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Many questions arise about the surge. Is the new strategy working? How long will it take to work? Will it stabilize Iraq enough so we can withdrawl? How many extra troops are there? How many more will Bush send?

Amongst all these questions, a few things are clear. The violence and deaths have not abated. The number of US troops deployed in Iraq are increasing, not decreasing as promised. (i.e. We'll stand down as they stand up.) And the rhethoric against Iran is getting more dangerous.

But what of the troops? Where are they going and why do they need more?

The deployment of additional US forces originally called for securing a troubled Al Anbar province and securing Baghdad. But now it appears that the extra forces are being sent to locations other than the original plan.

Surge = Diyala Province
Surge ≠ Al Anbar Province

Diyala is directly between Baghdad and the Iranian border.

Troops from Al-Anbar are being redeployed to Baghdad.

The surge was originally touted to boost security in Al-Anbar and Baghdad, but IMHO, it appears that the troops are going to Baghdad and Diyala. This would mass troops to the East of Baghdad and in and around the city of Baghdad itself.

This positioning supports defensive operations against any major ground offensive operations originating from Iran. It also may serve as an attack position for counter offensive operations against any major ground offensive operations originating from Iran. Additionally, it can provide on a continual basis, supplemental security to the northern oil fields.

Originally posted to wolverine 06 on Sun May 13, 2007 at 11:04 AM PDT.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (8+ / 0-)

    :)

    Perhaps it is a universal truth that the loss of liberty at home is to be charged to provisions against danger, real or pretended from abroad. ~J. Madison

    by wolverine 06 on Sun May 13, 2007 at 10:55:54 AM PDT

    •  It's looking like "A bridge too far" (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Night Owl, roses

      We may soon get a seige mentality, based on bad news happening around Baghdad, where convoys may become obsolete.  Some eye opening reports are in the British press....

      http://news.independent.co.uk/...

      The three-month-old US plan to regain control of Baghdad is slow to show results, despite the arrival of four more US brigades. Security in the heart of the city may be a little better, but the US and the Iraqi government are nowhere near to dealing a knockout blow to the Sunni insurgency or Shia militias.

      The Sunni guerrillas trying to isolate Baghdad from the rest of the country exploded truck bombs on three important bridges last week, killing 26 people. One blew up in a queue of cars on the old Diyala bridge, just south of Baghdad. Two minutes later a truck exploded on a newer bridge over the same river. North of Baghdad, at Taji, long a centre for insurgents, a third vehicle bomb made impassable a bridge linking Baghdad with northern Iraq.

      I threw Katie Couric's tea in the harbor on 4/08/07.

      by Theghostofkarlafayetucker on Sun May 13, 2007 at 11:17:46 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  I think this story today is somewhat related... (3+ / 0-)

        ...both to what you are thinking and this diary in general.....

        "Stryker losses in Iraq raise questions"
        http://news.yahoo.com/...

        BAGHDAD - A string of heavy losses from powerful roadside bombs has raised new questions about the vulnerability of the Stryker, the Army's troop-carrying vehicle hailed by supporters as the key to a leaner, more mobile force.

        A single infantry company in Diyala lost five Strykers this month in less than a week, according to soldiers familiar with the losses, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they are not authorized to release the information. The overall number of Strykers lost recently is classified.

        The Stryker's vulnerabilities have become increasingly apparent since a battalion of about 700 soldiers and nearly 100 Stryker vehicles from the Army's 2nd Infantry Division was sent to Diyala province in March to bolster an infantry brigade struggling to restore order there.

        Trouble started as soon as the Strykers arrived in Baqouba, the provincial capital of Diyala.

        U.S. commanders ordered the vehicles into Baqouba's streets at dawn the day after they arrived. The hope was that the large, menacing vehicles — armed with a heavy machine gun and a 105mm cannon — would intimidate insurgents and reassure local residents.

        Instead, insurgents hammered the Strykers with automatic weapons fire, rocket-propelled grenades and a network of roadside bombs. By the end of that first day, one American soldier was dead, 12 were wounded and two Strykers were destroyed.

        "I think they're in the last throes, if you will, of the insurgency."

        by Big Nit Attack on Sun May 13, 2007 at 12:39:40 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  A friend survived FIVE tours to both Afgan and (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          peace voter, roses, Big Nit Attack

          Iraq.  

          He has pictures of two massive "junkyards" of camoflaged wrecks.  The sand damage to the engines was predictable, but the inability to cope and keep up to the pace was not.

          One of the pix in his album is from an elevated angle, and my amazed comparison would be the parking at a football stadium times two.

          I threw Katie Couric's tea in the harbor on 4/08/07.

          by Theghostofkarlafayetucker on Sun May 13, 2007 at 12:52:00 PM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  In the world of project management, we call it... (5+ / 0-)

    "scope creep".

    When Gen. Mixon asked for more troops earlier in the week, my reaction was: 1968.  After Tet, Westmoreland asked for more troops.

    Support the troops. Bring them home. All Spin Zone

    by Richard Cranium on Sun May 13, 2007 at 11:16:06 AM PDT

  •  Are we giving up on al Anbar? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Theghostofkarlafayetucker

    It's an al Qaeda stronghold, so it stands to reason that we'd defer to them.

    But yes, we should be watching for this sort of drift to indicate when/where/how the invasion of Iran might/will occur.

    Maximum exposure, maximum accountability, maximum justice.

    by Bob Love on Sun May 13, 2007 at 11:18:46 AM PDT

    •  Al Anbar has no oil, therefore no KBR built (0+ / 0-)

      facilities.  Any future "repositioning" will naturally follow the oil feild maps.

      What one wonders is HOW are they going to supply and maintain the largest embassy in the world when all the bridges are down.  

      I threw Katie Couric's tea in the harbor on 4/08/07.

      by Theghostofkarlafayetucker on Sun May 13, 2007 at 11:23:46 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  Iraq insurgent capabilities are increasing (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    roses, Theghostofkarlafayetucker

    Apart from the relentless rise in the number of insurgent attacks, the attacks are becoming more destructive and more accurately targeted. Consider that:

    1. Insurgent truck bombs are now big enough to drop steel bridges and destroy small US outposts.
    1. Mortar and rocket fire is now regularly hitting the Green Zone.
    1. The latest ambush completely wiped out a small US  patrol (5 KIA, 3 MIA) before help could arrive.

    What is the BushCo response? Ban reporters from attack sites. How much longer must this farce continue?

    We are producing an increasing number of useful goods and services for increasingly useless people. -- Ivan Illich

    by ANKOSS on Sun May 13, 2007 at 11:56:27 AM PDT

  •  Thanks everyone (0+ / 0-)

    for your comments.

    Perhaps it is a universal truth that the loss of liberty at home is to be charged to provisions against danger, real or pretended from abroad. ~J. Madison

    by wolverine 06 on Sun May 13, 2007 at 04:31:12 PM PDT

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