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Bowers:

In short, the DNC will be moving away from the long-term, decentralized, fifty-state strategy of Howard Dean's tenure, and toward serving as a short-term, centralized re-election effort for President Obama in 2012.  It will continue the move away from paid media ushered in by Howard Dean, maintain or increase the amount of resource expenditures in most states, and the number of states it targets will be a broader effort than the narrow focus we saw in 2001-2004 (but more narrow than 2005-2008). However, it will return to the traditional role of the DNC as a supplement for the sitting President's re-election campaign, rather than as the long-term, localized institution building operation that is was from 2005-2008.
The fifty-state strategy of 2005-2008 is going to be replaced with the "re-elect President Obama" strategy of 2009-2012.

Assuming Bowers' source is correct, the DC Democratic establishment will like this. They hated losing control of that cash and letting the states decide for themselves how to best spend it. This is a return to how the party has traditionally operated. Idaho, which implausibly elected a member to the House in an R+18.9 district -- the most Republican district held by a Democrat today and the 14th most Republican district in the entire country -- would likely get passed over using a more traditional resource allocation model.

Obama lost Idaho by 26 points. Yeah. Deep red. But Kerry lost it by 38 points. We become a national party by competing nationally. Look at the 2004 and 2008 maps:

2004:

2008:

Blue states were made bluer, light red states were flipped, and crimson states were lightened up. Look at that vertical column from North Dakota to Texas. Sure, Oklahoma is full of dead-enders, but what used to be a crimson band of solid Red has now lightened considerably. The Dakotas were single-digit contests despite having no Obama ground game, officially making them purple states. Montana will flip our way in 2012 after being a 20-point Bush state in 2004.

And yes, even Idaho, Wyoming, and Utah saw significant gains for Democrats. They may be some of the most Republican states in the union today, but significantly less so than four years ago. And that matters not just to Obama's reelection effort in 2012, but also to every Democratic candidate up and down the ballot between now and then.

Howard Dean was a rare political creature -- a person who embraced decentralization. The new crew in power is far more conventional, resorting to an old-school centralized power structure. Democrats have the White House, and perhaps it's understandable that they want to take a proven model (the Obama campaign) and begin building what will eventually morph into Obama's reelection campaign. But given the size of Obama's list and his fundraising prowess, it shouldn't have to be an either-or proposition.

Update: I wrote this as a comment in the threads, but it's a succinct summary of this post, so I'll paraphrase it here:

There reason that there's an inherent conflict with turning the DNC into Obama's 2012 reelection effort is that there's no reason for the Obama operation to have staffers in Utah. But there's a reason for the Democratic Party to have staffers in Utah -- helping Democrats get elected to important local- and state-level offices and building a bench for federal offices.

If Obama's DNC wants to staff up in battleground states, then great. But the rest of the states shouldn't be discarded. We've been down that road before, and it wasn't pretty.

Originally posted to Daily Kos on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 09:55 AM PST.

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Comment Preferences

      •  Nice move. It was so spectacularly... (17+ / 0-)

        ...unsuccessful.

        When will they ever learn?

        Brushing off my two-by-four.

        Will the last one out of democracy please turn out the lights?

        by Apphouse50 on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:04:58 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  It's the hubris of the victor. (10+ / 0-)

          I'm sorry to say that but it's like they're telling Dean "thanks for the piggyback ride", and then ditched him.

          I think the chances at this point are small but I hope Dean runs again some day

          •  The treatment of Dean (29+ / 0-)

            makes me totally angry. It was so petty and mean-spirited, like something from high school.

            It is also incredibly stupid and destructive to the party.

            •  This kind of shenanigans (6+ / 0-)

              are the reason a lot of people I know won't register as Democrats.  Or will do so only temporarily and for a very specific reason.

            •  I agree and am not happy about it. (4+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              ZenTrainer, dclawyer06, MacJimi, Johnny Q

              They have treated Howard Dean in an unacceptably shabby way.  My displeasure will be reflected in my (lack of) check writing and via emails to the DNC and Kaine.  

              All politics is local and all Democrats, even in the reddest of states deserve national support and a chance to build inroads in their regions.  Ask Jon Tester.  

              A return to the loser Shrum/Brazile/DLC state write-off strategy or the Kerry "I'm not sharing my list with anyone" policy is appalling to me.

              "Those dunes are to the Midwest what the Grand Canyon is to Arizona and the Yosemite is to California." - Carl Sandburg

              by Critical Dune on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 11:59:04 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  I'm thoroughly disgusted (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                smeesq, Words In Action

                They have treated Howard Dean in an unacceptably shabby way.  My displeasure will be reflected in my (lack of) check writing and via emails to the DNC and Kaine.  

                You and me both.

                Equal "rites" for ALL Americans!

                by Diana in NoVa on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 12:28:11 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

              •  The differences between 2008 and 2004 (0+ / 0-)

                that caused the difference in the results were many - not just a 50 state strategy.

                The biggest difference was that teh country in 2008 was VERY unhappy with teh Republicans and the majority of peopel in 2004 weren't.
                Here is a link to a 2004 poll just before the election - http://www.usatoday.com/...
                Look at question 7 which is a variant on the normal "is the country on the right track" question. It is actually a better designed question as it allows people 4 categories rather than the two extremes. Shortly before election day, 13% said "very well" and 46 said "fairly well" in response to "How well are things going in the country". When you consider the country was a year and a half into the war, a factor that would make people reluctant to change Presidents without very good reason, and 59% say that things are going at least "fairly well", you see that Kerry was convincing enough to win some people over who were not that unhappy with Bush. (Contrast this to Obama's situation, where the number thinking the country was going in the right direction was less than 20%. Different question, but the situation is so night and day - it doesn't matter.)

                In addition, Kerry effectively had less money than Bush - as he had to stretch his $75 million over 13 weeks compared to Bush having to stretch it over just 8. Obama didn't take public financing - so he actually had substantially more money than McCain. He had the luxury of advertising in places like Arizona. Kerry did not have the money to do that.

                What was great about the 50 state strategy was that it supported Democrats in all states - which meant that if a candidate in a red state faltered or - as it did- the Republican party lost favor - we had candidates there to take advantage of it. Strengthening the party at the local level also helps everyone - including the Presidential candidate in the red states.

                But, if you had to redo just where money and candidate time was allocated in 2004 constrained by the money they had - there would be few changes. The fact is that they spent most of their time and money in the set of states that were most likely to win. It would be hard to argue that time should have been taken out of PA or OH to the less likely VA or MO.

            •  Yeah, I thought the treatment of Dean (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              ZenTrainer, Words In Action

              is the kind of "childish"-ness Obama was orating against yesterday.

          •  But this is a different time (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            ShadowSD

            and a different strategy can be employed if it makes sense. And if Howard Dean was a rare political creature then Barack Obama is even more rare.

            You can all can keep pointing to the miracle of flipping Virginia, NC, Nevada, Colorado, and Indiana- but the factor of Barack as a unique poltical phenomenon cannot be overlooked in the overall eqaution.  If we want to roll out stats then we can ask why, depsite all of the effort, Tennessee and Oklahoma got even more 'Red'.

            •  50 State Strat Trumps Unique Candidate (11+ / 0-)

              yes, Obama was an exceptionally strong candidate. But a 50 state strategy seeks to get strong candidates across the country, at all levels. It is about the country, not one person or one small group of people.

              Why they want to pull back from levels spent in 2005-2008 is beyond me. To put the fate of any party on one man is a mistake. A strong party needs to be strong all the way down.

              Typical top down thinking. Maybe the Dems aren't as democratic as we hope.

              "When you enter the ocean, you enter the food chain, and not necessarily at the top." - Cousteau

              by Thucydides Junior on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 11:14:06 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Long-term (5+ / 0-)

                The fifty state strategy is also a long-term effort, aimed at developing and nurturing strong candidates in all 50 states. Having that level of depth is what will serve when the current unique candidate has moved on. Absolutely despicable to roll this back at a time of victory. This is when we can afford to expand and deepen the strategy. Welcome to leadership by the same tired old Demohacks.

                •  Very true (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  Words In Action

                  The 50-state strategy also helped down-ticket candidates, even down to the local city or county level. I know it did here in NM.

                  I guess Obama is concerned about Obama, period. Plus the party structure in many areas is chock full of, you know, those horrid progressives and members of the frightening Dem base. Why help them?

                  Thanks to Dean, many progressives ran for and won slots in the NM Dem Party structure, from precinct and ward chairs, to state central committee. We've been active in many party activities including platform and resolutions. Can't have that.

                  Plus, we know that Dems with some experience will begin to question Obama on his positions and actions, something I'm sure he believes his rally list of nonpartisan, newbie supporters won't be as likely to do. Hey, we're moving into a nonpartisan future, doncha know?

                  Visit my blog DemocracyForNewMexico: NM grassroots politics and activism

                  by barbwire on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 01:19:12 PM PST

                  [ Parent ]

            •  You cannot have perfection everywhere (6+ / 0-)

              Howard Dean has nothing to apologize for.

              And, of all times to be rolling back the 50 State Strategy... when we need to finish building on our successes and increase our margins... now is not the time.

              <div style="color: #a00000;"> Our... constitutional heritage rebels at the thought of giving government the power to control men's minds. Thurgood Marshal

              by bronte17 on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 11:21:41 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

            •  Who is discounting Obama (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Words In Action

              as a "rare political creature"?

              Also, 50 states was a goal, an impossible dream politically, but a goal all the same to aspire to.

              Because a few states still remain "red" are you saying 50 States was/is a losing strategy?

            •  states like Utah (3+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Odysseus, ZenTrainer, Words In Action

              ..and let's not forget all those beautiful state and federal lands and wilderness areas in Utah that need protecting (albeit sometimes protection FROM its citizens. Recall Cheney/Bushco's eleventh hour attempts to auction off oil drilling in the magnificent red rock areas of Southern Utah. And Salt Lake City had one of the country's most liberal two-term mayors (Rocky Anderson, who organized several anti-Bush/Cheney/Iraq war rallies. Dean had it right with the 50-state strategy, IMHO.

              "Nothing is worse than active ignorance." ~ Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

              by wildwood13 on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 11:55:22 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

    •  We dont know yet. (21+ / 0-)

      I can't believe they would abandon the 50 state strategy completely. I think it remains to be seen.

      "assuming Bowers source is correct" is the key line here.

      I DO think that they will amend it for re-election in some fashion. That's a no-brainer.

      Ablington is a scab at the bending factory. Relentless!

      by ablington on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:02:03 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Why would they reinvent the wheel? (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        tikkun, Mz Kleen, Clytemnestra, mcmom

        Let's hope they just "amend" the wheel.

        You won't have Putin's rearing head to kick around anymore.

        by rhubarb on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:03:53 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  The bottom line is that (14+ / 0-)

          we can't freak out until this source is somehow confirmed, and then we have to take a look at the new proposals.

          I think it's not an imprudent thing to re-ajust strategy in some fashion to accommodate for a RE-election. It doesnt mean abandoning the 50 state strategy, but it will require a different angle of approach.

          Ablington is a scab at the bending factory. Relentless!

          by ablington on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:06:56 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Agreed. (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            ablington, Clytemnestra

            You won't have Putin's rearing head to kick around anymore.

            by rhubarb on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:09:46 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  There is not really that much of a conflict (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              rhubarb

              between the two objectives.  An Obama re-election campaign would seek to expand his map - and all that remains to win is deep red territory; true, Utah and Oklahoma will likely not get the attention that many of the other states will, and in that sense it's not literally a fifty state strategy, but the vast majority of the deep red states WILL be pursued by Obama anyway - and if his coattails are anything like what they are now, it's a pretty smart strategy.

              I think that when we see how powerful Obama's name and organization are in 2010, the concerns about his strategy regarding the Congressional elections in 2012 will seem a bit silly.  His re-election campaign will compete to try and win in forty five states if his approval numbers are where they are now, and he will always continue to have the ability to expand the voter universe when he rallies his organization, which only benefits the Democratic party in Congressional elections that always have a relatively smaller universe of public interest.

              The all purpose reference for every Obama surrogate and supporter

              by ShadowSD on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 11:30:53 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  I think you're missing the point (3+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                rhubarb, ZenTrainer, alicia logic

                The 50-state strategy wasn't just for the presidential election. It was designed to attract and support candidates from the local level on up, not just action in presidential years. If what Bowers says is true, Dem Party offices will be running on empty until 2011. That can't be good for down-ticket candidates.

                Visit my blog DemocracyForNewMexico: NM grassroots politics and activism

                by barbwire on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 01:23:35 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

          •  DNC has 3 aims now, thus they have to readjust... (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            ablington

            That the DNC has several things to work on now...

            1.) Re-elect Barack Obama --
            Remember people plan their runs at president 3-4 years in advance, and are staffed up 2 YEARS before the election.

            It seems OFA will have a separate identity within the DNC, and will already have a small staff -- and like 20 million or so?

            2.) Support state parties growth.

            3.) The mid-term 2010 elections.

            Given these new aims, they have to readjust how to work with state parties.

            •  Plus, I bet Obama will raise less in 2012 (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Ilikepie

              unless the GOP can wrangle a serious contender. Which I doubt.

              Ablington is a scab at the bending factory. Relentless!

              by ablington on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:52:23 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  OFA will raise less, but .... (0+ / 0-)

                Consider the money should be spent more effectively AND if OFA can maintain good contact with the voterdb -- jeebus -- starting to raise funds from September 2011!

                OFA-- (Organizing for America, the Obama voter / fundraising db)

                OFA already had 30 MM in the bank after the election.

                OFA probably has the benefit of looking at preliminary 2012 budgets as well, and will likely start fund-raising for the DNC/OFA portion from 2010->2012.

                2009-2010 Goals for OFA --
                Technology -- HUGE advantage in having burnt-in systems and time and ability to expand on the feature set.

                Likely to improve the voter targeting software, as well as keep touching voters with contacts that are not directly for fund-raising.

              •  ? (0+ / 0-)

                You don't think the GOP is going to field a serious candidate in 2012?!

                You don't think they're going to spend the next 4 years tying this republican-created economy on Obama? You don't think they're going to use their considerable resources to drag him through the mud nonstop?

            •  All of this (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              barbwire

              makes me wonder if LBJ wasn't right when he suggested that the President be limited to a single six year term and that members of the House have four year terms.

          •  Even If It's 100% Confirmed (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            ablington, rhubarb, royce, Ilikepie

            Kos' headline is kind of a brutal rape of the actual text he's using.  Continuing the move away from traditional media and increasing expenditure on races that were previously considered a long shot are good things.  We have NO IDEA what the "narrowing of focus" they talk about even means.  It's just this place using something as an excuse to freak out; It's kind of what we do.

            If spittle & tooth=vigor & youth Bill-O & Savage won't grow any older If wishes & dreams=bitches & beams We'll all live in skyscrapers bu

            by TooFolkGR on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:31:05 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Democrats => perpetual chicken little .... (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              TooFolkGR, frankzappatista

              Sweet Jeebus...

              2005-2008
              1.) 50 State strategy -- awesome for a party out of power -- that can work on catered state party messages.

              Remember though from 2007-2008, there was a massive amount of work and interest in the presidential campaigns.

              So, in the 2005-2008 50 state there was significant overlap with the campaigns of Obama, Clinton and Edwards.

              As a result 2009-2012 will be different, thus the strategy absolutely has to be different.
              1.) Control of Executive and Legislature.
              2.) GOP response to "50-state strategy"
              3.) No Presidential Primaries for DNC, Presidential Primaries for RNC

              Now from the basic information I have, and extrapolation from the OFA campaign I see them doing several things.

              1.) DNC is going to be split into two chunks...

              a.) DNC --- supporting state parties.
              Naturally, there is going to be change in the 50 state strategy to figure out how to use Obama's fund-raising power to help grow the strength of state parties.

              i.) How does the DNC make it easier to share a stronger better registered Dem voterDB with state parties?

              b.) OFA --- Obama for American => Organizing for America -- the BHO re-election campaign and likely to have events and improve the networking technology that was used.

              change to emphasize defending the growth swing states ..PA, FL, IN, VA, NC, CO, NM, NV, IA, OH, and expand those near-miss targets SD, ND, MT, AZ, GA, TX (should appear)

              OFA and DNC will have some problems and goals that are exclusive, and some that are combined. The result of the two separate organizations necessatitates alteration of the strategy.

          •  On the Contrary (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            James Kresnik

            I think now is the time to "freak out" and let our views be known. BEFORE they move further on whatever they're planning. What good will it do to speak out after it's a done deal?

            Visit my blog DemocracyForNewMexico: NM grassroots politics and activism

            by barbwire on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 01:21:32 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

        •  You're missing the point. (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          tikkun, barbwire, FeloniousMonk

          At every chance throughout the campaign, Team Obama tried to reinvent the wheel.  They made use of the netroots--through my.barackobama.com.  They canvassed--solely for themselves.  They spent in all 50 states--after the DNC was already doing so.  They pushed the DNC to the side--and only targeted it for fundraising when they realized the RNC would more than makeup the gap between McCain and Obama.

          It only makes sense that Dean would be unceremoniously shown the door, and that Obama would try to co-opt the DNC for himself.  A) It's what Presidents, particularly Democratic ones, do.  B) It's what Obama does.

          If past trends portend for the future, one would hope this means Obama does what Dean did first, but better.  Unfortunately, I don't think Obama can out-Dean Dean here.

          •  I'd love to see Obama improve on Dean's strategy, (5+ / 0-)

            but that's not what Bowers' source is saying they're going to do.  It doesn't sound like they're going to tweak it, but rather just toss it, which is as stupid as it is petty and vengeful.  Maybe Democrats really are addicted to losing -- or maybe it's just that (speaking of no-brainers) they love power and control more than anything, including winning.  

          •  No I'm not missing the point (0+ / 0-)

            I meant reinventing Obama's wheel.  Here's hoping that Dean's method is not completely abandoned when it obviously worked so well this year.  

            You won't have Putin's rearing head to kick around anymore.

            by rhubarb on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 11:22:26 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  Regarding Team Obama and "netroots" (0+ / 0-)

            At every chance throughout the campaign, Team Obama tried to reinvent the wheel.  They made use of the netroots--through my.barackobama.com.

            Good thing too.

            Are you forgetting that most progressive netroots sites were provinces in Edwards-land?  And others, like MyDD and TalkLeft were Hillary-land?  I don't remember there being a large pro-Obama netroots site (until Edwards left the scene, prompting DKos to become a big Obama backer; yet sites like OpenLeft, Mydd, and TalkLeft continued to hate on Obama even then, and even after he secured the nomination in June (of course, Mydd and TalkLeft became PUMA hangouts, with the eager consent of the owners)).  

            Also, netroots sites that did support Obama after Edwards flamed out, like DKos, were ripe to tear Obama to ribbons as soon as he disagreed with them, with members boasting how they were going to not donate, phone bank, or canvas unless Obama submited to their demands.  (And even the owner of DKos declared, "I was going to donate $2300 to Obama, but he's done nothing to earn it".  That was Kos throwing a hissy fit over the extremely minor matter of Obama not wasting political capital in a full-throated defense of Wes Clarke's "inartful" comment regarding McCain's war record not being foreign policy or national security credentials.)

            The netroots weren't for Obama from the beginning.
            Some came over after Edwards, but weren't reliable supporters.  So Team Obama made a great decision in not relying on netroots sites, while still being happy to take their help when those sites felt inclined to give it.

      •  why would amending the strategy be a no brainer? (3+ / 0-)

        "There's a bailout coming but it's not for me."Neil Young

        by UTvoter on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:04:13 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  I don't believe in that approach. (8+ / 0-)

        The refusal of the incoming administration to use the phrase 50 state strategy at the ceremony elevating Dean's successor(where Dean was conspicuously absent) is alarming.

        Why should we wait and hope passively? Rahm's going to change his ways at some miraculous time in the future?

      •  I agree (0+ / 0-)

        Tweaks are okay. Just hope this is just a tweak. It's too early to say.

        -7.38, -5.23 I'm celebrating Barack Obama's victory. Catch me with the protests after 01.20.09.

        by CocoaLove on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:38:21 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  50-State Citizen Engagement in Government? (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        barbwire, cgirard

        If the Obama Administration truly intends to mobilize the masses (that'd be us) to support their agenda by providing the momentum needed to overcome the very real obstacles that remain in the Senate and House, a return by the DNC to the campaign-based strategy of highly selective targeting of resources would be folly and would undercut their message of a new kind of politics.

        The change that should occur is to broaden the party's mission from campaign-whore to democracy building by serving as a mechanism by which citizens may effectively participate in the governance of their nation (which would have the added benefit of re-branding the party in the eyes of many newly activated activists who would be unlikely to participate in traditional party efforts.)

        The party does not need to speak for us, but help our voices to be heard.

        The change that is being reported to be in the works would take us in the exact opposite direction.

        If we want this movement to continue it cannot be merely a personality cult, it must become a new way by which ordinary citizens participate consistently and effectively in this extraordinary democracy.  

        Democracy, it's not just for election day any more.

        Just another Jacques Bonhomme.

        by Into The Woods on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 11:07:02 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  This sounds like the... (31+ / 0-)

      ...all-eggs-in-one-basket strategy. Center the party around Obama, like it was done for Clinton, in the 1990s. It's a mistake to build your platform on the back of any politician, even an Obama.

      And in eight years, if Congress falls back into GOP hands & there's a GOP president, the Beltway Dems will decide to start acting like Republicans again to emulate GOP popularity.

      It just never ends, does it?

      Help Get Global Warming Idiot James Inhofe out of the Senate

      by AmericanFactotum on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:05:40 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  No, not really, as what is happening (20+ / 0-)
      Is that Obama is keeping his party building activities in-house. If he shared his list and his resources with the DC establishment, then the 50 state strategy would die, and he would have less power to push his agenda. He apparently has $75 million allocated for this.

      What he is doing, and what Markos should know but neglects to point out is setting up his own extra-party organization. There were people on the Mall yesterday collecting names, numbers and e-mails for an outfit called Organizing for America.

      Rumor around the beltway is that Obama is going to take the unprecedented step to employ organizers--who usually work at McDonald's in off years--starting this year. He's going to have one to two organizers per swing Congressional District, and an as-yet unknown number in swing Senate States. The D.C. establishment is very, very pissed off about this.

      The stated goal is to mobilize supporters behind his policies, which could be substantially to the left of certain Democrats. The DLC types are especially concerned about rumors of Obama's intentions to send staffers into safe Democratic seats with moderate to conservative Democratic representatives.

      So no, the 50 state strategy has not died. It has attained power, so it is going to look radically different than it did when it was out of power. That Obama is letting the DNC become the establishment organization doesn't really matter if he's raising and spending $75 million on his own private efforts.

      •  I hope the rumors are true (6+ / 0-)

        and I hope you will diary it when we have more solid information.

        www.bushwatch.net - Kicking against the pricks since '98!

        by chuckvw on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:22:47 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  It's still centralized (13+ / 0-)

        A key tenet of the 50-state strategy was that states knew better how to organize themselves than Washington DC. All's good if Obama launches his new organization and has activists in key districts. I'll cheer that on. But that's still a centralized operation.

        And every press report indicates that Organizing for America will be HQ'd at the DNC, essentially meaning that they'll be one and the same.

        An Obama political aide said that OFA will be housed at the Democratic National Committee, resolving a longstanding debate about whether the entity should be separate.

        So not that much of a "private effort", unless you have info suggesting that Obama's people are lying about the new organization.

        Ultimately, I'd love to see all of the above AND a commitment to let states keep some of the money raised by the party in their states in order to continue building up state parties. Because ultimately, our ability to have strong Democrats at the federal level is predicated on building a local bench, and THAT'S what the state party is all about -- state-level offices. (Not to mention that much of the policy that affects us most directly is decided on by local and state legislatures.)

        •  This is what winning looks like (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Odysseus, DelRPCV

          I understand where you're coming from, but we won. Yes it will be HQ'd in the DNC, but from what I've heard that is done more for legal reasons than for anything else. It's easier to specifically advocate for candidates if it's within the DNC.

          It's fine to be inherently suspicious of centralized power, but let's look at what some state parties were doing. They were local versions of the DNC circuit. As anybody who did any rural outreach on the campaign well knows, when State Committees don't give resources to local parties, they become social clubs where whether the debate over whether to serve Alfredo Sauce, Meat Sauce, or Vegetarian Sauce is the most critical issue facing the party.

          What Obama did is go into far-flung, long-written off communities and organize there. Where the local parties were strong and provided good help, they worked extensively with them to make things even better. Where they were weak, they worked with them to improve procedures. Where they were so far gone to be of little use, they built their own parallel structures to accomplish their goals. The latter often caused conflict with the local parties.

          I imagine they have notes. I imagine they're going to let the locals run things where they feel the locals are capable of it. And I imagine they're going to spend a disproportionate amount of resources on new swing states where the party structure hasn't yet caught up to its new-found electoral competitiveness.

          This is what winning looks like. We won. We now have the keys to the system. And it's being used. It's different, and I know it'll take a while to get used to. Heck, I was still cringing when I heard reporters us "The President," on the radio yesterday afternoon. :)  

        •  That might have been a key tenet (2+ / 0-)

          but it wasn't how things were run.

          A key tenet of the 50-state strategy was that states knew better how to organize themselves than Washington DC.

          The fact is all that was done from the DNC level during the 50 State Strategy in this regard was putting money down to the states to fund positions, but ultimately, a lot of times those positions were decided by the DNC.  I.e., we will fund a database coordinator, or a field organizer, but you don't get to pick how to spend the money.  That would truly have been a way to use the money at the state level, but in a lot of cases, that didn't happen.

          True decentralization would be good, but we didn't get that, not by a long shot.

          Obamaponies made of rainbows would make ME happy.

          by wmtriallawyer on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 11:32:49 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

    •  I donated to DNC for the first time (13+ / 0-)

      because of Howard Dean's 50 state strategy.  I will not be donating if they abandon this strategy.

      Be sure you put your feet in the right place, then stand firm. -- Abraham Lincoln

      by mkfarkus on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:16:29 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  That Depends on Whether Or Not You Think (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      tikkun

      Rahm Emmanuel was selected to head the DNC.

      If spittle & tooth=vigor & youth Bill-O & Savage won't grow any older If wishes & dreams=bitches & beams We'll all live in skyscrapers bu

      by TooFolkGR on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:29:38 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Yup this is Rahmbo's FU to (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      James Kresnik, Words In Action

      Howard Dean and the left.  The republicans must be rejoicing today. This is the best news they have gotten in months.  Looks to see them working a fifty state strategy themselves in the future.

      •  When I heard Dean speak 2 months ago (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Odysseus, Words In Action

        He said the Repubs won past elections because they've consistently used a 50 state strategy.

        They have been successful by winning city council seats, mayorships, county commissioner slots, etc...all which lead to local area strength and vote growth, even in blue territories.  

        The RNC also used massive techology to mine data which identified "turnable" Democratic sub-groups (his example was middle aged Jewish men) where, before his technology investment, the DNC had a moribund assumption that "nearly all Jewish voters vote Democratic".  

        "Those dunes are to the Midwest what the Grand Canyon is to Arizona and the Yosemite is to California." - Carl Sandburg

        by Critical Dune on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 12:10:21 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Apparently (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Words In Action

          the DNC will now be the All Obama All the Time Party. There were many complaints here that the Obama campaign was very reticent to help with any down-ticket races. They didn't care.

          Besides, this is the new nonpartisan era -- why would Obama be supportive of the Democratic Party? Instead of trying to pull his independent or newbie supporters into the Party structure, he's keeping them for himself, for the Obama Party. The Party of no conflict or disagreement. The Obama Way or the highway Party. Oh, I hope I'm wrong, but I fear I'm not.

          Visit my blog DemocracyForNewMexico: NM grassroots politics and activism

          by barbwire on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 01:32:40 PM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  Just last week... (0+ / 0-)

        a source said Kaine's DNC would be "the 50-state strategy on steroids." Sources don't mean anything.

        BTW, Rahm and Dean had a disagreement about running an election, that's it. They aren't mortal enemies with guns pointed at each other.

        And just because most of us on the netroots didn't like Rahm's decision about the 2006, doesn't mean he is an evil man bent on destroying all we believe in. Give the guy a break. I think he has bigger fish to fry than screwing Dean two years after a disagreement.

        "The only thing I would trust Dick Cheney on is if I had a dead hooker in my hotel room." --Jon Stewart

        by DemBrock on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 05:18:54 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Also... (0+ / 0-)

        check out this new report from The Hill:

        "The 50-state strategy is now and forever what Democrats do," Kaine told DNC members at the party’s winter meeting in Washington, D.C. The plan to seek to compete in all states was put in place by Kaine’s successor, Howard Dean.

        Stop listening to all the hearsay bullshit and wait to hear the words from the horse's mouth.

        "The only thing I would trust Dick Cheney on is if I had a dead hooker in my hotel room." --Jon Stewart

        by DemBrock on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 05:21:32 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Not ONE RED CENT (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Words In Action

      Will I spend for the Democrats to return to the failed policies of the past. Obama, assuming he is successful in his first term, will have no problems with re-election.

      The 50-State strategy is what got these idiots the power and the mandate they seem so willing to give up.

      IMBECILES

    •  I am so tired of this... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Ilikepie

      either Dean or Rahm bullshit. Yes they had a disagreement over how to run the 2006 election--Dean wanted to put staffers in every state while Rahm wanted more money for his House candidates, plain and simple. But people in here act like Rahm and Dean are mortal enemies, whose followers aren't allowed to speak any good of the other.

      Let's face facts: they aren't fond of each other, but both were highly successful in their positions in the 2006 election and both deserve a lot of credit for winning back Congress.

      And now just because Obama chose Rahm as his chief of staff doesn't mean he dissed Dean, or he thinks Rahm's style of winning elections are better than Dean's. The CofS is a position that requires someone who knows how Washington works; who knows both how to run a White House and how to pass legislation in Congress. Rahm is the perfect person for that job.

      As for Sec of HHS, who better to get healthcare through Congress than the former majority leader, a man who knows everything about Congress: committees, rules, 75% of senators, and even most staffers.  

      And BTW, just last week other sources were saying Kaine's DNC will be "the 50-state strategy on steroids." So now that a different source says the 50-state strategy is dead does not make it so.

      "The only thing I would trust Dick Cheney on is if I had a dead hooker in my hotel room." --Jon Stewart

      by DemBrock on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 05:10:47 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Also... (0+ / 1-)
      Recommended by:
      Hidden by:
      James Kresnik

      check out this new report from The Hill:

      "The 50-state strategy is now and forever what Democrats do," Kaine told DNC members at the party’s winter meeting in Washington, D.C. The plan to seek to compete in all states was put in place by Kaine’s successor, Howard Dean.

      Stop listening to all the hearsay bullshit and wait to hear the words from the horse's mouth.

      "The only thing I would trust Dick Cheney on is if I had a dead hooker in my hotel room." --Jon Stewart

      by DemBrock on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 05:21:59 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Anyone notice that Kerry just held up Clinton's (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LordMike, malharden

    confirmation?

    McCain said the GOP was ready to vote unanimously for Clinton, and Kerry kept holding it up with misc. bullshit.

    McCain asked multiple times to vote on it before lunch, and then kerry went on to indirectly blame the GOP for not being able to vote on it yesterday.

    Kerry is shitting on everything.

    •  Kerry should only be allowed to speak... (5+ / 0-)

      ...in order to keep a traditional filibuster going.  And/or if the strategy is to put the opponents to sleep.

      "Don't hope for a stronger America. Vote for one." - John McCain. And I did!

      by cartwrightdale on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 09:59:00 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Why would he do that? (5+ / 0-)

      What the hell is going on in the Senate?  

      If the people lead, the leaders will follow.

      by Mz Kleen on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:01:04 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  assuming they're telling the truth (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        tikkun, barbwire, smeesq

        they want a full debate and a yes or no vote on Clinton.

        Seems reasonable on its face, because of all of the shady sources of money for the Clinton Foundation. If Hillary is going to be negotiating directly with heads of state, we should know who's been giving her husband money for the past 8 years.

        •  WHY O WHY (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          barbwire

          did Obama let the Clinton's get their noses in the tent of this new administration?  It was just asking for trouble.  Once Hillary is confirmed, it'll be a matter of weeks until some scandal (and I don't mean a BJ from an intern)is all over the headlines, probably some allegation from a foreign govt. that Bill promised them something and didn't deliver... and even if it comes to nothing, it will energize the media and, once again, it'll be all about the Clintons.

      •  He did not do that (3+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Mz Kleen, Escamillo, smileyman

        Sen. Kerry was floor managing the Clinton nomination on the floor.  The Senate had allotted 3 hours of debate, equally divided, for the debate. This was necessary because a unanimous consent request to pass the nomination on a voice vote yesterday had failed.  (Someone objected.  I think it was Sen. Cornyn of TX.)

        Sen. Kerry delivered his opening remarks lauding Sen. Clinton for the job of Sec. of State. Sen Cornyn, who voiced his intent to vote for Sen. Clinton, spoke with his concerns about the Clinton Global Initiative and it's funding.

        Sen. McCain next spoke and wanted a Unanimous Consent Request (or UC) to move the nomination to a voice vote.  (The confirmation is a foregone conclusion, after all.)  3 other Senators had asked for floor time to speak. They could have objected to the UC. Kerry asked McCain to bring this up at the Caucus lunch, clear it with the 3 Sens who wanted to speak and then bring it up after the break.

        This went according to Senate rules.  There are no problems here and no one "shit" on anything.

    •  I Read Five Hours Ago (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      tikkun

      That there probably wouldn't be a Clinton vote until 4:30 this afternoon.  Kerry isn't ACTUALLY holding anything up by sticking to the schedule they all agreed on in advance.

      If spittle & tooth=vigor & youth Bill-O & Savage won't grow any older If wishes & dreams=bitches & beams We'll all live in skyscrapers bu

      by TooFolkGR on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:33:51 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  No he didn't, that is a completely false statemen (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      MadEye, rweba, malharden

      Sen. Kerry was floor-managing the nomination through the Senate.  He spoke advocating for Sen. Clinton, then Sen. Cornyn spoke.  Sen. McCain followed with a unanimous request to end the debate and confirm Sen. Clinton on a voice vote.

      Discussion ensued to make sure that the rights of all the Senators were preserved to speak. That had to be cleared.  (Ah, a unanimous request can be derailed if it is not, ah, unanimous.)

      The other Senators who wanted to speak on this issue must be identified and must release their right to speak on the Senate floor.  That will probably happen then the UC and the voice vote will occur.

      Nothing like what you said occurred.

    •  Clinton Shit on Clinton First (0+ / 0-)

      Clinton has some payback due, like it or not.  

      The truth about John McCain's Keating Cheating

      by tikkun on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:47:12 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Kerry was the floor manager pushing it through (0+ / 0-)

      as fast as possible - and he likely coordinated the Republicans and Democrats who spoke in her favor.

      When Cornyn called for debate and a roll call that set up time on both sides to speak on the nomination. Unless Cornyn agreed, which he didn't - they could not go to a vote.

      Kerry ran an excellent, very gracious SFRC confirmation hearing and he was on a few talk shows speaking of her as an outstanding choice.

      Obama thanked Kerry (in his comments at the state department) for the quick confirmation and the way he handled the debate.

      Your comment is extremely inaccurate.

  •  so. fucking. stoopid. (15+ / 0-)

    what a disappointment. wish i could say i was shocked though.

    i ain't. the kaine appointment spoke volumes.

    "after the Rapture, we get all their shit"

    It's time: the albany project.

    by lipris on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 09:57:07 AM PST

  •  Well, Rep. Walt Minnick (D-Idaho) won't be happy (11+ / 0-)

    But given Obama's expand-the-map strategy during the general election, and his get-every-delegate strategy during the primaries, I'll bet there's a bit more to the story than "RIP 50-state strategy". If any political team knows the virtue of a national strategy, it's Barack Obama's.

    The Republican Party is neither pro-republic nor pro-party. Discuss!

    by Nathaniel Ament Stone on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 09:57:52 AM PST

    •  Yeah I think youre right. (0+ / 0-)

      Ablington is a scab at the bending factory. Relentless!

      by ablington on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:03:14 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Don't know. (7+ / 0-)

      Obama sure didn't mind Dean being all but invisible yesterday. Did Dean get a ticket to ANY official inaugural stuff?

    •  It was a vastly expanded map (3+ / 0-)

      of course, but it wasn't a truly national strategy. Otherwise, he'd have organizers in Utah.

      And there's no reason for the Obama operation to have staffers in Utah. But there's a reason for the Democratic Party to have staffers in Utah. That's the inherent conflict with turning the DNC into Obama's 2012 reelection effort.

      •  And in Idaho (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Odysseus, TomP

        I saw a great deal of discontent here in Southeast Idaho, including far more Obama/Biden stickers and varieties of "Bush Sucks" than I have ever (and this is in an extremely conservative part of the state). A decent ground game here from the national party might have made LaRocco a serious contender.

        Put some resources here and some national help and I think the results will be surprising.

        (-5.12,-2.10): Left Libertarian http://www.politicalcompass.org/index

        by smileyman on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:38:19 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Tough call (0+ / 0-)

        How many resources do you put in Oklahoma where they were again at 64% for the republican candidate?

        But big gains were made so certainly an expanded, but not 50 state, campaign does work.

        Consolidate the states that swung, or try to expand further? Can both be done?

        4 years isn't a long time, but demographics will change. A new group of young voters will be around, a number of older voters will have passed.

        Then there's trying to get house/senate/gov candidates elected even if the state isn't going to go for Obama.

        It's a complex and interesting problem.

        "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -- George Bernard Shaw

        by Inspector Javert on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 11:08:35 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  There was a good reason to have staffers in Utah (0+ / 0-)

        Build up a good network of volunteers, and once they are really involved, send them off to Colorado, Nevada, and New Mexico for election day.  For those that can't travel, have massive phone banks. In an age with cell phones and computers, supporters anywhere are very useful. Plus, any Mormon supporters you have (and there are Mormon Democrats), especially the males, already have canvassing experience.  One of the hardest things to get people to do is break the phycological barrier of knocking on a door.  Mormons all do that on mission. It's one of the reasons they were so effective as volunteers for Prop 8.

        Salt Lake City is very liberal, Obama already had some organization there from the primary, and it took comparatively few resources to build up the volunteer structure with Obama's model of Neighborhood Leaders.  Why not tap into people that want to get involved, and then put them where they can make a difference, namely the three swing states they border.

  •  I cancelled my Democracy Bond (19+ / 0-)

    the other day. I was pretty unhappy with Howard's absence from the events and from the appointments.

    It was amazing while it lasted....But it is over now.  Sigh.

    Darwinic pilgrims claim the image fills them with an overwhelming feeling of logic. --The Onion

    by mem from somerville on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 09:58:04 AM PST

  •  Methinks the assumption (10+ / 0-)

    is that the email list assembled by Obama will be substituted for the Dean strategy.  Kaine better do a hell of a lot of talking to the grassroots before he makes such a shortsighted decision.

    "Let it be said by our children's children that when we were tested we refused to let this journey end, that we did not turn back nor did we falter." 1/20/2009

    by mspicata on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 09:58:10 AM PST

  •  Idiots (27+ / 0-)

    How can they think that going back to the old way is the right thing to do after all the gains that were made under Dean?  Ridiculous.  

  •  Hey, I've got an idea! (18+ / 0-)

    Let's take what works and throw it in the garbage!

    Ralphie?   Ralphie!

  •  so if the new DNC only focuses on blue states.... (13+ / 0-)

    doesn't that reinforce the meme that the Democrats are latte-sippers who don't care about rural areas?

    Not that most democrats are. But our leadership needs to stop sucking.

    •  I don't think "focus" is in there at all: (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Mz Kleen, cybrestrike

      I think Bowers is talking about centralized control, not writing off states.  But does centralization naturally lead to abandonment?

      "The first Republican who cries "Wolverines!" on the House or Senate floor has to be considered the front-runner for the 2012 Iowa caucus." JF on TPM

      by Inland on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:01:45 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  centralization vs federalism (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        tikkun, Inland

        I guess the question is, can centralization occur without effectively messing up Dem efforts in those states?

        The local control Dean allowed may have let local party types to better tailor their message/focus their spending on said local population. Central control may mean giving up that diverse message—certainly it HAS in recent history (McAuliffe, etc). And in that recent history that hasn't worked so well.

        So while this might not lead to writing-off, technically, it would necessarily lead to a less tailored message that might not resonate with precariously purplish areas.

        •  although- microtargeting! (0+ / 0-)

          Another question is how much the new DNC steals from the Obama campaign, which was (despite a certain amount of central control) really good at microtargeting because of effective tech use. If that's the central control we're looking at, the picture changes a lot....

          ... but we can't know which form we're looking at yet.

  •  They're looking at the senate map (23+ / 0-)

    for 2010 and deciding that dems are favored enough they can afford to do this.  It's a huge mistake.

    2 years from now, this country will be mired in deep economic crisis. Nothing Obama can do will prevent that at this point; he can only try to soften the landing and in a few years see things turn around.  But people live in the moment, and after 2 years of Obama, the GOP will run around screaming "look! he didn't fix our shit yet!" and this argument will be way more powerful than people think in both the senate and house races.

    Crippling Obama with senate or house losses in 2010 is not going to help the democratic agenda.

    So it sounds like the netroots will have to take up a lot more slack with these candidates.

    Visit Northern Word, a writing, photo and travel blog.

    by decembersue on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 09:59:15 AM PST

  •  Is the essence of the fifty state (8+ / 0-)

    local control?

    They hated losing control of that cash and letting the states decide for themselves how to best spend it.

    I guess that a problem is, with Obama and Dems in congress, we need a coordinated national message.  On the other hand, people on the ground know what works in their own states and need to excite indigenous populations.

    We need efforts in EVERY state because our nation includes EVERY state and EVERY state needs to be brought along.

    But control/coordination is a different issue.

    I'm not sure what the answer is.

    "The first Republican who cries "Wolverines!" on the House or Senate floor has to be considered the front-runner for the 2012 Iowa caucus." JF on TPM

    by Inland on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 09:59:19 AM PST

  •  If it's true... (8+ / 0-)

    It's the stupidest possible thing they could do.

    It wasn't just Republican incompetence, corruption, and cluelessness that flipped people. It was a re-energized party that reached out and challenged their opponents and believed that they could win.

    When you're pushing into enemy territory and you have them on the run, you don't pull back to your base. You keep pushing until you win.

    "Morbo congratulates our gargantuan cyborg president. May death come quickly to his enemies."

    by Dread972 on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 09:59:19 AM PST

  •  I really hope Bowers (11+ / 0-)

    source is wrong on this.  The 50 State Strategy is what got Obama and more Dem Senators and Congress critters elected.  The DNC would be making a tragic mistake if it were to abandon this strategy.

    Sounds like Rahm's and Schumer's hands are in this.  Idiots!!

    If the people lead, the leaders will follow.

    by Mz Kleen on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 09:59:23 AM PST

  •  Aw, crap! (15+ / 0-)

    We never got much help from the DCCC nor the DSCC, so I'll say it again:

    The DNC can help out or shut up, move over and get out of the way!  We here in Texas will do it ourselves.  Help welcome, but otherwise move over.

    Watch this state in the next 4 years.  Mark my words, they'll wish they had helped.

    Torture is Wrong! 10% of the US population on Food Stamps: help your food bank.

    by tom 47 on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 09:59:25 AM PST

  •  I'm swiching back to Independent from Dem (5+ / 0-)

    I've had enough of these assclowns

  •  I agree, (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    tikkun, Mz Kleen, filby

    the strategy needs to include both short and long-term strategies.  We need a game plan to calmly, rationally support our continued support of Dean's 50 state strategy.

  •  Throws a monkey wrench in that whole Better Dems (12+ / 0-)

    approach, doesn't it? Throws a big old honking SUV at the grassroots and people power approach, doesn't it?

    Take the Kama Sutra. How many people died from the Kama Sutra as opposed to the bible. Who wins? FZ

    by cosmic debris on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 09:59:54 AM PST

  •  OH HELL NO (9+ / 0-)

    Sorry, but I plan on giving my money and time to things that worked before ... maybe I'll try something new, but I find that I like success.

  •  50% + 1... (7+ / 0-)

    ..stinks.

    "Watch what you watchin'. Fox keeps feeding us toxins. Stop sleeping, start thinking outside of the box and unplug from The Matrix doctrine." -Nas

    by malharden on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 09:59:55 AM PST

  •  So, unless Obama produces miracles, we lose seats (9+ / 0-)

    in 2010.  Great, nice move DNC

  •  Great...back to losing elections again. (8+ / 0-)

    These DC people are so tied up with themselves...they don't give a damn about what works as long as they have power.

    This space for rent!

    by Danno11 on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:00:13 AM PST

    •  "Nobody could've predicted we'd lose seats" (10+ / 0-)

      Wait for it...it's totally coming.

      This space for rent!

      by Danno11 on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:06:02 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  they won't have power for long. (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      tikkun, Danno11, Mz Kleen, Words In Action

      Typical Dem strategy. "Hey! That worked great! Let's shoot ourselves in the foot to make sure we never do it again!"

      ~headdesk~

      •  As much as people here hate Republicans... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Isara

        ...the Republicans understand far better what works at winning elections (think about it, McCain lost, but only after literally everything went against him, a Democrat under the same circumstances would have had an electoral performance that made Mondale look like a Charles Evan Hughesesq "near miss" loss).  And they make sure to "shoot" their dissidents to ensure that the winning strategy isn't unraveled by malcontents the way this one seems likely to be.

        "An army of principles can penetrate where an army of soldiers cannot." - Thomas Paine

        by Mister Gloom on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:26:49 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  The Republicans win by playing on fear (0+ / 0-)

          they're great emotional manipulators. That's really hard to fight against, without a united front and message of reason.

          •  Absolutely... (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            BaritoneWoman

            This is so true it needs to be repeated.  And Republican political management is one of the most effective things in the world (as opposed to their practical management skills...still doing a heck of a job Brownie...).  And you can beat it in only 2 ways:  1.  Running an incredible, inspirational candidate at a time when everything is imploding around the Republican party (hard to find that type of candidate, even harder to replicate those circumstances, though we did manage it this year) or 2.  Immitate the management style but without breaking the law.  

            "An army of principles can penetrate where an army of soldiers cannot." - Thomas Paine

            by Mister Gloom on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:35:10 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

    •  Time to get rid of (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      mcmom, BaritoneWoman, Words In Action

      the dinos again.  Schumer needs to go, he's so fricking two faced it's pathetic.  He does whatever his Wall Street masters want.  He's not our friend at all.  Get rid of him and any other obstructionists to the 50 state strategy.

      If the people lead, the leaders will follow.

      by Mz Kleen on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:06:57 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  2 steps forward, 3 steps back (5+ / 0-)

    Ugh, does this party never learn? So much for pragmatism and sticking with what works.

  •  Very bad news for MI-11 (7+ / 0-)

    If the party is junking the 50-state strategy nationwide, it is also junking Howard Dean's "play everywhere" strategy. Which means we're back to writing off red districts. My district, MI-11, is one of them.

    Looks like the rubber band will stay on my checkbook when the DNC hits me up for cash.

    "There's no doubt in my mind, not one doubt in my mind, that we will fail."--George W. Bush.

    by Dump Terry McAuliffe on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:00:17 AM PST

    •  An MI-11 wasn't written when? (0+ / 0-)

      The guy this past cycle (was it Larkin?) got zilch in terms of support, as did Trupiano (though Trupiano at least managed to raise $100,000 despite this), Truran got zilch, Kelly only raised what he did (approx. $400,000) though his connections to the unions.  So when haven't Democrats written off the 11th?  If Cordelia Lear is correct this is going to get eliminated in redistricting anyways, so there's no incentive to try.

      "An army of principles can penetrate where an army of soldiers cannot." - Thomas Paine

      by Mister Gloom on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:28:33 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Fnck Bowers and the ballerina (1+ / 1-)
    Recommended by:
    Churchill
    Hidden by:
    SlackwareGrrl

    "Ballerina" is what I call Rahmbo, because of his ballet-dancing days (pace ballet folks, I'm a dancer when I can but I want to pissoff Emanuel). But that's our elite Democrats for you; win and then commit suicide. Our benevolent corporate overlords will be thrilled

    "A union is a way of getting things done together that you can't get done alone." Utah Phillips

    by poemworld on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:00:24 AM PST

    •  WTH? (5+ / 1-)
      Recommended by:
      Hannibal, trashablanca, mcmom, fiddlingnero, kat68
      Hidden by:
      poemworld

      Trying to insult Rahm Emmanuel by using a term referring to women is insulting to women. Explain yourself, because I'm feeling like your comment is worth a donut.

      Ballerinas are artists AND athletes.

      Criticize the man if you want to, but for goodness' sake come up with something not disparaging to women.

      •  Hate to say this but... (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        poemworld, Johnny Q

        ...all insults outside of generic curse words are insulting to someone.  This is why Democrats have the reputation as wimps, we can't run someone down without our party saying "Oh, that's disparraging to group X".  THis wasn't blatant sexism, so its allowed.

        "An army of principles can penetrate where an army of soldiers cannot." - Thomas Paine

        by Mister Gloom on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:30:21 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  So use generic curse words (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          MacJimi

          It's not THAT difficult. Or, even better, explain exactly what Rahm did that is so horrible. (Which is super-easy to do). Saying he's a ballerina gives the reader zero information about Rahm's current actions. Besides, it would be nice if progressive guys could realize that feminine attributes are not de facto insults. Sheesh.

          /you and I are not going to agree on this, so no point in further discussion. I'm done.

          •  Explanations don't work... (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            poemworld, MacJimi

            >>Or, even better, explain exactly what Rahm did that is so horrible. (Which is super-easy to do).<<</p>

            Here's a reasoned, detailed explanation of why what you are suggesting doesn't work:  Take a look at every political campaign in history.  Democrats:  Long, detailed explanation about why what's being done is wrong.  Republican:  The type of comment toward Democrats that you say gives no information.

            The Public: REpublicans!  Republicans!  Republicans!

            Frankly, people don't want detailed or reasoned discourse in politics.  They want the impression of strength.  

            "An army of principles can penetrate where an army of soldiers cannot." - Thomas Paine

            by Mister Gloom on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:39:54 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  I believe there's more than a kernel of truth (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              poemworld, SlackwareGrrl

              in what you say about impressions.  And, frankly it's sad because it speaks to "gut level reasoning" winning over reasoned discourse.  I think we're all guilty of that from time to time.  But Obama's election shows that people are getting tired of name calling being de rigeur in politics.

              I believe it's that kind of childish name-calling that President Obama was talking about.  I don't agree 100% with Obama on everything, but on that I agree.   It's a very hard habit to break.  Apparently, it's a habit the Rahm himself with have to break.  At the same time, politics is a full-contact sport and it's tough on people with thin skins.

              Yes, I believe there are many reasons to not like Rahm very much, but as SlackwareGrrl says, if you're gonna curse someone give some info behind it.

              •  The Issue of OBama's Election (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                poemworld

                >>But Obama's election shows that people are getting tired of name calling being de rigeur in politics.<<</p>

                I would argue that this indicates nothing of the kind.  We have an incredible, inspirational candidate running against a candidate who's campaign and party are imploding in every conceivable manner.  This doesn't indicate that people are getting tired of it.  IT indicates that the Harlem Globetrotters are going to beat the Washington Generals...

                "An army of principles can penetrate where an army of soldiers cannot." - Thomas Paine

                by Mister Gloom on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 11:41:28 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  Do you not remember that when McCain/Palin (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  poemworld

                  brought out the big guns of their personal attacks on Obama, namely that he was a Socialis/Marxist wanting to redistribute the wealth? that he was "palling around with terrorists"?? etc, etc...

                  And do you not remember how, much to their amazement McCain/Palin saw there numbers plummeting because of their baseless attacks?

                  The polls were showing this was a pretty close race until that last month when McCain/Palin went "nukyoolur" and it completely turned people off.

                  In Obama, people saw someone who was calm and cool headed and to that juxtaposed with McCain/Palin was indeed the change they were looking for.

                  •  asdf (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    poemworld

                    >>And do you not remember how, much to their amazement McCain/Palin saw there numbers plummeting because of their baseless attacks?<<</p>

                    McCain/Palin's numbers didn't decline primarily because of thier baseless attacks.  They declined because the country (under Republican control) was going down the crapper and the Republican party was spontaneously combusting.  This would have happened anyways.  If the country was at a normal level, McCain was remotely the candidate that he needed to be and he picked someone other than Palin as VP, that strategy would have worked (well, and you had a Democratic candidate who was less incredible than Obama, bearing in mind that he's probably the best campaigner on inspiration since JFK).  As a candidate Obama is one of the best there is but I'm talking about the norm here.  

                    "An army of principles can penetrate where an army of soldiers cannot." - Thomas Paine

                    by Mister Gloom on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 12:12:03 PM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  Contingencies, contingencies... (1+ / 0-)
                      Recommended by:
                      poemworld

                      we can go back and forth over Obama, elections and decorum.  But one this is certain:  you are much more adept at using the Bold button than you are at

                      Blockquote.

                       ;o)

                      •  Thank you for your sense of humor! nt (1+ / 0-)
                        Recommended by:
                        MacJimi

                        "A union is a way of getting things done together that you can't get done alone." Utah Phillips

                        by poemworld on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 12:25:06 PM PST

                        [ Parent ]

                      •  I'm old school (1+ / 0-)
                        Recommended by:
                        poemworld

                        In my day we didn't have your fancy blockquotes.  And we called Hiderating (HRing) Trollratings.

                        :)  

                        "An army of principles can penetrate where an army of soldiers cannot." - Thomas Paine

                        by Mister Gloom on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 12:26:06 PM PST

                        [ Parent ]

                        •  Actually I think I'll hydrate myself. (1+ / 0-)
                          Recommended by:
                          poemworld

                          It's lunchtime and all this commenting makes a lad mighty thoisty!

                          •  I disagree (0+ / 0-)

                            I knew exactly what I was doing when I called Rahm "ballerina". That's why I added the caveat. I like pushing asshole guys buttons, and one of the easiest ways is comparing them to women/girls.

                            A brief story. I was at a party in Austin this past fall. I heard one guy call another guy a "pussy". I told the guy who said that, "Dude, when I see you shit a watermelon out of your asshole, THEN I'll believe you're as tough as a pussy." I had several young women come up to me and thank me for saying that. Having watched and helped deliver several babies, I've seen what a pussy can do and, frankly, I'm impressed. As a het male, I'm also a member-in-good-standing of the pussy fan club.

                            Taking back words used against us is a great way to disarm an opponent. Maybe Rahmmy wouldn't be insulted. But I do like the visualization of him in a tutu and toe shoes arabesqueing across the floor.

                            "A union is a way of getting things done together that you can't get done alone." Utah Phillips

                            by poemworld on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 12:35:01 PM PST

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  Well... (0+ / 0-)

                            I like pushing asshole guys buttons, and one of the easiest ways is comparing them to women/girls.

                            This does confirm that you think it's appropriate to use women/girls as way to insult men.

          •  Rahm Has Made it His Business (4+ / 0-)

            to try to destroy progressives and progressive movements.  He is no friend of ours and he's dangerous

            The truth about John McCain's Keating Cheating

            by tikkun on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 11:01:58 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  We don't like Rahn. I'm no fan either. (0+ / 0-)

              That doesn't mean it's okay use feminine descriptors as insults.

              •  I didn't Say it Was ok (0+ / 0-)

                I'm pointing out that we need to be supremely aware that Emanuel is a putz and will destroy us given the slightest opportunity

                That said, the commenter used a very poor choice of words.

                The truth about John McCain's Keating Cheating

                by tikkun on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 11:22:46 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  Well (1+ / 0-)
                  Recommended by:
                  tikkun

                  Not once, anywhere in this exchanged did I express  liking Rahm.

                  •  SlackwareGrrl, you got your explanation (0+ / 0-)

                    What do you think? I'm actually curious.

                    "A union is a way of getting things done together that you can't get done alone." Utah Phillips

                    by poemworld on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 12:38:32 PM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  Your HR is unwarrented. (0+ / 0-)

                      Have you read the DailyKos FAQ?

                      Do note give retaliatory troll ratings. If you get what you believe to be an undeserved troll rating, do not retaliate. Leave it to others to decide if the rating was abusive.

                      You're just using an HR because you're mad I called you out. Read the FAQ and learn.

                      •  How's this for an insult, then? (0+ / 0-)

                        You called me out. I answered you. Now you hide behind the rules and don't address either my explanation or my counter-complaint. I've been talking to other TUs about how to approach using HRs, which I'm to some degree constitutionally loathe to use. But I'll take your advice, next time, and not use HR to retaliate. But this time I think you've earned it, both by your overreaction, you're chilling candid speech and you're gutless failure to reply to my thoughtful explantion that you asked for.

                        For all of this, SlackwareGrrl, I think you're a dick.

                        Feel better?

                        "A union is a way of getting things done together that you can't get done alone." Utah Phillips

                        by poemworld on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 02:01:54 PM PST

                        [ Parent ]

          •  Like "bitch"? (0+ / 0-)

            That's generic, but I use it infrequently because it is ACTUALLY disparaging of women.

            Though here's a little thought for you. I have three reasons why "bitch" is not an insult to women and can actually be a compliment. I'm talking about female dogs here, not human women:

            1. Bitches make great mothers.
            1. Bitches choose their mates.
            1. Bitches don't get raped.

            When I see my human sisters on earth having it as good a female dogs then I'll know that there has been exceptional progress in the feminist arena.

            Let me also recommend to you a wonderfully pro-male, sex-positive British feminist essay collection, edited by the left blogosphere's own Avedon Carol: "Bad Girls and Dirty Pictures". You might also try "The Skeptical Feminist", "Amazon Odyssey" and "The Politics of Reproduction". I'm also a fan of "The Dialectic of Sex". "Men in Feminism", co-edited by British literary theorist and critic Terry Eagleton is also a must-read, imho.

            Men CAN be feminists, too

            "A union is a way of getting things done together that you can't get done alone." Utah Phillips

            by poemworld on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 12:48:38 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

      •  hey SlackwareGrrl, dial it back (0+ / 0-)

        I'm a trusted user, too. I've never thrown a donut because my libertarian socialist/anarchosyndicalist/Chomsky-influenced take on freedom of speech is that it's especially for speech you dislike, even hate. This being the DKos community (semiprivate/semipublic/run by Kos himself ultimately), I generally bow to the will of my kossack sisters and brothers. And I certainly didn't want to hijack the thread with what I just considered to be a slam at Emanuel.

        But think about this for a second. Any man who actually comes out of ballet (think "Billy Elliot", a great movie from both dance and labor perspectives) and is secure in his own masculinity is not going to be insulted. I wouldn't be insulted and I've been doing aerobics for over 20 years, lately as the only man in a room full of women. Second, I expressly pointed out that I was not meaning to insult anyone BUT Emanuel. Third, I now wonder about why YOU are so sensitive? Got any issues you want to talk about?

        Let me also say that I don't consider myself a nice man, though I try to do good when and where I can. I use insults as part of political theater and combat. I attack men and challenge their masculinity when I see them act as bullies or idiots. I personally am not challengeable on this ground because my masculinity is not founded only on having a cock and balls. So lighten up and laugh a bit. If you want to criticize your natural allies, then pick something substantive, not just politically correct.

        Finally, you said pick an insult that "is not disparaging to women." "Ballerina" is not "bitch" or any variations on that theme. How is calling a man "ballerina" disparaging to women?

        So, for attempting to illegimately chill speech on DKos, here's your own donut. Enjoy!

        "A union is a way of getting things done together that you can't get done alone." Utah Phillips

        by poemworld on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 12:15:02 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Yeah, and? (0+ / 0-)

          I'm going to take advice on using HR's from someone like you who thinks  retaliatory HRs are an appropriate way to use HRs? No, I certainly won't take your advice, nor will I take furthur time to converse with you, since absolutely nothing fruitful will come of it.

          Your retaliation violates DailyKos site rules, as I mentioned above. You really should read the FAQ.

          /done.

          •  "Retaliatory" is in the eye of the beholder (0+ / 0-)

            in this case, I think. For one thing, imo calling Emanuel a "ballerina" was about as innocuous as can be and you overreacted. Second, you asked for an explanation but HR'd me anyway, before I could respond. I've given you an explanation -- what is your response. If it is satisfactory, then take off the HR. Third, HRs are just as effective for abusing HRs, imo, as for trolls. Fourth, I didn't know about the "no retaliation" rule, but ignorance is no excuse, so I'll let someone else uprate you if they wish. Fifth, as I mentioned, you're literally the first HR I've ever given and I think you deserved it. Sixth, again, I expressly stated that I was not wishing to insult ANYONE but Rahmhole. Maybe you don't know what "pace" means. Seventh, as your most recent replies have shown, you're not willing to defend your HR in the face of a cogent, probably correct, rebuttal.

            Believe me SwG, I don't want to talk to you, either. But I will defend myself in any case. When you want to demonstrate some integrity, I'm here and you know where to find me. So put up or shut up.

            "A union is a way of getting things done together that you can't get done alone." Utah Phillips

            by poemworld on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 01:54:14 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Actually. (0+ / 0-)

              I waited a good long while before giving it an HR. And about five others agreed with me, so it's already uprated.

              There's really no point in us conversing. We will never agree on this.

              •  tsk, tsk, tsk (0+ / 0-)

                still avoiding answering me, still hiding behind some recs given before I could respond. My apologies for not answering you with the alacrity you seem to demand. Taking care of my 70 year-old paraplegic father does take some of my time.

                I'm still waiting for you to address what I've actually written, but I'm beginning to think you don't have what it takes, e.g. the rectitude, to do so.

                "A union is a way of getting things done together that you can't get done alone." Utah Phillips

                by poemworld on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 02:09:30 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

              •  And you've not been uprated... (0+ / 0-)

                since our little flamewar/piefight started. I find that curiously satisfying.

                "A union is a way of getting things done together that you can't get done alone." Utah Phillips

                by poemworld on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 02:22:10 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

  •  Dumber than a Box of Rocks (4+ / 0-)

    NO! NO! NO!
    Why are they doing this?
    Retreat smells like defeat.

    After taking several readings, I'm surprised to find my mind is still fairly sound. Willie Nelson

    by cactusflinthead on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:00:26 AM PST

  •  This Okie will cry... (9+ / 0-)

    ... if the Strategy is abandoned.

    My only hope is for Obama, the party's de facto leader, to use his community organizing skills to grow the party in places where it has little grip.

    "I'm swelling with patriotic mucous!" --- Dr. Zoidberg

    by droogie6655321 on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:00:29 AM PST

  •  Shorter DNC (18+ / 0-)

    "Hey, it worked!"

    "Oh, then let's not do that anymore."

    "I'm not a humanitarian. I'm a hell-raiser." Mother Jones

    by histopresto on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:00:34 AM PST

  •  I like Dean (8+ / 0-)

    President Obama is missing out on quite a bit of talent by shunting Mr. Dean off to the side. One might suggest that Obama benefited significantly from Dean's 50 state strategy. I wonder if Obama recognizes that fact and is acting politically to shore up his base, or if he honestly thinks that Dean's strategy was ineffective.

  •  I always say: Once you find a plan that works, (8+ / 0-)

    make sure you run the fuck away from it as fast as you can.

    Gentlemen, you can't fight in here! This is the War Room!

    by bigtimecynic on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:00:42 AM PST

  •  Noooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo!!!!!!!! (5+ / 0-)

    it was working so well here in the intermountain west. not a single solitary dollar will they get from me if this holds up.

    "There's a bailout coming but it's not for me."Neil Young

    by UTvoter on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:00:46 AM PST

  •  Snatching defeat from the jaws of victory (11+ / 0-)

    Something power corrupts blah blah blah.  Fucking idiots.

  •  well shit (4+ / 0-)

    I really don't understand why they would return to a strategy which flat-out hasn't worked for ages, overthrowing a method which worked spectacularly well.

    I joined the Democratic Party for the first time this last year, based on the ideals of Dean and Obama. Looks like my tenure will be short lived :/

    •  It worked just fine... (0+ / 0-)

      ...if your interest is in the party elites running the party without interference from the grassroots. Party elites of a minority party still have a lot of clout in official circles. They even get invited to all the good black-tie affairs.

      It's just that their rank and file get shut out. But, who cares about them, right?

  •  Very, very disappointing (7+ / 0-)

    Apparently our Dem leaders don't learn from success or failure.

    There's an innate tendency on the part of even the elite to idolize men who are making a lot of money, and assume that they know what they're doing. PK

    by Betty Pinson on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:01:01 AM PST

  •  Dammit (11+ / 0-)

    But the good news is that we ourselves can help fix this. The DNC might defund worthy candidates in red states and red districts, but that doesn't mean activists in the blogosphere and elsewhere have to do so. Open your wallets...but bypass the short-sighted DNC and make sure that our friends are well-funded in all 50 states.

    The Bush Family: 0 for 4 in Wisconsin

    by Korkenzieher on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:01:05 AM PST

  •  Super. (6+ / 0-)

    Now we will be able to blame the Republican-controlled Congress for everything that goes wrong in Obama's Presidency.  

    << bangs head on desk>>

    "Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." -Voltaire

    by poemless on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:01:06 AM PST

  •  Un-frackin-believable (n/t) (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mz Kleen, Churchill, droogie6655321

    Hige sceal þe heardra, heorte þe cenre, mod sceal þe mare, þe ure mægen lytlað

    by milkbone on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:01:28 AM PST

  •  The Obama campaign was wonderful campaign (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mz Kleen, Churchill, louavul, mdmslle

    but coordination with down ballot races was not great here in Florida.

    This suggests 2012 will be the same.

    It's dissapointing.  

    •  Obama campaign wasn't in OKLA, maybe 2 people (0+ / 0-)

      they didn't have a 50 state strategy.  Maybe a 42 state strategy.

      80 percent of success is just showing up - Woody Allen.

      by Churchill on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:10:06 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  yea the Obama campaign basically built their own (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      mcmom

      structure, reaching over the DNC.

      It was an almost-fifty-state structure, so this is still a bit surprising.

    •  Very true (0+ / 0-)

      Our grassroots group formed a non profit to address the problem. If you're in central FL stay working with the MyBO groups which are still active.

      or come on over to our group http://polkcitzensforchange,.com where we are focused on promoting and growing the progressive movement in our county, choosing and promoting strong local and state candidates and being a go to point for national candidates to reach our county residents. We're already almost 1000 volunteers strong and we really dont care what the DNC (or for that matter the DEC) is doing.

      Is sad but at the end of the day, we are the ones who have to do this stuff. Our interests are different than these big national organizations and always will be.

      We're already getting geared up and organized for 2010.

  •  But the reality of the internet has already (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pattyp, Mz Kleen

    taken much of the power away from the DC establishment.

    I'm not upset that the DNC becomes a Re-elect Obama outfit because There are now numerous power bases and money flows on our side. we are diversified and it makes us stronger.

    "Just because you do not take an interest in politics doesn't mean politics won't take an interest in you" ~ Pericles

    by Chrispy67 on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:01:34 AM PST

  •  I don't get it. (8+ / 0-)

    As the great Charles Oakley once said, "if it ain't broke don't break it."

    Why on earth would they move away from this strategy. Republicans are on the run everywhere. Why let up?

  •  I am not sure about this (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Hannibal, cybrestrike, BrighidG

    I think we need to continue to reach out to all the states, and not only re-elect Obama, but get more progressives elected locally, and in the Congress.

    01-20-09: THE END OF AN ERROR

    by kimoconnor on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:01:43 AM PST

  •  Kaine needs to feel some heat from us (9+ / 0-)

    damn bored pathetic bloggers.

    Picture a bright blue ball just spinnin' spinnin' free. It's dizzy with possibility.

    by lockewasright on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:02:01 AM PST

    •  Remember Terry McCauliffe wants to succeed him. (0+ / 0-)

      Apparently, Terry is already poisoning his thinking.

      "Watch what you watchin'. Fox keeps feeding us toxins. Stop sleeping, start thinking outside of the box and unplug from The Matrix doctrine." -Nas

      by malharden on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:45:34 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  this does not make any sense... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    wishingwell, kat68

    With Obama's view of all inclusiveness - I just don't see this.  I truly believe we have not finished turning many more states blue.  With that said - I am going to assume this is a 'red herring' (pardon the pun).

    "Make no small plans. They will fail to stir humanity's blood, and will not be built anyway." - Daniel Burnham

    by mollyk on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:02:31 AM PST

  •  Wow. What could they be thinking? (4+ / 0-)

    I REALLY want to know, if this is true.

    Ready to go, y'all. -4.48, -4.56

    by pseudopod on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:02:58 AM PST

  •  I hope this is bullshit. (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mz Kleen, pseudopod, cybrestrike, BrighidG

    Why break a system that's working?

    This is my sig line. There are many like it, but this one is mine.

    by djtyg on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:03:05 AM PST

  •  This isn't good (5+ / 0-)

    For all of its complainers (I bet Rahm Emanuel had something to do with this), the 50-State Strategy worked.  Obama's campaign was modeled on it and Obama won.  Why they are throwing away one of the best Democratic election strategies of the of the last thirty years and replacing it with the model that was responsible for us losing both branches of Congress and the White House is beyond me.

    I am proud to admit that I come from one of the districts that had the least votes for George W. Bush in the entire country.

    by ThePrometheusMan on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:03:08 AM PST

  •  On a serious note, (9+ / 0-)

    while money from the DNC always helps, if they decide to scrap the 50 State Strategy it doesn't mean we are obligated to as well.  

    "Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities." -Voltaire

    by poemless on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:03:55 AM PST

  •  These morons just don't get it. (11+ / 0-)

    Or, more likely, don't give a fuck. For them it's about Washington and NYC returning to the traditional Washington and NYC, win or lose. "Want money?? Come see me". Well, fuck them and fuck that. We run The Show from here. Howard's Fifty State Strategy can happen from right here. I got Northern NY covered. Who you got?

    Second Life NetRoots Nation. Party with us at Cafe Wellstone!

    by winkk on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:04:13 AM PST

  •  so....Giordano's wrong and J. Dean was right? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    slinkerwink

    I'm confused....Al made a very good case that 50 state wasn't going anywhere....

    •  well i don't know what his case was (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      ksh01, Words In Action

      but i am inclined to believe that this strategy is working in the intermountain west.

      "There's a bailout coming but it's not for me."Neil Young

      by UTvoter on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:12:12 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Since I've been called out... (8+ / 0-)

      I wasn't going to wade into this thread because:

      A. I understand what Markos is doing (keeping the pressure on) and I think that's fine, but...

      B. I would never base any conclusion on what Chris Bowers has to say on this because Chris - and I like him as a person - does have an obvious axe to grind on this matter. That's been evident since November when he claimed that the DNC, by allowing the contracts of 200 state level staffers to end on the date they were always slated to end, was somehow "abandoning the 50 state strategy." I thought that was nonsense, still think it's nonsense, and don't get more than a chuckle out of those that are transparently looking for any thin pretext to portray the Obama-Kaine DNC in a negative light.

      The proof will obviously be in the 2010 midterm elections and how much is raised and where it is allocated. I frankly expect the DNC will allocate more money than ever before - and more of it coming from small donors without PAC and lobbyist money - and the 50 state strategy will be more muscular, not less.

      And as for the matter of whether that money is controlled by State Democratic Committees or the DNC, I think a lot of those state committees are controlled by self-serving political hacks, as anyone that has any experience dealing with many of them will testify. I'd trust O'Malley and the Obama team at DNC to make better organizer hiring decisions than most state committees.

      •  hope you're correct (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Words In Action

        I frankly expect the DNC will allocate more money than ever before - and more of it coming from small donors without PAC and lobbyist money - and the 50 state strategy will be more muscular, not less

        lord knows we need some more muscle here in Utah, where a tiny $250k can buy a house seat.

        "There's a bailout coming but it's not for me."Neil Young

        by UTvoter on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:27:15 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Plus, I'd add... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        emilysdad

        That the DNC, unlike the RNC, tends to be the party organization that is really underfunded, so focusing limited resources makes perfect sense, as money spent in, say, Virginia is going to give a greater bang for the buck than money spent in Idaho.

        And it's also noteworthy to point out that the DCCC and the DSCC are more than willing to spend their own money to protect their incumbents, so I doubt that Minnick's largest concern will be money in this instance (to point to kos's example).

        •  i totally and completely, but respectfully (!), (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Words In Action

          disagree with the bang for the buck argument. You can buy yourself a really cheap house seat in places like utah idaho new mexico etc. In contrast, a single seat in va could cost you millions. so technically, the same amount of cash that buys you a single VA seat could buy you 4-5 in a rural area. Therefore, more bang for the buck.

          "There's a bailout coming but it's not for me."Neil Young

          by UTvoter on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 11:11:35 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  But bang for buck doesn't necessarily mean... (0+ / 0-)

            the cheapest seat, because it doesn't matter how "cheap" Utah is to compete in if there isn't a realistic chance of winning elections there. For example, let's say that it costs $200,000 per house race in Utah and it costs $2,000,000 to run one in Virginia (I don't know exactly what it is, but this seems reasonable), on the face of it you would seem correct, but this does not factor in what the odds are of actually taking the House seat (or any other office position for that matter). If the Democrats only have a 1% of winning the hypothetical House race in Utah (presuming the money is spent) while they have a 40% of winning the hypothetical seat in Virginia, then that seemingly cheap $200,000 is just money down the drain. Virginia's demographics have been shifting to the extent that the state is reasonable competitive. Utah, on the other hand, has no underlying demographics that are at all favorable (it's heavily white, heavily conservative, and heavily mormon).

            Spending money in Indiana, on the other hand, makes perfect sense, as the state is more Republican than it should be based on its demographics (the state is quite similar to Ohio and Missouri in its composition). Your example of New Mexico is a solid one of course, but even though the media market is cheap, the reason why it makes sense to spend in New Mexico is because the demographics make the state reasonable for both parties to compete in.

      •  Thank you. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        The Field

        I agree with everything you said - especially the part about state committees being controlled by "self-serving political hacks." Having been involved with the Democratic Party on the local and state level, I can say: I know those people!  Preparing to post another comment about this point....

        "The pessimist sees difficulty in every opportunity. The optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty." Winston Churchill

        by royce on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 11:18:31 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Exactly (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          royce

          Some folks seem to be under the errant impression that when the important change took place at the DNC through Howard Dean's defeat of Terry McAuliffe, that the state party organizations magically changed at the same time.

          No!

          Many of them remain mirrors of the McAuliffe era DNC, and few have had a local Dean type insurgent to overthrow the stagnant order.

          If I had a nickel for every horror story I heard throughout 2008 by Obama campaign FOs (field organizers) about the state level bureaucracies and turf wars carried out by State Democratic Committees and their staffers, I'd be able to fund a 50 fifty state strategy all myself.

          •  "Dean's defeat of Terry McAuliffe"??? (0+ / 0-)
            I don't recall McAuliffe running for reelection.
          •  Exactly yes! (0+ / 0-)

            Part of a comment I posted later in this diary:

            My suggestion is that we build "better" state and local party organizations. That we do away with the flacks who have run those organizations forever. That we find people to run the organizations who aren't using it as a stepping stone to something better but rather than as a meaningful, important job in itself. That the organizations become less exclusive and more inclusive. That if they want to speak for Democrats, they need to actually talk to Democrats other than just themselves. And this is a good time for those things to happen: the people who are excited about politics for the first time are looking for ways to get involved....but will the old-time leadership reach out to them?

            "The pessimist sees difficulty in every opportunity. The optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty." Winston Churchill

            by royce on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 01:24:11 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

      •  Bingo! Thanks Al. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        The Field

        And as for the matter of whether that money is controlled by State Democratic Committees or the DNC, I think a lot of those state committees are controlled by self-serving political hacks, as anyone that has any experience dealing with many of them will testify. I'd trust O'Malley and the Obama team at DNC to make better organizer hiring decisions than most state committees.

        Exactly right.  In fact, a lot of the money that went to the states from the DNC was during Dean's reign was conditioned on hiring certain people per the DNC's wishes...exactly for this reason.

        Obamaponies made of rainbows would make ME happy.

        by wmtriallawyer on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 11:35:45 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Also (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          wmtriallawyer

          There's a diary posted right now by Debbie Marquez, DNC member from Colorado who ran for the DNC in order to support Howard Dean and has been one of his biggest allies all along.

          She includes a link to a live stream of the DNC meeting going on right now, Howard Dean is there passing the gavel to Tim Kaine, other officers are being elected, and the fifty state strategy is being continued according to her.

          That that diary has only a handful of recs suggests strongly that many of the folks complaining that the DNC is somehow abandoning the 50 state strategy in a way want that to be true just so they can have something to complain about. Yet it's of apparent disinterest to them to recommend an information-filled diary that disproves that theory. If they really cared that much about the fifty state strategy in substance - rather than as simply a canard with which to slam the new DNC under Obama - they'd be ecstatic over the news in that diary today! Instead it gets a great big yawn, which for me confirms that a lot of this noise isn't sincere.

      •  I wasn't calling you out per se (0+ / 0-)

        just noting the difference in positions, it's not personal, though Dean's success is something I want preserved.

    •  its HOWARD Dean (0+ / 0-)

      Not Jim Dean (as in Jimmy Dean Sausages). Sorry to nitpick, but there you have it.

      And BTW, I'd love to hear Giordano make the case that the 50-state strategy was "going nowhere" even though they regained both houses of Congress, won the presidency (and not by a squeaker margin) and increased Dems in Governors and control of state legislatures.

      You know, other than that, yeah sure it was going nowhere. WTF?

  •  That's It (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Isara, fromer, totallynext, cybrestrike

    I will give no more money to the DNC, DSCC, or DCCC until the DNC returns to the 50 State Strategy.  My money now goes to local clubs, county, and state party and selected candidates and selected national organizations like DFA.

    •  Um. Read a little more carefully. (0+ / 0-)

      And consider the source, as well as Bowers' anonymous "source," and just calm down.

      The festive scenes of liberation that Dick Cheney had once imagined for Iraq were finally taking place -- in cities all over America -- Frank Rich

      by Mother of Zeus on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:32:34 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  It's not Rahm (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mz Kleen, fromer

    its Obama campaign inner circle - they want to keep control of the info.  

    Again - the cut off your nose to spite your face mentallity.

    Dean - neighbor to neighbor was taken over by the campaign without any kind of thanks or anything.

    Takin it to the streets....Doobie Brothers

    by totallynext on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:04:36 AM PST

  •  Has Tim Kaine Said Anything About This? (5+ / 0-)

    One would think he'd want to stick as closely to a successful formula as possible.

    "Starting today, we must pick ourselves up, dust ourselves off, and begin again the work of remaking America." POTUS Barack Obama - 1/20/09

    by CityLightsLover on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:04:42 AM PST

  •  Not Good! (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mz Kleen, rlochow, fromer

    If Obama doesn't stick with the 50 state strategy than what was change about?  We win with the 50 state strategy, not with the DC just for yourself strategy.  I am ashamed.  I don't think I will give money to the DNC or the DCCC if they plan on this kind of strategy.  I will give to individuals or to grassroots like moveon.org or ActBlue.

  •  Back to losing, huh? (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mz Kleen, rlochow, Hannibal, fromer

    Why am I not surprised.

  •  Then the DNC will die again (7+ / 0-)

    And we will find a new way to have a 50 state strategy.

    The DNC can either understand this, or die.

  •  What the shit? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Mz Kleen, fromer

    Seriously?

    "I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just; that his justice cannot sleep forever." -Thomas Jefferson

    by smlefo on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:05:13 AM PST

  •  The fight should be for Texas (7+ / 0-)

    If the Dems can take Texas, and hold NY and CA, the Repubs will be finished in presidential politics for a generation.

    Obama - "Separate but Equal" is good enough for gays, but not for blacks.

    by Ken in Tex on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:05:57 AM PST

  •  Bunch o crap (4+ / 0-)

    Democracy bond canceled. Back to business as usual.

    If Governor Dean's approach really was not working, they should go public with some numbers that support their argument.

    Party needs to be  built to win when we don't have a rock star at the top of the ticket.

  •  Bright side? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Churchill

    If Obama controls the campaign purse then they dance to his tune?

  •  Being in the minority is much more fun (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pattyp, Churchill, Black Leather Rain

    that what when republicans whip you, it makes sense.

    pre-emptive war · collective punishment · torture | 21st century values

    by The Dead Man on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:06:51 AM PST

  •  Careful, now... (11+ / 0-)

    Chris Bowers is a great guy, but he has a very strong bias on this issue... in other words, if it is not exactly what Dean did then its then end of the world as we know it...

    If you read the entire article, and account for Chris' disappointment, you'll see that the 50 state strategy is going to be a lot more like Obama's election strategy...  There still will be massive organizing in most red states... In most cases, the end result will look the same...

    The key difference between the Kaine strategy and the Dean strategy is that the organization will be more centralized now... that isn't necessarily a bad thing... many state parties are still lackluster and disorganized, and they could use a kick in the pants...

    In addition, the Obama centralized method of organizing worked very well... the question will be is if it can translate down to congressional and state-level district races.

    I don't know if Kaine is as cognizant of how important these midterms are in regards to redistricting.. but, he did manage to win over much of Virginia in their statehouse elections, so we should hope he knows what he's doing...

    Comments that say "GM workers should get retraining" without SPECIFIC DETAILS about those "new jobs" that never come are trollworthy

    by LordMike on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:07:38 AM PST

    •  Thank you for a rational comment! (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      LordMike

      I must admit, I find the ability of people to freak out over any unconfirmed "news" rather amusing.

      Seems like some people are more than willing to fully believe any hint of bad news.

      •  It's too early to tell if this would be... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        rweba

        ...good or bad.

        There are some significant benefits to centralization of resources, and some drawbacks as well... The distributed model has potential long term benefits, but that potential is not always realized...

        The concern from Bowers, a very real one, is that long term plans will be shelved for short term gains at election time, not only missing potential new opportunities, but hurting our party's growth over the long term.

        We will need to keep on the DNC to make sure that places like Utah are not abandoned, 'cos someday that may be fertile ground (lots of Californians moving there)...

        And even if Bowers' worst case scenario comes to pass, we aren't helpless... We can shift our attention at the grassroots to state parties ourselves... give them the moneys that the DNC did not to get organizers on the ground.  We could even hire organizers directly from an organization we create or from MoveOn.

        All is not lost, yet... this could be a positive, I hope, but, Chris Bowers' concerns are very serious and very real... we have to keep building... as long as Kaine does that, then the 50 state strategy will not be lost.  The danger is that someone like Rahm will sabotage it to get some electoral gains in the short term while plundering some great expansion opportunities.

        Considering that both Kaine and Obama increased the spread and scope of the party, I think we have reason to be guardedly optimistic... but, we should still scream bloody hell to the DNC to make sure that they don't throw out the good part of 50-state with the bad.  We may be small donors, but there are enough of us that they will have to listen.

        Comments that say "GM workers should get retraining" without SPECIFIC DETAILS about those "new jobs" that never come are trollworthy

        by LordMike on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 11:04:37 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  I hear you (0+ / 0-)

          Thank you for your reply.

          I understand the desire to be vigilant, but I am not particularly worried until I hear someone go on the record.

          I think they are obviously going to tweak and adapt the strategy - nothing wrong with that! - but I really don't see any whole sale abandonment.

  •  Maybe overstated by both kos and Bowers. (9+ / 0-)

    Bowers also writes:

    Many, if not most, states will have more resources spent on them during the next four years than during the previous four years. In addition to increasingly centralized control over how these resources are spent, there will also be a return to a swing-state focus for 2012. However, it is important to keep in mind that the Obama campaign's version of a swing state strategy was broader than either the Gore or Kerry incarnations.

    •  I noticed that too (0+ / 0-)

      This does not sound like any kind of sea change in strategy.

      Just a bit more central coordination, which makes sense if we have an incumbent president.

    •  Two points: (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Populista
      1. Gore's situation was entirely different from 2008 and even 2004 as Gore assumed (due to Clinton scandal fatigue) whopping double digit 15-20% national poll deficits to begin with (which were reduced to about 10% deficits entering the Dem convention), and hence he was likely trailing by 25% or so in the eventual "red states." It would've been illogical (and in fact political malpractice) for Gore to spread his limited resources too thin (by trying to pull off wins in states where he was trailing by huge 20-30% deficits) under those circumstances, especially given the Nader factor where Nader was attacking Gore and threatening to deliver "must win" blue states to Bush. Gore's best case scenario for a victory was a "hail mary" approach focusing on a group of states that ensured 270 electoral votes with some buffer (as margin for error) to spare. With FL in his column, Gore did win 292 electoral votes, a strong accomplishment considering where Gore started out (likely less than 100 electoral votes in his column) in that cycle. The 2000 election should simply not be considered to be on the same footing as any other recent election, given the overwhelming shadow/handicap of Clinton scandal fatigue that Gore was forced to carry.

      2. While a sitting Dem president is the natural leader of the party, in principle, the DNC should be neutral broker when it comes to Democratic primaries (including the pres. primary.) Dean played a neutral and fair-minded broker in the 2008 primary and that can be argued to have been the reason why the Clinton camp couldn't find a way a somehow deny Obama the nomination and crown the "Mrs. Inevitable." One can be fairly sure that if someone like McAuliffe was the DNC chair, they would've bent the rules here and there to benefit Clinton, as eg with how the MI+FL situation was resolved. Considering how razor thin the primary ended up being in the end, even minor bending of the execution of the rules could've tipped the nomination over to Clinton.

      Tamino's Climate Analysis || Greenwald's Political Analysis

      by NeuvoLiberal on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 11:20:06 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Dems (GOP-lite) gotten the last dollar from me! (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Words In Action

    80 percent of success is just showing up - Woody Allen.

    by Churchill on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:07:56 AM PST

  •  and the kicker is that some of these (5+ / 0-)

    rural and intermountain seats cost SO MUCH less than those on the coasts. this totally sucks if it is true.

    "There's a bailout coming but it's not for me."Neil Young

    by UTvoter on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:08:04 AM PST

  •  this IS good news for John McCain. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Churchill, Hannibal, cybrestrike

    Fucking Democrats.  Reliably capable of fucking up a brilliant effort.

    Dear Mr. President, There are too many states nowadays. Please eliminate three.
    P.S. I am not a crackpot.
    -Abe Simpson

    by fromer on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:08:24 AM PST

  •  Texas making ground every two years (3+ / 0-)

    With more Democratic seats in the Legislature, and progress and occasional victories in our Congressional races.   That's WITHOUT a history of help from the DNC.   Think how much better we could do if we had some kind of support.

    Republicans - They Hate Us for Our Freedoms

    by mikeconwell on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:08:28 AM PST

  •  Switch from offense to defense (3+ / 0-)

    That's what it signifies. Perhaps it's appropriate. I don't like it personally. Somebody out there with more connections than me, KOS, needs to show that the 50-state is as excellent on defense as it is on offense.

    I'm saying this because I sure would love for SC to go blue again in my lifetime, but with the reversion to the conservative just-do-enough-to-get-reelected strategy, it's going to toss away all the red-state gains in 2008.

    "Half of the American people never read a newspaper. Half never vote for President. One hopes it is the same half." - Gore Vidal

    by sapper on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:09:00 AM PST

  •  Dixiecans (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sapper, Churchill, cybrestrike, mkor7

    The Republicans have a Dixie philosophy--and even there they lost my new state of North Carolina.  I always hated Dixiecrats and feel great hating Dixiecans.

  •  Seems the DNC is relying on Obama's star power (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sapper, Words In Action

    to carry us through the next few election cycles.  Brilliant.  It's not like he has anything better to do, other than campaigning for the DNC.

    What we don't know keeps the contracts alive and movin. They don't gotta burn the books, they just remove em while arms warehouses fill as quick as the cells.

    by Black Leather Rain on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:09:19 AM PST

    •  If the idea is conserving cash... (0+ / 0-)

      ...for a rainy day, hoping President Obama's coat-tails are a sufficient substitute (for now), I can live with that.  Shitcanning the 50-state strategy, however, I cannot.

      I happen to live in one of those districts gerrymandered to protect a GOP incumbent.  The GOP incumbent retired in '06 and now the district is blue.  It almost didn't stay that way for lack of money from the DNC to fight a self-financed challenger in '08, one who hopes for a rematch.  Well, it's his money, but I didn't particularly like his platform, which was virtually nonexistent where it wasn't a list of cookie-cutter national GOP agenda items.  I'd rather not have him representing me.  The point is, money is better spent on offense than helping someone win re-election to some safe seat by 20 points instead of 18.

      Half-baked ideas for sale - cheap!

      by Steaming Pile on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:36:47 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Fine (4+ / 0-)

    If true, I'll give more to the DFA and stop giving to the DNC.

  •  Hey, "a win is a win", right? (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Churchill, mkor7, SlackwareGrrl

    NO.  It's not the same to win narrowly vs. winning in a landslide.  The former still gets you to power, but only the latter helps you govern.

    Can you imagine how different the attitude toward Obama would be -- and the willingness to accept his new ideas -- if he had only won by the narrowest of margins, in contested battleground states?  It would have been a completely different America these last three months.  That's one of the reasons I supported Obama over Hillary in the first place -- sure she could probably win, but by much slimmer margins (there's no way states like Indiana or Virginia would have had a prayer of being competitive with Hillary, imho.)  And the country would never have a chance to be united and looking forward under someone hated by 50% of the nation at the outset (again, imo).

    "Don't hope for a stronger America. Vote for one." - John McCain. And I did!

    by cartwrightdale on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:09:52 AM PST

  •  Kos!!! You were such a supporter of the miracle (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Churchill, Hannibal

    blue dot, Omaha, and now you've left it off the map, just like the MSM!

    You are contradicting the whole thrust of your argument in this story.

    Sigh.

  •  More centralized means (8+ / 0-)

    people like Nancy "Impeachment is off the Table" Pelosi get to call the shots about distributing the money, which is a way to keep members in line with HER agenda.

    Not for me.  My money goes to individual candidates.  

  •  Big mistake (3+ / 0-)

    Why not just crown Queen Palin right now?

    This is the one area where I wish we would imitate the Republicans. If they were in our shoes, they'd utterly destroy their opponents for a generation rather than hand them the keys to the kingdom.

  •  This is understandable. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    rlochow, SoCalRefugee

    There's not going to be as much enthusiasm for Obama in 2012- it'll be a reelection effort, rather than a full-blown upheaval of the natural order of things.

    They won't have the money to run the 50-state strategy. I just hope they attack the purplish states- including Montana and the Dakotas- rather than just the "swing" states with lots of EVs.

    Tactically speaking, the 50-state strategy is what you do if you're on the outs but have lots of money as well.

    I don't like it that much, but I understand it.

  •  Looks like the consultants are back in charge (7+ / 0-)

    These are the same fine folks who told Capitol Hill Democrats not to challenge George W. Bush on the Patriot Act, the Iraq war, FISA, torture, Guantanamo, or investigating corruption everywhere in the administration.

    Sometimes being a Democrat is like rooting for the Detroit "Lions".

    "There's no doubt in my mind, not one doubt in my mind, that we will fail."--George W. Bush.

    by Dump Terry McAuliffe on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:11:36 AM PST

  •  "President of all Americans" sounded 50-stateish (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Churchill, Lady Libertine

    to me.  

    Maybe it's time to adopt naif as my username/sig-line.

  •  so I guess Republicans will win in (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Churchill, Habitat Vic

    2010, 2012, and beyond .. well enjoy these two years, it was nice while it lasted

    Dems learned NOTHING

    if we don't win small races, we don't win big  races and people like Ken Blackwell get into power and can keep us out of power

    where do I send flowers?

    Republicans heart big business & the rich and hate everyone else. Need Proof? Bush and his administration's scorched earth policy for the last days in offic

    by Clytemnestra on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:13:28 AM PST

  •  The DNC is $15 million in debt, I believe (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    SoCalRefugee

    So could it be that these organizers were let go, because it's the end of an election cycle, and the DNC doesnt have much money to pay them, rather than it's the end of the 50 state strategy?

  •  why can't the DNC walk and chew gum? (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pattyp, rlochow, Words In Action

    Why can't they do both - focus on re-electing Obama and continuing the 50 state strategy?

  •  I don't really trust Bowers (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    pattyp, Mother of Zeus, Escamillo

    he tends to get hysterical at the slightest suggestion someone is not as "progressive" as he expects them to be.  Almost certain he's exaggerating this.

  •  Let's see how far the Democrats will (0+ / 0-)

    get if they ignore Howard Dean and instead elevate hacks and nitwits like Harold Ford to be the 'leaders' of the party!

  •  Clinton wing winning? (3+ / 0-)

    this sounds like James Carville speaking for the conservative wing of the party. He and many of the village people hate the idea of going nationwide, it reduces the need for consultants to slice and dice the electorate.

    •  Go to the head of the class (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      fiddlingnero, smeesq

      And allow me to add this prediction: before long, Mark Penn will not only get his millions from the HRC campaign but he'll be rehabilitated as a political genius.

      These guys are harder to get rid of than skunk smell.

      "There's no doubt in my mind, not one doubt in my mind, that we will fail."--George W. Bush.

      by Dump Terry McAuliffe on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:20:18 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Obama is head of the party (0+ / 0-)

      Its silly to assume Clinton has any say in the matter.

      There's an innate tendency on the part of even the elite to idolize men who are making a lot of money, and assume that they know what they're doing. PK

      by Betty Pinson on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:43:41 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  We may end up at a point (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    mainefem, oaktownadam, Lady Libertine

    where the national party structure is irrelevant. With the Internet and the rise of the Netroots, we can do a far more effective job in finding candidates, fundraising, and putting boots on the ground than the national party does.

    Ultimately, this is all about control -- the folks in charge of the DNC, the DSCC, and the DCCC prefer a top-down organization, where they set the policy and decide where to put their resources, while the Netroots are more a bottom-up, or even more of an even level "organization", with feelers stretched out all over the place and more autonomy given to the local office. To a certain extent, that's the way the Obama campaign worked -- less direction from "on high" and more trusting the local folks who knew the ground situation. Sure, it led to some pretty embarrassing screwups, like the McClurkin debacle and the Muslim women being barred from the front of the crowd due to the fear of the Right wing focusing on the headscarves and all that crap, but it's still a learning process.

    And let's face it -- most of the Party top names were in the Clinton camp starting out last year, after all that's how she had that huge lead in superdelegates and why everyone saw her winning the nomination as "inevitable". It was only when Obama started bringing in the average Joes and Janes, that led to "regular" delegates, that party leaders started to take note of the black dude with the funny name.

    With the Internet making it easier to donate to specific candidates (heck, look how much money Tinklenberg cleared after Bachmann opened her big yap -- imagine if he'd had that kind of coin earlier on in the campaign), do we even need the national party structure except maybe for general "Democrats are cool" ads and the like?

  •  Can't this wait..enough of the perpetual campain (0+ / 0-)

    ing we might not have an election in 2012.....

    •  Have the Republicans stopped working for the next (0+ / 0-)

      cycle?

      I don't think there's any responsible way to avoid the perpetual campaign.

      The difference is that Obama doesn't need to politicize his every move over it.

      But, the DNC is ALL ABOUT campaigns, and damn well ought to be preparing, and using their best game plan.

      We have no time but the time to change.

      by Words In Action on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 05:33:55 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  We want progressive governance. (6+ / 0-)

    That means citizens empowered to make decisions about their lives at the local level in all 50 states. That means democracy.

    The two things go together.

    What was the meaning of Barack Obama's campaign?

    That's a story we are still writing. We hold the pen.

    Whether that story is a grassroots one or a more "corporate board room, poll and power driven" one is something we will see in the months to come.

    But one thing is clear. We in the netroots and grassroots want progressive governance and we know that won't come from decisions made behind closed doors in DC.

    Progressive governance will only come with pressure from the grassroots, from people empowered to make decisions about their lives and communities where they live.

    That was the founding spirit of our nation. That's what people liked about Howard Dean.

    Democracy.

    It works.

  •  I'm beginning to see both political parties (6+ / 0-)

    as predatory pigs interested in self serving power at the expense of representing the will of the voters.

    The two party system is a clever way for pigs to alternate turns at the trough while pretending to be shocked at how much that last pig ate.

    Obama can't reform Washington without taking on both political parties.

    •  Sure, that's more or less a given (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      rlochow, crystal eyes

      That's the way institutions of this nature work: their chief goal is to perpetuate and expand, and they develop power elites that use the institution as a vehicle to perpetuate and further their own careers. Meanwhile, activist networks such as the netroots try to invade and commandeer the institutions and use them to further their goals. That's our role, that's how we should understand ourselves. I've long thought we in the progressive netroots identify way too much with the Democratic party. Not in the sense that a third party was currently viable - it isn't - but in the sense that we should never ever expect any loyalty from the party - and shouldn't show it any unless it helps further our agenda.

      An Ceiling Cat rode invisible bike over teh waterz (cskendrick)

      by brainwave on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:35:35 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Booo (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    triv33

    Hiss.

    I demand prosecutions for torture.

    by heart of a quince on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:19:12 AM PST

  •  That being said (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    GlowNZ

    I'm sure I will get flamed for this, but if you're talking about "success of the 50-state strategy", you have to give at least as much credit to Rahm Emmanuel's recruiting/targeting efforts (in 06) and Obama's campaign organization (08).

  •  No surprise here (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    smeesq

    Anyone who has been paying attention knew that when Emmanuel was tapped for COS job and Gov. Kane was selcted for the DNC it would be the death of the 50-state strategy. Well at least the GOP will have one thing to be happy about today. What a disaster this will be; to take a winning strategy and go back to a losing one all because of ego....

  •  U.S. is a 50 link chain. Way to go Dean! (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Words In Action
  •  I an depressed and astonished at this turn. (4+ / 0-)

    Why not just poke a stick in Howard's eye? It was the work of Dean and the advent of internet support that was responsible for Obama's campaign.

    I think, therefore I am. I think.

    by mcmom on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:21:45 AM PST

    •  Abandoning the 50 State Strategy is sheer folly. (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      KLM, Words In Action

      I'm glad Obama won (obviously) but to see him getting all the credit is a little maddening.  Besides, the 50 State Strategy was not just about electing a Democratic President but electing more and better Dems across the board.

      It would, indeed, be quite sad to see the awesome gains made be lost in a few scant years because Dean (and his energy and ideas) was tossed.

  •  I may get flamed as well (0+ / 0-)

    I thought the 50 state strategy a swell idea, and still do ... however ...

    If the opposition is going to gin up their 2012 base on social issues in states like IN, NC, VA, etc. - which would be about their only card to play if all goes reasonably well - allocating most resources to purple states makes sense.

    •  You're falling into the short term think (0+ / 0-)

      that's been the bane of our electoral practices for years.  And they have not worked in the long run.  

      Just look at 2006, we should not taken back congress that election without the 50 state strategy.  

  •  They really hate winning, don't they? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Words In Action

    In TX-32, track the voting record of Pete Sessions at SessionsWatch.

    by CoolOnion on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:24:59 AM PST

  •  Disaster (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Words In Action

    Obviously, the most important thing to do when you hit on a winning formula is to try to abandon it.  

    OK, so Dean needs to find a way to run a 50 state progressive campaign without the Dem party.  Perhaps the new national boots on the ground director of Moveon.org or something?  Isn't moveon looking to become more than an internet cheerleader for the new Obama administration?

  •  leave it to the democrats (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    rlochow, Words In Action

    to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory....

    It's continually amazing to me that Dean gets so little respect from the political establishment. They seem to have had it out for him since day one...first by labeling him an "extreme liberal" (nothing further from the truth), then by playing his roar over and over out of context, and now by giving him an unceremonious shove off the stern of the ship.

    Thanks for all the help, Howard, and don't let the door hit you on the way out!

  •  Isn't the real question... (0+ / 0-)

    whether Axelrod, Plouffe, et al., change their strategy for 2012?

  •  I believe in a 40 state strategy personally (0+ / 0-)
  •  Re-electing Obama should not be... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Lady Libertine, Johnny Q

    the only objective for Dems over the next four years, important as that is.
    We need to get more and better Dems in the Senate, the House, and in state and local offices across the country.  We need particularly to replace not only Repubs but, as important, Blue Dog Dems-- the DINOs and the ODOSIs  (Only Democrat on Some Issues).  That means not turning over everything to the DNC or, heaven forfend, the DLC or its remnants.  Obama will not be successful unless he has the base to make real changes occur and stick.  FDR knew this, so presumably BHO knows it too.  DailyKOS has its work cut out.

    To make the world safe for capitalism, we must first make capitalism safe for the world.

    by djohnutk on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:27:10 AM PST

  •  The Party just switched from offense to defense (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Words In Action

    Essentially what has happened is that the Democratic Party -- our party -- has switched from offense to defense.

    When we were on offense we were advancing on and capturing new territory like Montana, Indiana, Virginia, Missouri and the Dakotas.  As of today we are consolidating our power and assuming a defensive posture in order to hold onto what we have.

    It is a reasonable approach if your goal is to gain and consolidate power.  However, if your goal is to bring progressive government to all Americans then it really isn't a reasonable approach at all.

    Howard Dean really wanted to empower people.  The 50-state strategy emanates from who he is, and from all of us who supported him.

    Going forward, one of two things will have to happen if we are ever going to see anything like the 50-state strategy again:

    Either it will be viewed by Democratic power brokers as a good way to gain and keep power, or more of us in the grassroots will need to rise to prominence in the ranks of the Democratic Party.  I'm hoping -- and working for -- the latter.

    p.s. - let's also not forget that Obama was ours first.  Before anyone else had any idea who he was we were sending oodles of small donations to his Senate campaign.  We are the cutting edge of the Democratic Party... so, let's stay sharp!

    The hope of a secure and livable world lies with disciplined nonconformists who are dedicated to justice, peace and brotherhood. -Martin Luther King Jr.

    by Joshua Lyman on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:27:12 AM PST

  •  Those EEEEEEdiots! (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    luaptifer, roxy317

    The Ren and Stimpy Show:

    How Sweet To Be An Idiot

    A corrupted government. Patriots branded as renegades. This is how we roll.

    by GreyHawk on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:28:43 AM PST

  •  Heres my reply on any form the DNC sends asking (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Words In Action

    for cash.

    "No 50 state strategy?  No way, no how, no cash from me!"

  •  "A source close to the transition" (2+ / 0-)

    Wow. Sounds like one I can really take to the bank.  

    I'm now going to commence running around my living room and frothing at the mouth until I succeed in getting my panties all in a twist and soaking my carpet in spittle.

    Oh, on second thought, maybe I'll wait until there is a more credible - i.e., non-anonymous - source of information and/or some tangible evidence of such a shift in strategy.

    Sigh.

    The festive scenes of liberation that Dick Cheney had once imagined for Iraq were finally taking place -- in cities all over America -- Frank Rich

    by Mother of Zeus on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:30:27 AM PST

    •  Precisely what I was thinking (0+ / 0-)

      Until I hear it from Kaine or even President Obama it's nothing but hearsay to me. I seem to remember them saying they were keeping it. Alas, look at all the kneejerk reactions---again. Gawd, I think people have spent so much time in the lost column that some don't know how to extricate themselves from it.

      You don't make peace with friends. You make it with very unsavory enemies.

      by Its any one guess on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:33:38 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Based on Drunk Comments Some Blogger Received.. (2+ / 0-)

    ...at a Party.

    Any chance we could chillax a bit?  And. Not. Do. Those. "Not. One. Dollar." Ultimatum. One. Word. Sentences. That. Aren't. Impressive?

    The Obama/Biden Inaugural -- the exact moment when the world went from gray to colorful.

    by alkatt on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:30:33 AM PST

  •  Damn Gate Repairmen. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Johnny Q

    Somebody go and get our battering ram out of storage.

    Let's go back to E Pluribus Unum

    by hazzcon on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:30:57 AM PST

  •  Kos, (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    TooFolkGR, Mother of Zeus, gougef

    sometimes your diaries are complete crap.  

    http://politicz.wordpress.com/

    by GlowNZ on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:32:25 AM PST

  •  from dnc blog itself, 12-9-08: (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Words In Action

    "Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, in politics and elsewhere. And after two straight cycles of congressional pickups, outgoing DNC chair Howard Dean is no longer a boogeyman for his Republican counterparts -- he's a template for success.

    This past weekend, a candidate for RNC Chair, Michigan Republican Party Chair Saul Anuzi, said the Grand Old Party would do well to follow the example set by the former Vermont Governor.

    'There is a perception that we are a regional party and that we are a party from the South because that's the region we're consistently winning today," Anuzis told Politico. "I do think we need to have our version of the 50-state program that [Democratic National Committee Chair Howard] Dean had.'"

    now i ask you, are dems insane?

    I have always found that mercy bears richer fruits than strict justice. -Abraham Lincoln, 16th U.S. President (1809-1865)

    by greenbird on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:32:44 AM PST

  •  Lemmings (3+ / 0-)

    Are we really reaching this level of collective freak-out over an unsubstantiated rumor about what our strategy might be for an election nearly two years away? Really?

    Leaving out the part where the outrage is vastly out of proportion to the actual changes described in Bowers' piece, couldn't people wait until there was some evidence this is actually going to happen before vowing never to donate to the DNC?

    "Mom, baseball, apple pie, and a unified Democratic juggernaut.

    by Purplepeople on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:33:03 AM PST

  •  And I thought Hillary... (0+ / 0-)

    was going to trash Howard Dean...and the 50 state strategy...hmmm...I guess Hillary is not that evil after all...

    Obama/Biden'08 Delivering Change he Promised

    by dvogel001 on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:33:06 AM PST

    •  Well I Don't Think Anybody's Evil (0+ / 0-)

      And this really doesn't have anything to do with Hillary.

      If spittle & tooth=vigor & youth Bill-O & Savage won't grow any older If wishes & dreams=bitches & beams We'll all live in skyscrapers bu

      by TooFolkGR on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:35:04 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  That was one of the many... (0+ / 0-)

        reasons given for villifying Hillary during the primary...she will destroy Howard Dean...the Clinton's hate Dean...etc...just saying...very interesting turn of events here...

        Obama/Biden'08 Delivering Change he Promised

        by dvogel001 on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:43:51 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  I don't see enough evidence to freak out (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    bottlerocketheart

    The "source" seems to be hinting at a greater degree of central coordination.

    This may not be a bad thing, if they have proven methods that they believe they can standardize and roll out on a nation wide basis. Local efforts are not always as effective as they could be and you want to make sure the money is being used as effectively as possible.

    Also there is no mention of abandoning the 50 state strategy, just a greater targetting of Swing states. But since the amount of resources and spending is going to increase, even red states like Idaho will probably get more resources than they are getting now.

    So centralization vs decentralization in the DNC is an interesting debate, but I don't think it is equivalent to "abandoning" the 50 state strategy.

  •  Wasn't that a wonderful Inaugeration?!!! (0+ / 0-)

      I'm wondering just how much the inclusive 50 state strategy actually had to do with the huge turnout of people for the inaugeration yesterday.  

    Seems to me that anything that changed the voting patterns of people so dramatically would also have changed thought patterns, as well as increased the probability that people would see total participation and interest in politics as being something the want to , no, indeed NEED to do.

    They came to witness the transition of power.  Howard Dean had a lot to do with stoking that interest!

    I hope that the people will have some expectation over how this next election is going to transpire.

    I hope and pray that the results of President Obama's governance for the next four years will convince people all over the country to vote for him again.  

    The best strategy for reelection is to govern so well that reelection will be the obvious choice.

    Save the money.  Just do such a good job they won't let the Democrats go.  Continue squabbling like this, and it's less likely.  

  •  Think of all the corporate money being dangled (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    fastwacks

    in front of the Dems by BigAg, BigPharma, BigWeapons, BigCoal, BigOil and all the rest.

    The Dems hold the purse strings now, and all these industries are lining up to dance with them.

    The grassroots funding channels will have to compete with them - always did, always will.

    BushCheney Inc. - They lied to me, they lied to you, they lied to our troops.

    by jjohnjj on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:34:33 AM PST

  •  Not related to this thread, but too short for (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Lady Libertine, SlackwareGrrl

    a diary. Obama's just done talking with his senior staff and Biden got snarky on the chief justice. Biden was asked to administer the oath of office to the senior staffers and he said "I have to do this again? I don't have as good a memory as Chief Justice Roberts".  :)

  •  wow (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    bottlerocketheart

    one day into it, and alreay dkos is in a meltdown.

    http://politicz.wordpress.com/

    by GlowNZ on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:35:16 AM PST

  •  Not just this, kos... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Words In Action, SlackwareGrrl

    Howard Dean was a rare political creature -- a person who embraced decentralization.

    Dean was "a rare political creature" because he put results ahead of ego. He put was was good for the Party ahead of what was good for the Beltway insiders, who had fed at the coffers of the DNC under Terry McAuliffe and his predecessors for years. He put long term gain ahead of short term patchwork.

    He will be missed. I miss him already.

    I have not GBCWed. I'm just not commenting at present.

    by Bob Johnson on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:35:17 AM PST

  •  Because if Obama has proven one thing in the (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Words In Action

    last election cycle it's that he can't get elected without the support of the entrenched establishment elites... er, something. Stupid is as stupid does, and these clowns are frackin idiots.

    Can we please just focus on better Democrats this next election cycle, please?  I know the DNC leadership is largely unelected but it would send a nice message to them.  

    "Man will never be free until the last king is strangled with the entrails of the last priest." -Denis Dederot (-6.38, -6.36)

    by The Rational Hatter on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:35:18 AM PST

  •  Dean don't get no respect (3+ / 0-)

    Between his campaign for the presidency and his tenure as DNC Chairman, Dean plowed the row for the successes in the last election.

    The old time power brokers have had their noses out of joint.  So I guess we the new strategy is:  that worked really well.  So let's change it.

    Why is the democratic party so intent on breaking my heart?  Dysfunction:  I wish democrats would quit you.

  •  The RNC just scheduled a big... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Words In Action, SlackwareGrrl

    party in celebration of the death of the 50-state strategy...wheh...that will probably save us at least $100 Million next cycle...

    Obama/Biden'08 Delivering Change he Promised

    by dvogel001 on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:37:30 AM PST

  •  Call me cynical (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    sweeper

    but I see Rahm's hands all over this one!  Remember the spat he had with Dean when Rahm was running the DCCC for the 2006 elections.

  •  Crawling back into their shell I see (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    wyvern

    Hmmph! In that case, I want results and I want them now. Democrats have been rather pathetic when they took over Congress and have pretty much stumbled their way since Obama's electoral win. This is it for the Democrats. If they don't produce, lead and stand strong, they're toast. A bad move. A stupid move.

  •  In the end it's at least partly empirical (0+ / 0-)

    In other words, whether the R+35-to-R+25 shift in a state like ID is sustainable into the single digits and beyond is only partly a question of priorities and resources, but it's partly a question of predicted demographics.  There are solid demographic predictors of R vs D and if Idaho or Oklahoma have those predictors then they're no more likely to turn Democratic than California or Hawaii would even after years of bad Democratic regimes.  It's not just a matter of philosophically splitting the difference between the Dean Way and the Penn Way--it's about finding, rationally, the most effective path.  That does require some essentially philosophical weighting of short- versus long-term goals, of course.

    -5.38/-3.74 We're currently in a sig interregnum. A siggie vacante, as it were.

    by Rich in PA on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:38:28 AM PST

  •  I hate messing with a winning strategy. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    wyvern

    I was dubious about Dean and the 50 state strategy and have since been converted.

    I don't understand this at all.

  •  They couldn't be stupid enough (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    wyvern, James Kresnik

    to ditch the 50 state strategy.

    Oh wait, yes they could.

    I hope this is just empty rumor.

  •  Massive Fail (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    poemless, fhcec, wyvern

    Ugh...this is incredibly disheartening.

    Feingold is my hero.

    by Marc in CA on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:40:54 AM PST

  •  Sorry DNC, the... (0+ / 0-)

    ...50 state strategy is too entrenched to abandon.

    How do I know?  Just ask Obama to show you his 2 million strong campaign e-mail list.

    That's how I know.

    " Most people have their opinions handed to them by the corporate media but think those opinions are their own." -Dallasdoc

    by wyvern on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:41:23 AM PST

  •  How many here go to local Dem meetings? (0+ / 0-)

    In other words, "Put your money where your mouth is.." Our legislative district democrats voted in a chair who is a past Dean supporter. Our county chair also was a past-Deaniac. Dean said that voting wasn't enough - yo had to run for office or support someone to run. So we did, from precinct captains to chairs to county and state officers. We know who we are in the state; we know what this means, "I want my country back!" and this, "more and better Democrats."

    I don't it that Obama and Dean are not comrades. It's a natural affinity. What happened?

    Where is Howard Dean?

    by mrobinson on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:43:37 AM PST

  •  2 Things (0+ / 0-)
    Obama's definition of a swing state is much much broader than we had before which is a cause for optimism, AND Obama did have staffers everywhere didn't he? Even in deep red states? So the operations won't completely atrophy.

    Perhaps we should start a funding organization for those deep red states that would be overlooked? It wouldn't be that much but it might be something, especially if we just focused on a dozen or so states...

    There's something attractive about invincible ignorance... for the first 5 seconds.

    by MNPundit on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:45:07 AM PST

  •  again: from today's website: (0+ / 0-)

    "A 50-State Strategy
    How Democrats can and will win in every state, every county, and every precinct.
    The Democratic Party is committed to winning elections at every level in every region of the country, and we're getting started right now with a massive effort to fund organizers on the ground in every state.
    The ultimate goal? An active, effective group of Democrats organized in every single precinct in the country. Here's what we're doing to get there:

    1. The Democratic Party hired organizers chosen by the state parties in every state -- experienced local activists who know their communities.
    1. We brought those organizers together for summits where they learned from each other the best practices for getting organized to win elections.
    1. Armed with the knowledge they've shared with each other, Democratic organizers returned to the states and recruited and trained leaders at the local level.
    1. Those local leaders recruited more leaders and volunteers until every single precinct in their area has a trained, effective organization of Democrats dedicated to winning votes for Democrats.

    (This includes a quote from Gov. Dean on the right.)

    Latest News: Gov. Tim Kaine Answers Your Questions
    January 16, 2009 - Gov. Tim Kaine, the incoming chair of the Democratic National Committee, answers your questions from all over the country."

    they're insane to abandon this, right?

    I have always found that mercy bears richer fruits than strict justice. -Abraham Lincoln, 16th U.S. President (1809-1865)

    by greenbird on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:45:38 AM PST

  •  It will come back (0+ / 0-)

    the 50 state strategy is why Obama is the president

    That and he is the anti-Christ, and therefore has magical powers

    Humility will get you everywhere

    by Krush on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:47:57 AM PST

  •  Without prejudice to the 50 State Strategy (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    emilysdad

    Can you really talk about the 2008 without talking about tailcoats? It was Obama for America that flipped Indiana and North Carolina and narrowed the gap in states like Utah, and not so much the DNC.

    People should distrust this desire to play the President and his administration against the image of Dean -- and indeed, it is just an image of Dean, more an archetype of scorned purity than the flesh-and-blood former Governor of Vermont. That impulse is rooted, not in a dispassionate analysis of the facts, but in the psychological scars of the lean years, and will not serve the party well.

  •  We have to fight this (0+ / 0-)

    The DNC should not worry about 2012 yet, but worry about 2010.  2010 is likely to be a very tough year for Democrats as the economy is likely to be in a deep recession and people will blame Democrats for it.  I could care less about Obama's reelection right now.  

  •  This is why I am starting... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    bottlerocketheart

    ...to grow tired of some of my favorite blogs. Floating an unsourced story in a transparent attempt to create pressure on an organization reeks of good old boy politics.

  •  This is a bad decision, and we will fight it. (0+ / 0-)
  •  So it's up to us then. (4+ / 0-)

    I don't know about anybody else, but I haven't given money to the DNC in well over a year.

    I have given money to the Ohio Democratic Party, and the Michigan Democratic Party, and at least two other state parties. I've given money to No on Prop 8 (I live in CA), and more individual candidates and groups than I can count. Both through ActBlue and just by going to the specific website and donating.

    There's more than one way to have a 50-state strategy. So why do we need to play along with the false meme that the DNC is the only game in town?

    We need to do what we've been doing, and what's been working: Give - both time and money - to local candidates, as well as candidates in other states that need your support. Get involved in your local Democratic party chapter, or a progressive group. (The smaller the chapter, the more impact you can have.)

    Everything we have accomplished - not just us Kossacks, but if you think about it, President Obama too - was born of a refusal to just fall in line with the party establishment and the daddy and mommy figures in DC. I'm not about to start now just because I can finally hear "Hail to the Chief" again without wanting to vomit.

    We ARE a 50-state strategy.

    We took our country back. Now let's take it forward.

    by yulooloo on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 10:54:49 AM PST

  •  So what to do besides getting angry (0+ / 0-)

    Have a fundraiser for state parties that are (1) in red states that the DNC will likely ignore, (2) have through the 50-state initiative gotten active and cleaned up their act, and (3) have a lot of bloggers in the region who can help out.  Some quick picks:

    Texas - these folks are making progress against an entrenched Republican Party.  Give them the funds to have the state party deploy the organizers that the DNC under Dean was deploying.

    Idaho - Kos hits on the reason.

    Mississippi - Because Musgrove started making us believe again.  And because it is the key symbol of voting rights.

    West Virginia - Because the union strength there almost got something going.

    Arizona - Because we need to start rebuilding the bench after Napolitano's cabinet appointment.

    Georgia - Because Jim Martin needs to be the next Governor of Georgia.

    Missouri - Because it is the next Virginia.

    Wyoming - Help Dave and Gary build a statewide party.

    States that need to get their acts together:

    Alabama
    South Carolina

  •  What did you expect them to do? Too many (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lisastar

    people were getting involved.  The base was becoming too powerful.

    The party had to rein it in.  The party elite, that is.

  •  What is the deal? (0+ / 0-)
    Obama based his campaign around the 50 state thing.  Could someone please explain to me exactly what Howard Dean did that establishment Dems hate him for?  It's like "Hey you succeeded, now get the F out!"  What are they thinking?  Or are they not?

    "I doubt not your intelligence, only the dirtiness of your mind."

    by MicahT0078 on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 11:09:15 AM PST

  •  A different suggestion (4+ / 0-)

    Foremost, I'd rather we had confirmation of this information before we go off half crazy...again. Then, I'd like more details. In the interim:

    I think the DNC's 50 state strategy is great. But, I get the impression that there are people who think Obama won because of that strategy. Obama won because his campaign had a 50 state strategy. In my part of the state (and from what I've heard, all of the state), I was the only person in a  leadership role (volunteer) for the campaign that was also active in my local Dem. party. The Democratic Party did not bring a great deal to the effort. (In fact the local party sneered at Obama volunteers....those volunteers weren't the "real" Democrats...they hadn't been supporting the party since the dawn of history, so they didn't count..they wouldn't stick around afterwards, so why bother with them...etc).

    My suggestion is that we build "better" state and local party organizations. That we do away with the flacks who have run those organizations forever. That we find people to run the organizations who aren't using it as a stepping stone to something better but rather than as a meaningful, important job in itself. That the organizations become less exclusive and more inclusive. That if they want to speak for Democrats, they need to actually talk to Democrats other than just themselves. And this is a good time for those things to happen: the people who are excited about politics for the first time are looking for ways to get involved....but will the old-time leadership reach out to them?

    "The pessimist sees difficulty in every opportunity. The optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty." Winston Churchill

    by royce on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 11:09:30 AM PST

  •  If Bowers is Correct, I Simply Proves That Us... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Johnny Q

    Democrats know how to f**k up a one car funeral.  This is exactly what led to the disasters of the seventies and eighties and the last eight years; a 'central committee' with no idea of the local issues becoming so Washington focused that they lost the electorate.
    Unless and until the central money source realizes that you have to elect Democrats to the courthouse in order to secure the White House, the Repugnants will be back for sure.  You have to get people at local level so that the electorate will once again feel comfortable pulling that Democratic lever.

  •  Typical Establishment Democratic response: ... (0+ / 0-)

    ....When something works, get RID OF IT.

    "...if my thought-dreams could be seen, they'd probably put my head in a guillotine...." {-8.13;-5.59}

    by lams712 on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 11:29:21 AM PST

  •  Fine.... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    exsimo2, jarotra

    A lot less money for the DNC then.  (I prefer candidate-specific donations anyway...)

    Maybe we need to create our own financial version of the fifty-state strategy.  Since money talks, having state parties be more beholden to us than to the DNC, DCCC, DSCC, etc....might wake the folks at the top of the party up.

    Can we use ActBlue for that purpose?  Five bucks a month to, say, North Carolina or Nevada or even Mississippi isn't much from one person, but multiply that by a few thousand.....

    As for our common defense, we reject as false the choice between our safety and our ideals.

    by Palamedes on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 11:34:56 AM PST

  •  Canceled my DemoBond; where to send the $$? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    jarotra, James Kresnik

    I read this post then started watching Tim Kaine's video in which he promises to answer questions from the membership, and the first one is nominally from some guy who considers himself a conservative Democrat (has always voted straight-ticket Republican) and wants to know how we're going to reach out to him.

    Stopped watching, at that point.  Kaine chose to address that question first.  You know, the "how can we contort ourselves to attract votes that we credulously think we can attract if we just agree to fashion ourselves as Republicans?" question.

    The other thing that sent up a red flag for me was when Al Giordano endorsed Kaine. Al's been wrong about everything since he predicted that Obama would, um, win the election.  I don't particularly hold this against Al, but to the extent any predictor reliably contains information, it seems worth paying attention to.

    So I canceled my Democracy Bond. If in the end it's not RIP for the 50-state strategy, I'm guessing we'll hear about it here, and I'll reactivate it.

    In the meantime ... is DFA the best replacement? Maybe this new PCCC?

    "Rove's job, and by extension McCain's job, is to basically nuke reality and leave everything open to question." - dday

    by itswhatson on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 11:38:21 AM PST

  •  From MyDD (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    bottlerocketheart

    Kaine's own words at the DNC meeting... take with as many grains of salt as you wish...

    There's no question it'll be hard to match Howard Dean's record as chairman of this party. His 50-state strategy was simple and powerful. The Obama campaign adopted it and the results speak for themselves.

    The basic point-and the principle I'll carry with me as DNC Chair-is that everybody matters...

    ...You don't have to be a big donor for your donation to matter.

    ...You don't have to be an expert for your idea to matter.

    ...You don't have to be a full-time campaign worker for your effort to matter.

    I will be true to that strategy-every state, every community, every person matters.

    Together, we'll do some new things-because we can never rest on what worked yesterday. But we will never again as a party write off states or regions or people.

    The 50 state strategy is now and forever what Democrats do.

    Comments that say "GM workers should get retraining" without SPECIFIC DETAILS about those "new jobs" that never come are trollworthy

    by LordMike on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 11:39:41 AM PST

  •  Very disappointing. (0+ / 0-)

    And really, Obama doesn't need the Democratic party machinery to win reelection IMHO. The party benefited from Obama and his team but he's not going to have any support if the DNC doesn't invest in all areas.

    OH, HELL YEAH!!

    tragically un-hip

    -5.88, -6.82

    by Debby on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 11:46:57 AM PST

  •  Too bad. This is a return to (0+ / 0-)

    the way they lost elections and gave the country to the radical right.

  •  Since we're treating anything as TRUE (0+ / 0-)

    an anonymous source close to the DNC indicated that plans are in motion to both criminalize abortion as well as annex New Zealand.

    May your anger be righteous.

    by bottlerocketheart on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 11:57:04 AM PST

    •  You've apparently never (0+ / 0-)

      prepared for a contingency.

      They don't pay me enough to save, and they don't pay me enough to spend. So let 'em bail their own asses out and stop blaming me. -Joy Busey

      by James Kresnik on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 06:20:39 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  There's preparing for a contingency ... (0+ / 0-)

        ... and then there's going batshit insane.

        A lot of people are waiting to see if there's anything substantial to the rumor. That's healthy.

        A lot of other people are already proclaiming revolution.

        Do you dial 911 every time your floorboards squeak?

        May your anger be righteous.

        by bottlerocketheart on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 08:54:38 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  No Automatic Weapons Ban !!! (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    James Kresnik

    We will lose the Mountain States if Congress reinstates this ban.

    No ifs
    No ands
    No buts

    No Colorado
    No Wyoming
    No Montana
    No Utah
    No Idaho

  •  TERRIBLE decision to ditch the 50-state strategy (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    TheCrank

    I hope the party establishment reconsiders before we get ourselves a repeat of 1999/2000. :-/

    The media image of a "center-right" U.S. is a myth and a joke.

    by boofdah on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 12:00:00 PM PST

  •  All the experts have the succinct explanation (2+ / 0-)

    of why Obama won his campaign.

    But I would like to remind all and sundry that the knowing experts were betting that Obama was too young , too inexperienced and would undoubtedly end up an ideal VP for Hillary giving her a bit of a boost as the Democrats took their turn at the trough/err White House.

    That is the conventional wisdom as I glean it. But it didn't work that way because a decentralized and broadly based Party and Presidential primary process came up with many who were enthusiastic for Obama because: 1) he was against the Iraq fiasco, 2)represented a clean break with the worst of past Democratic failures, 3) and didn't seem to owe big donors and the elites in the Democratic Party as much as the rest of the crowd of candidates.

    Even better a Democratic party with nationwide, not regional representation came thru for him. He had a chance in a fair contest to make his case.

      We need better candidates and genuine progressives to make the democrats not a blue version of Republicans lite but a positive change from the centrists and status quo moderates. The party elites like the majority status. That is why they are basking in their status and pulling the ladders up so new people can't come in. They got theirs, why bother?

    Wrong strategy.  Republican dead enders will be the last to agree with us, grumbling all the way. The job for US is to use bold ideas to actually solve several problems, not convince a few bitter Repubs and the professional deniers in the media to like us.

    There is no "happy medium" of huge tax cuts and bailouts for banks that will bring our economy back.

    Remember that was an economy that was sliding down for the vast majority of Americans since Reagan.

     We need to do better, not to adopt conciliationist or lukewarm responses to the drastic crisis we are in.  Either we do respond or we go down in a couple of cycles of spinning wheels.
    And that means taking our case to the local election contests as vital to sustaining our majority while the really big problems get tackled and the wind goes strong at Obama's back so he can get the bold plans thru the congress.

    cast away illusions, prepare for struggle

    by Pete Rock on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 12:02:32 PM PST

  •  no surprise (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    dclawyer06

    it was clear when they failed to give Dean his due.

    Well, I stopped givng to the DNC long ago. Will now just laugh loudly when they call or come to the door.

    Oh, and thanks, Rahm.

    They aren't clueless...they know EXACTLY what they're doing.

    by lisastar on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 12:03:48 PM PST

  •  I live in Texas, and we have a shot.... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    revgerry, jarotra

    at turning this state blue.  Our Hispanic and Black populations are increasing, and even here, Bush's policies are increasingly unpopular.  So I would oppose any policy which gave up on changing red states to blue.  Obviously the party can prioritize--we're not going to carry Utah any time soon.  But even in Utah, we can increase the number of Democratic state legislators, and maybe pick up a Congressional seat here and there....

    But the Democratic party should make Texas their number one priority.  The state has 34 electoral votes, and will get more after the next census.  Turn Texas blue, and a Republican presidential victory becomes almost impossible.

    •  I'm with you here in Dallas (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      revgerry
      See my comment above.  Great minds...

      http://www.dailykos.com/...

      May I also suggest we deny Bush his current GOP Congresscritter, Pete "the Streak" Sessions (TX-32)?  He's the GOP NRCC Chair, in charge of "winning Congressionsal seats for the Republicans".  I predict fundraisers with Bush over in Preston Hollow - - not good.  Let's paint a big target on Pete's back.

      Torture is Wrong! 10% of the US population on Food Stamps: help your food bank.

      by tom 47 on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 12:52:01 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Nebraska (0+ / 0-)

    Nebraska is purple!!! At least give us our blue dot on the eastern side!

  •  I have canceled my democracy bond, (0+ / 0-)

    and yes, i told them why.

    I also think we need to contact Obama directly through any of his new communication mechanisms, though he will no personally see the email (unless someone has his personal e-address)  if enough of us complain, and mount our own "campaign, perhaps they will hear us.

    Beyond that, I urge every activist to become a PC if you are not (precinct committeeman)m, and become an active voice and vote within the party.  

    We have the power.

  •  I hate this. 50-state strategy WORKED (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    James Kresnik

    and what's more, the whole point was that the party is interested in the welfare of the whole country, not simply hanging on to power. That means the elections for local dogcatcher and DA are as important for party organizing as that for President. Maybe more so, since national candidates tend to have their own sophisticated resources and local candidates, especially first timers running as the minority party, need lots of help.

    I don't belong to any organized political party. I'm a democrat. -- Will Rogers

    by TheCrank on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 01:52:25 PM PST

  •  MUST...STOP...the ....WINNING!! (0+ / 0-)

    The Seminole Democrat
    A blue voice calling from the deep red

    by SemDem on Wed Jan 21, 2009 at 01:56:07 PM PST

  •  So hearsay from Bowers is regarded as Gospel (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aexia

    Truth now?  That's a shame.  People, get some perspective.  You're freaking out over hearsay; and not just any hearsay, but hearsay from a source with a HUGE chip on his sholder.  There's nothing to see here.

  •  Failed Policies of Past (0+ / 0-)

    I won't contribute to a backward looking DNC.  Howard Dean's strategy produced some much needed movement towards the democrats in surprising places.  Changing this strategy in any significant fashion would be an error.  The DNC can still work towards Obama's reelection, but it would be a terrible mistake to reject present success for past failures.  Are the democrats serious about reinforcing their majorities?  about rescuing our country from the effects of the last eight years?  

  •  Canceled my contribution (0+ / 0-)

    I just sent the DNC a request to stop my monthly bond contribution. I explained that my small contributions were to support Dr. Dean's 50 state strategy and since that is no longer going to be the policy then I would no longer be contributing.

  •  I don't like it (0+ / 0-)

    I don't like giving up a strategy that gave us victory, and instead adopt a failed strategy that kept us in the weeds for time out of mind.

    WTF?

    My only conclusion:  some Dems like to fail, want to fail.  For psychological reasons I don't want to get into (and don't understand), they feel justified by failure.

    The only good thing, we have a little time before the next congressional elections to work on them.  Maybe we can change a few minds.

    Argh.

  •  Bowers has been wrong during most of 2008 - 09 (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Aexia, Populista, Escamillo

    He has jumped to conclusions multiple times on rumors that aren't true. He is about as accurate as Jerome Armstrong this election season.

  •  Hear, hear. (0+ / 0-)

    There's a reason for the Democratic Party to have staffers in Utah -- helping Democrats get elected to important local- and state-level offices and building a bench for federal offices.

    A highly centralized party or movement, focused on a single personality, however talented and successful in a given historic time, will get into real trouble in the longer term term.

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