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Please, STOP IT!

Why are so many on both sides so hot about this? As a gay man, I was very disappointed at first to learn of this. Then it hit me. It’s not that Warren’s invitation to the inauguration is a problem. The point is that he and I BOTH have a place at the table.

I would have pushed for a different choice. But for heaven’s sake, could we please stop demonizing each other?

Randy, CSMonitor.com

Is it possible that Obama has picked his invocation speaker based on his speaking and writing ability and not his political views?

Is it possible that ceremonial choices at the inauguration do not have to be dictated by politics? Are there other things beyond politics that Americans care about?

Is it possible that, even if his political views are equivalent to James Dobson, Rick Warren is not a primarily political person and actually devotes himself mostly to nonpartisan charity work?

Is it possible that there is a difference between Warren and his evangelical friends? Let's look at the three most recent articles he wrote for pastors.com.

Facing the world's five giants!

  1. The first global giant is spiritual darkness.

Here’s a startling truth: Billions of people have never even heard the name of Jesus Christ. Three thousand distinct people groups around our world wouldn’t even know the name of Jesus if they heard it.

  1. The second giant we want to tackle is the lack of servant leaders around the world.

Around the world, there are plenty of people in leadership who abuse their power. Many refuse to use their power for the good of their people -- instead they choose to use it for themselves. This has created chaos in the world.

  1. The third giant we’re going after is poverty.

More than half of the world -- that’s three billion people -- live on less than two dollars a day. One-sixth of the world’s population lives in slums. Those are heart-breaking statistics. Proverbs 28:7 (NIV) says, "The righteous care about justice for the poor, but the wicked have no such concern."

  1. The fourth giant we want to attack is disease.

Billions suffer the effects of famine and drought. They are homeless, hungry, and helpless. They’re ill. We can do something about that.

  1. The fifth giant we want to tackle is ignorance.

Over half the world is still illiterate. How can a country grow and be strong economically when its citizens can’t read, can’t write, and don’t know the fundamentals of math and science that we take for granted?

A plan for blessing the whole world

More is expected of those who have more
Jesus said it this way in Luke 12:48b (LB): "Much is required from those to whom much is given, for their responsibility is greater." Would you agree that based on the blessings of your life you probably have a greater responsibility than other people in the world? It’s obvious we’ve been given freedom and opportunities that many people don’t have. We’ve been given material and physical and spiritual abundance that a lot of people around the world simply do not have.

Use your influence to tackle HIV/AIDS

Two years ago HIV/AIDS was not on my agenda; it was not even a blip on my radar. I'm a pretty focused person, so I've essentially invested my vocational life in two things: building a model of a healthy local church and training other pastors to do the same.  I don't know a lot of things, but I do know how to equip and mobilize pastors. So, HIV/AIDS was not on my agenda at all until God spoke to me in a very audible way –through my wife.

Cut it out, guys. This guy is not James Dobson. He does not contribute to Focus on the Family or the AFA. To compare him to these organizations which actively fight against equal rights is insulting to my ears, and I am not even a Christian.

The political arguments you have made are based on cherry picked statements from individual interviews over a period of years, not the style of preaching he advocates in his churches nor anything from the books he's written. Yes, he said these things. Yes, they are abhorrent. But they are not representative of his character-- you should recognize that from Obama's longtime support of Jeremiah Wright. Talking Points Memo absurdly fears he will use the invocation as a weapon against Obama later-- but he's never done anything close to that sort of backstabbing.

For once, let Obama make a choice that isn't ruled by partisanship.

Originally posted to shii on Thu Dec 18, 2008 at 08:22 AM PST.

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Comment Preferences

  •  Pro lifers are also upset (5+ / 0-)

    Warren's own backlash

    Gay leaders are outraged that Obama chose Rick Warren to deliver in the invocation, and now pro-lifers are mad at Warren for doing it.

    The optics of which are probably more or less what Obama wants.

    http://www.cbn.com/...

  •  Sure It's Possible (6+ / 0-)

    It's also likely they picked him without even checking on his position on Prop 8.  But that doesn't mean it's OK that they did that.  

    "Dignified people, without a whimsical streak, almost never offer fresh insights, in economics or anywhere else." Paul Krugman

    by Dana Houle on Thu Dec 18, 2008 at 08:25:50 AM PST

    •  Kudo's (6+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      GenXWho, shii, Nova Land, rb137, MA Voter, pinkbunny

      Recognizing a chance for discussion is the first step towards progress.

    •  The fly in the ointment (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DaleA

      You do a good job of bringing up Warren's good points, but it comes down to Warren's hateful stance on gays.

      At the "Religious Left" forum at Netroots Nation one of the panelists pointed out that there are some fundie churches doing some insanely great charity work for the poor and the sick — as they are called to in the Gospels — but still harbor a hateful policy toward homosexuals.  It was an open question whether the religious left should embrace these people for what we have in common, or criticize them for where we differ, or both.

      This is Obama's kickoff party.  This is an event filled with symbolism and should set the tone.  Homophobia should not share a stage with Obama.

      Would we tolerate someone who was "only a little racist"?  No.

  •  It's all possible. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    NearlyNormal

    And of course, so are their exact opposites.

    •  If you don't ask (0+ / 0-)

      then how will you find out?

      The Republicans are now like a wounded, cornered animal - and that makes them very dangerous.

      by DupageBlue on Thu Dec 18, 2008 at 08:40:42 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  If you ask, "Isn't it possible?"... (0+ / 0-)

        then what can you find out?

        Yes, it's all possible. And so are the opposite conclusions. So you've "found out."

        Now what?

        I wouldn't stand in the way of anyone asking a question. But a more pointed one is more likely to turn up something interesting in the answer.

        Is it possible? Yes.

        How about, is it likely? Is it wise? Is it something people will understand?

        Any of those would probably tell us a great deal more than whether it's possible. Some truly stupid things are nonetheless quite possible.

        •  But asking is also the start of a (0+ / 0-)

          discussion, and talking about a difference is very hard - but not as hard as living with hatred for another person, any person. Even Rick Warren.

          The Republicans are now like a wounded, cornered animal - and that makes them very dangerous.

          by DupageBlue on Thu Dec 18, 2008 at 09:19:37 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I wouldn't know. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            DupageBlue

            But tell me more about my hatred, Doc.

            Asking is the start of a discussion. But when the question is simply "Is it possible?", it's not that good of a start.

            There are qualitative differences in discussions. That's just true.

            •  No, please do not misunderstand (0+ / 0-)

              I was not referring to you or if you hate anyone! I would never presume to know your feelings and I am sorry if you inferred that from my comment.

              The question "is it possible" is (to me) the best start:

              ... is it possible to build that?

              ... is it possible to love them/him/her?

              ... is it possible to save them/him/her?

              ... is it possible to agree?

              Is it possible you are as glad as I am that we are having this discussion?

              The Republicans are now like a wounded, cornered animal - and that makes them very dangerous.

              by DupageBlue on Thu Dec 18, 2008 at 09:45:12 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  But look at the questions asked. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                DupageBlue

                Let's not make up a bunch of "is it possible" questions that might be worth discussing. Let's look at the "is it possible" questions that were actually asked:

                Is it possible that Obama has picked his invocation speaker based on his speaking and writing ability and not his political views?

                Is it possible that ceremonial choices at the inauguration do not have to be dictated by politics? Are there other things beyond politics that Americans care about?

                Is it possible that, even if his political views are equivalent to James Dobson, Rick Warren is not a primarily political person and actually devotes himself mostly to nonpartisan charity work?

                Is it possible that there is a difference between Warren and his evangelical friends?.

                All of that is possible. All of the opposites are possible. These questions don't tell us anything.

                It's possible that Obama picked his invocation based on nothing in particular. It's possible that Rick Warren is primarily a political person. It's possible that there's a difference between Warren and other evangelicals, but it's shoe size.

                The author should just assert these things if he or she believes them. That's more valuable by far than asking me whether they're possible.

                •  I have to agree with you... (0+ / 0-)

                  All this is possible. Right now it feels like because of this one thing people are ready to toss Obama, as if all this time they never really thought he could change the direction of this country; but they supported him anyway. I have not been happy with everything he has done, But he is not even the President yet. When he supports legislation to strip the rights of women to proper healthcare or the rights of people to equal treatment under the law - then I will worry.

                  The Republicans are now like a wounded, cornered animal - and that makes them very dangerous.

                  by DupageBlue on Thu Dec 18, 2008 at 11:15:23 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  I don't know how other people feel. (0+ / 0-)

                    But I can tell you that I never really thought he could change the direction of this country but I supported him anyway. Not from the very beginning -- though I should also add that I didn't believe anyone else could change the direction of the country, either.

                    But I didn't come to that conclusion because of this particular incident.

                    I think all those things are possible, but several of them are unlikely, and are mostly poor guesses.

          •  Finding Out (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            DupageBlue

            Make up your mind. We will not find out anything by discussing it here on DKos. And really, we don't need yet another diary to start a discussion of this issue on DKos. It's not like everyone has been standing around mute on the topic since the announcement was made.

  •  I agree - he is NOT a "bigot" (6+ / 0-)

    He is wrong about gay issues. He has backwards thinking.

    But, no more backwards than my own grandmother who voted for Bush, thinks gay is immoral, etc...yet always calls me and tells me to give a kiss to my lesbian partner and our baby!

    He isn't out preaching hate. He's preaching about poverty and all that.

    We're throwing the baby out with the bathwater.

    •  For you it's a policy issue (10+ / 0-)

      For me, it's my fundamental rights. Is having someone who actively advocated a law that took my rights away acceptable? Not when it is a celebration for the nation, including the GLBT community that put him there.

      A fellow ain't got a soul of his own, just little piece of a big soul, the one big soul that belongs to everybody - Tom Joad, Grapes of Wrath

      by gladkov on Thu Dec 18, 2008 at 08:45:23 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  You are absolutely justified in your anger. (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Nova Land, rb137, pinkbunny, Mistral Wind

        That said, we will not be able to bully laws in place.  I have no right asking you to be patient, but I see no quick fixes here.  I can only say I do see an America of equal rights for all people on the horizon, but it will require changing some existing prejudices.  I see no way of accomplishing this without some kind of dialogue.  Right now there are too few players that we can hope to put in a room together.  If this Warren guy is one of them, then alienating him seems like a bad idea.

        •  In the meantime (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          DaleA

          We don't need to legitimize people like Warren.

          Does Warren have some good points?  Sure.  But it's "close, but no cigar."

          Read the tail end of Matthew 25.  Jesus says that you must treat every other person as if they were Him.  According to Jesus, when Warren denies human rights to gays, he is denying human rights to Jesus.  This is one of the places where Jesus Himself promises punishment for misdeeds.  

          Jesus said to love everyone — no exceptions. As a Christian, I'm tired of people accepting that Warren's exclusionary theology is somehow compatible with that.  I want to see Obama reject it as well.

    •  "The Good Jew" (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DaleA

      When the Nazis decided to rid their society of Jews, a problem was identified: the problem of "The Good Jew."

      The leaders realized that while generic antisemitism could be whipped up, the Jews with whom people were friendly would be seen as "the good Jews."  People would think, "Oh yes, those Jews are terrible, but not dear Mr. Goldberg, my tailor! He's a good Jew!"  The key is to hide the targeted group from sight... hence the vigorous opposition to any public reference to homosexuality and the pressure for gays and lesbians to go back into the closet.  What would your grandmother say to you about lesbians if she didn't know you were one?

      Similarly, when blacks were second-class citizens in the U.S. lots of whites liked them — as long as they were cleaning toilets or shining shoes.  Everyone adored their black domestic worker.

      Just because someone treats you nicely doesn't mean they mean you well.  If someone is denying you a basic human right, it doesn't matter how much they are smiling while they do it.

      Just because Warren has good things to say on topics of poverty doesn't mean he isn't preaching hate.  Jesus commanded His followers to love everyone and He said that all were equal in His "family."  Christian values are a package deal and the oppression of gays is not in the package no matter how much assholes like Warren seem to think that it is.

      He is preaching hate.  I say this as a committed and educated Christian.

  •  this is gonna sound stupid (0+ / 0-)

    but did you ever post on a website called somethingawful

    I used to post there but it got really stupid and I quit, just wodering though.

    as to the Rick warren thing I am pretty sick of talking about it.

    Barack Obama: A man after my own heart.

    by rexymeteorite on Thu Dec 18, 2008 at 08:28:16 AM PST

  •  Ignoring Joseph Lowery = something bad (11+ / 0-)

    I don't know if it is prejudice or racism or just white privilege...

    but, I can't help but notice that people are livid about Rick Warren, yet completely ignoring the huge significance of having Joseph Lowery also be there giving a prayer.

    Last month everyone was blaming blacks on Prop 8. This month Obama picks a black civil rights hero who is extremely pro-gay marriage to give teh benediction. No one cares or notices?  Is this not a GOOD step towards reconciliation between blacks/gays?  

    Why are we focused on ONE speaker who will be doing nothing more than giving a prayer?

  •  the warmongers/corporate whores that fill Obama's (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DemDachshund, Free Spirit

    cabinet concern me much more. not that i expected anything different from Obama, but that does not mean i hoped for something different. i knew "change" was just an advertising jingle.

    This warren fellow will come and go on jan. 20th, the rest will be there for a long time, making policy and shit.

    I hope some reporters have the guts to throw shoes i mean tough questions at these people.

    Free Muntadhar al-Zaidi! and buy that man a new pair of shoes!

    by Tom J on Thu Dec 18, 2008 at 08:31:04 AM PST

  •  Wrong. Warren is the Religious Right's good cop (5+ / 0-)

    He's peddling a smiley-face, New Agey version of the same retrograde social policy that Dobson is pushing. Rick Warren is a better-fed, more media-savvy version of Elmer Gantry. And he's a horsecrap writer.

    The Detroit "Lions". 2008 NFL Pre-Season Champions.

    by Dump Terry McAuliffe on Thu Dec 18, 2008 at 08:33:42 AM PST

  •  I bet Warren is going to say something that (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Cedwyn, GenXWho, Mistral Wind

    will shock people for the better.

  •  Someone is always going to be upset. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    rb137, Mistral Wind, hikerbiker

    However this whole discussion is a good thing, the trick is to not take things personally.

    My brother in law (who is a closet racist) once saw me shake the hand of an usher at a play our families went to - the usher was African-American. He asked me why I shook his hand - I told him "because he offered it to me."

    The Republicans are now like a wounded, cornered animal - and that makes them very dangerous.

    by DupageBlue on Thu Dec 18, 2008 at 08:37:45 AM PST

  •  You actually get this more than most here. (10+ / 0-)

    As long as there is no discussion between the Christians and the left, we will get nowhere at passing sane civil rights laws.  There is very little I agree with Rick Warren on, but I will give him credit for being respectful to Senator Obama during the election.

    This is rare among the Christian right, and we shouldn't pass up the opportunity.  If we can't find a peace on gay rights and abortion, we will continue to be politically crippled as a nation.  From what I see here the left seems as close minded and unwilling to listen as the evangelicals.

    Acceptance is bred from understanding.  Understanding is bred from proximity.  This is a chance to begin constructive debate without alienating the two sides.  I am certain there are just as many evangelicals that are upset with Warren for showing any support of Obama.  Hopefully there are enough rational people on both sides to move forward.

    •  Very well said!! (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MA Voter, Dr Teeth

      The Republicans are now like a wounded, cornered animal - and that makes them very dangerous.

      by DupageBlue on Thu Dec 18, 2008 at 08:43:46 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Also Demonstrated Here at DK (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Dr Teeth, Wolf Of Aquarius

      The civility that's utterly missing on the right is here. I am including those who believe the choice is abhorrent it's still done in a civil fashion. Just so you know this gets through and there are religious folk who hear it. This controversy will probably help provide more and not less sympathy and empathy for the plight of gay people amongst religious conservatives. It worked for me and cause me to flip.

    •  As I've said before... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Dr Teeth

      Understanding is bred from proximity.  This is a chance to begin constructive debate without alienating the two sides.

      No argument there. If an openly gay man or woman will also have a high-profile role in the inauguration, then I'm find with Warren having one too. If not...then there is no proximity, no constructive debate, no understanding to be gained, and really no justification for this choice.

      Will an openly gay man or woman also have a high-profile role in the inauguration?

  •  As I recall many loved Obama's willingness to (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    MA Voter, Mistral Wind

    try to breach the divide and behave civilized with those you disagree with.
    We railed at the Bushies and the rightwing for stereotyping us, for demonizing and screaming at anyone who did not agree with them and having a different opinion on the issues.
    So, what's happened to our belief that we were better then that?  
    We are acting the same as those we condemned.  We are hyperventing over someone who doesn't agree with us 100 percent and therefore should be demonized.

    We have a problem.  We need to examine our own hypocrisy.

    •  Perhaps . . . (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Free Spirit

      We need to examine our own hypocrisy.

      And right after that, we need to examine our never-ending propensity to act like a complete bunch of bend-over-and-take-it saps.

    •  Speak For Yourself (0+ / 0-)

      We are hyperventing over someone who doesn't agree with us 100 percent and therefore should be demonized.

      Speak for yourself. No one elected you the DKos spokesperson.

      I not only haven't hypervented, nor even vented, I have no problem with Warren participating...as long as an openly gay man or woman gets to participate with equal visibility. Barring that, this is not breaching any divide. It is just widening it.

      I do have a problem with people gushing over how this is all about reaching out, breaching divides, bringing people together, without even having bothered to ask whether an openly gay man or woman has been invited participate with equal visibility. Which leads me to suspect that most of this high-minded talk of reaching out, breaching divides, bringing people together is just so much apologetic hot air.

  •  Human Rights are not "partisan" (6+ / 0-)

    Rick Warren is anti human rights. Therefor should be disqualified from speaking at any US Government sanctioned event.

    To include him is to aknowledge that those who believe human rights do not apply to all somehow are allowed to have that opinion.

    They are not, as stated in our Constitution.

    •  True we are all equal (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Mistral Wind

      But forcing people who don't agree with you into the background just allows them to fester and reinforces there belief of a "gay agenda" trying to subvert their way of life. Look at what happened when Prop 8 passed - an act designed to push gays to the back of the bus; but they are rising up and fighting back - a new civil rights movement.

      That is a beautiful thing; don’t make the same mistake by treating people who are misguided the same way you are fighting against being treated.

      The Republicans are now like a wounded, cornered animal - and that makes them very dangerous.

      by DupageBlue on Thu Dec 18, 2008 at 08:57:59 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  so you belive that... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        DupageBlue

        ... human rights should be voted upon?

        The issue of human rights is not subject to debate nor opinion, nor consensus.

        Those that preach against equal rights, are incorrect and should not be given a platform. Let them fester in their own churches and wherever else.

        The only mistake that is being made is by those who assume that since Obama said it, it must be right.

        as was posted by earlier commenters, what would you be saying if he asked an anti-semite to speak? The world would implode.

        •  Human rights should never be voted on (0+ / 0-)

          let me be very clear on that!

          And I don't assume Obama is right, but I have hope that he is. I have seen hate all over the world, it almost always come down to two things:

          1. People that don't understand other people.
          1. People seeking power over others.

          But tell me something: How do you define anti-semite?

          I doubt how I define it would be the same as yours or someone of the jewish faith.

          The Republicans are now like a wounded, cornered animal - and that makes them very dangerous.

          by DupageBlue on Thu Dec 18, 2008 at 09:29:52 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  I see your point. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            DupageBlue

            It is valid to say that people should attempt to understand all points of view. But it is not valid to permit someone who preaches against a class of people speak at an event such as this.

            Mr. Obama is wrong, and his rationale is shallow and predictable.

            To say this is a 'reach across the aisle' thing is hogwash.  Do you think Washington would invite King George to his inauguration simply to show that he is open to all pov's?  No.  It would be hypocritcical of the leader of the FREE world to allow someone who is against all people obtaining equal rights, to speak at his inauguration.

            Again, Mr. Obama is wrong on this and it worries me that there are people who suggest hate speech be given equal time in this day and age.

            •  I worry about it as well (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              LeftcoastBlues

              But the only reason that "reaching across the aisle is hogwash," is because democrats are really the only ones that ever do it, remember "Reagan Democrats" is NOT an oxymoron.

              We agree on the ends, but differ only on the means – and even there I don’t think we are that far off.

              I feel Obama is right, but I also realize that I have never been discriminated against like this – so if you have then you have a right to your perspective.

              In the past 24 hours I have "spoken" to many different people about this on DK; and, with one exception, I have truly enjoyed every one of these conversations. That is the power we have that the wingnuts and haters lack – they simply reinforce their own positions over and over.

              In fact all of us laying our feeling out on the table is perhaps the best thing that will come of this situation.

              The Republicans are now like a wounded, cornered animal - and that makes them very dangerous.

              by DupageBlue on Thu Dec 18, 2008 at 10:17:59 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

      •  Can the divisive melodrama (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        DupageBlue

        Not inviting someone to give the invocation at your inauguration is not forcing them into the background. And you know it.

        What a shamefully dishonest argument.

        •  No, your right it is not the same. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Free Spirit

          That was not my point. We cannot achieve justice by denying justice; if we do we are looking for revenge not justice. This entire argument goes far deeper than Obama asking Warren to give the invocation; the passion generated all over the internet by it should tell you that.

          It has truly struck a nerve, even more so than the passage of Prop 8 - I am excited by that, this is a chance to fight back - be passionate.

          But I fear marginalizing anyone - it creates resentment and resentment leads us right back to where we started. After the Civil war when the slaves were free the abolitionists, for the most part, said basically "...Ok your free have a great life!" Where did that get us? It led us to the abuses that are still here today.

          Progressives, in my opinion, are the only chance we have of coming close to achieving this, conservatives are too scared of change to accept anything like this or talk about it honestly. If we win equality for everyone and keep people from feeling like they "lost," That will truly be victory.

          The Republicans are now like a wounded, cornered animal - and that makes them very dangerous.

          by DupageBlue on Thu Dec 18, 2008 at 11:48:19 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

  •  Juan Williams today on NPR (0+ / 0-)

    talked about how Warren is somewhat progressive on poverty, etc.  Is that true?

  •  lol (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DaleA

    Classic

    Yes, he said these things. Yes, they are abhorrent. But they are not representative of his character-

    hahaah  , oh really. So did he apologize for them? Must of missed it.

    SO according to you, I can hate all kinds of stuff, but hey it doesnt reflect on my character?  interesting..

  •  Yup, he nailed it - that's the world's (0+ / 0-)

    Facing the world's five giants!

    The first global giant is spiritual darkness.
    Here’s a startling truth: Billions of people have never even heard the name of Jesus Christ. Three thousand distinct people groups around our world wouldn’t even know the name of Jesus if they heard it.

    number one problem!

    I hereby formally retract anything negative I ever said about him.

    •  You realize the guy is a pastor? (0+ / 0-)

      For him, Christianity is equivalent with goodness. Maybe you have had more relativist pastors but Warren is pretty affirmative of his religion. I don't think that should be a barrier to speaking at the invocation.

      •  The barrier is his bias against me (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        tiponeill, DaleA

        Tell me, would it be okay to invite a pastor who compared anyone else's marriage to incest or pedophilia?  Blacks, Jews, Catholics?  

        This man worked actively to eliminate my rights.  I'm not seeing the Obama campaign building any bridges to ME.

        •  WTF, spritual darkness? (0+ / 0-)

          If your circumanstances in your particular corner of this rock are lousy, then, yes, your outlook would be bleak. And hearing the name of Jeebus, Zeus, Gaia or Odin won't exactly improve your situation. Seems like the emphasis should be on providing potable water, food and a means of improving one's lot in life.

          The Republican brand: "Consequences, schmonsequences, as long as I'm rich"

          by D in Northern Virginia on Thu Dec 18, 2008 at 09:08:53 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  Would you like to confront your oppressor? (0+ / 0-)

          Or try to treat him like he doesn't exist?

          The Republicans are now like a wounded, cornered animal - and that makes them very dangerous.

          by DupageBlue on Thu Dec 18, 2008 at 09:11:27 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  Yeah... (0+ / 0-)

      I suspect lots of people stop listening after one giant.  Still, it's a nice list.

      Hynes, Daley, Madigan, Cullerton, Geokaris, Fawell, Lipinski, Jones, Jackson, Stroger...Did I forget any families?

      by Inland on Thu Dec 18, 2008 at 09:35:35 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Obama has missed a great opportunity to reach out (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DaleA, Free Spirit

    to the racists and the anti-semites.

    Why don't we have more David Dukes at the inauguration to bring us all together ?

    I wouldn't mind if Obama was equally insulting everyone, yet he only seems tone deaf when it comes to anti-gay bigots.

    We are powerless to act in cases of oral-genital intimacy unless it obstructs interstate commerce. - J. Edgar Hoover

    by tiponeill on Thu Dec 18, 2008 at 09:32:36 AM PST

  •  A Seat at the Table (0+ / 0-)

    The point is that he and I BOTH have a place at the table.

    Agreed. And if there is an openly gay man who will also have a high-profile "seat" at the inauguration, I have no problem with Warren having one too.

    Is there an openly gay man who will also have a high-profile "seat" at the inauguration?

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