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Several articles/editorials have been written lately in various places about the fact that we, the taxpayers, via our government, could be buying the businesses we are bailing out for less than we are giving them or guaranteeing them.

For example, apparently the big three automakers can be bought for $10-$15 billion, while we are considering bailing them out with $25 billion or more.

Citigroup, which is worth about $20 billion, got a government guarantee of $250 billion in exchange for $7 billion at 8% (less than Buffet's 10%) and some warrants at about 4x current market price.

Sorry for being lazy, but I'm guessing AIG and others have done at least as well, while we, the taxpayers, via our government and government-elect's acts of comission and omission, have been screwn.

So, I have to wonder, as many smarter people before me have, why the hell we aren't buying these damn companies and nationalizing them, at least until they become profitable, then selling them back to a private entity for a profit, as Switzerland did so effectively in the 90s? At the very least, why aren't we getting equitable chunks commensurate with our investment, as Britain is doing now (and Switzerland also did)?

I guarantee you there are tons of bright, experienced managers who would die for the opportunity to prove they can turn these companies around at a fraction of the cost of the guys who drove them into the ground.

We know the answer why this won't happen, of course. We do, in fact, have a thinly veiled Mussolini-style fascist, corporatist government. I know, I sound like Noam Chomsky. Forgive me for talking immoderately about the colossal mess we are in. But how else do you explain where the first several hundred billion of the bail-out went? Why we can't even ask the Fed to tell us who they've given money to? Why it is Tim Geithner wants to boot Sheila Bair from the FCC because she's "too independent" (meaning, she actually gets it and is doing what is in her power to do about it)?

Sorry, while anarcho-syndicalism, at least as I understand it, is just plain silly, Noam is right on this: the financial elites own our government.

No matter who is actually sitting in the offices, writing the redacted e-mails, creating crippled legislation, holding hearings, writing stern letters, etc., we get token justice, amortized over generations. And in exchange we give the consent implicit in doing little or nothing about huge boatloads of injustice.

The administration leaders get seats on the CFR.

And the elites keep reaching further into our multi-generational future earnings potential.

We could similarly examine

  1. companies too big to fail;
  1. executive compensation;
  1. golden parachutes for poor performance;
  1. the ill-effects of the concentration of wealth on the nation, not to even mention the common good;
  1. over-"financialization" of the economy (e.g., making money from derivatives instead of widgets or ski lessons).

And then we could come up with solutions

  1. anti-trust enforcement;
  1. executive compensation regulations, especially for "losing" concerns;
  1. effective (not sticker) tax rates for the upper brackets;
  1. limits and regulations on gambling rather than investing in goods and services as a percent of GDP or something).

And after each case we would face down the same bugbear: our government is not OUR government.

Put another way: the indirect action of electing a representative is not even remotely enough. It's just the start, and frankly, after 8 years of waiting, I'm amazed we did it. Today, at this point, we are still pissing on the dark side of Pluto.

In order to address any of the issues listed above, which are only a piece of the enchilada, we will get long drawn-out blue-ribbon committee deliberations followed by half-measures of quarter-measure legislation staggered over generations, all in the name of bipartisanship, moderation, free trade, etc. And, despite the advances here and there, somehow the net results ultimately will circle back to similar conditions, because along the way the solutions will be hog-tied or cast overboard, like Glass-Steagal, by both moderates and wingnuts, as being outdated and unnecessary, like welfare and quality education. And the taxpayers will be too busy working, watching TV or finding someone they want to have a beer with to much notice. In the end: The New New Neutured Deal, if you will.

Which brings me to my bucket of questions:

  1. What will it actually take for enough people to give enough of a shit to actually matter?
  1. How many more trillions of dollars of fraud and corruption will it take?
  1. And what, exactly, will giving a shit actually look like?
  1. Another groundswell for the midterm election, or the next Presidential?
  1. And then, when we are still hemorrhaging to the special interests?
  1. More or less of the same?
  1. Years of indirect action, propelling candidates into office who face the same daunting odds within the same system against the power elite who become their daddy before our heroes even get to DC?

We really don't have to wait this out to know that the results will fall far short of what is needed to overcome the effects of the thirty year  pact between the puppetmasters of the voodoo economists, right-wing media echo chamber and the moral majority.

As hard as I worked for and as much as I love and respect Barack Obama and hope for change and believe he wants to implement it, the bottom 95% and the future of this country and this planet will continue to suffer, even with debt-financed jobs and tax cuts. And, relative to the rich and the rest of the world, they will continue to work harder and fall further behind. There is nothing on the books that will change that, and the negotiating hasn't even begun. In fact, some of the things that were on the books, like rescinding the tax cuts on the rich, are ALREADY receding into the future, pre-inauguration...

(Note: while the rate of the concentration of wealth slowed appreciably over the course of the Clinton years, it never stopped; the concentration of wealth is in no small part the reason we are where we are today.)

(Hint: the time for moderate triangulation is long past).

Experts are already predicting that by 2025, the U.S., the world's financial superpower, will be no more than a "leader among equals". And in 2050? Less.

As Kevin Phillips and others have warned, concentration of wealth, over-financialization of the economy and military over-reach have a proven track record of doing in empires (Spanish, Dutch, British...).

As Jared Diamond has pointed out, environmental destruction, resource depletion and climate change devastate civilizations, too. Collapse.

How 'bout all of the above, at once, NOW?

Does this evoke a visceral reaction? Does it get you kinda worked up? Or does it just feel like a downer best left alone?

I mean, this IS happening to our country and our planet on OUR watch.

If a man with an axe busted down your door, hacked down the wall and took the safe with everything you have and much of what you will ever have inside it, slung it over his shoulder, marched it outside, tossed it in the back of his yacht, and took off down the canal, paraphrasing Jimmy Malone/Sean Connery in "The Untouchables", what would you be prepared to do?

That's not a rhetorical question.

Unless you have a net worth of tens of millions dollars or more and earn the better part of a million dollars or more a year, in which case the laws make it pretty difficult for you to fail, it's already happened to you.

And he keeps coming back for more. Every day.

So what are we prepared to do?

I'm asking this because we watched the man with the axe in action during the 2000 election, and we and our leaders collectively, for all intents and purposes, stood around, slackjawed, scratching our heads. Ditto for the run-up to the Iraq War, minus those relative few who actually did try to stop it, the 2004 election and all the other atrocities too numerous to mention that went relatively unchallenged over the past eight years. It took eight years to muster enough determination to effectively respond and convince 53% to join us. What are we, a pack of ADD-addled dinosaurs?

Paraphrased and excerpted from "Not Deterred," by Paxus Calta-Star, in a book edited by Paul Rogat Loeb called "The Impossible Will Take A While: A Citizen's Guide to Hope in a Time of Fear."

It's 1996 in Sophia, the capital of Bulgaria. Unlike many of its neighbors, Bulgaria did not throw out its communist leaders, but instead settled for minor reforms.

Polina is 18. She's concerned because Bulgaria, Russia and the U.S. have worked out a deal to complete an unfinished nuclear power plant that had been half-constructed in the 80s. Other reactors in the country experienced serious accidents and had to be shut down. Polina has joined For the Earth to fight this reactor. They hold a conference and lots of esteemed authorities discuss various alternatives that could be promoted in order to replace the project: alternative energy, greater energy efficiency... Polina remarks, "if you want to stop the construction... you need to overthrow the government." Conversation continued, the conference ended.

Polina and 20 friends went to Parliament to protest. Entertained, the media shows up and televises it.

"Three months later, in March 1997, there are 20,000 people on the steps every day. Bowing to popular pressure, the government resigns. Shortly thereafter, the first Democratic reform government is elected. A couple of months after that, they release their energy policy--canceling the Belene project."

Obviously, we don't need to overthrow our government, nor could we do it with 20,000 protesters, even daily. Not that we could really expect to do that without a significant change in mindset. Nevertheless, we do have serious problems that need serious solutions, we can't take for granted that they will be, in fact we can be pretty much assured that in many really important ways they won't be, and it will take unimaginably outrageous action to change that.

But most days now everyone expects Obama to do it alone--"decider"-style, which is why we can ignore his cabinet appointments--or waits for further instructions, and STFU in the meantime, of course. (Which unvariably will lead to many, many more calls for STFU until...) When and if he needs us, he'll let us know. He's got this, remember?

...as if we don't know anything today about these bailouts, companies too big to fail, executive pay, concentration of wealth and over-"financilization" of the economy.

...as if we can't articulate intelligent concerns and/or demands while the clock runs.

...as if it would be impolite to be demanding more of the government and the government-elect that we do have in the meantime, you know, TODAY.

...as if we have time for honeymoons, while the man with the axe wreaks havoc on the rest of the century.

...as if there were no man with an axe.

What are we prepared to do?

Because, IMHO, the man with the axe IS still rampaging through our world, current and future, pretty much unconstrained. Just listen to Henry Paulson any night of the week. The indignation he faces by our leaders and we the taxpayers is still, however hopeful, so pathetic it is effectively non-existent.

So, other than celebrate and pat ourselves on the back about the election and enjoy the holidays, what are we prepared to do, about the man with the axe, tearing up all the good parallel universes left ahead for our children and grandchildren?

Cause all I hear is moaning and teeth-gnashing about Bush and Paulson and now Clarence Thomas, STFU about Obama's appointments, and Christ-on-a-cracker, Lieberman-on-a-dredle, Lou-Dobbs-on-taco, wait until Obama's inaugurated before expecting or asking anything of him... The man with the axe is...Bush's fault!!!

In the meantime, all we need is someone to blame and some eggnog?

And in the months it takes for the Obama administration to push the government into action (notwithstanding the tidal wave of executive orders he will sign upon entering office, which I admit will be sweet), what are we prepared to do while the man with the axe continues to run wild? Because things like the economy, Iraq War and healthcare won't get solved overnight, especially when approached in moderation.

I hate to be the bearer of bummers, really, because it's so unpopular and I like being popular as much as the next guy, but my ego is a heckuva lot less important to me at this moment than this 800-lb. man with an axe everyone wants to ignore.

Folks, the sky--the economy of today and the long-term future, both, just for starters--continues to fall everyday. Sorry, this chicken little is so right you can track it on the stock market; you can follow it in consumer confidence; you can see it in the national debt and deficit; you can watch it in the under-estimated unemployment numbers; hell, you can even follow it on the evening propaganda. (You can watch it slide off Antarctica...) Yes, folks, hate to break it to you, but the sky IS falling; nothing very constructive is happening in government, business or the grassroots; and nobody wants to talk about it, other than to malign Bush or Paulson or invest all their hopes in Obama...next year.

I'm no Jimmy Malone. I haven't taken a gut full of lead and dragged myself thirty feet across the floor to tell you this. Just like most of you, I'm doing fine. I seem to be doing fine. I can blog. I can watch gazillions of channels on satellite TV (including MSNBC). I can go to my daughter's basketball games. I can do all kinds of things, and so can she and her older sister and my wife. But I know we're NOT okay. I know in fact we have been under seige for decades and that I, my wife and/or my daughters may well wake up in a second-class country, with far fewer options than those few we have today. The options are dropping like species of flora and fauna. Because, unless a whole helluva lot of us get sensible and/or angry and damn heroic--like the abolitionists and suffragettes and civil rights movement--the man with the axe will just keep hacking away, filling his yachts with the savings and consumer electionics our grandchildren will have to work overtime to pay China back for.

I'm writing all this cause I look around and I don't see many of us who look scared, hungry or angry enough to tackle the work ahead. Maybe I'm misunderstanding. Maybe when 3,000 people show up to protest Prop 8 and no one shows up to protest Paulson, Bernanke and Cox or the CEO's of the big 3 automakers, it doesn't seem like we're on top of our game. It looks to me like we are as far away from the level of organization and response we need to deal with the problems we are facing now as we were in 2000 from getting worked up enough for victory in 2008.

And meanwhile, our horizon has about 360 degrees of points of no return.

So do we keep on truckin' down the same path, blogging, watching our flat-panel TVs and playing our gaming systems, or do we get about doing something even bolder and braver than electing Barack Obama so we can give future generations the better world it deserves and needs to survive?

Is it worth it?

P.S., For those who think there is work we should be organizing and doing, I highly recommend Loeb's book for perspective, ideas and inspiration. It has 49 great poems and essays from Seamus Heaney, Desmond Tutu, Nelson Mandela, Jonathan Kozol, Marian Wright Edelman, Howard Zinn, Vaclav Havel, Pablo Neruda, Sherman Alexie, Tony Kushner, Jim Hightower, Arundhati Roy, Mark Hertsgaard, Adrienne Rich, Maya Angelou, Alice Walker, Terry Tempest Williams, etc.

Originally posted to Words In Action on Thu Dec 04, 2008 at 12:18 PM PST.

Poll

What are you prepared to do?

20%5 votes
0%0 votes
0%0 votes
12%3 votes
16%4 votes
33%8 votes
4%1 votes
12%3 votes

| 24 votes | Vote | Results

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tips for hunting the man with the axe. n/t (6+ / 0-)

    The difficult I'll do right now. The impossible will take a little longer. - ? (Billie Holiday lyric & WWII Army Corp Engineers motto, per Paul Rogat Loeb)

    by Words In Action on Thu Dec 04, 2008 at 12:19:35 PM PST

  •  Simple reason we don't buy them (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    wystler, Dr Teeth

    Companies like GM have HUGE amounts of debt due to the horrid pensions plans and lifetime health benefits they were forced to ceed to their Union masters.  Buying GM for $1 still means 10's of billions in debt we would add to our books.

    This is the same reason you don't see investors running to buy these companies.  No one wants a company which such a horrible long term debt problem.  I don't want that problem either.

  •  Tips for the Serenity Prayer (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Dr Teeth

    God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.

    The difficult I'll do right now. The impossible will take a little longer. - ? (Billie Holiday lyric & WWII Army Corp Engineers motto, per Paul Rogat Loeb)

    by Words In Action on Thu Dec 04, 2008 at 12:31:42 PM PST

  •  To me it is simple. (4+ / 0-)

    I am not an ideologue, even when it comes to the economy.  To say you are going to spend government money into companies is socialism.  But this stupidity of trying to avoid socialistic control is moronic.  If we are going to be socialists, let's be smart socialists.  The total cost of GM would be about $70 billion dollars ($9 billion in total stock, and $60 billion in debt).  If the US bought them out right, we would own a huge manufacturing base.

    That base can easily be used to make any product we need.  Wind generators, tidal generators, high speed trains, and any other part of the solutions for the 21rst century.  That would be smart socialism.  Dumb socialism is spending money to prop up failing free markets.

  •  Thank+ (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Words In Action

    "...a printing press is worth 10,000 rifles..." Ho Chi Minh

    by Radical def on Thu Dec 04, 2008 at 12:45:37 PM PST

  •  Thanks for well put analysis...organizing is on (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Words In Action, UTvoter, Onomastic

    Don't let the exceedingly vocal Blue Dog preponderance and naysaying on dkos get you down, heh...

    They may be more or less in control of the Congress and administration now, but they are on their way out, as surely as the Republicans, I think.

    It's important to note that the grassroots organizing you call for is, in fact, underway, nationwide...

    http://www.realizingthepromise.org/

    http://www.dailykos.com/...

    The campaign touted by dkos, to:

    a) get more Democrats elected and

    b) get "better" (ie: more progressive) Democrats elected

    seems to me the most pragmatic, viable strategy.

    We now have a Democratic super-majority in Congress, damn near.

    Now we need a progressive majority within that.

    While there may be a role for mass demonstrations, even leading up to localized, or even, preferably, a nationwide general strike (and I mean an actual manifestation of that, not merely a "call" for it, heh), ultimately, unless such actions are to call for more democracy, toward a progressive super-majority in the Congress, it will be no more than the same old useless posturing and posing we have seen for years now on the left, on the streets.

    Futile gestures of protest and defiance are...futile.

    We need to seize the power, democratically.

    Democracy is the most fundamental revolutionary concept.

    All Power to the People!

    And, btw, what's wrong with sounding like Chomsky, lol?

    Obama should make him head of the FCC!

    "...a printing press is worth 10,000 rifles..." Ho Chi Minh

    by Radical def on Thu Dec 04, 2008 at 01:13:07 PM PST

    •  When I see all the votes for Let Go and (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      RedMeatDem, UTvoter, Onomastic

      Let Obama, I understand why it took 8 years to get here.

      People are so slow to realize the depth of the shit they are in and so quick to conclude they've gotten out of it.

      re: your comments about elections as the best/only (non-futile) method of democracy, I'd strongly suggest you take a look at the book I excerpted. Most significant social action has in fact come about through direct action, not indirect action (elections).

      In order for Obama to follow through on his promises and perhaps then some, with all the naysaying moderates around him, he will need massive public pressure behind him.

      The difficult I'll do right now. The impossible will take a little longer. - ? (Billie Holiday lyric & WWII Army Corp Engineers motto, per Paul Rogat Loeb)

      by Words In Action on Thu Dec 04, 2008 at 01:18:58 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Voting is Also Direct Action (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Onomastic

        And I'm not talking about dkos polls, lol, which prove absolutely nothing about politics in the US, or even of the dkos community, but merely reflect whoever happens to be online over the relatively short time that the item is high on the list.

        "Direct action" is a deep subject, with various meanings to various tendencies of thought, heh...

        Some consider participation in a peaceful non-violent demonstration to be a direct action.

        Some say you have to break out some windows, and fight with the cops.

        Others say you have to pick up the gun, and go to war.

        Most take it to mean doing something outside of the normal, day to day status quo, that makes waves, that has a direct impact, and that gets material results.

        I have yet to see a demonstration or protest, or an attack on symbolic targets, or armed struggle in the US, get any material results, except to the extent they may have influenced people to vote, to change whatever it was that was the problem.

        Yeah, maybe, to some extent, mass demonstrations can cause minor changes in policy, temporarily...but until the people elect representatives who will consistently act on their behalf, any "results" will be short lived, superficial, and inconsequential, ultimately.

        Some people point to riots in the streets, and say "this is what democracy looks like", but I disagree.  Such events are indicative of a profound lack of democracy.

        Grassroots community organizing and activism is needed, and demonstrations have a role, but what I'm saying is that they need to change the focus, the rhetoric, the "line" if you will, to go beyond merely "we are righteously pissed off about "X, Y, and Z", and need to start calling for "More Democracy", as the only material solution to whatever the issue may be.

        This recent election was a profound rejection of the fairly consistent calls from most of the "direct action" left for boycott of elections.  

        If the "left" wants to be relevant, and make a real difference, they need to call off that boycott bullshit, and start advocating for more democracy, as the most fundamental revolutionary concept.

        "...a printing press is worth 10,000 rifles..." Ho Chi Minh

        by Radical def on Thu Dec 04, 2008 at 04:09:52 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  well spoken (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Onomastic

          altho it never hurts to have your torches and pitchforks at the ready!

          however when the  diarist states that

          It took eight years to muster enough determination to effectively respond and convince 53% to join us.  

          , it reminds me that a 7 point spread is not entirely  a

          profound rejection

          a rejection yes, but not as profound as i would have liked.

          roll up our sleeves and organize i guess!

          "But above all, I will never forget who this victory truly belongs to - it belongs to you." Barack Obama

          by UTvoter on Thu Dec 04, 2008 at 04:24:39 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  a (0+ / 0-)

            "...a printing press is worth 10,000 rifles..." Ho Chi Minh

            by Radical def on Thu Dec 04, 2008 at 04:28:09 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  clunky keyboard! but, yes, 7 points is small (0+ / 0-)

              but it's actually huge, compared to other elections, especially recently, heh.

              My analysis is that the sole reason the Republicans and Blue Dogs have prevailed, and the only reason the progressive caucuses in the Congress have remained an isolated, relatively powerless minority, has been low voter turnout, over the years

              And a very big responsibility for that falls on the "left", I think, a very substantial portion of whom have consistently called for electoral boycott, posing "direct action" as an "alternative".

              Even though record numbers of youth, and virtually all people of color turned out for this election, the popular boycott of elections persists.

              Over 100 million people who were eligible to vote did not, in this election.  That's a third of the entire population.

              40 million who were registered failed to vote, and 60 million who were eligible didn't even bother to register.

              If even half of that 100 million had voted, I think the margin of victory would have been substantially higher, into the double digits.

              I think there are various reasons for a profound cynical defeatism among the electorate...

              On the one hand, the Democrats have not inspired much confidence, in their timorous reaction to having most of our most popular leaders assassinated back in the 60's and 70's, and various other forms of intimidation, both private, and also public, such as the rise of brownshirt "militias" during the Carter and Clinton admins, the mailing of the anthrax, etc.

              But I think more significant factors have been all out bourgeois commercial mass media blitz for the last 30 years, to attempt to discredit the revolutionary sea change in public opinion, and the entire electoral process, along with the many other various dirty tricks by the Republicans to suppress voter turnout, by hook and by crook

              And I think COINTELPRO remains alive and well, and has thoroughly infiltrated all organizations and movements opposed to capitalism and fascism, injecting that cynical defeatist electoral boycott rhetoric, extremely doctrinaire dogmatic rhetorical posturing and "revolutionary" posing, and, of course, to otherwise generally set people up to look like fools, and get busted.

              "...a printing press is worth 10,000 rifles..." Ho Chi Minh

              by Radical def on Thu Dec 04, 2008 at 04:49:53 PM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Well, that's it exactly. 100,000 did not vote, (0+ / 0-)

                despite the past 8 years of hell and the past 18 months of "enormous" electoral activity.

                What, one wonders, would it take to get, as you suggest, even half of those 100,000 to show up?

                Homeland invasion? Repeal of the Fair Labor Act? What?

                One can only wonder, since the last eight years were chock full of outrages.

                Same with contributions. After all that, a few % of the population contributes less than the country spends in chewing gum?

                I mean, don't get me wrong; I'm perfectly aware that 53% and several billion dollars are enormous on the historical scale.

                On the real human scale, in terms of what the public reality was/is in 2008, the response, for my money, is still mind-bogglingly pathetic. And yet we can't really expect to maintain even a fraction of that energy between now and the next Presidential election. As if our work is done here.

                The difficult I'll do right now. The impossible will take a little longer. - ? (Billie Holiday lyric & WWII Army Corp Engineers motto, per Paul Rogat Loeb)

                by Words In Action on Thu Dec 04, 2008 at 08:35:56 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  100 MILLION! (0+ / 0-)

                  "But above all, I will never forget who this victory truly belongs to - it belongs to you." Barack Obama

                  by UTvoter on Thu Dec 04, 2008 at 09:13:25 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  and i believe i heard or read somewhere (0+ / 0-)

                    that utah has the lowest per capita registered voters in any state. i would look that up but i'm tired and going to bed. how people, women especially (i am one), can not vote is totally beyond my comprehension

                    "But above all, I will never forget who this victory truly belongs to - it belongs to you." Barack Obama

                    by UTvoter on Thu Dec 04, 2008 at 09:16:14 PM PST

                    [ Parent ]

          •  r (0+ / 0-)

            "...a printing press is worth 10,000 rifles..." Ho Chi Minh

            by Radical def on Thu Dec 04, 2008 at 04:28:09 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

        •  Technically, voting is defined as indirect action (0+ / 0-)

          because it involves handing over responsibility to a representative.

          If you check it out, say, on wikipedia, you see there is technical jargon built up around socio-political action.

          And I beg to differ about direct action being more significant in terms of political action. Historically, all of the heavy-lifting of social action has occurred over long periods of time (generations) by incredibly determined, infinitely patient saints with strong convictions. Had it not been for generations of activists, public opinion on slavery, women's suffrage, the black vote, women's rights, gay rights, wars would have ever entered a region where politicians would feel safe enough to adopt and fight for them.

          The difficult I'll do right now. The impossible will take a little longer. - ? (Billie Holiday lyric & WWII Army Corp Engineers motto, per Paul Rogat Loeb)

          by Words In Action on Thu Dec 04, 2008 at 08:26:21 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Correction: (0+ / 0-)

            "And I beg to differ about direct action being more significant in terms of political action."

            SHOULD BE

            "And I beg to differ about indirect action (i.e., electoral politics) being more significant in terms of political action."

            The difficult I'll do right now. The impossible will take a little longer. - ? (Billie Holiday lyric & WWII Army Corp Engineers motto, per Paul Rogat Loeb)

            by Words In Action on Thu Dec 04, 2008 at 08:51:09 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

  •  If you want to wait until next year, you'll (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    UTvoter

    deserve all the shit you get while waiting.

    The difficult I'll do right now. The impossible will take a little longer. - ? (Billie Holiday lyric & WWII Army Corp Engineers motto, per Paul Rogat Loeb)

    by Words In Action on Thu Dec 04, 2008 at 01:20:27 PM PST

  •  good rant - (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Words In Action

    i believe a big guy with an ax stole my 401K

    "But above all, I will never forget who this victory truly belongs to - it belongs to you." Barack Obama

    by UTvoter on Thu Dec 04, 2008 at 01:46:52 PM PST

    •  I'm hearing "don't worry, be happy." (0+ / 0-)

      What are these people thinking?

      The difficult I'll do right now. The impossible will take a little longer. - ? (Billie Holiday lyric & WWII Army Corp Engineers motto, per Paul Rogat Loeb)

      by Words In Action on Thu Dec 04, 2008 at 01:54:40 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  yeah, looks like 53% of poll responses (0+ / 0-)

        say STFU to you and the man with the axe. however, there is a number of people who used to read this site and are now no longer connected to the internet - the guy with the axe cut their connection.

        if you talk to Roy, the post-doc with his fingers on the pulse of the economy, he's with Krugman and you

        But nothing is happening on the policy front that is remotely commensurate with the scale of the economic crisis.

        krugman

        "But above all, I will never forget who this victory truly belongs to - it belongs to you." Barack Obama

        by UTvoter on Thu Dec 04, 2008 at 02:48:15 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  by the way (0+ / 0-)

    glad you think

    anarcho-syndicalism, at least as I understand it, is just plain silly

    you had me worried!

    "But above all, I will never forget who this victory truly belongs to - it belongs to you." Barack Obama

    by UTvoter on Thu Dec 04, 2008 at 01:53:58 PM PST

  •  You can watch this now...underway (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Words In Action

    Grassroots Organizers meet with new Obama administration, today, in DC

    http://www.c-spanarchives.org/...

    "...a printing press is worth 10,000 rifles..." Ho Chi Minh

    by Radical def on Thu Dec 04, 2008 at 02:02:46 PM PST

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