirm any breaking blog story.  Even kos makes mistakes born out of his passion for principles.

    I kinda like Howard Dean, it's those wild eye crazies that came with him I wonder about!

    by redlief on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:18:46 PM PST

  •  I turn 35 tomorrow! (none)
    I'll wait til then to take the poll. ;-)

    "...with liberty and justice for al[most everybody]."

    by PeteyP on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:20:42 PM PST

  •  From the YearlyKos Survey (none)
    Age:      
    Under 25 81 11%    
    26-35 193 27%    
    36-45 224  31%  
    46-55 159  22%  
    56-65 50  7%  
    Over 66 8  1%  
    n=715

    Now I'm going to take the poll and see how close we match :)

    Support the project that believes in the best our community has to offer! Support YearlyKos

    by gina on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:25:57 PM PST

  •  I'm 19, been reading since i was 17 (4.00)
    i wish more of my peers read kos or similar blogs...univ of maryland is infamously politcally apathetic though...i need to help change that..

    Lee College Democrats University of Maryland www.terpdems.com

    by leeroxxor on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:29:11 PM PST

  •  I am 49 (4.00)
    I graduated in 1974.  I voted for Carter in my first election.  I then voted for Carter again, Mondale, Dukakis, Clinton, Clinton, Gore and Kerry.  I am a Democrat.  I've been a Democrat all of my life.  I found this site about two years ago, stumbling around on the internet.  I think I linked to it accidently.  I visit more than once a day.  It has helped keep me entertained and informed and It has helped keep me from loosing my mind the last couple of years!  Thanks Kos!  
  •  Couldn't be a more perfect curve (4.00)
    Wow! To see that for real really brings home those statistics classes.
  •  27 (none)
    but will be paying for law school until I'm 55.

    I heart studen loans.

    "In a time of universal deceit - telling the truth is a revolutionary act." - George Orwell

    by Five of Diamonds on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:33:48 PM PST

  •  for three more months... (none)
    i'm 34.  and i'm just fine with being called a youngster.
  •  That 21-25 age bracket... (4.00)
    Polling at 8% at the moment.

    Where the heck are they going for their serious political blogging, if not here?

    In my opinion, until the young people of our nation wake up and start talking about politics seriously, as we did in the 70s, America is in big trouble.

    We look forward to hearing your vision, so we can more better do our job.
    -Your Preznut, 9/20

    by Big Nit Attack on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:37:55 PM PST

  •  I win (4.00)
    66 here.  First time I voted was for John Kennedy and I was soooo proud.
  •  Where the heck are the under 35+ (none)
    They are going to have to hang around to pay the bills these fools are running up and it's their education loans that are being chopped.  They had better get their little butts in here and figure out what's going on.

    Present company excepted of course!

  •  42! (none)
    Born just a month before JFK was shot. High School Principal in Chicago. Separated. Two kids. Became energized by Dean. Canvassed for the first time in Iowa, later Wisconsin. Hey, I'm in the most popular group. Damn, it's great to be with a bunch of other geezers!

    The purpose of education is create men and women capable of doing new things, not merely repeating what others have done~~Jean Piaget

    by BigAl on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:50:37 PM PST

  •  I think I might be (none)
    the oldest Kossack.  Do I win something?

    "He that sees but does not bear witness, be accursed" Book of Jubilees

    by Lying eyes on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:56:53 PM PST

    •  how old are you? (none)
      are you older than 70?

      actually, there are probably lots older than me.

      gretel

      •  xerico posted above... (none)
        ...that she was born in 1931.

        Robyn

        Teacher's Lounge opens each Saturday, sometime between 10am and 11am EST

        by rserven on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 05:36:37 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Xerico (none)
          surprised me, too. I was born in 1935, and she was already 4 years old. Retired linguistics instructor here, lifetime Democrat--but wait, I think I voted Peace & Freedom one time in Marin County, CA. Probably just in a primary.

          I went to a campaign meeting in Marin in the 1970s, when David Harris (married to Joan Baez while he spent 20 months in prison for refusing to be drafted) was trying to run for president. I asked him what he was going to try to do about the Federal Reserve Board and escalating interest rates. He said, "You tell me what the Federal Reserve Board is, and I'll tell you what I will do." It's great to have ideals, but one needs a few facts, too.

          Oh, jeez. If you are looking in here, David, no harm meant. We were all young and naive, once. What makes me feel really good, these days? When my 23-year-old granddaughter calls me "Dude."

          "That story isn't worth the paper it's rotten on."--Dorothy Parker

          by martyc35 on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 06:40:34 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  Damn - (none)
        My claim to fame has been beaten by l931 and 1934!  I'll be 70 January 4 and I just don't know what to make of it.  I hang with people here who see the world as I do, who share my outrages and my agony over Bushworld atrocities, and who every day give me hope that I'll live to see the day this evil will be driven from the idea that is America.

        p.s.  And I can hold my own with MaryScott in the X-rated language department.

        "He that sees but does not bear witness, be accursed" Book of Jubilees

        by Lying eyes on Fri Dec 23, 2005 at 08:50:52 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  The Perfect Bell Curve............ (4.00)
    I used to do many manufacturing quality studies and I have never seen a Bell Curve so absolutely perfect as this one. Interesting....very interesting....

    Those are my principles. If you don't like them I have others. Author: Groucho Marx

    by JellyPuddin on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 03:57:06 PM PST

  •  my 80 + dad also read Kos (none)
  •  will be (none)
    41 next month so I voted 41-45 anyway :D
    •  also (none)
      That's what I thought..   that majority would be in 40's avg.   since DK site has mover 10 million unique visitors anyway from all 50 states plus international!  (we have americans abroad though)
  •  Age and Politics (4.00)
    An old politcal proverb once stated that "he who is not a liberal at 20 has no heart, while he who is not a conservative at 40 has no brain.

    I'm 57, I still have a brain, but I'm no longer a conservative. In days of yore I voted for as many Republicans as Democrats, but they were people like Weld and Brooke in Massachusetts, Republicans who believed in fiscal responsibility coupled with a respect for personal freedom.

    People like these have been purged from the Republican party.  Weld was even denied the position of ambassador to Mexico by members of his own party.

    Today, "conservatism" has become an unholy alliance of the very rich who hope to avoid all taxes, corporate thieves, and religious fanatics who feel they have the right to tell everyone else how to live.

    Ambrose Bierce, a curmudgeon of yesteryear, wrote a book called "The Devil's Dictionary" in 1911.  He defined a Christian as "One who believes that the New Testament is a divinely inspired book admirably suited to the spiritual needs of his neighbor.  One who follows the teachings of Christ in so far as they are not inconsistent with a life of sin."

    This definition, written almost a century ago, captures both aspects of the new "conservatism": fanatics trying to dictate all aspects of the lives and loves of their neighbors and the cynical, greedy politicians who pander to the fanatics in order to better serve their wealthy owners.

    I realize, of course, that most Christians are sincere, pious, and have no wish to resume the "Holy" Inquisition against those of differing beliefs.  As in the Muslim world, the words of the fanatics get all the attention, and now the "Christian" fanatics have a president, a congress, and a Supreme Farce willing to accommodate them.

    But it's not a question of age.  The values upon which this country was founded are being systematically destroyed.  The ideas for which my ancestors died are being exterminated.

    He who is now a new "conservative" at 40 has no heart and no brain!

    •  I am a conservative (none)
      "An old politcal proverb once stated that "he who is not a liberal at 20 has no heart, while he who is not a conservative at 40 has no brain."

      I believe in conserving The Constitution of the United States of America to pass down to future generations as strong or stronger then I received it.

      I believe in conserving energy.

      I believe in conserving the air and water.

      I believe in conserving the great American outdoors.

      I believe in conserving food supplies and eating leftovers so that there is more of this great earth's abundance available for more of it's abundant people's.

      I believe in conserving our young men and women in arms, using them wisely, properly, and sparingly in defense of our great nation.

      I believe in conserving my earnings... if only they would keep pace with inflation enough that I had the opportuntiy to practice it.

      I believe in conserving wisdom and history in books so that we all might learn from the accumulated experience of the human race.

      I am a conservative.

      Peace,

      Andrew

    •  Hear, Hear! (none)

      "He that sees but does not bear witness, be accursed" Book of Jubilees

      by Lying eyes on Fri Dec 23, 2005 at 08:53:23 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  53 (4.00)
    An old-timer from the sixties who still has the progressive fire in the belly.
  •  7:15pm and it's (none)
    the prettiest little bell curve:

    under 14  18 votes - 0 %  
    15-20    168 votes - 2 %  
    21-25    482 votes - 8 %  
    26-30    590 votes - 9 %  
    31-35    628 votes - 10 %  
    36-40    791 votes - 13 %  
    41-45    810 votes - 13 %  
    46-50    799 votes - 13 %  
    51-55    723 votes - 12 %  
    56-60    507 votes - 8 %  
    61-65    265 votes - 4 %  
    Over 66  171 votes - 2 %  

    5952 Total Votes

    with the center being just over the edge and the 4 largest segements all being over 35. Sounds just about right from my anecdotal conversational experience here.

  •  48 year olds rock. n/t (none)

    Fear will keep the local systems in line. -Grand Moff Tarkin Survivor Left Blogistan

    by boran2 on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 04:16:40 PM PST

  •  that's a pretty bell curve, aint it ? (4.00)
    I'm 27 btw.

    Scooter wears indicty-whiteys!

    by skyterrain on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 04:17:20 PM PST

  •  Hey, I consider myself a young blogger. I am (none)
    between the age of 41 to 45. LOL. How about Bush? He is over 56 years old but has a mind and a vocabulary of a 16 year old or younger. What has age got to do with it. My version of Tina Turner's - What's love got to do with it.
  •  Whew! (none)
    I'm glad to see my age range (secret to you, dummy!) is well represented.

    I'd a hated to think of myself as a grandmother figure, especially since I ain't one!

  •  First Vote---McGovern (none)
    Since then, I have always voted for the man---Carter, Carter, Mondale, Dukakis, Clinton, Clinton, Gore, Kerry.

    The two best votes I ever cast were the two times I had the honor of voting for Jimmy Carter. But I have absolutely no regrets about any of those votes and would cast the same votes in a heartbeat.

  •  my age changes soon (none)
    20 now, 21 in a week.  :)
  •  A couple of weeks ago (4.00)
    my kid said "Mom, what's it like to be a grownup?"  And my first thought was "I haven't any idea."

    At 45 you'd think I'd know.  

    George W. Bush deserves a fair trial.

    by CJB on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 04:25:48 PM PST

    •  At 51 I often feel the same way (4.00)
      Funny how you really don't age in some ways.  Oh, at 51 I have some aches and pains I didn't used to have and maybe not the amount of energy to spend but the passion is still there and I certainly don't think of myself as old or even grown-up in the sense I thought my parents were grown-ups.

      "Do Iraqi children scream when the bombs fall if no one is in the White House to hear them?" Bernard Chazelle

      by dmac on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 05:22:06 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  I'm still trying to figure out ... (4.00)
      what I want to be when I grow up. I'm 47. How sad is that?
      •  Gives me Hope (4.00)
        :)  32

        Keep your constitution close my friends, and read it daily.

        by smokeymonkey on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 05:43:18 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  You misspelled it (4.00)
        You misspelled that - it's "How cool is that?" :)

        People who don't know what they want to be when they grow up are nearly always very interesting people.

        A word after a word after a word is power. -- Margaret Atwood

        by tmo on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 06:50:48 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  No, no! Not sad at all! (none)
        I abandoned high-tech, took time off for the kid, became a nanny in the meantime.  (Me!  A nanny!  If anyone would have told me ten years ago that I'd be caring for other people's kids, I would have taken them out at the knees!)  Now I'm looking at the work world and thinking, hmmmmm.

        Not-for-profit?  Organic food co-op?  Arts organization?

        If anyone knows of a good gig for a professional blog  commenter (light weight, snark/humor oriented, nothing too intellectually taxing) that pays really well, drop me a line, would you?  

        George W. Bush deserves a fair trial.

        by CJB on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 07:09:35 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  43 now, (none)
    but I was just a punk kid of 40 when I first became a Deaniac and started regularly lurking on this site.

    Ah, misty watercolored memories . . .

    "Nothing will impede our march toward victory! Long live the Empire!" -- Cmdr. Jonathan Archer, "In a Mirror, Darkly"

    by Thomas Kalinowski on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 04:32:37 PM PST

    •  Brother! (none)
      At 40 I was hitting DeanForAmerica. People on there later began discussing Kos. Ahh, brotherhood.

      The purpose of education is create men and women capable of doing new things, not merely repeating what others have done~~Jean Piaget

      by BigAl on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 06:06:10 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  What about a poll that assess your mental age? (none)
    I was born in 1980 but I have friends my age that act like their 5 and others that act 80. I also have older friends that are 'middle aged' and act younger than I am.

    The Only Constant is Change

    by proudprogressiveCA on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 04:36:57 PM PST

    •  Mentally I'm 32, assuming that IQ (none)
      is an accurate descriptor of mental age (though the normal forms of those tests "break down" at high and low ages, part of the reason why a lot of 4-6 year-olds can test in the 2-300's).

      I'm actually 20, though I sometimes find myself starting to say that I'm 18.

      Jumping on the politicalcompass.org bandwagon: (-3.63, -3.03) - Does that make me part of the right wing here?

      by someone else on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 05:48:56 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  US Age Spread (none)
    Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

    From y2k census, age under each bar is the top age for that group, to the one below.

    Looks like some of the Baby Boom must have been siphoned off in the Rapture.

    That'll piss off the Christians.

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy....--ML King, "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 04:41:04 PM PST

  •  Interesting Bell Curve (none)
    Truthfully, I had assumed everyone was around my age.  Interesting that the plurality of respondents fall within the 46-50 category.  That's a lot older than I would have guessed.  But then, my young mind has been warped by the traditional media.

    Jim Treglio, age 29

  •  27 (none)
    and exhausted!  Must have walked 40 miles this week (I live in Manhattan).

    Not complaining though - I was supportive of the TWU strike.

  •  I just discovered the wonder and power of (none)
    blogs in the past few months--and I'm in the 51 -55 range.

    They shouldn't count us out yet!

    "I will not rest until families gather to spend December 25th together at Osama's Homo-bortion-pot-commie-jizz-porium." Jon Stewart

    by zesty grapher on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 04:55:21 PM PST

  •  I can't remember an age when I wasn't polit- (none)
    ically conscious.  I'm 49, and my earliest memory of politics or at least a world outside of mine was sitting on my mothers knee at six years old the day of the Kennedy assination,seeing Kennedy's name and picture on the TV screen along with his birth and death years.

    My parents religiously watched the 6:30 news every night of my life growing up.  Parents are an important influence on their children's knowledge of a bigger world.

    But once your interest in politics is turned on, it can't be turned back off again.  Funny about that.  

    It would be so nice to ignore the world for a while.

  •  33 and something... (none)
    read the daily kos a lot at work. should post more, but can't stop downloading music...

    It does not require a majority to prevail, yet a tireless minority keen on setting brush fires in peoples minds. - Samuel Adams

    by historical wit on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 04:59:15 PM PST

  •  Hell no (none)
    It's not true....where did the hippies of the 60's go???  Were right here and were getting mad as hell!
  •  DailyKos has one foot in the grave! (none)
       Kossacks are just a bunch of old geezers!  All the kids are growing up Republican!

       Whaddaya mean that's not what I'm supposed to say?  Where's my talking points?  And my reading glasses?

                              Cde. Troleg Trolsky
                             

  •  My stats (none)

      I am 41 and Hispanic (Puerto Rican).

      Down go two blog-reader stereotypes...

    Republicans oppose abortion -- it happens eighteen years too early.

    by Buzzer on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 05:24:34 PM PST

  •  Skewing old (none)
    Of course, now you'll have the problem that your readership is skewing 'old', and advertisers don't seem to like customers who have been burned enough not to believe all the hype.

    Democrats: Giving you a government that works.

    by freelunch on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 05:27:11 PM PST

  •  Other Potentially Helpful Kos Poll Questions (none)
    It might be interesting to know the education types and levels of the Kossacks, the age distribution of people who post comments, and the age distribution of people who diary.

    Polls covering those questions might not be all that helpful though unless you make the poll freep-proof by requiring a login.

    "I will return the highest standards of honor to the highest office in the land. This is my pledge." - George W. Bush, 2/2/2000

    by HipCitizen on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 05:27:13 PM PST

  •  This is probably (none)
    the funniest thread DKos has ever produced.

    "In a time of universal deceit - telling the truth is a revolutionary act." - George Orwell

    by Five of Diamonds on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 05:35:04 PM PST

  •  Old People (none)
    I'm surprised that many old people were this forthcoming about their age.  46-50 is winning!

    So who has the 'How do we reform AARP' diary?  Come on, admit it!

    Keep your constitution close my friends, and read it daily.

    by smokeymonkey on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 05:41:04 PM PST

    •  Watch who you're calling "old" .... (4.00)
      whippersnapper.
      •  47 (none)
        Aren't you thinking about those benefits though?

        Keep your constitution close my friends, and read it daily.

        by smokeymonkey on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 05:49:32 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  You're joking, right? (4.00)
          One of the little known games that's being pulled is on the younger Boomers like me ... while my older sister (born 1951) can get her Social Security at 62 or 65 like everyone now, they began a game-playing formula with the younger ones like me (born in 1958). I won't hit my two qualifying ages until later on this sliding formula -- the first not until I'm 63 and nine months, the second when I'm 66 and eight months.

          I'm counting on NOTHING. Repeat, NOTHING, from Social Security. Sure, it may be there when I need it, maybe not. If it is, I'm sure it will be chump change. I'm concentrating on turning the heat down NOW in my house and squirreling pennies away that I can count on. And since I'm self-employed, this really nicks me because I pay BOTH sides of the Social Security equation (as employer and employee), and have for years. So 15% of my annual income is currently going into the fund, and I doubt I'll ever get it out.

          Strangely though, I don't really begrudge it. For all the hullaballoo about selfish Boomers breaking the system, you've got to realize that for our whole lives we supported the "Greatest Generation"  getting the best benefits ever ... there were many more of us working than them retiring and they lived pretty high on the hog (in the years the fund should have been preparing for the onslaught of us). But I still think that's the way a civilized society should operate -- supporting those who've worked their whole lives in a style that lets them keep some human dignity.

          But it means I'm on my own. And I know it. And I'm struggling to save now for retirement.

        •  old vs. elder (none)
          I am a sort of elder.  My mom is 90 and sometimes is sharper than I am.  Smokey, you and I and Robert Byrd all have more in common than we are different - we love the constitution.  I feel quite comfortable amongst all of you.  I understand how it would seem to be about benefits; it isn't.  But I am also fully aware that you are supporting me, as you will be supported when you are elder.  I am grateful, and I believe the benefits will be there for you, too.  Keep your constitution handy.  We really need it right now.
          •  No offense (none)
            All in snark.  I happily support you.  The 'elders' are the ones that made this all happen for me, so I can sit in my boxers, safe in my house, drinking a fine india pale ale, and blogging sullenly because I feel the fight is over for a bit (congress having gone home).

            Keep your constitution close my friends, and read it daily.

            by smokeymonkey on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 06:27:13 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

    •  Why... (none)
      are you surprised?  Tomorrow every one of us will be older than we are today?  
  •  Also known as a normal distribution... (none)
    The results represent a good bell curve which in the old days used to be known as a "normal" distribution.  It is reassuring to know that Kossacks are normal!

    Four Bush disasters: 9/11, Katrina, Iraq, Bush

    by djohnutk on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 05:51:17 PM PST

  •  I'm not surprised (4.00)
    that it's skewing older than WaMo thought.  And don't count us "geezers" out (I'm 57).  We cut our teeth on Viet Nam war protests, civil rights, women's lib, etc.  I've been waiting for years for the "youngsters" to develop a political conscience, and I think you have.
  •  Dang. It looks like a Bell curve. n/t (none)
  •  how old are you? (none)
    i wonder what the relationship between age and the resources to pay for broadband is?
    i wonder what a series of these graphs overlayed, for say the last five years would look like?

    are there people at colleges or in marketing offices studying the social aspects of the infusion of the internet into folks homes. i don't seem to run into such on the internet. perhaps this is part of the overall plot?

  •  The older you get the younger you feel (sort of) (4.00)
    When I turned 30 I thought I would feel old, but I didn't, same at 40,  now after 50 I still don't feel that old, except maybe when I look at my son who is now a college senior.

    I have to say that all my classmates at the 30th high school reunion did look old though. I wonder what happened?

    Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter - Martin Luther King

    by Do Something on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 06:00:45 PM PST

  •  look! it's the bell! oh btw... is this like (none)
    only druggies watch john steweart or whatever it was...
  •  39 (none)
    born on the same day as the black panthers and the federal department of transportation.  (alas, i'm white, and i walk a lot.)

    Standing tough under stars and stripes we can tell this dream's in sight -d.fagen

    by homo neurotic on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 06:38:53 PM PST

  •  57 (4.00)
    But with 5 year old twin girls, whose incredible cuteness makes up for the fact that I can't retire until I'm 85 (at least).

    Let all the poisons that lurk in the mud hatch out -- Emperor Claudius

    by Upper West on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 06:47:58 PM PST

  •  Niiice Bell Curve Ya Got There, Kos n/t (none)
  •  Twenty-eight (4.00)
    I feel old usually, but not on this site.  It's a shame though that there are so few people in their 20's and younger that are involved here and in politics in general.  Of course, what should I expect?  We were all raised to obey authority, waste all of our time on commercialism, and give up control of our lives.
  •  The United States of Daily Kos (none)
    Here are the results of dividing the percentages in the Daily Kos age distribution by the 2000 US Census age distribution.

    10-14    1%
    15-19    39%
    20-24    109%
    25-29    127%
    30-34    137%
    35-39    160%
    40-44    171%
    45-49    192%
    50-54    211%
    55-59    192%
    60-64    130%
    65-69    26%

    The categories are not an exact match, but close enough.  A larger number means that there are more people of that age group at Daily Kos that would be expected from the age distribution in the US population.

    There is some under-representation in the under-25 and over-65 categories, which means that all the other categories will be above 100%.

    But this is not surprising.  What is surprising is how very closely the age distribution of Daily Kos users mirrors that of the US population.  From 35 to 60, especially, the rate of participation is pretty uniform.

    </stats nerd mode>

    --
    Blogs will matter when we act locally: Local Diaries on Daily Kos.

    by miholo on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 09:18:27 PM PST

  •  Maybe I'm missing something here, (none)
    but how come the column percentages, added together, total only 93%, and not 100%? I can understand rounding off a little, but that seems like too big a difference to me.

    Is there a 7% sign-up in the "Ageless" category?

    "Sometimes I wonder whether the world is being run by smart people who are putting us on or by imbeciles who really mean it." - Mark Twain

    by Donna in Rome on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 09:38:11 PM PST

    •  No, just crappy code... (none)
      ...all the percentages are rounded down so that, for example, 9.9% will be displayed as 9%.  Add up an average of 0.5% loss in each of 12 categories, and there should be about 6% missing at any time.

      --
      Blogs will matter when we act locally: Local Diaries on Daily Kos.

      by miholo on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 10:35:53 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Taking a Closer Look at the Data (none)
    A more accurate look at the data might be to divide the kosvoters in each age range by US census projections for 2005 in the same age group, to see what the relative % of respondents in each age group are.  ie. kosvoters/census for each age group.  The results below indicate that the highest percentage of active Kos participants in any age group is in the 51-55 year old range. (note this data analyzed at 10660 votes)

    Participation Percentage by Age Group

    0-14   0%
    15-20  .841%
    21-25  3.618%
    26-30  4.302%
    31-35  4.764%
    36-40  5.988%
    41-45  6.111%
    46-50  6.345%
    51-55  7.17%
    56-60  5.895%
    61-65  3.613%
    66-100 .98%  

  •  Poll results resemble a normal distribution n/t (none)

    "...in this abject posture have ye sworn / To adore the Conquerour?..../ Awake, arise, or be for ever fall'n."

    by Valtin on Thu Dec 22, 2005 at 11:01:51 PM PST

  •  Age (none)
    Old independent still trying to make sense out of politics without substance. DKos is refreshing.
  •  Seems like the slacker generation... (none)
    (of which I include myself) has started to wake up.  Perhaps we were all actually thinking while not demeaning ourselves to work in lousy retail jobs.

    Excessive literary production is a social offense. - George Eliot

    by pyramus on Fri Dec 23, 2005 at 04:16:35 AM PST

  •  nice gausian distribution (none)
    n/t
  •  Throw it in their teeth! (none)
    Talk about no-brainers. Great for you to collect the data. Wonder how come the MSM cannot do that?
  •  Looks like... (none)
    A pretty standard distribution to me...

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