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The following exchange was broadcast this morning (6 June, 2006) on Morning Edition (NPR's morning news and entertainment show).  Five minutes were devoted to Renee Montagne's interview with the Mayor of Toronto, David Miller.  Montagne, following her usual modus operandi, leaps on a chance to make her ignorant, stupid, xenophobic, Bushist points.

Make the jump for the transcript, which I typed out just for you.

The interview can be found here:  http://www.npr.org/... .  (Text page with link to audio.)

The interview starts off with the usual journalistic stuff:  When?  What?


Montagne:  When did you learn about the investigation into this alleged plot, and what do you know about the evidence against these men?

Mayor Miller:  I learned of the investigation several months ago.

But soon Montagne adopts a different voice, halting, pitch raised, a little arch -- you know that voice, the one bad female reporters use when they want to get conspiratorial with male interviewees -- a sort of "just between us" voice:


Montagne: [1:57]  (Voice rising) What are you hearing, as mayor, from the Muslim community there in Toronto?

Mayor Miller:  Our Muslim community is very active, very involved in the city -- a very peaceful community.  I've spoken with a number of the leaders of the Muslim community over the weekend.  They are very shocked by what happened.  You know in Islam if you kill one person you kill everybody.  It's a very peaceful religion, and they're as shocked as Torontonians are, and ...

Montagne jumps on this.  JUMPS.  Mayor Miller corrects himself.


Montagne:  Well.  Well, they sort of are Torontonians.

Mayor Miller:  Sorry!  They're as shocked as every Torontonians is.  And I think one of the concerns the Muslim community has, which I share, is how could this small group of young men become so disaffected and alienated to fall into this hard-line ideology.

Questions any middle-class society -- any parents -- would ask.  But Montagne, sensing blood, moves in for the kill.  She abandons any pretense at journalism, and sets up, what to her must be an obvious syllogism:  if you have open immigration, if you have a liberal society, if you provide for the downtrodden, you will suffer terrorism.  Note that in the middle of tripping over her tongue, she almost can't get out "social services".  As Mark Crispin Miller pointed out in his analysis of Bush's lying ("Cruel and Unusual:  The Bush/Cheney World Order"), it is when they are substituting an acceptable phrase for an unutterable thought that these people's minds stutter.


Montagne:  Well, interesting, because, you know, you know, you wonder, what, what can you do, to keep people from becoming alienated.  Canada has a very open society, very liberal immigration policy, very good, um, social, ah, social services, uh, uh, are you at a loss for what to do now?

Mayor MIller deflects this taint, but Montagne is not to be turned away.  She interupts him in order to insist on her (mis)reading of the cause of the (foiled) terrorist plot.  To his credit, he brings up an example that anyone but a right-wing hack would have considered before pressing the point.


Mayor Miller:  Well, you know all the things you just mentioned are reasons why our city and our country work.  We are very proud of our diversity.  More than half of the people who live in Toronto, including myself, were not born in Canada.  And I think that's why Canada works.  We don't expect --

Montagne:  (Interrupts) Although it didn't work -- uh, it didn't work in this case!  If it's true.

Mayor Miller:  We don't expect these kind of occurrences, exactly because of our public services, because of our diversity, because of our mutual respect for people of all backgrounds, and I, I don't ... There's no easy answer, but I think that's the key question:  How did this fairly small group of young men become so radical.  And the parallel I'd draw with the United States is Oklahoma City.  Timothy McVeigh had become very radicalized, and I think the same questions could be asked, and that's the question we're going to be asking ourselves and working to address over the coming months.

Thusly does one -- calmly and politely -- with Canadian style -- repel the forces of ignorance and xenophobia -- at least for a few seconds.

Montagne still presses forwards.  Only a few seconds left for her, a journalist, to MAKE HER POINT.


Montagne:  Well just in the couple of seconds we have left, if you would, I mean how, in a sense, sad are you, given that Canadians are, I don't know, maybe think of themselves as better than this?

Mayor Miller:  Well, we are all shocked and saddened.  I think the positive thing is, are, that our police service and our intelligence service worked so well together that we know that we're safe, but we're not going to allow this to compromise our fundamental values, and our fundamental values in Canada are respect for everyone -- we're a welcoming country, and all communities, particularly the Muslim community, contribute very strongly to that ...

Montagne:  Fine.  Thank-

Mayor Miller:  ... vibrant city ...

Montagne:  Thank you very much.  David MIller is the mayor of Toronto, the Canadian city said to be one of the targets of the terrorist plot uncovered last weekend.  You are listening to Morning Edition, from NPR news.

NPR has been in decline for some years, certainly hastened since Bush and his harpies took control of our treasury.  NPR as we knew it is dead.  Long live NPR.  Renee Montagne, however, is no journalist, and should not receive a dime of money to impersonate one.

Originally posted to Yellow Canary on Tue Jun 06, 2006 at 07:24 AM PDT.

Poll

When did you relize NPR had been co-opted?

22%7 votes
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| 31 votes | Vote | Results

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Comment Preferences

  •  just heard this 5 minutes ago (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    buchadolph, Yellow Canary

    She basically wanted him to say, "Yeah, Canada's disbanding now.  We can't keep tabs on the entire nation.  I hear there are even criminals!  So yeah, we're done.  Do you guys want Toronto?"

    D-Day, the newest blog on the internet (at the moment of its launch)

    by dday on Tue Jun 06, 2006 at 07:18:16 AM PDT

  •  I don't always agree with NPR (4+ / 0-)

    but what the fuck are you talking about?  How do you see some egregious journalistic violation in that interview?  

    I'm just confused.  It just looked to me like she had a typical American view of Canadians.

    Pray that there's intelligent life somewhere up in space because there's bugger all down here on Earth.

    by bawbie on Tue Jun 06, 2006 at 07:19:33 AM PDT

    •  I know, it's overstated. (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      bawbie, station wagon, buhdydharma

      But I think bigotry and hatred start small, are amplified by the media, and end up ingrained in our discourse.  Since I am a long-time listener (now "consumer") of NPR (now NPR's products), I take especial umbrage when stupidity and ignorance are allowed to flourish among the headliners.

      Perhaps it is more apparent when you hear the inflections in her voice.  To me, it was clear that Montagne was gleeful at Toronto's (and Canada's) being the target of a terrorist plot, for two reasons:  one, "they are so holier than thou with all their "openness is good" crap" (paraphrasing, but that's how it sounded to me), and two, "serves them right for letting Muslims walk around free and even providing social services for them".

      That NPR has a woman who thinks these things (and yes, I just put those thoughts into her head, but this is hardly the first time this has come up), and promotes her to the top of their organization, says a lot about what "National" and "Public" mean in America today.

      When they shut down the Internet -- Meet in Washington, DC. Bring your legs and arms -- we'll need all the muscle we can get.

      by Yellow Canary on Tue Jun 06, 2006 at 07:40:45 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Thanks for bringing this up (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Yellow Canary

        I often have trouble sleeping and last night was no exception. So when the NPR blasted me at 6 AM I was groggy to say the least, and didn't process this hit piece all the way. But it was bugging me as I got dressed. You're right - she was subtle, but the insistence on scoring against Canada was right out of a hockey game.

        I thought Miller did well to liken this (successfully thwarted) attack to the actions of everyone's favorite homegrown terrorist, Timmeh McVeigh.

        But even that didn't shut up Agendawoman.

        Mr President, wars are not fashion accessories. And they don't make good pets.

        by kamarvt on Tue Jun 06, 2006 at 07:58:49 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

    •  Listening to it would make a difference... (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      bawbie, station wagon, Yellow Canary
      I heard it and thought it was rank.

      The NPR questions imply a kind of "Islamofascism hits liberal Canada" take.  Montagne:

      a) made the Canandian mayor (whose tolerant and open government just successfully interdicted a plot) look foolish and defensive and

      b) despite Montagne's "gotcha" on ethnic inclusivness, indulged this logic: "you can't do anything to prevent the terrorists from rising up against you even in a society founded on welcome and equality."

      That logic flows to, as the diarist implies, a kind of Bush worldview that we must fight them "over there" and reduce our "civil liberties and openess" over here.  It's also pretty ignorant about Canada.

      Regardless, interviewing the Mayor of a city that just averted a major terrorist attack is no time to play "gotcha."  That was what struck me most.

      ...k/o...flip the rock...

      by kid oakland on Tue Jun 06, 2006 at 07:42:53 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  The Shift in Emphasis at NPR (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    murasaki, Yellow Canary

    I noticed the shift in 2002.

    The blame has to be squarely placed on the managers and editors who handle the day-to-day traffic coursing through the NPR conduit. I do not fault the reporters and cannot routinely blame them for what they are compelled to read on the air.

    Not only content is affected. Next time you listen, make a list beforehand of the topics you would be interested in hearing and then monitor to the segments. To your horror, none of the topics you listed will be explored in any depth  past the superficial one or two sentences, if any, during the news break.

    That has been my personal experience recently. What a disappointment.

    •  The shift in emphasis ... (0+ / 0-)

      is because they follow the news closely and they integrate information.

      There is absolutely no bigotry and no xenophobia in asswerting that a small but persistent percentage of the Muslim community wants to overturn western legal systems and establish Islamic law.  We have to confront any spokesman for the Muslim community and ask them if they support secular governance.  They will wriggle and twist and do their best to not answer.  I've seen it a million times, and nobody minds.

      •  This might be a worthy tangent. (0+ / 0-)

        We have to confront any spokesman for the Muslim community and ask them if they support secular governance.  They will wriggle and twist and do their best to not answer.  I've seen it a million times, and nobody minds.

        Can you provide examples?  I won't even hold you to the "million".

        I'm not picking a stance opposite yours -- I want you to clarify what you mean and substantiate it.  When you say "spokesman for the Muslim community" I assume you mean Muslim communities in secular countries like the US, Cananda, England, France, etc.

        Note that how this thwarted plot might fit into the larger picture of Islam and The West was not explicitly discussed in this piece.

        When they shut down the Internet -- Meet in Washington, DC. Bring your legs and arms -- we'll need all the muscle we can get.

        by Yellow Canary on Tue Jun 06, 2006 at 08:16:31 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Concur. There are no Gerry Adamses in Islam. (0+ / 0-)

          As leader of Sinn Fein, Gerry Adams accepts that he will have to spend considerable time and effort distancing himself and the movement he represents from the extremist elements of the Irish Republican Army. No single individual, and no comparable focus, exists for Islam in the West.

          And really, hasn't this whole get-the-mainstream-to-denounce-the-outlier game gotten a little old? Must every leader of every movement be goaded into a Sister Souljah moment?

    •  Good points. (0+ / 0-)

      How are reporters compelled to read things they don't want to on air?

      Isn't it astonishing how thorough and far-reaching the Bushist take-over of our government and -- particularly -- our media has been?  Someone devised and executed a plan to either ruin or co-opt NPR -- and succeeded.

      The Web is next.

      I myself laugh at myself when I read that.  But if I were them, controlling or dismantling the Web is exactly what I'd be spending my money and brain-power on.

      When they shut down the Internet -- Meet in Washington, DC. Bring your legs and arms -- we'll need all the muscle we can get.

      by Yellow Canary on Tue Jun 06, 2006 at 07:57:49 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Do you distinguish between NPR and (0+ / 0-)

        shows carried by NPR like the Diane Rehm Show and Fresh Air with Terry Gross?  I know there are others that are very good at night, but am unable to listen regularly.  

        Morning Edition has changed in the last few years, no question, for the worse, but that comes right out of NPR studios directly, right?  Other shows are supported locally by individual stations, right?  Some stations carry mostly music programming all day with the direct NPR news only.  I'm lucky to live within range of a very well supported station from Ann Arbor, so I think my listening experience may be very different from folks who live far from university towns.  I think this may be why I get in arguments defending NPR here when the subject comes up--  it's not uniform listening across the states.  FWIW.

        The way to disempower fearmongering autocrats is to examine them so minutely that their activity seems ridiculous and hyperactive. Patricia Taylor

        by station wagon on Tue Jun 06, 2006 at 08:06:48 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  Yes, this is a distinction I will make from ... (0+ / 0-)

          .. now on.  Thanks for bringing it up.

          I don't know the structure of NPR or, in particular, NPR News.  Anyone?

          When they shut down the Internet -- Meet in Washington, DC. Bring your legs and arms -- we'll need all the muscle we can get.

          by Yellow Canary on Tue Jun 06, 2006 at 08:18:05 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  I know when the NPR station I listen to does (0+ / 0-)

            pledge drives that it's possible to dedicate donations to particular shows, which I do.  I think there's discretion possible on the part of individual stations.  There was talk of the ex-Bush appointed head of Public Broadcasting to push music programming under the guise of supporting the arts, haha, but I think that was beaten back.  Common Cause was on this war within Public Broadcasting big-time.  NPR and PBS were in the crosshairs, and I don't think it's over.  I could definitely feel the chill and the hammer hanging.  I think Bill Moyers was a particular target and that he has spoken about this.  I wish I knew more about the structure of NPR to share now, but I'll see if I can figure it out when I have more time.

            The way to disempower fearmongering autocrats is to examine them so minutely that their activity seems ridiculous and hyperactive. Patricia Taylor

            by station wagon on Tue Jun 06, 2006 at 08:37:37 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  Dedicate isn't the same thing as sequester. (0+ / 0-)

              My public radio station runs pledge breaks with comments like "So if you like 'Wait Wait . . . Don't Tell Me!' send us a pledge blah blah blah." They're pretty careful, though, not to suggest that you can direct your contribution for acquisition of a specific program. But that's the local station here; YMMV.

              NPR gets some direct funding, but my understanding is that it mainly functions like a cooperative that assesses dues from its member stations--and that those dues, plus acquisition charges, constitute most of NPR's revenue.

              •  you could be right there-- (0+ / 0-)

                I could be wrong.  Maybe they just register support for a particular show as a vote to continue buying the show and the money goes into the big pot.  I left a link just below to a Wikipedia page on NPR for Yellow Canary.  Sounds like you have a really good idea of how it works, thanks, ticket punch.

                The way to disempower fearmongering autocrats is to examine them so minutely that their activity seems ridiculous and hyperactive. Patricia Taylor

                by station wagon on Tue Jun 06, 2006 at 11:12:31 AM PDT

                [ Parent ]

          •  Wikipedia has a page up with links (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Yellow Canary

            here that clears up a lot of questions for me.

            Yellow Canary, NPR is not dead, seriously.  Today Diane Rehm's 10:00 was on the proposed marriage ammendment that you can download or listen to online, for example.  Look at her schedule from the last few weeks- great topics and guests.  Don't give up.

            The way to disempower fearmongering autocrats is to examine them so minutely that their activity seems ridiculous and hyperactive. Patricia Taylor

            by station wagon on Tue Jun 06, 2006 at 11:08:43 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

        •  'No question' for the worse? I'll question that. (0+ / 0-)

          The previous host had been phoning it in for years--put me to sleep. Steve Inskeep, Montagne's co-anchor, has put some much-needed spring in the program's step. It's better.

          A character in a radio play that lampoons public radio, on NPR/WNYC's "On the Media," describes the aim of public-radio newsgathering as "church bells. Gravel. Truth that goes crunch." Link to an MP3 here.

        •  An excellent diary from a while back (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          station wagon

          explains the distinction well. Thanks Eddie Haskell, whoever you are.  Eddie Haskell's 2005 diary

          Basically, there's NPR the organization in Washington, and there's lower-case public/non-commercial radio in general.  Your local public radio station has a relationship to NPR that's a lot like your local newspaper's relationship to the Associated Press.  Stories from the AP appear in your local paper; someone at the local paper chose which AP stories to run and where, and which stories that the AP covered should also be covered by the local reporter. It's much the same with your local public radio station.  

          •  thanks so much, Eloise, will read it! n/t (0+ / 0-)

            The way to disempower fearmongering autocrats is to examine them so minutely that their activity seems ridiculous and hyperactive. Patricia Taylor

            by station wagon on Tue Jun 06, 2006 at 05:27:29 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

          •  holy cow! Eloise- (0+ / 0-)

            that was a fantastic diary.  This is such useful info.  You get the golden link award today.  I have saved it to share and for future reference.  So often complaints are about NPR news shows, you know, the drive time morning and afternoon shows.  A well supported station like mine has so much more.  It's really helpful to know that our donations directly effect the quality of programs on our local stations.  I love Eddie's point that the worst thing we can do is simply drop out as listeners and supporters, that we can have a real impact if we follow his recommendations for letter writing.  

            You're a star.

            The way to disempower fearmongering autocrats is to examine them so minutely that their activity seems ridiculous and hyperactive. Patricia Taylor

            by station wagon on Tue Jun 06, 2006 at 05:39:42 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

  •  Seems like it ought to be the Mayor (0+ / 0-)

    you're pissed off at:

    and they're as shocked as Torontonians are, and ...

    corrected by the interviewer:

    Well.  Well, they sort of are Torontonians.

    Another exemplary aspect of this interview is that Montagne repeatedly makes clear that this is still an "alledged" incident and they're only discussing "if it's true" -- a level of skepticism I doubt is being displayed by the mainstream media (except the New York Times which had an article raising some of the potential problems with this case).

    I didn't hear the interview, and like the previous commenter I don't always like what I hear on NPR, but this seems to be yet another case of exemplary reporting (even if it was by a "female reporter" with a "halting, pitch raised, a little arch" voice).

    Is America finally suffering from Idiot Fatigue?

    by LarryInNYC on Tue Jun 06, 2006 at 07:44:28 AM PDT

    •  You should listen to it. (0+ / 0-)

      The Mayor's slip cannot be valorized on way or the other.  He immediately, unequivocally corrected himself, and moved right on.  I think his meaning was clear (and it was not what Montagne was spot-lighting).

      I was aware that it reads much more ambiguous in print than it sounds in voice.

      I stand by my characterization of Montagne's shift in voice at that point in the interview.  Your snarkiness is empty until you listen to the interview, at which point we could discuss our different perceptions.  Since you haven't heard it, your questioning how it sounded to me is hollow.

      That said, you are correct in this:  Montagne does have some exemplary aspects of good interview practice.

      When they shut down the Internet -- Meet in Washington, DC. Bring your legs and arms -- we'll need all the muscle we can get.

      by Yellow Canary on Tue Jun 06, 2006 at 08:26:07 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Won't get a chance to listen to it (0+ / 0-)

        until tonight at the earliest.

        On the one hand people can say a lot with their tone of voice, so you may well have a point.  I'll try to listen to the interview with an open mind.

        On the other hand, a lot of people don't say that much with their tone of voice.  Some of my favorite NPR reporters have voices that could charitably described as odd (Daniel Zwerdling, for instance, with his upraised inflections or Bob Garfield, who can't ask the time of day without making it sound like you stole his watch).  If, as you suggest, there was a deliberate attempt to skew the interview I would expect it to be reflected in the actual words as well as the tone of voice.  I don't find the excerpts you cited as "ambiguous", I find them exemplary.

        I'm not sure whether your last comment was snark or not (eg "Montagne is an excellent interviewer, a talent she uses to accomplish her, and her NPR masters', evil goals), but assuming it's not -- I agree.  I frankly think that Morning Edition has seen a large improvement since Bob Edwards was "dissappeared" (not that I like the circumstances under which it was done).

        Is America finally suffering from Idiot Fatigue?

        by LarryInNYC on Tue Jun 06, 2006 at 08:39:27 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  NPR was co-opted in the 80's (0+ / 0-)

    We used to call it National Petroleum Radio

    She was only a moonshiner's daughter, but she always made me liquer - Rev. Billy C. Wirtz

    by gatorcog on Tue Jun 06, 2006 at 07:48:04 AM PDT

  •  Cowards (0+ / 0-)

    My god, the amazing fear we have of speaking honestly about this.  How can anyone imagine that these actions (if the allegations are true) have nothing to do with Islamism?  Why do we cringe and scurry away from facing simple facts?

    Is anyone prepared to say that Canada has done anything to deserve this?  No, I doubt it.  They are fighting the Taliban in Afghanistan ... anyone want to step up and say that's wrong?  They have open, liberal social policies, including allowing gay marriage.  Anyone want to say that makes them worthy of attack???

    There have been imams in Toronto preaching hatred for Canada.  Hatred for the country they reside in.  

    And why do the imams remain in Canada, if they hate it so much????  What's to hate about Canada, Mr. Imam???

    I'll let clear minds figure it out.

    We can't claim to be progressive if we turn away from simple truths because we don't want to offend or challenge someone else's beliefs.

    If someone believes that Canada should have religious laws, tell them to go to hell.  And if someone is not willing to give their support to Canada's form of governance, tell them to go to another country.

    This mewling political correctness is nothing but cowardice, and it is sickening.  

    •  Could you provide examples of ... (0+ / 0-)

      ... "the mewling political correctness" that is "nothing be cowardice"?

      Speaking plainly, I am not sure at what you are pointing your blunderbuss.

      Montagne could have asked any number of questions about Canada or Toronto's Muslim population.  The only question she asked was what had the mayor heard from leaders of Toronto's Muslim community.

      When they shut down the Internet -- Meet in Washington, DC. Bring your legs and arms -- we'll need all the muscle we can get.

      by Yellow Canary on Tue Jun 06, 2006 at 08:37:09 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  There was another one on Morning Edition (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    va dare

    today.  Tried to find it on the website, but couldn't.  It went something like "Democrats have found their equivalent of the gay marriage constitutional amendment to get their base out to vote, and that is an increase in the minimum wage."  Oh puhleeze.  As if the two issues are alike in any way.  Let's see, one sets in stone discrimination against a group of people in our country.  The other seeks to lift up workers who are struggling to make it in an economy that leaves minimum wage workers falling behind more and more as prices outstrip the ability to provide basic necessities.

    I love Diane Rehm, Science Friday, Fresh Air with Terry Gross, but Morning Edition has gone down the tubes.

    The way to disempower fearmongering autocrats is to examine them so minutely that their activity seems ridiculous and hyperactive. Patricia Taylor

    by station wagon on Tue Jun 06, 2006 at 07:58:10 AM PDT

    •  You have to work pretty hard (0+ / 0-)

      to turn the statement "Democrats have found their equivalent of the gay marriage constitutional amendment to get their base out to vote, and that is an increase in the minimum wage." into a suggestion that the two issues are morally equivalent.  They're clearly talking about the two issues in terms of whether or not they get the base out to vote.

      As far as I'm concerned, it's about friggin' time that the Democrats find a motivational equivalent of the gay marriage issue to get the good guys to show up at the polls.  Is that issue a minimum wage increase?  I tend to think not -- but I'm happy to listen to any evidence that it might be so.

      Is America finally suffering from Idiot Fatigue?

      by LarryInNYC on Tue Jun 06, 2006 at 08:02:15 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  LarryInNYC-- I don't think we really (0+ / 0-)

        disagree.  I'm just saying that while even conservatives recognize the cold political manipulation going on to wave raw meat in front of Bush's base to get out to vote, a hike in the minimum wage is long overdue and I don't think making it a central issue fits in the same category of manipulation.  It's kind of like saying 'Democrats do it, too' in the K Street corruption issue.  I heard it as drawing the same kind of false equivalence.  It's this administration's MO to use PR at the expense of real, positive governance, not the Democrat's MO.

        It's possible I'm making no sense, if so, I'm sorry.  Out of my league.

        The way to disempower fearmongering autocrats is to examine them so minutely that their activity seems ridiculous and hyperactive. Patricia Taylor

        by station wagon on Tue Jun 06, 2006 at 08:29:40 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  Stopped listening when Air America came online. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    murasaki

    I just couldn't stand to hear another "Third generation Ugandon Quiltist Whose Family Business Is Being Threatened By The Encroachment Of Big Box Stores" human interest piece when our government is spying on us here at home and our soldiers are dying on a daily basis for no particular reason.

    •  A bit self centered, are we? (0+ / 0-)
      •  I know, I know. (0+ / 0-)

        How dare I worry about such trivial matters, when Inuit percussionists are in danger of losing their trade to the electric drum machine industry?

        •  Yes, there are some dull stories (0+ / 0-)

          But they also talk about international news that's more relevant.  Focusing solely on domestic issues is not a good idea when you are a voter in the most powerful country in the world.

          •  Um. Iraq's not exactly a domestic issue. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Yellow Canary

            I do see your point -- though I don't agree with you at all.  I believe NPR concentrates on a LOOOOT of irrelavant shit at the the expense of the real news.  This city is burning for God sake.  There simply shouldn't be enough time in the schedule to deviate from covering the most dangerous administration in our nation's history.  

            And when NPR does focus on "hard news?" It's usually more like "hard stenography." ("The Democrats say such and such, while the Republicans counter such and such.  So it's tough to tell -- the truth probably lies somewhere in the middle.  Let's talk to a fellow at a right-wing thinktank and get HIS take on it.)

            Sorry.  NPR is lame.  They hide behind their monotone voices, big words, and well-annunciated syllables.  They fancy themselves intellectuals, while ignoring the same stories (Downing street memo, Ohio vote disenfranchisement, etc) that Fox and CNN ignore.  

            I'm not impressed, I'm not donating, and I'm simply not listening any more.

  •  Canada allows for very intrusive measures but (0+ / 0-)

    that doesn't bother most Canadians for two reasons:

    1/ No death penalty. Never.

    2/ No torture under any circumstances no matter what.

    The worst thing that might happen to a Canadian is that he or she might be arrested in the US and shipped to Syria or Egypt to be tortured.

    Virtually all immigrants: Muslim, Sikh, Hindu, Jewish and Christian have large communities of folks who fled to Canada to avoid religious intolerance and persecution.

    Canda is far from perfect. But when the government screws up, folks don't end up in Gitmo, so there's less alarm.

  •  I heard her too ..and them my brain barfed. (0+ / 0-)

    I think she must be a very tightly screwed down person who never learned to breathe easy.  We need to get together and send her something to ease her bowel movements.

    I was also saddened by NPR contiuing to choose the word .. " dozen " to describe Iraqi deaths.  As though the Iragi citizenry were a commodity.  As guess as far as the United States of America military/corporate industrial complex goes.  All sentient beings are commodities to be bought and sold.

    •  My favorite this week ... (0+ / 0-)

      ... was when the lead-in to the Haditha massacre story said ...

      ... the military may be suspected of dirty tricks.

      Shooting babies in the skull, shooting 82 year old men, shooting bound mothers and daughters ... dirty tricks.  Yeah.

      When they shut down the Internet -- Meet in Washington, DC. Bring your legs and arms -- we'll need all the muscle we can get.

      by Yellow Canary on Tue Jun 06, 2006 at 08:30:19 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Neocons on the CPB (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Yellow Canary

    That's only part of the problem. As NPR got bigger, they seemed to think they have to ape the corporate media too.

    Then there's the whole religious, southern track . . .

    --Referring to Debbie Elliott, on Weedend Edition. She seems to have mush for brains, except that she also has an agenda about inserting a Christianity subtext in every program. Like interviewing a fundamentalist paster about what the sermon will be on Sunday. Nows that's NEWS

    I wrote them complaining about her pablum, using a divergent e-mail address. And guess what? Now I get e-mail from Bill Frist on that address.

    "A fool and his money are soon elected." --Will Rogers

    by murasaki on Tue Jun 06, 2006 at 08:19:23 AM PDT

  •  I cannot listen to the piece (0+ / 0-)

    But from what I read she is asking uncomfortable questions of a powerful man.  This is what reporters are supposed to do.  I've heard Mary Lou Finley and Barbara Budd ask tons of questions of Canadian politicians that make them squirm.

  •  Huh (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Yellow Canary

    I can't listen to the piece right now, because I'm at work. But her point seems to be that somehow Canada's liberal policies are to blame for letting Muslims live in Toronto, some of whom were terrorists plotting an attack. The implication seems to be that this would never happen in the States, because the USA's tough policies keep us terrorist-free.

    Montagne is a naive fool if she thinks that there aren't already terrorists here in the US. Americans are deluding themselves if they think that Bush's kick ass policies have eliminated all terrorists from the country.

    After explaining how the country's openness is what makes Canada work, Montegne says, "Although it didn't work -- uh, it didn't work in this case!  If it's true."

    How did it not work? They caught this group before any attack could happen. This is a story of success, not failure. The Canadians were able to identify a terrorist group and thwart an attack - all without resorting to extraordinary rendition, torture, subverting the law, or invading another country. This shows that law enforcement is an effective tool in stopping terrorism. Where is the evidence that our "tough" policies have stopped anything?

  •  Renee (0+ / 0-)

    I heard another example of her ignorance and lack of journalistic sense this morning.  They were discussing Intermittent Explosive Disorder or some such thing.  Renee tried to tie this to "road rage" 3 separate times that I heard each time being essentially rebuked by the psychiatrist she was interviewing.  It is much more about domestic violence and a potential cause of it than about giving someone the finger on the freeway.  She is either stupid or incompetent (but then most republicans are, eh?).

    We're all just monkeys burning in hell. SmokeyMonkey.org

    by smokeymonkey on Tue Jun 06, 2006 at 09:31:08 AM PDT

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