Skip to main content

Petition: Medals of Dis Honor

Twenty-three soldiers from the Seventh Calvary were later awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for the slaughter of defenseless Indians at Wounded Knee.

We are asking that these Medals of DIS Honor awarded to the members of the 7th Calvary of the United States Army for the murder of innocent women children and men on that terrible December morning be rescinded.

Credit & permission for image to & by www.myspace.com/removewoundedkneemedals
Photobucket

Crossposted at Native American Netroots

(Reposted for obvious reasons, and to firmly state the fact that a reconciliation event that ends in "native artifacts and ritual items like carved masks (were) thrown into bonfires" is NOT what is needed)

A feather was lying on the sidewalk when I left work; I picked it up and looked closely at it. Carrying it as I walked, there was a baby bird beside my car, homeless. The baby bird had no wings and just stared at the pavement in the darkness, moving its head up and down. Several thoughts came into my mind as I watched and realized picking the bird up would get my scent on it and cause rejection from its mother. I thought about the suicides on reservations, the lack of justice on reservations, climate change, alcohol and drug addiction in the American Indian population, health concerns of American Indians, and the worries of the American Indian People in general. I then looked at the bird again, relating to it.

It is precisely things like "Twenty-three soldiers from the Seventh Calvary were later awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for the slaughter of defenseless Indians at Wounded Knee," counties and national parks being named after Custer, streets and so on being named after Sheridan, and Chivington Colorado being named after Chivington, that can lead me to feel like that bird with no wings staring at the pavement in darkness. Interesting, there isn’t a town, street, river, tank, or monument named after Hitler in Israel, nor would any medal of honor be bestowed upon a Holocaust Overseer. But the dominant culture in America, a term applied only to those doing harm, needs a rationalization when there are "national indigenous movements fighting to protect their dwindling territories and the right to manage the natural resources." Why rescind "the Congressional Medal of Honor for the slaughter of defenseless Indians at Wounded Knee" when condoning genocide works so well? Let’s take a trip to the past to make a correlation in order to outline the right thing to do.

I had gotten into a discussion with a woman in Cheyenne about Washita, and she told me how a couple men coordinated an event of reconciliation. It involved a reenactment with Sand Creek Massacre descendants and grandsons of Custer's 7th Calvary at the same location Black Kettle was exterminated by Custer. Paramount was the re-burial of a child victim's bones.

The descendants camped where Custer's 7th Calvary had attacked Black Kettle's camp one century earlier; however, they were unaware that the grandsons of Custer's 7th would be coming over the hill firing guns with blanks in them. When the 7th Calvary's grandsons came towards them on horses firing blanks in their weapons, there were many feelings of surprise, fear, anger, and betrayal experienced by the Sand Creek Massacre descendants. Remember, the Sand Creek Massacre descendants and the ones who were slain at Washita were the same individuals.

Unknown to the Cheyenne, a California group called the Grandsons of the Seventh Calvary, Grand Army of the Republic, had been asked to join the Reenactment-

A line was formed after the reenactment with the grandsons of the 7th Calvary, who obviously wanted to help in this healing, at the front of the line. Lawrence Hart, a Mennonite pastor, felt very angry as he watched the bones of the child being passed down it towards the front. A Native woman then put a blanket over the little coffin containing the child's bones, which continued to be passed down the line to Hart. The blanket was then handed to him.

"Among the Cheyenne was Lawrence Hart, a peace chief and a Mennonite pastor. The celebration became tense. The final event of the day was the re-burial of the victim's remains. The small coffin was covered with a beautiful new woolen blanket. According to Cheyenne tradition, the blanket would be given to a guest."

"The older peace chiefs asked Hart to give the blanket to the captain of the Grandsons of the Seventh Calvary! He couldn't believe what they were asking. This man was the enemy! Hart's own great-grandfather, Afraid of Beavers, had barely escaped the attack by hiding in a snowdrift."

"Hart was tense. As the captain came forward, Hart told him to turn around. Hart's trembling hands then draped the beautiful blanket over the captain's shoulders."

"It was a grand moment. The wise Cheyenne peace chiefs had initiated peace.
The Grandsons embraced the chiefs. Some cried. Some apologized. When Hart greeted the captain, the officer took the Garry Owen pin from his own uniform and handed it to Hart."

"Accept this on behalf of all Cheyenne Indian people," the captain said. "Never again will your people hear Garry Owen."

Read that last sentence again said by the captain, and remember that "Garry Owen" was the song Custer had his band play right before the exterminations began at Washita.

"Accept this on behalf of all Cheyenne Indian people," the captain said." Never again will your people hear Garry Owen."

The lady I spoke with said there wasn't a dry eye left.

Now, forty years later, it’s time for "Never again will your people see a ‘Congressional Medal of Honor for the slaughter of defenseless Indians.’" Please sign the petition if you haven’t already.

Petition: Medals of Dis Honor

Twenty-three soldiers from the Seventh Calvary were later awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for the slaughter of defenseless Indians at Wounded Knee.

We are asking that these Medals of DIS Honor awarded to the members of the 7th Calvary of the United States Army for the murder of innocent women children and men on that terrible December morning be rescinded.

Photobucket

Mitakuye Oyasin

Originally posted to Winter Rabbit on Mon Nov 02, 2009 at 04:20 PM PST.

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  Petition signed. With our country now controlled (11+ / 0-)

    by corporations, permanent war, and trying it's hardest to make Orwell as prescient as ever, it's time to atone for our past, live up to what we've done and resurrect the principles this country was founded on.  This would be a good start.

  •  For those who don't know about this.... (9+ / 0-)

    ..terrible massacre:

    At the Wounded Knee Massacre, on December 29, 1890, 365 troops of the US 7th Cavalry, supported by four Hotchkiss guns, surrounded an encampment of Miniconjou (Lakota) and Hunkpapa Sioux (Lakota) near Wounded Knee Creek, South Dakota.[1] The Army had orders to escort the Sioux to the railroad for transport to Omaha, Nebraska. One day earlier, the Sioux had been cornered and agreed to turn themselves in at the Pine Ridge Agency in South Dakota. They were the very last of the Sioux to do so. They were met by the 7th Cavalry, who intended to disarm them and ensure their compliance.

    During the process of disarming the Sioux, a deaf tribesman named Black Coyote could not hear the order to give up his rifle and was reluctant to do so,.[2] A scuffle over Black Coyote's rifle escalated into an all-out battle, with those few Sioux warriors who still had weapons shooting at the 7th Cavalry, and the 7th Cavalry opening fire indiscriminately from all sides, killing men, women, and children, as well as some of their own fellow troopers. The 7th Cavalry quickly suppressed the Sioux fire, and surviving Sioux fled, but U.S. cavalrymen pursued and killed many of the fugitives.

    By the time it was over, about 200 men, women, and children of the Lakota Sioux had been killed. Twenty-five troopers also died during the massacre, some believed to have been the victims of friendly fire as the shooting took place at point blank range in chaotic conditions.[3] Around 150 Lakota are believed to have fled the chaos, with an unknown number later dying from hypothermia. The massacre is noteworthy as the engagement in military history where which the most Medals of Honor have ever been awarded in the history of the US Army.

    The site has been designated a National Historic Landmark.[4]

  •  Metals of honor is really a misnomer anyway. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    navajo, Urizen

    There is no honor in war.  If truth is the first casualty of war, then honor is the second.

    Metal of valor would be more aptly named, but I guess that already exists.

    You are entitled to express your opinion, but you are NOT entitled to agreement.

    by DawnG on Mon Nov 02, 2009 at 04:42:18 PM PST

    •  your sig line says we may not agree (0+ / 0-)

      so I'll be bold enough to ask if you want to say that there is no honor...
      let alone, as you state,  no honor in war.

      i find a definition of honor as:
      • adherence to what is right or to a conventional standard of conduct"

      If truth, as you state,  has been the first casualty of war,  then convention is the second???

      Are our conscripts,  are our volunteers, are our military troops, if ordered to proceed without the ability to determine TRUTH for themselves damned if they proceed in a conventional manner?  

      Is there a military mindset where the first reaction to receiving an order is to determine truth,  and then set about adherence to standards of conduct???

      In my opinion, and you may disagree,  honor must follow orders,  not questions of truth.  
      In my opinion,  dishonor is a revision,  a new way of looking on the totality of the historical situation.      The orders given that resulted in massacre,  the commands can be called into account,  but NOT the actions of the soldiers who followed orders.      I have serious problems with the word and concept of HONOR,  but to question whether the enlisted men or the commanders in this event were more stupid is almost irrelevant.

      So yes,  I've given myself up,  honor does equal stupidity, in my opinion...  but we do not need to take away the old medals from descendants of folks who died feeling they were being honorable.      What we need today is to inform our troops that they have the right to determine TRUTH for themselves,  and NOT force them to conform to "standards of conduct" and yes,  I fear for any of our troops who might be reading the same materials that Pat Tillman was reading.

    •  Is this snark? (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Prof Haley, sorenScostanza
      Or just ignorant drivel?

      The MEDAL of Honor (not metal) bears one word prominently:  

      VALOR

      (In the Army and Air Force versions)

      And there is honor in war for those who serve honorably, not because war is good, but when evil is on the march someone has to stand up.

      Are you saying none of the forces who fought the Nazis didn't serve honorably?

      Remember what we are honoring:

      The Medal of Honor is bestowed on a member of the United States armed forces who distinguishes him- or herself "conspicuously by gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his [or her] life above and beyond the call of duty while engaged in an action against an enemy of the United States."

      It frequently involves defending comrades at risk to themselves. It has increasingly become a posthumous honor.

      War sucks. But we honor heroism and valor. Advocate for peace, but don't diss those who do their jobs when called upon.

      "Troll-be-gone...apply directly to the asshole. Troll-be-gone...apply directly to the asshole."

      by homogenius on Mon Nov 02, 2009 at 05:45:30 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  were the medals of dishonor (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Urizen

    from awards to these:  ??? Twenty-five troopers also died during the massacre, some believed to have been the victims of friendly fire as the shooting took place at point blank range in chaotic conditions.[3] Around 150 Lakota are believed to have fled the chaos, with an unknown number later dying from hypothermia. The massacre is noteworthy as the engagement in military history where which the most Medals of Honor have ever been awarded in the history of the US Army.

    ???

    WHO  were awarded medals after this massacre?

    those following orders?

    •  Give me a minute. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      RonV

      She nourishes us; that which we put into the ground she returns to us. Big Thunder

      by Winter Rabbit on Mon Nov 02, 2009 at 04:47:42 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  I hope you aren't insinuating following orders (5+ / 0-)

      would rationalize awarding of medals of honor.  It's hard to envision the slaughter of innocent people as anything but dishonorable, even if following orders.

    •  Here (8+ / 0-)

      http://www.dailykos.com/...

      The Names of the Soldiers Awarded the MoH (3+ / 0-)

      Recommended by:
         SarahLee, navajo, Winter Rabbit

      The first MoH were awarded during the Civil War.  The vast majority of MoH were awarded during the 19th century.  According to http://www.homeofheroes.com/... of the 3462 MoH that have ever been awarded for unique acts of bravery, 2335 were for actions that occurred in the last 40 years of the 19th century.  Another 1122 were for actions in the 20th century, and 5 in the 21st century.

      According to http://www.history.army.mil/... 426 were awarded for actions during the "Indian Wars."  Here are the citations.

      Wounded Knee Creek, S. Dak., 29 December 1890 and
      White Clay Creek, S. Dak., 30 December 1890:

         AUSTIN, WILLIAM G.

         Rank and organization: Sergeant, Company E, 7th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: At Wounded Knee Creek, S. Dak., 29 December 1890. Entered service at: New York, N.Y. Birth: Galveston, Tex. Date of issue: 27 June 1891. Citation: While the Indians were concealed in a ravine, assisted men on the skirmish line, directing their fire, etc., and using every effort to dislodge the enemy.

         CLANCY, JOHN E.

         Rank and organization: Musician, Company E, 1st U.S. Artillery. Place and date: At Wounded Knee Creek, S. Dak., 29 December 1890. Entered service at: ------. Birth: New York, N.Y. Date of issue 23 January 1892. Citation: Twice voluntarily rescued wounded comrades under fire of the enemy.

         FEASTER, MOSHEIM

         Rank and organization: Private, Company E, 7th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: At Wounded Knee Creek, S. Dak., 29 December 1890. Entered service at: Schellburg, Pa. Birth: Schellburg, Pa. Date of issue: 23 June 1891. Citation: Extraordinary gallantry.

         GARLINGTON, ERNEST A.

         Rank and organization: First Lieutenant, 7th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: At Wounded Knee Creek, S. Dak., 29 December 1890. Entered service at: Athens, Ga. Born: 20 February 1853, Newberry, S.C. Date of issue: 26 September 1893. Citation: Distinguished gallantry.

         GRESHAM, JOHN C.

         Rank and organization: First Lieutenant, 7th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: At Wounded Knee Creek, S. Dak., 29 December 1890. Entered service at: Lancaster Courthouse, Va. Birth: Virginia. Date of issue: 26 March 1895. Citation: Voluntarily led a party into a ravine to dislodge Sioux Indians concealed therein. He was wounded during this action.

         HAMILTON, MATHEW H.

         Rank and organization: Private, Company G, 7th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: At Wounded Knee Creek, S. Dak., 29 December 1890. Entered service at: New York, N.Y. Birth: Australia. Date of issue: 25 May 1891. Citation: Bravery in action.

         HARTZOG, JOSHIJA B.

         Rank and organization: Private, Company E, 1st U.S. Artillery. Place and date: At Wounded Knee Creek, S. Dak., 29 December 1890. Entered service at: ------. Birth: Paulding County, Ohio, Date of issue: 24 March 1891. Citation: Went to the rescue of the commanding officer who had fallen severely wounded, picked him up, and carried him out of range of the hostile guns.

         HAWTHORNE, HARRY L.

         Rank and organization: Second Lieutenant, 2d U S. Artillery. Place and date: At Wounded Knee Creek, S. Dak., 29 December 1890. Entered service at: Kentucky. Born: 1860, Minnesota. Date of issue: 1 1 October 1892. Citation: Distinguished conduct in battle with hostile Indians .

         HILLOCK, MARVIN C.

         Rank and organization: Private, Company B, 7th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: At Wounded Knee Creek, S. Dak., 29 December 1890. Entered service at: Lead City, S. Dak. Birth: Michigan. Date of issue: 16 April 1891. Citation: Distinguished bravery.

         HOBDAY, GEORGE

         Rank and organization: Private, Company A, 7th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: At Wounded Knee Creek, S. Dak., 29 December 1890. Entered service at: ------.
         Birth: Pulaski County, 111. Date of issue: 23 June 1891. Citation: Conspicuous and gallant conduct in battle.

         LOYD, GEORGE

         Rank and organization: Sergeant, Company I, 7th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: At Wounded Knee Creek, S. Dak., 29 December 1890. Entered service at: ------. Birth: Ireland. Date of issue: 16 April 1891. Citation: Bravery, especially after having been severely wounded through the lung.

         McMlLLAN, ALBERT W.

         Rank and organization: Sergeant, Company E, 7th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: At Wounded Knee Creek, S. Dak., 29 December 1890. Entered service at: Baltimore, Md. Birth: Baltimore, Md. Date of issue: 23 June 1891. Citation: While engaged with Indians concealed in a ravine, he assisted the men on the skirmish line, directed their fire, encouraged them by example, and used every effort to dislodge the enemy.

         SULLIVAN, THOMAS

         Rank and organization: Private, Company E, 7th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: At Wounded Knee Creek, S. Dak., 29 December 1890. Entered service at: Newark,
         N.J. Birth: Ireland. Date of issue: 17 December 1891. Citation: Conspicuous bravery in action against Indians concealed in a ravine.

         TOY, FREDERICK E.

         Rank and organization: First Sergeant, Company C, 7th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: At Wounded Knee Creek, S. Dak., 29 December 1890. Entered service at:---

         ---. Birth: Buffalo, N.Y. Date of issue: 26 May 1891. Citation: Bravery.

         TRAUTMAN, JACOB

         Rank and organization: First Sergeant, Company I, 7th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: At Wounded Knee Creek, S. Dak., 29 December 1890. Entered service at: --

         ----. Birth: Germany. Date of issue: 27 March 1891. Citation: Killed a hostile Indian at close quarters, and, although entitled to retirement from service, remained to the close of the campaign.

         WARD, JAMES

         Rank and organization: Sergeant, Company B, 7th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: At Wounded Knee Creek, S. Dak., 29 December 1890. Entered service at: Boston, Mass. Birth: Quincy, Mass. Date of issue: 16 April 1891. Citation: Continued to flght after being severely wounded.

         WElNERT, PAUL H.

         Rank and organization: Corporal, Company E, 1st U.S. Artillery. Place and date: At Wounded Knee Creek, S. Dak., 29 December 1890. Entered service at: Baltimore, Md. Birth: Germany. Date of issue: 24 March 1891. Citation: Taking the place of his commanding of ficer who had fallen severely wounded, he gallantly served his piece, after each flre advancing it to a better position.

         ZIEGNER, HERMANN

         Rank and organization: Private, Company E, 7th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: At Wounded Knee Creek, and White Clay Creek, S. Dak 29-30 December 1890. Entered service at: ------. Birth: Germany Date of issue: 23 June 1891. Citation: Conspicuous bravery

         NOLAN, RICHARD J.

         Rank and organization: Farrier, Company I, 7th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: At White Clay Creek, S. Dak., 30 December 1890. Entered service at:------. Birth: Ireland. Date of issue: 1 April 1891. Citation: Bravery.

         RAGNAR, THEODORE

         Rank and organization: First Sergeant, Company K, 7th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: At White Clay Creek, S. Dak., 30 December 1890. Entered service at:------. Birth: Sweden. Date of issue: 13 April 1891. Citation: Bravery.

         VARNUM, CHARLES A.

         Rank and organization: Captain, Company B, 7th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: At White Clay Creek, S. Dak., 30 December 1890. Entered service at: Pensacola, Fla. Birth: Troy, N.Y. Date of issue: 22 September 1897. Citation: While executing an order to withdraw, seeing that a continuance of the movement would expose another troop of his regiment to being cut off and surrounded, he disregarded orders to retire, placed himself in front of his men, led a charge upon the advancing Indians, regained a commanding position that had just been vacated, and thus insured a safe withdrawal of both detachments without further loss.

      Sioux campaign, December 1890

         JETTER, BERNHARD

         Rank and organization: Sergeant, Company K, 7th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: At Sioux campaign, December 1890. Entered service at: ------. Birth: Germany. Date of issue: 24 April 1891. Citation: Distinguished bravery.

         NEDER, ADAM

         Rank and organization: Private, Company A, 7th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: Sioux campaign, December 1890. Entered service at:------. Birth: Bavaria. Date of issue: 25 April 1891. Citation: Distinguished bravery.

         WILSON, WILLIAM O.

         Rank and organization: Corporal, Company I, 9th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: Sioux Campaign, 1890. Entered service at: St. Paul, Minn. Birth: Hagerstown, Md. Date of issue: 17 September 1891. Citation: Bravery.

      For chasing and/or killing Indians:

         COMFORT, JOHN W.

         Rank and organization: Corporal, Company A, 4th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: At Staked Plains, Tex., 5 November 1874. Entered service at: ------. Birth: Philadelphia, Pa. Date of issue: 13 October 1875. Citation: Ran down and killed an Indian.

         SALE, ALBERT

         Rank and organization: Private, Company F, 8th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: At Santa Maria River, Ariz., 29 June 1869. Entered service at:------. Birth: Broome County, N.Y. Date of issue: 3 March 1870. Citation: Gallantry in killing an Indian warrior and capturing pony and effects.

         GLYNN, MICHAEL

         Rank and organization: Private, Company F, 5th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: At Whetstone Mountains, Ariz., 13 July 1872. Entered service at: ------. Birth:

         Ireland. Date of issue: 4 December 1874. Citation: Drove off, singlehanded, 8 hostile Indians, killing and wounding 5.

         BERGERNDAHL, FREDERICK

         Rank and organization: Private, Band, 4th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: At Staked Plains, Tex., 8 December 1874. Entered service at: ------. Birth: Sweden. Date of issue: 13 October 1875. Citation: Gallantry in a long chase after Indians.

         O'SULLIVAN, JOHN

         Rank and organization: Private, Company I, 4th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: At Staked Plains, Tex., 8 December 1874. Entered service at New York, N.Y.
         Birth: Ireland. Date of issue: 13 October 1875. Citation: Gallantry in a long chase after Indians.

         SMITH, CORNELIUS C.

         Rank and organization: Corporal, Company K, 6th U.S. Cavalry. Place and date: Near White River, S. Dak., 1 January 1891. Entered service at: Helena, Mont. Birth: Tucson, Ariz. Date of issue: 4 February 1891. Citation: With 4 men of his troop drove off a superior force of the enemy and held his position against their repeated efforts to recapture it, and subsequently pursued them a great distance.

      Follow me on twitter!

      by Jeff in CA on Sun Jul 27, 2008 at 06:55:27 PM PST

      She nourishes us; that which we put into the ground she returns to us. Big Thunder

      by Winter Rabbit on Mon Nov 02, 2009 at 04:54:09 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  If you read the descriptions... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Winter Rabbit

        of the actions leading to the awarding of these medals, it is clear that many of them were awarded fraudulently. The occasional incident of pulling wounded comrades to safety is far over shadowed by the obvious lies.

        Some, such as: "Ran down and killed an Indian." sound like acts of cowardice.

        Where's the "Honor" in that?

        "I was so easy to defeat, I was so easy to control, I didn't even know there was a war." -9.75, -8.41

        by RonV on Mon Nov 02, 2009 at 05:33:32 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  "Punishing" dead people is a seriously terrible (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Bronxist, Uncle Irish

    way to attract interest in and support for a cause.

  •  Be back in a littlte bit. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Situational Lefty, alstradamus

    She nourishes us; that which we put into the ground she returns to us. Big Thunder

    by Winter Rabbit on Mon Nov 02, 2009 at 04:58:05 PM PST

  •  Done. And thank you. (6+ / 0-)

    I can't think of anybody who's ever changed my mind about anything by yelling at me and telling me how morally superior they are.

    by Urizen on Mon Nov 02, 2009 at 04:58:55 PM PST

  •  Wounded Knee today (8+ / 0-)

    Thank you WR for reminding everyone of the injustice of bestowing medals on drunken soldiers who were taking revenge on innocent people for their hero Custer. In 1973 when I led our people in a seventy-three day liberation of that sacred ground there were still two or three surivivors of the 1890 horror still living. I was fortunate to meet one a very elderly lady who encouraged us to fight on and warned us never to trust the wasicu. She wanted us never to forget that time of genocide so I know I speak for Sally Hat when I say, pilamaye.

    Today our people at Wounded Knee still suffer the "historical punishment" levied upon them for their brave resistance. It was an open government plan to hold our people as paupers far from the eyes of the world and keep them there in perpetuity. This they have done, though once it was by force of arms now it done through the stark choice of leaving ones homelands and people to become economic refugees in the slums of American cities. In order to remain who we are we must suffer 70-85% unemployment and all the social ills that go with being the survivors of genocide. Those once ridden over by the madness of Custer and Chivington are to this day paying the price for attempting to remain red in a sea of white.

    •  You're very, very welcome cacamp. (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      RonV, navajo, NY brit expat, alstradamus

      My hope is that all who do not understand yet, will by your words. Thank you.

      She nourishes us; that which we put into the ground she returns to us. Big Thunder

      by Winter Rabbit on Mon Nov 02, 2009 at 05:19:05 PM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  perpetuity? (0+ / 0-)

      " to hold our people as paupers far from the eyes of the world and keep them there in perpetuity"

      ummm,   I (one/32Cherokee) purchased a home form a Lakota who was moving to Florida to teach,  and eventually he and family returned one county north  to SD,  don't know if they ever were in any slums, but he does have, always had,  a shoulder length haircut,  so maybe "remaining red" in a sea of white counts..., but college professor doesn't count...  at some point in his life he decided he wasn't going to "suffer" much}

      "In order to remain who we are we must suffer"   c'mon man,  the soldiers who were awarded medals were trying to remain who they were, soldiers,  and remain alive,  as well as the Lakota,  trying to remain who they were and remain alive.   For some this is a long term struggle,  for some a flash,  for some a gradual transition.

      Those folks who you say wanted you paupers in perpetuity are long gone.  Maybe it's time to educate the folks who took their place.

      You say some are paying a price for attempting to remain red in a sea of white.  What say you about the promise that the sea of white is about to become a minority...  surpassed by hispanics?

      •  You're out of line, (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        RonV

        the soldiers who were awarded medals were trying to remain who they were, soldiers,  and remain alive,  as well as the Lakota,  trying to remain who they were and remain alive.   For some this is a long term struggle,  for some a flash,  for some a gradual transition.

        Those folks who you say wanted you paupers in perpetuity are long gone.

        I'm not quoting this, and you don't either, just read it.

        http://www.cgs.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp/...

        She nourishes us; that which we put into the ground she returns to us. Big Thunder

        by Winter Rabbit on Mon Nov 02, 2009 at 06:17:02 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  NJR, you seemed to have just joined and come (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        RonV, Winter Rabbit

        into this diary all hell bent.  What's up?  

        •  not new (0+ / 0-)

          I dislike efforts against the little guys.

          Go after the names of Custer, every street, county, city, park, etc.    Go after the name of Chivington
          Go after the policy makers,

          We can't change history, but we can add footnotes that might help prevent a repetition of evil.

      •  one of our "lost birds" (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Winter Rabbit

        Here is an example of what we call our "lost birds" i.e. those who have been lost to their people though the process of cultural and physical genocide. Often they identify with their colonizers so much they lash out at their own people as njr has done. The truth is I'm very educated and come from an educated family, my brother is a Rhodes Scholar and another is a Math PHD, I'm a former Business Agent for the IBEW, Economic Development Director and Executive Director of my Tribe, as well as National Chairman of AIM during the liberation of Wounded Knee.

        As all thinking people know there are many sucessful Native people in America such as Vice President Curtis of the Kaw Nation or General Clarence Tinker the first American General Officer killed in WW2. I could go on and on but those individual successes in no way change the realty of the position our people occupy in this society and/or the history contained in this diary.

        What the 'lost bird' doesn't understand is that we who refuse to melt into the melting pot and choose to remain red in a sea of white have a homeland and Nation based on treaties ratified by Congress and signed into law by the POTUS. Over the generations our entire struggle has been to get the USA to live up to its treaty obligations and Constitutional duties as the legal "trustee" of our Nations. It's a complicated branch of law that employs many attorneys and entire law firms across the nation. What the lost one doesn't understand is that our nations are a fully modern part of the American system with a special relationship to America under the Constitution. However the USA hasn't lived up to it's side of the bargain nor will they return our land we gave up to them.

        That in a nutshell is the rub. So when I speak of the historical punishments my people suffer I'm not taking an uninformed position, I know whereof I speak and could offer a lost Cherokee an education, or, like a gnat around a buffalos ass he/she can continue his/her ignorant buzzing.

  •  America built on slavery and ethnic cleansing (0+ / 0-)

    If we start down this road of dishonoring soldiers for past atrocities there will be no end.  This country was built on atrocities committed in the name of "manifest destiny".  You could fill a rather large encyclopedia with all the episodes starting with kidnapping of slaves in Africa and the ethnic cleansing and subsequent genocide of indigenous tribes.

    In more recent memory there's FDR's policy of ethnic cleansing in California forcing hundreds of thousands of American citizens of Japanese descent from their homes and herding them into concentration camps like the Germans did to Jews. Does that mean we should tear down his statues and rename all the buildings named after him?

    On a side note, after protests by the German government, the British did remove a statue dedicated to Sir Arthur "Bomber" Harris who initiated a terrorist campaign by saturation bombing of German civilian population centers in World War Two.  This policy ultimately led to the firebombing of Dresden where more civilians were killed than Hiroshima and Nagasaki combined.

  •  Washita & Sexual Slavery (6+ / 0-)

    Following the battle of the Washita, Custer invited all of the officers to select an Indian woman for sexual purposes. Custer took first choice and selected Mo-nah-see-tah, who was pregnant at the time.

    There is also a diary on genocide on Street Prophets which might be of interest.

  •  Signed & Donated. Duty, dept, responsibil (4+ / 0-)

    The lion does not turn around when a small dog barks.

    by mawazo on Mon Nov 02, 2009 at 05:28:29 PM PST

  •  I signed the petition. I couldn't find the (5+ / 0-)

    words to comment.  Those soldiers didn't award those medals to themselves.  I think those responsible for honoring this atrocity have a special place in hell.


    The religious fanatics didn't buy the republican party because it was virtuous, they bought it because it was for sale

    by nupstateny on Mon Nov 02, 2009 at 05:47:04 PM PST

  •  Thank you Winter Rabbit. Petition signed. (4+ / 0-)

    Let us honor those who fell, not those who killed them.

    Mitakuye Oyasin.

    "The truth shall set you free - but first it'll piss you off." Gloria Steinem

    Save the Internet!

    by One Pissed Off Liberal on Mon Nov 02, 2009 at 05:54:52 PM PST

  •  Holders of the Medal of Honor (4+ / 0-)

    are, by regulation, entitled to salute from any member of the uniformed services, no matter the respective ranks of the two, and to be greeted and saluted before all non-recipients, again irrespective of the ranks involved.  The Medal obligates a four-star general to salute a private.  It's disgusting to think how much undo respect was paid to these men by their comrades over the years.

  •  Thank you for the diary and this action. I went (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    RonV, Winter Rabbit, alstradamus

    to sign the petition, but it appears that I have already done so. Medals of honour awarded for a war crime and these people's memory still being honoured; it is way past time that the victims of this genocidal campaign are honoured and the perpetrators dishonoured (to say the least).

    This is my only post tonight, but I could not go to bed without thanking you and commenting on the importance of this campaign.

    No society can surely be flourishing and happy, of which the far greater part of the members are poor and miserable (Adam Smith, 1776, I, p. 96).

    by NY brit expat on Mon Nov 02, 2009 at 06:19:28 PM PST

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site