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THE WEEK IN EDITORIAL CARTOONS

This weekly diary takes a look at the past week's important news stories from the perspective of our leading editorial cartoonists (including a few foreign ones) with analysis and commentary added in by me.

When evaluating a cartoon, ask yourself these questions:

  1. Does a cartoon add to my existing knowledge base and help crystallize my thinking about the issue depicted?
  1. Does the cartoonist have any obvious biases that distort reality?
  1. Is the cartoonist reflecting prevailing public opinion or trying to shape it?

The answers will help determine the effectiveness of the cartoonist's message.

:: ::

A time of love, a time of hate
A time of war, a time of peace
A time you may embrace, a time to refrain from embracing


Tom Toles, Washington Post

Introduction

Were most of the editorial cartoonists frustrated by the slow and uncertain pace of Healthcare Reform this past week?  Very much so.  Were they increasingly concerned by the growing military buildup in the mountains of Afghanistan?  Absolutely.  And many were citing it as another case of imperial overstretch and beginning to compare it to the quagmire that was the Vietnam War in the 1960's and early 1970's.

One other issue, however, really riled up the juices of this creative bunch: the proposed buyout of Marvel Comics by Disney Enterprises, Inc for $4 billion.  The action heroes of their youth were now being forced to co-exist with the commercially-motivated characters of Disney.  Oh, the humanity!  Would Spider-Man have to compete with Mickey Mouse for the affections of Minnie Mouse?  Would the Hulk still be able to flex his muscles and learn to live with the Sleeping Beauty?  How would the Wolverine get along with Bambi? And, finally, would Captain America still survive as a symbol of strength and resolve?  Many, many questions remain.

Developing...


Mike Thompson, Detroit Free Press, see reader comments in the newspaper in response to this cartoon by Thompson

:: ::

As Thompson wrote in his blog in the Detroit Free Press

The Disney marketing juggernaut reels in girls when they’re young with the Disney princess and keeps them hooked through their pre-teen years with Hannah Montana.

Now, with the purchase of Marvel Comics, the ubiquitous Mickey is positioning himself to cash in as the major pop culture influence in the lives of young boys.

One company having such a pervasive influence on entertainment and the shaping of young minds should be a concern for any parent.


Bruce Beattie, Daytona News-Journal

Other issues that received a great deal of attention were Dick Cheney's past shenanigans involving the C.I.A. and the sheer absurdity of the phony controversy that wingnuts have tried to generate about President Barack Obama's address later today to the country's school children.  The Lockerbie Affair was seen as a stain on the politically-vulnerable British government of Prime Minister Gordon Brown.  The start of the college and professional football seasons was welcomed enthusiastically after the dog days of summer.

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One of the cartoonists I've regularly featured in this weekly diary is Jim Morin, the Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist for the Miami Herald.  Known for his rather distinctive drawing style, Morin has been a feature at the newspaper since 1978.  His cartoons are "immediately recognizable with their population of troll-like, bug-eyed, sawed-off characters who observe and comment on the fashion and foibles of political, social, and economic events."


Jim Morin, Miami Herald

Morin talks below of the challenges facing him on a day-to-day basis, sources for his brilliant ideas, political figures he likes to draw, and his important role on the editorial board of the Miami Herald.


Jim Morin, Miami Herald

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1. CARTOONS OF THE WEEK

No more looking for love in all the wrong places
Looking for love in too many faces
Searching your eyes, looking for traces
Of what.. I'm dreaming of...

Waylon Jennings, Looking for Love


David Fitzsimmons, Arizona Star


Bob Englehart, Hartford Courant

:: ::

After months of confusion, dithering, infighting, intense lobbying, and negotiations, and amid late signals that President Barack Obama is finally ready to provide clarity and take firm positions on the major issues with respect to Healthcare Reform, there isn't any shortage of unsolicited advice he is getting from all quarters.  

Editorial Cartoonist Bob Englehart of the Hartford Courant urges him to simplify his message and learn from his opponents, even as they have engaged in a disgraceful campaign of fear, lies, and distortion

I can't help thinking that this whole health care reform thing would've gone so much better with Tom Daschle in charge.  Too bad he had a tax problem.  I hope President Obama comes back from vacation with a new way to sell his program, one that's pointed and simple.  Much like the heads and brains of the Republicans.

I'll give them full credit.  The GOP knows how to make a simple message that plays on fear.  "They're going to pull the plug on grandma."  Brilliant. A total lie, but easy to understand.  "Death panels."  Genius. Government experts will tell us when we have to die.  Sarah Palin, you da bomb.  "Get your hands off my Medicare."  OK, sorry.  Here's your Medicare back, old-timer.

Try to make any changes and the Earth will crash into the sun.  Got it. Everyone back to your caves.

:: ::


Mike Peters, Dayton Daily News


Jeff Danziger, New York Times Syndicate


Bill Day, Memphis Commercial Appeal

The Health Care Long Knives Are Out

Chan Lowe, South Florida Sun-Sentinel

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Chan Lowe, the Editorial Cartoonist for the South Florida Sun-Sentinel, reviews the state of the healthcare debate in this country and the prevailing attitude of widespread ignorance

There are so many moving parts in this game of three-dimensional chess, so many special interests, so much money to be made and lost, that only someone with the legislative skills of a Ted Kennedy -- or maybe a Tom Daschle -- could have played it pitch-perfect.

Sadly, the American people seem to be forgotten in all the jockeying.

We have only our own ignorance to blame.  If the majority of this country had any idea what the average citizen takes for granted in Europe, and for what cost, our members of congress would pass universal health care in a heartbeat, to the light of torches waving outside the U.S. Capitol windows.


Lloyd Dangle, Troubletown.  I'm reposting this cartoon from a couple of months ago as the last thing we need is another impressive speech from President Barack Obama.  We know by now that he has superb oratorical skills.  I'll settle for a less-than-brilliant speech and one which accomplishes the kind of change he promised during the campaign  


Steve Sack, Minneapolis Star-Tribune

Kill Bill

John Darkow, Columbia Daily Tribune


Mike Thompson, Detroit Free Press, see the large number of reader comments in the newspaper in response to this cartoon by Thompson

:: ::

Mike Thompson, Editorial Cartoonist for the Detroit Free Press, is rather direct in telling the President that Republicans do not have his best interests in mind and the sooner he realizes that, the better off he, the Democratic Party, and the country would be

To put it bluntly, President Barack Obama is getting his tail kicked in the health care debate.  Maybe a few days at Camp David to reflect and refresh will help him come to the realization that it's impossible to compromise with people who have no agenda other than a desire to see your agenda die.


Matt Wuerker, Politico


Lloyd Dangle, Troubletown, see Dangle's blog entry about this 1994 cartoon and an important question he raises


Gary Varvel, Indianapolis Star-News

Hope Floats

Nick Anderson, Houston Chronicle, see the large number of reader comments in the newspaper in response to this cartoon by Anderson

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2. Wingnutty Behavior, Part I: The Summer of Their Discontent


Ed Stein, edsteinink.com

:: ::

Even though the rowdy scenes at many town hall meetings do not necessarily reflect real public opinion (why would support for the Public Option be consistently high then in many recent polls?), there is no denying the fact that this orchestrated campaign of disinformation had had some effect on how the country perceives the coming changes.  

Ed Stein, who used to be the staff cartoonist for the now-defunct Rocky Mountain News, explains how he thought of the above cartoon and the obviously contradictory beliefs of one of the characters portrayed

The medigogues demonizing health care reform have scared people most with the boogeyman of "government-run health care," whatever that means.  What’s bizarre about the effectiveness of this approach is that Americans much prefer the government-provided health care we already have to private insurance.  I’m speaking, of course, about Medicare and the Veterans Administration, both of which are extremely popular with patients.

I came up with this flight of fancy after overhearing a conversation in which someone said he was so fed up with the direction Obama was taking us that he was considering leaving the country.  It was a very short leap to get to this cartoon.


David Fitzsimmons, Arizona Star


David Fitzsimmons, Arizona Star


Signe Wilkinson, Philadelphia Daily News


Jim Morin, Miami Herald


Mark Streeter, Savannah Morning News


Bill Sanders, sanderscartoon.blogspot.com


Joel Pett, Lexington Herald-Leader


Bill Sanders, sanderscartoon.blogspot.com


Paul Szep, Huffington Post


Joel Pett, Lexington Herald-Leader

:: ::

Resist the G.O.P.'s Campaign of Fear

Norman Rockwell, Freedom from Fear (1943)

:: ::

3. Wingnutty Behavior, Part II: Faux Outrage Over a Speech to Kids


Chan Lowe, South Florida Sun-Sentinel

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Lowe cannot understand why any person would object to having the President of the United States speak to young children and offer lessons of hope and encouragement. Unless, of course, some of these people have been brainwashed by the likes of rightwing radio/tv talk show hosts Sean Hannity, Rush Limbaugh, Glenn Beck, and their ilk

It's hard for reasonable people to even wrap their minds around the ugliness of thought that would cause a parent to prevent his child from being exposed to the words of the President of the United States.  

One should at least have enough respect for the office to listen to its occupant before disagreeing...

The other stuff, that he's trying to poison young minds with his socialistic, communistic dogma -- well, if you really believe what Limbaugh, Hannity, Beck et al feed you, then I'm not going to waste further keystrokes trying to talk you out of it.


Matt Davies, NY Journal News

::

Editorial Cartoonist Matt Davies of the NY Journal News writes in his blog that the reasons for such silly objections are self-evident

Keeping one’s child out of school because The President of The United States is going to address American schoolchildren to tell them to stay in school speaks for itself.


Joe Heller, Green Bay Press-Gazette


John Cole, Scranton Times-Tribune


Bruce Plante, Tulsa World


Daryl Cagle, MSNBC.com


Matt Bors, Idiot Box

:: ::

Altie cartoonist Matt Bors is at a loss of words to explain the totally irrational behavior of some parents

A sizable portion of America has gone insane.

The concept of civics appears lost.  The basic functions of government are derided -- if they are even known.  The president addressing schoolchildren about doing homework is viewed as the equivalent of a dictate from Chairman Mao.  The country seems too dumb to proceed.

The only presidential address to children I'm worried about is Wednesday's.


Dave Granlund, Politicalcartoons.com


Mike Keefe, Denver Post


Stuart Carlson, Universal Press Syndicate


Nick Anderson, Houston Chronicle, see the rather large number of reader comments in the newspaper in response to this cartoon by Anderson

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4. Healthcare Reform: Serve the "Public"


Jim Morin, Miami Herald

:: ::

Robert Borosage, the president of the Institute for America's Future, urges Barack Obama to ignore his critics for much of the country's fiscal problems are the responsibility of the previous Republican Administration and reminds him to keep that in mind as he proceeds to finalize the debate over healthcare

In these ruins, it is hardly "fiscal responsibility" that is the "animating issue" of American politics.  Conservatives love to huckster this theme when they are out of power. Since Reagan -- who, as Dick Cheney noted, taught us "deficits don't matter" -- the right has followed a consistent path.  In power, they cut top end taxes, explode the military budget, and run up record deficits.  Thrown out of power, they suddenly become chastened disciples of fiscal discipline, preaching against licentious spending, renting garments in the name of balanced budgets, looking towards the day when they are returned to power to once more cut top end taxes, explode the military budget and run up record deficits. So Reagan doubles the national debt and runs up unprecedented deficits which conservatives in both parties use to shackle the Clinton presidency. So Bush squanders the Clinton surplus, and bequeaths a trillion dollar deficit to Obama.


Scott Stantis, Chicago Tribune


Jack Ohman, Portland Oregonian


Kevin Siers, Charlotte Observer


Drew Sheneman, Newark Star-Ledger

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Editorial Cartoonist Drew Sheneman of the Newark Star-Ledger writes that this isn't the first time that Pfizer, Inc (the world's largest research-based pharmaceutical company) has been fined for illegal marketing practices

You'd think a $2.3 billion fine would be enough to convince Pfizer not to market their drugs like this anymore until you find out this is their fourth fine in the last ten years.

Stay classy Pfizer!

:: ::


John Sherffius, Boulder Daily Camera


Lee Judge, Kansas City Star

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Insurance Industry

Clay Bennett, Chattanooga Times Free Press, see reader comments in the newspaper in response to this cartoon by Bennett


Bruce Plante, Tulsa World


Bill Day, Memphis Commercial Appeal


John Trever, Albuquerque Journal


Joel Pett, Lexington Herald-Leader

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5. The G.O.P.: Is it About to be Rendered Irrelevant?


Clay Jones, Freelance-Star (Fredericksburg, VA)

:: ::

Editorial Cartoonist Clay Jones of the Freelance-Star (Fredericksburg, VA) thinks that the revelations in Republican gubernatorial candidate Bob McDonnell's graduate school thesis -- in which he supported some radically conservative positions on a number of major social issues -- could have major ramifications in this November's election in Virgina

I really miss Macaca.  Yesterday some people told me this wouldn't amount to anything.  Those same people told me the Macaca thing wouldn't amount to anything and that the Iraq invasion would be a simple inexpensive endeavor after the invasion.  Stay tooned.


Tom Toles, Washington Post


Dwane Powell, Raleigh News and Observer


Robert Ariail, robertariail.com


Chan Lowe, South Florida Sun-Sentinel

:: ::

Lowe is not thrilled with how Florida Governor Charlie Crist appointed a temporary U.S. Senator -- someone who, in essence, is keeping the seat warm until he (Crist) reaches the U.S. Senate next year if elected

Sure it was a cynical move on Charlie's part, appointing his own political crony to a U.S. Senate seat because he's the only person he can trust not to want to keep it.

George Lemieux is a nice guy, but it would have been easier for us to swallow if he had at least some experience in elective office...

Once Charlie gets elected next year, this could be the first time in history that a sitting U.S. Senator has a former senator as his chief of staff.

I may be wrong, but I understand that Sen. LeMieux will be eligible, after his year in office, for the gold-plated health care and pension plan that U.S. Senators have voted for themselves, so maybe he'd rather just retire on our dime than take a demotion.  Besides, it would be confusing whenever somebody came into the office and said, "Senator," and they both answered, "Yes?"


Bruce Beattie, Daytona News-Journal

Conservative Curt Schilling Pitches Senate Run

Dave Granlund, Politicalcartoons.com

Former Congressman Jim Trafficant is Out of Jail

Jeff Darcy, Cleveland Plain-Dealer

:: ::

6. The C.I.A. Investigation: Dicking Around


Bob Englehart, Hartford Courant

:: ::

Englehart offers his thoughts on "Mullah Cheney" and the C.I.A. investigation into torture abuses

Do I think Attorney General Eric Holder's probe into the CIA's torture tactics is political?  Of course I do and yet, I don't.  Everything is political in Worshington, Dicey.  But, I also think a bunch of career prosecutors have examined the reports of torturing by the Bush boys and are concerned enough to want to take a closer look.

When federal prosecutors even THINK laws have been broken, they act.  Believe me, we in New England know.  The New Haven, Connecticut office of the Justice Department has put enough of our crooked politicians in jail to staff a medium-sized city hall.  The lead prosecutor in the CIA probe is a no-nonsense career pit bull who I don't believe is politically motivated, but I'll never convince the Taliban-like religious followers of Mullah Dick Cheney or his lackey W otherwise, so I won't even try.

:: ::


Clay Bennett, Chattanooga Times Free Press, see reader comments in the newspaper in response to this cartoon by Bennett


John Sherffius, Boulder Daily Camera


David Fitzsimmons, Arizona Daily Star


Vic Harville, Stephens Media Group (Little Rock, AR)


Nick Anderson, Houston Chronicle, see the large number of reader comments in the newspaper in response to this cartoon by Anderson


Bill Sanders, sanderscartoon.blogspot.com


Steve Greenberg, greenberg-art.com

Dick Cheney Cries Out in the Wilderness

Chan Lowe, South Florida Sun-Sentinel

:: ::

Lowe has some very interesting disclosures in this blog entry.  He reveals the self-censoring that occurred in many newsrooms in the period after the September 11th terrorist attacks.  Was it due to potential retaliation by the government against news organizations?

We were deep into 2002, probably five or six months after 9/11, before my editor would even entertain the idea of my drawing a cartoon that did not portray George W. Bush in anything but a favorable light.

"We're not ready for that yet," I remember him saying.  He was probably right, as far as the sentiments of our readers were concerned.

The terror was still fresh, the country had rallied around its president, and unbeknownst to us, Dick Cheney was quietly machinating behind the scenes to exploit our national myopia and expand executive power to unheard-of levels...

These are different times, and the man who used to condemn the Bush naysayers as unpatriotic didn't even wait for the inaugural platform to be disassembled before he began loudly trashing the new president.  It's his right.  Too bad he didn't see it that way when he was on the receiving end.


Steve Breen, San Diego Union-Tribune


Dave Granlund, Politicalcartoons.com


Abell Smith, Fighting Words


Jeff Danziger, Creators and Writers Syndicate

:: ::

7. Waiting for Barack Obama

Partisanuenza

Rob Rogers, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

:: ::

Editorial Cartoonist Rob Rogers of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette sympathizes with Obama given the myriad of difficult issues he has to contend with

Obama should have washed after up shaking hands with people on Capitol Hill.  He's got a serious case of partisanuenza.  It strikes every new president at some point in their first term.  As if that's not bad enough, he also seems to have contracted a case of food poisoning from some bad Afghanistan chicken.  Tastes like Viet Nam.  Oh, and did I mention he was run over by the economy?  He is hurting.  Good thing he has a decent health care plan.


Mike Luckovich, Atlanta Journal-Constitution


Ron Rogers, South Bend Tribune  


Patrick Chappatte, International Herald Tribune


Chris Britt, State Journal-Register (Springfield, IL)

:: ::

8. Economy: When Will Consumers Feel the "Recovery?"


Rob Rogers, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

:: ::

The banking sector seems to be doing a lot better.  So, why is it, asks Rob Rogers of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette that the benefits are not trickling down
to consumers?

The banks are making a profit again!  Hallelujah!  So why don't I feel better?  Maybe because they were the problem to begin with and now we are just back to where we started: them getting rich and the rest of us struggling.  I'm not really this cynical.  Most days I'm a lot worse. Here is today's cartoon about our nation's recurring fiscal nightmare. It won't be the last  cartoon I draw about the bailout.  You can take that to the bank!

:: ::


Clay Bennett, Chattanooga Times Free Press, see reader comments in response to this cartoon by Bennett  


Gary Varvel, Indianapolis Star-News


Ben Sargent, Universal Press Syndicate


Marshall Ramsey, Clarion Ledger (Jackson, MS)


Steve Sack, Minneapolis Star-Tribune

:: ::

9. Labor Day: Tough Economic Times for Labor


Signe Wilkinson, Philadelphia Daily News  

:: ::

There wasn't much to celebrate this past Labor Day Weekend, writes Matthew Rothschild in the Progressive magazine

It’s Labor Day and the American worker doesn’t have a lot to celebrate.

Unemployment stands at 9.7 percent -- that’s 15 million people out of work, officially, and millions more unofficially.

"Nearly one in six workers are now unemployed or underemployed," notes the Economic Policy Institute.

Many of those who are lucky enough to still have work have seen their hours and benefits cut back, or have been forced to take unpaid furloughs. Twenty percent of companies have suspended their contributions to 401(k) plans or other pensions.

And wages are stagnant, and have been for some time.


Mark Streeter, Savannah Morning News


Jim Morin, Miami Herald


Dave Granlund, Politicalcartoons.com


R.J. Matson, New York Observer

:: ::

10. The Afghanistan War: No Way Out?


David Horsey, Seattle Post-Intelligencer

:: ::

Noted Pakistani author and journalist Ahmad Rashid, who has written several best-selling books about Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Central Asia, offers his prescription for the American role in Afghanistan.  It requires continued involvement for a very long time

The Obama administration can come out of this quagmire if it aims low, targets the bad guys, builds a regional consensus, keeps the American public on its side and gives the Afghans what they really want -- just the chance to have a better life.

There is no alternative but for the United States to remain committed to rebuilding a minimalist state in Afghanistan.  Nothing less will stop the Taliban and al-Qaeda from again using Afghanistan and now Pakistan to wreak havoc in the region and around the world.

Garry Trudeau devoted his entire Doonesbury strip this past week to the American involvement in Afghanistan and how it is beginning to resemble Vietnam

:: ::


Garry Trudeau, Doonesbury


Tom Toles, Washington Post


Joel Pett, Lexington Herald-Leader


David Fitzsimmons, Arizona Daily Star


Tony Auth, Philadelphia Inquirer


Steve Breen, San Diego Union-Tribune


Ed Stein, edsteinink.com


Scott Stantis, Birmingham News.  Stantis joined the Chicago Tribune a few days ago


Tony Auth, Philadelphia Inquirer


Pat Oliphant, Universal Press Syndicate


Bruce Beattie, Daytona News-Journal


Clay Bennett, Chattanooga Times Free Press, see reader comments in the newspaper in response to this cartoon from Bennett

:: ::

11. Japanese Elections: Change for the Better

Change in Japan

Patrick Chappatte, International Herald Tribune

:: ::

An editorial in the Washington Post welcomes the political change in Japan

There can be no democracy without political competition: For that reason alone, the landslide victory by the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) in Sunday's national election is cause for celebration.

The DPJ defeated the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP), which had ruled Japan with only 11 months of interruption since 1955.  Japan under the LDP was hardly a dictatorship, but its political machine and its unelected allies in the bureaucracy had run out of ideas and energy.  Japan's once-dynamic economy has been in stagnation pretty much since 1989.  With its falling birthrate, even Japan's population of 125 million is not only aging but actually shrinking.

Can the Democratic Party of Japan, a mix of former LDP politicians, ex-socialists and civic activists, succeed where the LDP has failed?


Petar Pismestrovic, Kleine Zeitung (Austria)


Paul Szep, szep.com


Taylor Jones, Politicalcartoons.com

:: ::

12. The Lockerbie Affair: A Growing Problem for Prime Minister Gordon Brown


Bob Englehart, Hartford Courant

:: ::
Did the British Government release a convicted terrorist in order to get some sweetheart oil deals from Libya?  Englehart believes that was the case

With friends like the Brits ... I've read the explanation from all sides and I believe the Times of London that the British government cut a secret deal with Khadaffy Duck, i.e., free the Libyan national hero al-Megrahi for access to Libyan oilfields.  All things considered, I always believe the journalists over government.

Even the Scottish legislature condemned it.  I mean, jeez Louise, it's $27 billion in the pockets of British Pete.  All they have to do is go to Libya and find the oil.  There's nothing stopping them, certainly not public opinion.


Jimmy Margulies, New Jersey Record


Kevin Kallaugher (KAL), The Economist


Steve Benson, Arizona Republic


Monte Wolverton, The Wolvertoon

:: ::

13. The Environment and California Fires


Chan Lowe, South Florida Sun-Sentinel, read his blog entry on offshore drilling off of the coast of Florida


Tom Toles, Washington Post


David Horsey, Seattle Post-Intelligencer


John Sherffius, Boulder Daily Camera


Mark Streeter, Savannah Morning News


Steve Greenberg, Ventura County Star (CA)

:: ::

14. School's In and it's Time Hit the Books Again


Bob Englehart, Hartford Courant, see reader comments in the newspaper in response to this cartoon by Englehart
:: ::

Englehart asks this question on his blog: is college for everyone?

The national intense emphasis on college is a huge societal mistake. It's causing many kids and their families to make the wrong choice.  A kid who would make a fine electrician, craftsman or a plumber might flunk out at a university.  A musician who might be a star in music school could go down in flames at a liberal arts college.  A young woman who deep down inside wants to be a nurse, paralegal, or a dental hygienist but doesn't want to disappoint mom and dad might find out the hard way that she doesn't belong at State U.  A kid who would excel in art school might not do well taking courses he thinks are a waste of time like French lit, economics or calculus (isn't that what grows on the backs of your teeth?)

And speaking of math, it's not for everybody.  I mean, really, that's why they make calculators.  Think of it this way.  Instead of math, what if the national obsession was on drawing?  That would be fine for me, but most of my friends would be sunk.  Not everybody has the affinity for art.  Not everybody has the affinity for math, either, and it's downright criminal to expect otherwise.  

End of Summer

Dave Granlund, Politicalcartoons.com


Steve Kelley, New Orleans Times-Picayune


Terry Mosher (Aislin), Montreal Gazette


Adam Zyglis, Buffalo News

:: ::

15. Sports Talk: Are You Finally Ready for Some Football?

Season Opener

Clay Bennett, Chattanooga Times Free Press, see reader comments in the newspaper in response to this cartoon by Bennett


Bruce Plante, Tulsa World


Rick McKee, Augusta Chronicle (GA)


Bill Schorr, Cagle Cartoons


Drew Litton, drewLitton.com


Kerry Waghorn, Universal Press Syndicate

:: ::

16. Disney Buys Marvel Comics: A Marriage Made in Heaven?


Pat Bagley, Salt Lake Tribune


John Sherffius, Boulder Daily Camera


J.D. Crowe, Mobile Register, read his rather interesting blog entry in the newspaper


Drew Sheneman, Newark Star-Ledger


Mark Streeter, Savannah Morning News


Henry Payne, Detroit News


Guy Badeaux (Bado), Journal LeDroit (Ottawa)


Drew Sheneman, Newark Star-Ledger


Jeff Koterba, Omaha World Herald


Signe Wilkinson, Philadelphia Daily News


Nate Beeler, Washington Examiner


Daryl Cagle, MSNBC.com


Mike Luckovich, Atlanta Journal-Constitution


Lalo Alcaraz, LA Weekly

:: ::

17. Senator Edward Kennedy: Can Anyone Ever Replace Him


Matt Bors, Idiot Box

:: ::

Matt Bors contrasts Ted Kennedy's personal shortcomings to the crimes committed by the Bush/Cheney Regime

Ted Kennedy was about as good as Democratic Senators are going to get.  He genuinely believed in, fought for, and enacted progressive change.  Legislation he helped pass probably improved the quality of your life or someone you know.  Conservatives hated him for it and constantly reminded us of Chappaquiddick, an event some of them managed to morph into a murder...

It's a deep stain on his legacy but one contrasted by a lifetime of doing good in the public sphere.  The same can't be said for Bush, Cheney and Co.  Their crimes are ignored by those who yelp about Chappaquiddick. And when they pass no criticism should be spared.


R.J. Matson, Roll Call


Rex Babin, Sacramento Bee


Dave Granlund, Politicalcartoons.com


Rob Rogers, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

:: ::

18. Final Thoughts

Finally, how's that new blog launch coming along?  Hurry up as that will be the only way you'll become famous!


Ted Rall, Universal Press Syndicate

:: ::

A Note About the Diary Poll


Dana Summers, Orlando Sentinel

:: ::

Super Bowl Dreams

Ever since Dan Snyder took over as owner of the Washington Redskins a decade ago, the 'Skins have always made splashy off-season moves.  If such roster moves were an indication of how a professional football team might fare in the regular season, then the Redskins would have won the the Super Bowl almost every year since 1999.  

Not this year.  This past off-season was different for the Redskins.  Which is why the Redskins will (you heard it here first) win the Super Bowl next February.  This year, the team will come to play.  One game at a time.  Each player will give 110%.  It's a new day in Washington, D.C.  (have I exhausted all of the sports cliches?)  

Why the cause for such optimism?  This year -- instead of signing washed-up big names like Deion Sanders, Bruce Smith, or Jeff George in years past -- the team drafted wisely and signed the league's best defensive lineman through free agency, Albert Haynesworth, while making him the highest-paid defensive player ever.  The team chose defensive end/linebacker Brian Orakpo in the first round of the NFL Draft from the University of Texas (good thing Texas didn't secede from the Union, eh?), who is destined to become a star in the NFL ala Lawrence Taylor.  Re-signing Pro Bowl cornerback DeAngelo Hall to a multiyear contract bolsters a very good secondary unit. For a defense rated 4th overall in 2008, these additions only make a potent team defense much stronger.

Hail to the Redskins!
Hail Victory!
Braves on the Warpath!
Fight for old D.C.!
Run or pass and score -- we want a lot more!
Beat 'em, Swamp 'em,
Touchdown! -- Let the points soar!
Fight on, fight on 'Til you have won
Sons of Wash-ing-ton. Rah!, Rah!, Rah!

                   

On the offensive side of the ball, the Redskins finally have some young, tall wide receivers (Malcolm Kelly, Devin Thomas, and Marko Mitchell), something the team hasn't had since the days of Hall of Fame wide receivers Charley Taylor and Art Monk.  The running game is excellent with Clinton Portis and Ladell Betts.  Entering his fifth season as the team's quarterback, Jason Campbell is poised to have a breakout season.  The offensive line is capable but needs depth and, importantly, must avoid injuries.  The special teams, while not spectacular, are solid enough to help the team win.

So, there you have it.  Who will the Redskins beat in the Super Bowl?  Redskins 28-Patriots 21.  

That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

So, tell me how your team will make it to the Super Bowl -- only to lose to my Redskins!  

Originally posted to JekyllnHyde on Tue Sep 08, 2009 at 04:31 AM PDT.

Poll

Which NFL Team Has the Best Chance to Win the 2010 Super Bowl?

2%4 votes
4%6 votes
5%8 votes
5%8 votes
15%21 votes
0%0 votes
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5%8 votes
3%5 votes
4%6 votes
13%18 votes
7%11 votes
1%2 votes
2%3 votes
27%38 votes

| 138 votes | Vote | Results

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