Skip to main content

One of the heartening aspects of the 2008 election was that 18-to-29-year-old Americans tied the 1972 record turn-out for their age group. An estimated 23 million voters under 30 voted, and two-thirds cast ballots for Barack Obama. That result led a few amateur observers to the rash conclusion that the nation was headed into some invincible Democratic Party juggernaut for a generation or two because those energized voters would continue to choose Democrats.

In Massachusetts Tuesday, young people flattened that idea, according to a survey by Rasmussen Reports for the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement at Tufts University. It's not that they gave Republican Scott Brown the majority of their votes. They didn't. Those who voted preferred Martha Coakley by nearly 3:2. Nothing like the 4:1 margin they gave Obama in 2008, but still respectable.

In '08, however, 47.8% of the under-30s voted in Massachusetts, compared with 81% of the 30-and-over population. On Tuesday, only 15% of young voters cast ballots, compared with 57% of the 30-and-over population. The Massachusetts vote isn't the first sign of dwindling interest by youth. Last year, 17% of young voters showed up for the Virginia governor's contest, 19% for New Jersey's.

It's unknown how much of this fall-off in Massachusetts can be attributed to a get-out-the-vote effort that ignored young voters, according to some people with inside knowledge of the poorly organized Coakley campaign. If that was the campaign's approach, it obviously was yet another misstep by the organizers.

“Three state elections do not necessarily make a national trend, but there is clearly an issue right now with youth turnout and enthusiasm,” said CIRCLE director Peter Levine. “It will be interesting to see the turnout of young voters in November’s mid-term elections.” ...

Their most important issue was the economy, whereas for voters overall, the number one issue was health care.

Of those Massachusetts voters who said that health care was the most important issue in the Senate campaign (56%), 86% opposed the Democrats’ plan. That was probably one contributor to Scott Brown’s victory. But young voters favored the health care plan, 55%-40%.

Young voters were less likely to be “strong” supporters of President Obama than Massachusetts voters overall (30% of youth versus 35% of all voters), but they were more likely to support him at least “somewhat.” (Sixty-seven percent support the president somewhat or strongly.)

A megaton of commentary has already been written about whether the Massachusetts race was a referendum on President Obama or his policies. The majority of voters there voiced general approval of Obama. But attitudes toward the administration's policies are another matter. And those attitudes may well have had some dampening effect on the youth vote.

Two months ago, Harvard's Institute of Politics released its biennial survey of Young Americans’ Attitudes Toward Politics and Public Service. The survey of 2807 18-to-29-year-olds found that 58% approved of Obama's overall performance, several points higher than the approval rating given him by the overall U.S. population. At the same time, however, youth disapproved of his handling of specific issues, including the economy (52% disapproved), health care (52% disapproved), Iran (53% disapproved), the federal budget deficit (58% disapproved) and Afghanistan (55% disapproved - the poll was taken three weeks before the President announced his decision to send more troops, something that
66% of those surveyed said they opposed).

Whether views like those plus general impatience with the pace in Washington were demotivating factors in Tuesday's election, this plunge in the youth turnout ought to get some serious attention from Democratic leaders unless they want to see Massachusetts repeated in races across the country come November.

Originally posted to Daily Kos on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 07:56 AM PST.

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

    •  Bingo (12+ / 0-)

      Boring machine politicians rarely inspire youth movements.

      Obama was a one-off. Until Dems run inspiring candidates they will never see that kind of grassroots effort again.

      "One man alone can be pretty dumb sometimes, but for real bona fide stupidity nothing beats teamwork." - Mark Twain

      by greendem on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:00:30 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

        •  Not just charisma (8+ / 0-)

          If you want the youth vote, ffs, don't run the freaking Attorney General as your candidate!

          AGs get elected and stay in office thanks to older voters who want tough law enforcement and aggressive prosecutions. That's simply a recipe for turning off the youth vote.

          Every horror committed by man begins with the lie that some man is not a man. - Jyrinx

          by kyril on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:07:29 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  It's also the mandates in the HCR senate version. (5+ / 0-)

            Look, young adults don't like the prospect of someone telling them they have to start their careers and financial lives by being forced to purchase a private health insurance plan or pay a penalty.

            I haven't spoken to a single young adult who liked the senate version. If a voting block is turned off by the policy of the day, it won't turn out to vote.

            A proud product of graduate academia

            by APA Guy on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:15:24 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Of course Brown supported mandates (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              kyril

              when he voted for the Massachusetts plan under Romney.
              Still, it was the Democrats' fault since, once they abandoned the public option, a mandate that one buy into a private insurance plan became unacceptable.

              •  Thanks Meteorblades (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                kyril, Miggles

                Sorry for the jump ahead but I'm glad to see that Meteorblades is on top of this aspect of the story.

                The MSM is all about the role of the Independent voters and has over-looked the youth vote (18 to 29).

                They were absent big time in the recent elections in NJ and Virginia too.

                So the story should be about independents and the youth vote and the generational shift in American politics.

            •  This single adult (youngish) person (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              kyril

              did not mind the mandate- that makes sense. You have to do the same thing in Germany and in France- most people  must have some sort of insurance, and it must be paid for. The income gathered from the mandate would have made the other things possible, like more preventive care. It would have made my individual rate cheaper in the long run ( I purchase my own insurance.)

              What I did mind was no national exchange and no public option - two things that would have significantly driven down costs for everyone and improved service.

              Why yes, I am Catholic.

              by ems97007 on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 10:49:08 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

          •  Amirault case? (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            TLS66, kyril

            I don't think I have the facts to make a conclusion, but I held off on maling any donation in this race. I do not think a false prosecution is ever water under the bridge, even after 20 years.
            Now this is something for Democrats in Massachusetts to be thinking about. There have been plenty of problems in Houston, but it is just the South that has them.

            •  A person who tries to get ahead (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              kyril

              by ruining the life and reputation of someone else is truly contemptible.

              "Valerie, why am I getting all these emails calling me a classless boor?"

              by TLS66 on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:42:38 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

            •  Oops, omitted word (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              kyril

              NOT just the South

              Some Harris County prosecutors have admitted they would knowingly prosecute an innocent person. In 2008 we got rid of DA Chuck Rosenthal because of a sideline scandal.  A black Democrat almost beat the new Republican in November. There are some suspicions of election theft.

        •  Coakley's dogs have charisma. nt (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          littlebird33
      •  They didn't show up not because of Obama. (8+ / 0-)

        Coakley had no charisma for the to be motivated. Look how many young people Obama attracted at his rally on Sunday. They consider him as a Rock Star, the problem for dems, it's that they are "Obama Fans" not Dem fans.

        Republicans secret dream = the impeachment of Bo the Dog LOL

        by LaurenMonica on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:07:44 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Well, if we want the "Yuts" we better (10+ / 0-)

          get them some JOBS!  I've got two twentysomethings and although they like Obama, they're really pissed over the job situation.  After 4 years of college...no decent jobs, no health insurance.  One way or the other, we've got to move on to jobs.  And this is coming from someone with pre-existing conditions who really needs HCR.  But, it's taking up all the oxygen.  JOBS, or we're out of a job in November!

          •  yes (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Fabian, Fury, kyril

            its all about the jobs.

          •  So NOT VOTING and participating in a Brown... (5+ / 0-)

            ...victory is going to help them?  That honestly couldn't be more delusional.

            And if they don't have jobs, they don't have time to educate themselves and vote?  FAIL.

            "When people show you who they really are, believe them." - Maya Angelou

            by Pennsylvanian on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:14:53 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  it doesn't help or hurt to vote (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              bvig, ems97007

              when there is something that makes no difference most people just don't bother with it.

            •  we're jusy not stupid enough (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Wisewood, ems97007
              To be afraid enough to vote for the party that has now used and mocked us. Fuck the Democrats, seriously. The only reason fucking anyone in this embarrassment of a country votes is out of fear that the other party will be worse. Fuck that, the Democrats can go to hell. I'll vote again in my life when one of the parties does a fucking thing about the corporate control of our lives, when one of them raises taxes to a suitable level. Its clearly as likely to be Republicans as Democrats, which is to say neither ever will. So fuck them, we cannot be made fear pawns like the religious right. To vote right now is to say thank you to the Guy who just beat you up. Better to leave the country, which is my plan.
              •  Leave the country? Don't let the door hit you. (2+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                LeighAnn, littlebird33

                If NOT voting because you are mad is your solution, then you are doing it wrong.  I guess you are off to the land of rainbows and unicorns where life is like a dream.  Good luck with that.

                "When people show you who they really are, believe them." - Maya Angelou

                by Pennsylvanian on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:34:14 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  NOT SO (0+ / 0-)

                  Occassionally not voting can be a statement of a lack of confidence in the powers that be.  The lesser of two evils thinking is what has gotten us into the two party frat mentality we're in today.  I should imagine the jeffersons etc...might have said the same thing.   Or they simply would be calling for a revolution.  Don't be an appeaser.

                  Disobedience is the true foundation of liberty. The obedient must be slaves. -Henry David Thoreau

                  by Iculus3 on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:56:53 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  There is a better answer (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    Iculus3

                    Freakin' RUSSIA has it on EVERY ballot in EVERY election at EVERY level for EVERY position.

                    "NONE OF THE ABOVE".

                    We need the same thing, on EVERY ballot in EVERY election at EVERY level for EVERY position. And a rule that if "NONE OF THE ABOVE" wins more than some nominal percent (I'm thinking 5%), the other persons or policies should be closely re-examined.

                    If it's
                    Not your body
                    Then it's
                    Not your choice
                    AND it's
                    None of your damn business!

                    by TheOtherMaven on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 09:46:11 AM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  I'd agree here, but the 5 percent is too low (0+ / 0-)

                      It would cause alot of quagmires.  I'd suggest if none of the above got more than the actual candidates/ choices then that should be the case.

                      Disobedience is the true foundation of liberty. The obedient must be slaves. -Henry David Thoreau

                      by Iculus3 on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 02:44:27 PM PST

                      [ Parent ]

              •  There are much more democratic (0+ / 0-)

                and economically-just countries in the world.

                Good luck.

                But, I'm not sure most of them are taking in Americans these days.

                "One man alone can be pretty dumb sometimes, but for real bona fide stupidity nothing beats teamwork." - Mark Twain

                by greendem on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:55:55 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

              •  Thank You (0+ / 0-)

                God Speed on your plan to leave the country. Watch the door on the way out.

              •  Dude (or girl) We so need you (0+ / 0-)

                ignore Pennsylvanian- We in the USA TOTALLY need you. I passed on an opportunity to work in France to come back here and work on the Obama campaign. I eventually started my own company and am working with people to start their own. We need people to give a damn, and to MAKE our politicians give a damn, too.

                Why yes, I am Catholic.

                by ems97007 on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 11:11:40 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

            •  i kind of agree with you there... I mean (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              littlebird33

              this was a big election, all over the media etc..., and to not vote in it is just ridiculous.  I don't care if you are busy or whatever...how could you possibly not?  A diary the other day (Called 'McCain 105') showed that in every area, all the McCain voters' totals turned out for each precinct, but Obama voters didn't turn out, or only about half of them did.

              How could they do that?  I am as angry about the HCR bill as anyone, but this was like a national election...

              TURN OUT

              •  Turnout (0+ / 0-)

                Bingo, Bingo, Bingo evangeline. its the real story of the election. Every McCain voter above ground came back and pulled the lever for Brown + 5% of right leaning indies who came out. the real story was THE COMPLETE COLLAPSE OF THE MINORITY VOTE.

              •  How could they? (0+ / 0-)

                Well, it's easy - like with HCR, if it seems to young people that the difference between voting for a Democratic Senator and not voting at all isn't much of a difference... then you can't really blame them for not going to the polls.

                "We peer so suspiciously at each other that we cannot see that we are standing on the mountaintop of human wealth, freedom and privilege." - Pierre Trudeau

                by Wisewood on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:40:07 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

            •  I couldn't hold my nose and vote for a stinker (0+ / 0-)

              candidate until I was in my 30's.  I still feel like a hypocrite on many levels in my golden years when I do so. But I do it.

            •  This is not about rationality, it is about (0+ / 0-)

              emotional connection.  Kids today have been exposed to sophisticated advertising techniques almost since birth that instructs them to disregard rational choice, but to make their purchasing decisions based on emotional appeal.  Why aren't car commercials based on mpg and safety rather than sizzlem, pop, built "tough" and sexy women.  Why, because they are appeals to emotion, not rationality.  This election was the same way.  Kids, and the public at large, don't see executive orders, they don't see the behind the scenes stuff.  They see the the continuing job stagnation, the continued weak response to the excesses of the banks and Wall Street, and the public sausage making of the HCR, where the spotlight has been on a few pissant Senators from less populous states appear to garner all the attention and control the agenda while the Hamlet in the White House paces and broods, but doesn't come out forcefully to push the HCR agenda that he wants.  Back in the days of Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, Ford, Carter, etc., Presidents would provide specific outlines of what they wanted, would command national prime time television messages to communicate to the American people what they wanted, call in recalcitrant Senators and Congress members to plead, cajole, threaten, or beat them into submission to get their legislative agenda passed.  President Obama, not so much.  Until he comes out and actually commits to what he wants, young people are not going to rush to vote for him.  And don't expect rationality.  

              And it feels like I'm livin'in the wasteland of the free ~ Iris DeMent, 1996

              by MrJersey on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 09:54:16 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

          •  Bingo. nt (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Fury, kyril

            Free speech? Yeah, I've heard of that. Have you?

            by dinotrac on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:15:15 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

        •  Obama fans? So this is like American Idol? (4+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          John Lane, CParis, MrJersey, littlebird33

          Please.  They need to grow up and take some civic responsiblity if this is how they view politics.  It's not a popularity contest with special effects and prizes.

          "When people show you who they really are, believe them." - Maya Angelou

          by Pennsylvanian on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:12:52 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  It's sad but true. There is a cult of personality (4+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            greendem, kefauver, MrJersey, wvmom

            around Obama and Youth aren't loyal to the Democratic Party first, like it or not. When Obama isn't on the ballots and as long dems run candidate with no story and charisma, youth voters, AA, Latinos won't show up.

            Republicans secret dream = the impeachment of Bo the Dog LOL

            by LaurenMonica on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:15:27 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  keep telling yourself that (4+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              714day, ChakraTease, wvmom, ems97007

              But also consider the fact that the Democrats haven't done a fucking thing with the biggest senatorial majority in decades. Consider that we all pegged problems on bush because that's when we started paying attention, and suddenly we are seeing that it's not a Republican problem, not a Karl rove problem, but a fucking systematic issue. Voting is taking tums and this country has cancer. Consider that the real fools here might be the ones taking the stomach settler.

            •  PARTY LOYALTY IS FOR THE BIRDS (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              mudgod

              Why should the youth support every dem that runs, when that dem isn't running with their or any of the constituents needs/ dreams in mind.  

              Don't blame the lack of inspiration on the uninspired.  

              Disobedience is the true foundation of liberty. The obedient must be slaves. -Henry David Thoreau

              by Iculus3 on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:58:46 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

            •  The attitude you just expressed (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              mudgod, ems97007

              ...is the reason not all Dems can count on those votes.

              You could be forgiven about such an insulting assumption about kids -- but AAs and Latinos in general -- period?  We turn out for stories and charisma?

              Sadly -- some candidates have similar attitudes.  How can somebody adequately represent me if they have some insulting and ridiculous impression of who I am?

              •  Contempt is systematic in the Dems (0+ / 0-)

                Both nationwide and with some here on DKOS.

                They really DON'T GET IT, and they really don't mind insulting people with the lack of action, corruption, laziness and arrogance.

                Party loyalty will occur when Dems really stop, get together and finally pass HCR and get jobs started again with redoing the infrastructure.

                Why yes, I am Catholic.

                by ems97007 on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 11:17:13 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

            •  And because they want everything just the (1+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              MrJersey

              way they want it and they want it right now. I've seen posts where "I've been involved in politics for five years, ten years, wah, wah, and I'm tired.
              I'll show you I won't vote/play."

          •  Good luck with that (0+ / 0-)

            Calls for people to grow up usually work.

            "One man alone can be pretty dumb sometimes, but for real bona fide stupidity nothing beats teamwork." - Mark Twain

            by greendem on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:18:05 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  Obama appealed to young people - Coakley did not (3+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            greendem, kyril, littlebird33

            I think a lot of young people are of the view that no matter who is elected it's all the same - not exactly true, but I've seen that sentiment echoed on here a lot.  Unless you have a lot of time to hash through issues it's hard to be clear.  This isn't young people's fault for not wanting to spend hours on DKos every time an election comes up.  It's Dems fault for not making it more accessible and what they do put out so horribly generic that you just say oh, same old bull.

            Man's capacity for justice makes democracy possible, but man's inclination to injustice makes democracy necessary. ~ Reinhold Niebuhr

            by bvig on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:20:07 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  Who said anything about spending time here? (0+ / 0-)

              How about they just take a few minutes to vote and stop making excuses?  It's not a frat party; it's democracy - a responsiblity, and it's more accessible than ever if you take the time to do your civic duty.

              "When people show you who they really are, believe them." - Maya Angelou

              by Pennsylvanian on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:29:41 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Because a few minutes doesn't cover it (0+ / 0-)

                Many dems are not good for this country.  Young people often are not tied down by party line.  While they tend towards being Dems they sway a lot more than people in the system.  If you don't make yourself a believable candidate then what's the point in voting for you.  The only reason I could see for voting for Coakley is that Brown may be worse, and that wasn't made until very late.  And I'm not sure even on all levels that's true.

                Man's capacity for justice makes democracy possible, but man's inclination to injustice makes democracy necessary. ~ Reinhold Niebuhr

                by bvig on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:33:29 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  Just more excuses for not voting. (2+ / 0-)

                  I never said young people needed to vote for Coakley or the dems, just that they need to vote.  So you could see a reason for voting for one candidate but you didn't bother?  If that is your persuasive argument for why young people get to bitch and not participate, color me unconvinced.

                  "When people show you who they really are, believe them." - Maya Angelou

                  by Pennsylvanian on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:49:11 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  No they probably didn't see a reason (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    ChakraTease

                    and why are you saying you - I'm not from mass.  

                    But the argument - she doesn't suck as much as him - is basically what the dems put out there, and not until late in the game.  And color me unconvinced that that's enough to motivate someone you're worth voting for.  A vote is a signal that you want them governing you.   Coakley didn't convince young people of that so why should they vote.  

                    Man's capacity for justice makes democracy possible, but man's inclination to injustice makes democracy necessary. ~ Reinhold Niebuhr

                    by bvig on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 09:01:25 AM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                  •  Not voting can be a vote (0+ / 0-)

                    kind of goes to the

                    what if they started a war and no one came, idea.

                    You are not elite because you vote.  I vote every chance I get, but there is nothing inherently wrong with not voting when you feel both parties are exactly the same.

                    Is it really that strange to feel that way?

                    Disobedience is the true foundation of liberty. The obedient must be slaves. -Henry David Thoreau

                    by Iculus3 on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 09:02:00 AM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  Not voting (0+ / 0-)

                      If you feel that allowing the GOP/media to paint a story that isn't true that may play a part in bringing them back from the dead, then you bet its completely justified to feel that way. If you don't know the difference between Coakley & Brown and the impact that can have you know squat.

                      •  I KNOW SQUAT (0+ / 0-)

                        And obviously there are some differences, but sometiems the point that both are inadequate and don't represent the people is more important.  Self Righteous jerk.

                        Disobedience is the true foundation of liberty. The obedient must be slaves. -Henry David Thoreau

                        by Iculus3 on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 02:45:43 PM PST

                        [ Parent ]

        •  Keep telling yourself that.... (0+ / 0-)

          ...just keep repeating

          "It's not Obama's fault. It's not Obama's fault. ..."

          That should make you feel better....

        •  You HIT IT, Lauren (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Nina

          Many, many young people- liberal Republicans to ConservaDems- are HUGE, HUGE, HUGE Obama fans. He's everything that he is- from a multicultural background, he did (soft) drugs, hung out with punk artists and intellectuals while studying hard in school, turned down the easy big money to work for community, married a woman who is his intellectual equal, if not his superior, and two gorgeous daughters.

          He's me, and my Republican friend from college, and my crazy Independent but votes Dem fundementalist Christian friend from Salem.

          What Dems have not learned in this year and is determined to not learn is WHY Obama appeals to so many people. He's cool, and many of his policy ideas are just plain BRAVE, SMART AND SENSIBLE.

          I know people here do not like the Senate bill as it is. But when I described it to people here in Beaverton, and worked the numbers for them, people  actually did like it. Did I miss the PO? Yes, I do. It would drive costs down with necessary competition. And Many people, right or left, were expecting a PO.
          Yet people were willing (as of November) to fully get on board with it- because it was SENSIBLE and open to ADDITIONS.

          But Dems don't want to learn SENSIBLE, BRAVE AND SMART. Not Coakley, apparently, and not the House.

          Why yes, I am Catholic.

          by ems97007 on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 11:04:59 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  Not only that, but Obama did damage by (6+ / 0-)

        leading the young voters along and then backstabbing them. He could have energized these voters for a generation. Instead, he probably has turned them into political cynics, who just won't care about politics that much anymore.

      •  This is a bit misleading (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        bvig

        The better comparison is with 2006.

        In 2006, according to the exit poll 11% of the electorate was between the ages of 18-29.  

        If Rasmussen is right ( and I doubt it) the youth vote turned out reasonably well.  Certainly above what most of the pre-election polls predicted (PPP for example put the 18-29 vote at 8% of the electorate)

        The bitter truth of deep inequality has been disguised by an era of cheap imported goods and the anyone-can-make-it celebrity myth - Polly Toynbee

        by fladem on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:43:58 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Wimpy Dems (0+ / 0-)

        The Dems gave the young folks no reason to come out and vote.

        There are no words to describe how disgusted I feel about the wimpy Dems we hear and see on our tvs. They do not fight for those of us who voted for the change that President Obama campaigned on.  Now we see that due to Brown getting elected, the Dems think the message was to move right. The Dems in DC have no clue. Brown won because of the Dems betraying those of us who want change.  Many Dem/independent voters in MA either didn't vote, voted for the 3rd candidate, or voted for Brown to send (wrongly) a message. Where is our message machine to fight the massive Repub message machine?  No one ever really explained what was in the health care reform bills.  All we ever heard was when it passes and people see what's in it, they will like it. Duh!  Are the folks in DC insane?  They let the Repubs define the issue because of their lack of message. As far as I can tell, the Dems are doomed in the mid terms because they lack the backbone to fight for the people.  Someone needs to tell the DC Dems to grow a pair. They have no idea the disgust their own supporters feel towards them.  How they do not see what is going on, is beyond me.  

      •  Would it be too much to ask... (0+ / 0-)

        ...for people to have greater maturity, and think of their own long term goals?

        We Democrats are too use to being short-term protestors, not long term, nose-to teh grindstone policy advocates.

        The GOP: The Party of Failure. Pass it on.

        by Stephen Daugherty on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 10:33:06 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  The issues should inspire (0+ / 0-)

        Maybe that is the problem; everybody is waiting to be inspired and not doing enough inspiring.  It is silly and naive to expect every politician to possess the charisma of President Obama.  What I expect in a good politician is simple decency and competence.   What should inspire them are the issues and not the person’s oratory skills.

        Life isn’t always inspiring, it shouldn’t be.  If it were it would diminish the truly inspiring moments.  You can’t survive on candy alone; you’ve got to eat your vegetables too.  Vegetables may be boring but they are good for you.  When you get down to it, politics is mostly administration so all the great speeches mean absolutely nothing when you get down to the business of governing.

        Stop making excuses for these people and demand they either participate of shut up.  Nothing is worse than a whiner do-nothing.  Their lack of participation is not only hurting them, it is hurting countless Americans without health insurance, whose homes are being repossessed and struggle everyday living off of poverty wages.

    •  You mean if you don't appeal to a (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      stagemom, Junkyard Dem

      group they won't vote for you? AMAZING!  So when you appeal to moderates you get lots of votes. And when you appeal to the bases you don't?

      Clings to Music and the hope of three Jets playoff wins.

      by Mro on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:04:01 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Ergo they voted third party? (0+ / 0-)

      Oh, you mean they didn't vote.

      Quit lionizing them: they are ignorant and lazy.

      America: our highest paid profession is thief.

      by Paul Goodman on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:17:46 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Um no....most aren't (0+ / 0-)

        The ones who are ignorant and lazy you're never going to motivate.  However, a lot of involved young people came out for Obama and spent a lot of their time on him.  Yes it's important but why they hell would you do that just for any old politician.  Especially when you don't trust them or believe in them.  Why help a candidate in a system you don't believe in.  That's the thing.  Obama was different, Ron Paul different, Green party different.  Young people don't believe in this system and it's hard to motivate them to spend a lot of time supporting bad candidates in a bad system.    

        Man's capacity for justice makes democracy possible, but man's inclination to injustice makes democracy necessary. ~ Reinhold Niebuhr

        by bvig on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:36:28 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Wimpy Dems (0+ / 0-)

      The young folks as well as everyone else had no reason to come out and vote.

      There are no words to describe how disgusted I feel about the wimpy Dems we hear and see on our tvs. They do not fight for those of us who voted for the change that President Obama campaigned on.  Now we see that due to Brown getting elected, the Dems think the message was to move right. The Dems in DC have no clue. Brown won because of the Dems betraying those of us who want change.  Many Dem/independent voters in MA either didn't vote, voted for the 3rd candidate, or voted for Brown to send (wrongly) a message. Where is our message machine to fight the massive Repub message machine?  No one ever really explained what was in the health care reform bills.  All we ever heard was when it passes and people see what's in it, they will like it. Duh!  Are the folks in DC insane?  They let the Repubs define the issue because of their lack of message. As far as I can tell, the Dems are doomed in the mid terms because they lack the backbone to fight for the people.  Someone needs to tell the DC Dems to grow a pair. They have no idea the disgust their own supporters feel towards them.  How they do not see what is going on is beyond me.

    •  BS (0+ / 0-)

      BS, there is everything to fight for right now.  Real health care reform, economic recovery, all these things are dependent on maintaining a Democratic majority in Congress.  It is their own fault that they can’t see that.

      Let’s be straight forward; the youth of America whine all the time about how the previous generations failed them but yet they never realize the damage they cause when they decide to stay home and play Xbox.  

      It is time to call them out and make them take responsibility for their actions and stop blaming their lack of participation on apathy.  If they got up and voted we wouldn’t be in nearly as bad a shape as we are now.

    •  Exactly. Where's our Health Care Reform? Jobs? (0+ / 0-)

      For those of us in our 30s, where's our HCR?

      For all of us, where's the Jobs bills? What about the environment?

      18 majority and the legislature cannot pass those two things? So what's the point? To go out into the snow for a lackluster candidate and a promise?

      Why yes, I am Catholic.

      by ems97007 on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 10:38:05 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  No, no, no... (0+ / 0-)

      ...it is their fault for failing to recognize the changingest of changery changers who is now in the White House, and the great leadership we are getting from the Democrats in DC.

      I tell you, young people today ....

      "The sudden disappointment of a hope leaves a scar which the ultimate fulfillment of that hope never entirely removes." Thomas Hardy

      by Timoteo on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 10:59:45 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  You may have found part of the smoking gun: (16+ / 0-)

    Ignore the young people at your own peril, especially when they're your base in the future.

    Happy little moron, Lucky little man.
    I wish I was a moron, MY GOD, Perhaps I am!
    -Spike Milligan

    by polecat on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 07:57:17 AM PST

  •  The Mass. Election was a Referendum on Housepaint (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    irmaly, Fury, CParis, kyril, dinotrac

    You see, I wasn't sure whether to paint my house green or a light beige.  But what the voters of Massachusetts did, is they sent me a message to paint the house green.

    I can make this glib statement reaching my own predetermined conclusion about an election in a state I don't live in because I'm a national teevee pundit.

  •  The saddest part (5+ / 0-)

    is that those young people got involved because they thought their vote would create change in what they saw was a system of entrenched interests.

    They were obviously disappointed in seeing every good thing proposed come to a grinding halt. Like Health Care Reform.

    We need two lists: those we will work to elect and those we will defeat. If you're not progressive, you're not a Democrat.

    by moosely2006 on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 07:58:37 AM PST

  •  Not at all surprising. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Junkyard Dem, MrJersey, kyril

    The Coakley campaign did virtually NOTHING to energize ANYONE. Not the youth vote. Not the Latino vote. Nothing. Zilch. Nil. Nada. This was perhaps one of the worst-run, presumptuous campaigns of all time.

    So if you give the people nothing to fight for, why would you expect them to run to the barricades?

    "Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhumane." -- Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

    by frisco on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:00:03 AM PST

  •  True story, yesterday I was walking next to 2 20 (7+ / 0-)

    something guys discussing the MA election.  With smiles on their faces, they discussed how the Republican won, and wasn't it great that health care will now probably be defeated because "what do we need health insurance for?"  Nothing a like a good old self centered attitude, right?

    I see traitors, but they don't know they're traitors....

    by hcc in VA on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:00:13 AM PST

    •  MA Healthcare (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      CParis, MrJersey, dinotrac

      Especially since they already have a significantly better health system in MA than they would have gotten under the national plan anyways.

      •  It's actually an issue that Brown raised... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        CParis

        and remember that he voted FOR the Mass plan...

        Think of laws that allow California to impose stricter emissions standards for cars within its borders.

        Should a state have the right to opt out of the federal plan and enact their own health care?

        If you lived in Mass and were happy with what you've got (I don't know if that's completely true because they've had some serious financial bumps in the road) would you want to see your costs increase for an inferior federal plan?

        Free speech? Yeah, I've heard of that. Have you?

        by dinotrac on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:20:57 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Don't need mandated health insurance (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Deward Hastings, John Lane, AJsMom

      need some competition.  Mandates have only driven up the price in Mass.  Perhaps they're not as stupid as you think.

      Man's capacity for justice makes democracy possible, but man's inclination to injustice makes democracy necessary. ~ Reinhold Niebuhr

      by bvig on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:23:47 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  The youth (0+ / 0-)

      see that they were going to be forced to pay for a policy. They DON"T want that!
      They thought it was "free" LOL

      A veteran is someone who, at one point in his/her life, wrote a blank check made payable to The USA for an amount of "up to and including my life." - unknown

      by AJsMom on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:47:59 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Because if they live in Virginia, they have a (0+ / 0-)

      better chance of being shot at random in a mass killing using guns than in other states and may need that health care insurance to patch up all the holes in their bodies.

      And it feels like I'm livin'in the wasteland of the free ~ Iris DeMent, 1996

      by MrJersey on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 10:15:57 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  It was a referendum on Obama's stewardship.... (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Junkyard Dem, Dems 2008

    ....of the Democratic Party apparatus.

    And he failed miserably.

    •  Actually (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Tuffie, kefauver, LaurenMonica

      It was a referrendum on the IQ of the Pretend Blue State.

      They get to be sent back a grade for three years.

      Maybe in 2012 they can get out of the Remedial class.

    •  I dunno. Obama is still pretty popular among the (0+ / 0-)

      youth.

      We all knew that when Obama isn't on the ballots, AA, Latinos and youth are less likely to show up, we saw it GA-Sen race in 2009, VA-Gov Race and NJ-Gov race in 2009, and now in MA

      Republicans secret dream = the impeachment of Bo the Dog LOL

      by LaurenMonica on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:03:05 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  He has control of the party.... (8+ / 0-)

        ...he put his boy in charge of the DNC and his political operatives in the White House.

        He should be able to win a deep blue state regardless of the quality of the candidate.

        And this goes back throughout his first year: I mean, he lost the health care message war to a bunch of beer-bellied bubbas wearing colonial costumes!

        Duck, defend and retreat won't win elections and won't pass legislation.

        •  Youth are Obama fans not dems Fans. That's a (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          kefauver

          huge problem for dems.

          Coakley screwed up royaly and Jesus Christ himself couldn't have save her. She took vacations while her opponent was campaign, she underestimated her opponent which is a fatal mistake. She didn't have internal polls until the DSCC realized that she was in danger. Even Ted Kennedy and John Kerry used to campaign hard even though their seats were safe.

          Republicans secret dream = the impeachment of Bo the Dog LOL

          by LaurenMonica on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:12:01 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Not even Obama fans anymore (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            MrJersey, ChakraTease

            I have two sons in their early twenties who were initially inspired by Obama, but my impression from talking to them and their friends now is that they don't think Obama really give a shit about their generation.  

            They see him as just another slimy politician from a generation that is mostly obsessed with greed and power. They live on very meager incomes, and take care of each other as best they can, while consciously not wanting to adopt the values of a generation they view as having f**ked up the World.

            Unfortunately, voting has become one of those values. Sadly, I find that I lack much evidence with which to convince them otherwise!

            Don't Blame Me: I Voted For Campaign Obama!

            by seenos on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:48:24 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  I see some of this too (0+ / 0-)

              with my kids and nephews, though not in as harsh a way as with yours...not a slimy politician now, but certainly a disappointment and someone that they're disillusioned with, and feeling as though he wasn't what they thought he could be. I don't think they'll turn out for him next time unless something changes for them. Most of them do vote, so I figure it will be 3rd party time for them. They also live on meager incomes and try to help each other out...it's recycling, and freecycling, and Good-Will, and do without for them...and no healthcare for most of them.

          •  as war grinds on (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            MrJersey

            and the rich get richer, (in part at their expense) . . .

            I see fewer and fewer bumpers and backpacks proudly sporting their "Hope" and "Obama" stickers.  People who (had he done what they voted for) would have been clearcoating over them to preserve them forever are peeling them off instead.  In droves.

            There is a palpable sense of betrayal among the "youth" I meet and know . . . they were "fired up and ready to go" and he took them . . . nowhere . . .

            Fake Left, Drive Right . . . not my idea of a Democrat . . .

            by Deward Hastings on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:52:19 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  These are just excuses. (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            MrJersey

            Failing a major scandal,  Democratic Party should have been able to win a senate seat in a deep blue state where they were ahead by 30 points a month ago.

            And the fact that they didn't reflects on the people Obama put in charge which, in turn, reflects on his leadership of the party.

            Do you think Rove would have lost a seat in Texas when Bush's chief domestic program was riding on the outcome?

          •  My 13 year old grandson calls Obama (0+ / 0-)

            A "big mouth" who is always on TV all the time. I never got on the Obama bandwagon, although Grandpa John voted for him, as did dad, both because of McCain. I'm more of a democrat (small d) than my kids, although I'm much less of one than I was in the past before Wall Street took over large sections of the party.

            Some may consider this forcing my politics on my son. I worked for General Motors. We bought American. We supported the union. We supported those who supported the union. I learned that from my father, and my son learned it from me. He grew up a democrat during the Reagan/Bush generation. He's an independent. He doesn't remember LBJ. I do. He knows the Kennedys from TV. He was only a democrat because dad was. He liked Bonior, but Clinton and Granholm turned him off. Bonior's left politics.

            In five years, my grandson can vote. Dad's an independent. Will he listen to grandpa, or is grandpa just some old guy who doesn't get the youth? He never had LBJ who I thought was great outside of the war. He never had Nixon. He never had the GM culture of the past. Bill Clinton was before his time, which is a good thing, frankly. He doesn't even know who Ronald Reagan is. He won't remember how bad Bush was. He has Obama.

            Who's he voting for, if anybody?

            Support Fair Trade. Buy American! Keep jobs at home. Political Compass Economy -6.62, Social -4.82

            by John Lane on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 12:51:03 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

    •  Don't think so (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      kefauver

      It's about the candidate and the issues.

      Man's capacity for justice makes democracy possible, but man's inclination to injustice makes democracy necessary. ~ Reinhold Niebuhr

      by bvig on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:24:20 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  Says the Tired MSM Meme . . . (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      bvig

      The Only Way to Save the Democratic Party is to Allow Republicans to Win - Some Moron at DKOS

      by kefauver on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:41:47 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Then get used to losing. (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        MrJersey

        Because if you don't think Obama's responsible for the people he put in charge of the party campaign apparatus, and you don't think better people would have seen the problems earlier and won the election, you don't know politics.

        •  Coakley Won the MA Democratic Primary. (0+ / 0-)

          She became the candidate and thought she could coast. No amount of help from the DNC or Obama would have helped. She took the seat for granted and took a vacation to the Caribbean over the Christmas break. Add in multiple campaign gaffes and an arrogant attitude. The onus of blame lies with her and her campaign manager. If you can't understand this then you don't know politics.

          The Only Way to Save the Democratic Party is to Allow Republicans to Win - Some Moron at DKOS

          by kefauver on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 09:41:12 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  The primary system is BROKEN (0+ / 0-)

            And three consecutive failures in three consecutive states prove it.

            VA: McAuliffe and Moran shredded each other, allowing wimpy Deeds to crawl into the spotlight - and lose dismally.

            NJ: Corzine should have been primaried out.

            MA: see VA. Another shredder, with the weakest and worst candidate surviving.

            I'm not sure how, or if, it can be fixed. Perhaps Instant Runoff Voting would help.

            If it's
            Not your body
            Then it's
            Not your choice
            AND it's
            None of your damn business!

            by TheOtherMaven on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 10:04:52 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

  •  See the front page article below... Supreme Court (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    xysea, Dems 2008

    decision.

    Who cares.

    It's all over.

    None of this analysis means anything. None of this "give them something to hope for" shit matters.

    Corporations have unlimited power to spread their message. It's over.

    We will see a major political realignment beginning today.

    Today's Democratic party goes much further to the right economically, siphoning off independents. Today's Republican party becomes the Palinite Teabagging party.

    All we can do is support the corporatist Democrats or deal with what's waiting in the wings. That is our only choice.

    Yes, I'm in a dismal mood.

  •  Count me among those who can differentiate (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Fabian, annieli

    between the man personally and his policies.

    Rachel Maddow mad an astute commentary regarding the time for politics and the time to get policy done. The Admin and Congress would do well to start getting strong policy changes through and taking bold steps.

    Conservatives want live babies so they can raise them to be dead soldiers.- George C.

    by gereiztkind on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:00:39 AM PST

  •  Young voters typically don't show (8+ / 0-)

    Obama was the exception -

    The care of human life and happiness, and not their destruction, is the first and only legitimate object of good government. - Thomas Jefferson

    by ctexrep on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:00:43 AM PST

  •  Youg Voters love candidates with Charisma (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Junkyard Dem

    Martha Coakley well being a smart lady was lacking charisma to energize the youth

    Republicans secret dream = the impeachment of Bo the Dog LOL

    by LaurenMonica on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:01:04 AM PST

    •  Please stop pushing the charisma thing (6+ / 0-)

      Young voters aren't stupid, and there's no magic recipe for energizing us, and even if there were, it wouldn't be something so shallow as "charisma."

      Martha Coakley's political resume was anti-youth. In order to stay in office as an AG she had to be anti-youth, because older voters, Dem or Republican, demand harsh, aggressive, anti-youth prosecutorial behaviour from their AGs.

      It also doesn't help that she favoured the Senate bill.

      Every horror committed by man begins with the lie that some man is not a man. - Jyrinx

      by kyril on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:16:59 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Young voters need fear (0+ / 0-)

        Just like older voters, they are very knee jerk.

        We should have been fear mongering on the danger of Brown, but we didn't.

        Which is why I propose, for the good of MA to run revenge ads in their media markets reminding them of what they did with their vote, or lack of vote.

        HELP WANTED: DNC Chairmen, Apply online at Democrats.org EEOC

        by George Pirpiris on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 09:58:40 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  As pointed out in a diary the other day ... (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        kyril

        Coakley angered a lot of residents of Massachusetts by her actions fighting against a very popular marijuana decriminalization ballot measure.  She compounded this by disregarding the will of 65% of the state's voters, first by urging the legislature to overturn the law.  Then when that failed, encouraging local law enforcement to continue arresting and prosecuting marijuana users under whatever ruse they could devise.

        I suspect that a lot of freedom loving citizens of Massachusetts couldn't stomach the idea of sending a hard core law and order prosecutor type to the Senate.  Especially one who had displayed such contempt for the will of the voters, and especially about an issue as important as using the force of the legal system to punish people for engaging in a very common and relatively socially accepted behavior.  

        "The people were ahead of the politicians on this issue; they recognize and want a more sensible approach to our marijuana policy," said Whitney Taylor, chairwoman of the Committee for Sensible Marijuana Policy, which campaigned for the ballot initiative. "They want to focus our limited law enforcement resources on serious and violent crimes. They recognize under the new law that the punishment will fit the offense."

        The proposition will become law 30 days after it’s reported to the Governor’s Council, which usually meets in late November or early December. But the Legislature could amend or repeal the new law, as they've done with some prior laws passed by the voters, said Emily LaGrassa, a spokeswoman for Attorney General Martha Coakley. The Associated Press called the outcome at about 9:20 p.m.

        Here is a video put together by marijuana reform activists regarding her positions on release of arrest information to potential employers - EVEN WHEN ACQUITTED.  This woman is an authoritarian disaster.

    •  Smart lady but smart campaigner? (0+ / 0-)

      I've yet to see that argument.

      Man's capacity for justice makes democracy possible, but man's inclination to injustice makes democracy necessary. ~ Reinhold Niebuhr

      by bvig on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:25:09 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  The timing was pretty bad for the younger (0+ / 0-)

    voters imho.  I think that Brown having young daughters helped him with the younger voters.

  •  That's because (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    CParis

    Staying home is bad, but at least it isn't sticking your hand in the garbage disposal that is Zoolander.

    Still, evil only triumphs when Good is dumb.

    Dumb like the people of the Pretend Blue state.

  •  Funny how people are (6+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Zoltan, AJsMom, kyril, xysea, Muzikal203, bvig

    Screw them over and they stop coming to your assistance.

    Only the Democrats could take such a big advantage and piss it away so fast. But I guess the corporations our party serves aren't run by young people, now are they?

    "we must make the rescue of the environment the central organizing principle for civilization" - Al Gore

    by racerx on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:01:46 AM PST

    •  Nope (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      bvig

      The corporations that are run by young people, no matter how fabulously profitable, are having almost as hard a time getting listened to as ordinary young people (see: total lack of action on Net Neutrality).

      Every horror committed by man begins with the lie that some man is not a man. - Jyrinx

      by kyril on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:20:17 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Your sig line is ironic today (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        kyril

        Seeing as a bunch of non-persons have been handed the keys to the kingdom.

        But back to the original point I'll bet that 90% of the dollars spent on politicians are coming from people over 50 yrs of age.

        "we must make the rescue of the environment the central organizing principle for civilization" - Al Gore

        by racerx on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 10:29:24 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

    •  Good Point! (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      xysea

      Man's capacity for justice makes democracy possible, but man's inclination to injustice makes democracy necessary. ~ Reinhold Niebuhr

      by bvig on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:26:08 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Not a big surprise (8+ / 0-)

    Young voters don't turn out for non-presidential elections.

    Excise the excise tax.

    by Paleo on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:03:20 AM PST

  •  There was nothing new and/or different about this (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    kefauver, Fury, kyril, bvig, LaurenMonica

    race for them to get enthused about.

    The fact is, MA Dems lost an open-seat special election with a crappy campaign.  And, not for the first time, either.

  •  listen (4+ / 0-)

    i wrote barack several months ago telling him, while i am a senior and will always vote; please do not disappoint the young people who believed in you, worked for you and voted for you. the more he is seen as just another politician, saying one thing and doing another, the young people will not come out.
    they don't believe in "politics as the art of the possible," politics is about compromising if it waters down principle, they have no patience for wealthy old white men who want nothing more than maintaining their wealth and power!

  •  From a College Student's perspetive (11+ / 0-)

    The main issue in turnout has to have been timing.

    Boston is a college town, as everyone knows, and most of the students simply weren't back in town yet. They were still on winter break.

    Most would have absentee voted, but because the election didn't seem important, most of my friends weren't able to make the deadline to apply for an absentee ballot.

    The timing of this race - in January, with the importance not clear until it was too late - is the main reason students didn't vote.

    I hope I get to become a sycophant.

    by Pluto101 on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:04:41 AM PST

  •  Brown has already said the reason (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Fury

    he won was because they already had insurance in their state and didn't want the hcr bill.

    Cloakly did a lousy job with explaining what would happen to their state insurance if she won and they passed hcr.

    They say the state insurance isn't that good and is expensive.  

    •  Coakley lost (0+ / 0-)

      coakley lost because the youth/minority vote collapsed, its as simple as that. I blame it on the youth/minority vote not being cast. I'm not a fool I realize you can't expect turnout like 2008, but sure as hell Brown got it from Mccain +5% didn't he?

      It isn't just Coakley, Obama's & the Dem leaderships fault. Blame needs to go to the kids and the parents that didn't work them also. I have 3 kids ages 23-31 and you bet I was all over them all weekend to get out and vote for Coakley. how many of the parents did this?

  •  Obama led the youth along with lofty promises (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Deward Hastings, AJsMom, kyril

    of change. When it became clear that Obama's approach is corporate business as usual, he created a lot of cynicism among the youth. The people who got burned in 2009 are not likely to pour their heart and soul into another campaign.

  •  What did you expect? With Obama showing a (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ChakraTease, AJsMom

    different leadership from the presidential campaign, he sounds and acts like a different individual. Hope he gets it...

  •  Young voters are usually no-shows (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Fury, CParis, AJsMom
    2008 was the exception, not the rule.

    I wonder what will happen in 2012 when Obama is no longer as cool as Avatar.

    I am that gadfly which God has attached to the state, and all day long and in all places...arousing and persuading and reproaching you.-Socrates

    by The Navigator on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:08:09 AM PST

    •  You hit the nail on the head with this post! (0+ / 0-)

      The youth vote will NOT turn out in 2012 like they did in 2008. Obama will still be popular, but things just aren't turning out the way Obama campaigned.
      His promise of transparency and then using backroom deals on healthcare.
      Letting Congress make him out to be a liar.
      But the biggest thing I have heard, and havent really seen addressed is the mandate to force people to buy health insurance.

      The younger voters honestly thought that healthcare would be FREE. They do NOT want to pay for it!
      I cannot stress this enough!

      A veteran is someone who, at one point in his/her life, wrote a blank check made payable to The USA for an amount of "up to and including my life." - unknown

      by AJsMom on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:57:22 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Young voters need the story in their face. (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Fury, ActivistGuy, kyril, bvig, JC from IA

    As the father of two of 'em, who both voted in 2008, it seems to me that if the candidate isn't compelling enough, they won't be moved.

    If they can't directly relate to the story and feel an immediate need for action, they'll have little motivation to vote.

  •  LIHOP. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ActivistGuy, kyril

    Back to Third Way As Usual.

    Govern center-right, look see liberals and youth don't turn out.

    We are called to speak for the weak, for the voiceless, for victims of our nation and for those it calls enemy.... --ML King "Beyond Vietnam"

    by Gooserock on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:08:26 AM PST

  •  They read the blogs (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Minerva, Deward Hastings, JC from IA

    We went from "Fired up!  Ready to go!" to "Fire Rahm!  I'm ready to leave the Party!"

  •  The kids did go back from Christmas break the day (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Minerva, Fury, kyril, xysea

    before.  Classes started on Tuesday.  Bad timing.

  •  I saw who voted as I worked the polls (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    irmaly, Minerva, Fury, kyril

    in Scott Brown's hometown.  There were a few young people, and some that had never voted.  They went for Brown. All the elderly voted for Brown, and even though MA has health care (insurance) reform, they're still worried that Obama is taking away their medicare.

    •  Yes. The Republicans' Medicare spin is killing us (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Minerva, Fury, kyril

      Our canvassing is showing us the same thing. Older folks are downright freaked out that they are going to lose benefits. They are totally convinced of it. Trying to explain falls on deaf ears. (One Democratic woman even told me the other day when I gently pressed her about the public option--which she brought up as something she was very opposed to--that the reason she was against it was because if everyone got this, she would lose her own benefits. Note: this is a not an evil, selfish woman. This is a scared as hell woman with a lot of health issues.)

      "Whenever a fellow tells me he's bipartisan, I know he's going to vote against me."-- Harry S. Truman

      by irmaly on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:18:00 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Freezing COLA increases only fed this fear (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        irmaly

        Horrible, hideous decision. It played right into the Teabag mania. And it happens again NEXT year? Earth to Obama and Congress: you don't have a fucking CLUE.

        If it's
        Not your body
        Then it's
        Not your choice
        AND it's
        None of your damn business!

        by TheOtherMaven on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 10:20:01 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Young people came out for Ross Perot years (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    kyril

    ago and Ron Paul recently without being totally enthralled with their politics.  The young knew that the traditional parties did not reflect their interests.  With unions and many progressives  disenchanted is there any chance for Dr. Dean and Alan Grayson on a Progressive ticket?  This could steal the thunder from the teabaggers who are being coopted by the rethugs?

  •  Who'd of thought huh? (4+ / 0-)

    That when you promise big and deliver small, the people who voted might get upset, especially first time voters and newly re-energized non-voters.

    Will the Democratic party ever learn this lesson?
    They've got the rest of this year to salvage something from the HCR derailment. So time to step up the game Dems. No more stupid mistakes, do what you were elected to do and you will do fine at the polls.
    If you fail you will suffer horribly. It may not be fair, it may not be logical, but that's the way it works.

  •  Who exactly are these Amateurs anyway? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    irmaly, kyril

    That result led a few amateur observers to the rash conclusion that the nation was headed into some invincible Democratic Party juggernaut for a generation or two because those energized voters would continue to choose Democrats.

    The professional opinion differed from the "amateur" opinion only in it's timing, as Winograd and Hais were saying this well before the election. And in truth, there is no evidence that they were incorrect. Youth turnout is always fickle, but youth eventually become adults and when they do, they generally join the adult voting reliability in more or less the same percentages as preceding generations. What is of note here, is the fact that young voters are forming their opinions and voting inclinations now. Their full effects will not be felt until they have aged fully into the adult population.

    "crush in it's birth the aristocracy of our monied corporations which dare already to challenge our government" -Thomas Jefferson

    by Phil In Denver on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:09:11 AM PST

  •  its a POSITIVE THING that young voters didnt show (0+ / 0-)

    I was worried that they DID show up and they voted for the Father of the American Idol contestent and the pretty boy who posed nekkid in the magazine...

    if that had been the scenario I would be mighty worried right about now IF I was an older democratic incumbant because BROWN is the template by which all republican challenges will be cut ... handsome and entrenched in the POP CULTURE of the day...  saying nothing in carefully crafted populous soundbytes and driving around in a truck to boot.

    If young people stayed HOME its positive for our situation becasue it means the 'fer show' Brown did NOT ignite excitement just like Coakley did not...so young voters never got involved.

    OBAMA offered young voters a view of the country that they WILL inherit and grow old in and his offering excited them - they are fast losing faith with the view and with OBAMA because, for all his talk of change he seems to be the same as every other politician at the moment.  

    Young voters know how they want the future in America to look..if a candidate is selling them snake oil, even if its wrapped up in a package that is pleasing to look at they are not going to buy it... to many OTHER pleasing to look at products around to capture their attention and their time.

    "don't send birkenstocks to battle spiked heels"

    by KnotIookin on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:09:16 AM PST

  •  Young voters expect results. (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Deward Hastings, kyril

    We are not a patient generation, generally.  (I'd like to still count myself as young at 38, but I digress).  We expect when we do something, it will have a result.  You may agress or disagree with that on principle if you will, but it's something that's an earmark of all generations, GenX forward.  We're techno kids, we're used to immediate effect and to be fair, Obama sort of played on that.  He implied he could 'get things done' in DC, without possibly understanding what all that meant.

    The young are also passionate about their politics and beliefs, as well.  They loved a fired up Obama, they loved the idea they were getting a strong leader who would fight for them; many are majorly disillusioned that he took their cash and taxes and are giving it to banks, Wall Street and car companies while bending over backward to avoid punitive measures.  That's not strong.  That's weak.

    So, I understand why they're upset.  They gave the president a mandate, a Congress & and a House and he's done nothing that they've clearly said they wanted: Regulatory reform, FISA ended, Gitmo closed, the wars ramped down, Green jobs & energy, Jobs period, Health Care refom and war criminals prosecuted.

    *this space available for lease if you have something appropriately witty for me to share*

    by xysea on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:09:21 AM PST

    •  Your young people sure sound old! (0+ / 0-)

      Young people clearly said they wanted regulatory reforms and were concerned about their taxes?  The 30-44 year old group -- which is what you seem to be describing -- is not "young voters."

      Whenever I saw interviews with actual young voters -- 18-25 or 29 depending on whom you ask -- I repeatedly heard it was more about how he conducts politics -- not necessarily any specific promises.  And I have children in that age group -- and that seemed to be the draw for them and their friends -- as well.  He's still the same person -- using the same approach.  The people on the ballots were not him -- they weren't using the same approach.

      Maybe young people aren't turning out for these other folks the way they did for Obama because these other folks aren't Obama.

      People are working backwards from a preformed conclusion that it's all about Obama and imagining "evidence" to support what they believe.

      Turnout was extremely low among blacks and hispanics -- too -- in the neighborhood of around 30% or so (that's a rough average -- based on numbers like 25%, 28%, 34%, etc in high black/hispanic areas).  Yet -- hispanic support for Obama is around 70% and black support is around 90%.

      I know Obama never promised that his supporters would continue to turn out for every other Democrat -- so -- why are people determined to try to make this about Obama?

      It's been said Coakley didn't even bother to campaign -- at all -- not even run ads -- in black/hispanic communities or geared to the young.  So -- I guess she got the votes she wanted.

  •  Promote Citizenship Ethos To Just Vote (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    CParis

    In every election.

    •  Pafrt of the problem (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Meteor Blades, kyril

      in the longterm view, has been the reduction of the view of citizen to mere voter, taxpayer and consumer.  This narrow, instrumentalist view of the citizen slowly squeezes the life out of a republic.  

      "99% of the battles and skirmishes that we fought in Afghanistan were won by our side." ~ Marshall Akhromeyev

      by ActivistGuy on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:15:24 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  I am not a consumer, I am a person! (0+ / 0-)

        "Consumers" is a euphemism for "useless eaters". And you know what they do with "useless eaters".

        If it's
        Not your body
        Then it's
        Not your choice
        AND it's
        None of your damn business!

        by TheOtherMaven on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 10:23:28 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Disagree (0+ / 0-)

        Thats only if you allow yourself. In the age of the internet no one should allow themselves to be reduced to that level, I say that is BS. That sounds like excuse mongering from the team that lost the big one.

      •  I Remember Fighting For Hourly Pay (0+ / 0-)

        In a company years ago where they employing the pay-one-price Disneyland style of labor cost management in making their workers work unpaid overtime. The employer spokesperson tried to persuade that I shouldn't look at myself as a worker. I should look at myself as a skilled professional and even management.

        So as an activist do you often try to defuse people thinking that they might have a collective common interest with others?

        Don't want to dismiss liberals while using narrow, instrumentalist terms. But sometimes, we are complete fucking idiots.

  •  I am a young voter and I'm extremely displeased (6+ / 0-)

    with this president and his party's reluctance to change policy in D.C.

  •  So yet again the young disengage. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    kefauver, Fury, CParis

    No excuse.  

    They really are failing themselves spectacularly.  

    "When people show you who they really are, believe them." - Maya Angelou

    by Pennsylvanian on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:09:58 AM PST

    •  What are they engaging for? (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Deward Hastings, AJsMom, kyril

      Their money is being taken, their ability to build their own lives is being compromised, they'll probably be sent off to war at some point before its all over, their privacy is in tatters and no one gives a crap that they're in debt to go to school for jobs that aren't there.

      Please tell me why they shouldn't disengage?

      *this space available for lease if you have something appropriately witty for me to share*

      by xysea on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:11:29 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Because if you don't vote, you get the government (4+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        scott5js, kefauver, CParis, pistolSO

        ...you deserve.  If you don't vote, talk to the hand, because if you want to sit on the sidelines and bitch when you don't vote, who the fuck cares what you have to say?  THAT is why AARP has so much power and 20-somethings don't.  Money and votes talk; bullshit walks.  If you don't vote, you have nothing to offer but bullshit.

        "When people show you who they really are, believe them." - Maya Angelou

        by Pennsylvanian on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:17:11 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  We voted and we're not getting the (3+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Deward Hastings, AJsMom, kyril

          government we deserve.  So, now what?

          *this space available for lease if you have something appropriately witty for me to share*

          by xysea on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:20:33 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

          •  Ha - you voted once! (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Pennsylvanian, kefauver

            The seniors volunteer, donate and vote in every election, year after year - politicians pay attention to them.

            Just cause you voted for Obama in 2008 doesn't put you at the head of the line -- many of those seniors voted for him, too.

            Never interrupt your enemy when he is making a mistake. ~ Naploeon Bonaparte

            by CParis on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:38:06 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

          •  So you think women or blacks got their agenda... (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            kefauver, CParis

            ...passed with their first vote?  Your comment belies a very naive view of history and an extremely distorted expectation of immediate gratification in the political realm.

            "When people show you who they really are, believe them." - Maya Angelou

            by Pennsylvanian on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:41:43 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  So, keep voting for sh*t that ain't working (2+ / 0-)
              Recommended by:
              Deward Hastings, bvig

              and wait your turn, maybe you'll get a bone thrown at you one day, when you're 65+.  Or maybe not.

              That's your tonic?

              *this space available for lease if you have something appropriately witty for me to share*

              by xysea on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:44:58 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Or get involved and become a consitutency... (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                kefauver

                ...with influence.  THAT is your tonic.  

                Complaining about others getting things because they work for them?  THAT is your problem.

                "When people show you who they really are, believe them." - Maya Angelou

                by Pennsylvanian on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:51:22 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  Wrong. You don't seem to grasp (0+ / 0-)

                  that people like YOU have a real effect on whether or not young people will continue to vote. Being attacked for it is NOT the way to do it, being LECTURED is not the way to do it and you're oblivious to that, because you'd rather be a smug curmudgeon THAN ACTUALLY DO OR EXPECT SOMETHING.

                  What do you think?  This happened in a vaccuum?  People HAVE been involved or they wouldn't have bothered to give, canvass, campaign or vote in the first place.  

                  More generational 'we're better than you' bullshit from those who think they're above everyone else.

                  In other words, the status quo.

                  *this space available for lease if you have something appropriately witty for me to share*

                  by xysea on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:56:10 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

                  •  I'm 39, and I'm staying to fight. (1+ / 0-)
                    Recommended by:
                    CParis

                    If you want to give up, so long.  See what apathy and victimhood get you.  I'm thinking Scott Brown.

                    "When people show you who they really are, believe them." - Maya Angelou

                    by Pennsylvanian on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 09:06:34 AM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  Fighting got me Scott Brown. (0+ / 0-)

                      So, now what?

                      I never said I was leaving.  Again, you must be on the weed, or have a reading comprehension problem.  I said I empathised with those who felt that they made a statement by not turning out.

                      As an aside, even when we voted we got Scott Browns. What we're doing ain't working.  Time to try something new.  I'm up for it.  You're just going to do the same ol' shit and hope it someday might work out for you.  Good luck with that.

                      *this space available for lease if you have something appropriately witty for me to share*

                      by xysea on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 09:09:38 AM PST

                      [ Parent ]

            •  PS It wasn't my first vote, (0+ / 0-)

              but thanks for the condescension.  I'm 38.  I'm young, and I've been voting since I was 18 in state, local and Federal elections.  Keep trying though.

              *this space available for lease if you have something appropriately witty for me to share*

              by xysea on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:45:39 AM PST

              [ Parent ]

              •  Never said it was your first vote. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                CParis

                But you pretending that voting is useless would be pretty offensive to people who waited and fought for decades for even the basic right to vote.  Taking it for granted and acting like the world should snap to the demands of a constiutency that only turns out every 8 or 10 elections or so is arrogant and totally naive.

                "When people show you who they really are, believe them." - Maya Angelou

                by Pennsylvanian on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:53:37 AM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  Voting right now is useless. (0+ / 0-)

                  Because whatever I vote for, I get shit on for.  Whatever I vote for, I'm told 'don't criticise'.  Whatever I vote for, I'm told you're better than me.  So, what is the fucking point?  I'll just cede you the moral high ground, you can decide what's best for me and then I can go about doing what I do since it's not making a damn of difference anyhow and I'm not doing it right anyway, according to you.

                  See, how that works?  You're not really ENCOURAGING people.  You're DISCOURAGING them, yet you're too high up on your moral high horse to notice that.

                  You'd rather just beat me with a stick.  Well, I'd rather not be beaten, thanks.  I'll pass.

                  *this space available for lease if you have something appropriately witty for me to share*

                  by xysea on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:58:16 AM PST

                  [ Parent ]

            •   Pennsylvanian (0+ / 0-)

              Great response, you got game today. I really am losing respect for the younger people, they need to suck it up.

          •  Keep on voting (2+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Pennsylvanian, xysea

            If you live in Texas your primary is Tuesday, March 2. I will be voting early.

            •  And yesterday ... (0+ / 0-)

              I got my new voter regislation card. It was a bit late, and I had called the Tax Office the day before. I am always suspicious of these Republicans.
              You see, voter registration is handled by the Assessor and Collector of Taxes, an elected official who is Republican. In 2008 Harris County just barely voted for Obama, but re-elected the Republican Tax Collecor, who then broke the public trust by resigning to take a private job. The County Commissioners' Court then appointed another Republican.

  •  This doesn't surprise me at all (5+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    kefauver, CParis, kyril, indres, annieli

    Young people in the last few decades have dropped their party affiliations.  They vote for candidates, period.  Obama got them motivated; so did Schwarzenegger in my state in 2003 (the lines of voters in that recall election were almost all people under 30).

    When nobody motivates them, they stay home, leaving the election to whoever is the most pissed off and/or has the time to vote.  Those usually aren't Democrats.  

    I can't understand why people are frightened of new ideas. I'm frightened of the old ones. (John Cage)

    by dotalbon on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:10:06 AM PST

  •  What was the turnout in minority communities? (4+ / 0-)

    Specifically, what steps did Coakely take to energize black and Latino voters?

    [nearly zero]

    Now, more than ever:
    'The work goes on, the cause endures' Ted Kennedy

    by shpilk on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:11:16 AM PST

  •  Numbers in Amherst looked low (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Minerva, kyril

    Is UMass still on semester break?

    "99% of the battles and skirmishes that we fought in Afghanistan were won by our side." ~ Marshall Akhromeyev

    by ActivistGuy on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:12:16 AM PST

  •  GOTV canard (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    kyril

    I think I'm going to blow beans out my ears if I hear one more "failed GOTV" opnion.

    The President of the United States showed up on the weekend before the election to make the case that voting for Coakley was vital to his agenda.

    Coakley himself made the point by promising to be the 41st vote against the Senate health care package.

    Turnout for the special was unheard of -- nearly 3/4 of that for the 2008 Presidential election.

    If people didn't vote, it's because they didn't want to, not because they didn't understand the importance of the election.

    The big question is this:

    Did they fail to turn out because they are disappointed in the way things have gone, or

    Did they turn out in 2008 because of Obama and not because of his agenda.

    Free speech? Yeah, I've heard of that. Have you?

    by dinotrac on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:12:47 AM PST

    •  Try lazy, ignorant. (0+ / 0-)

      Oh, did I violate a taboo?

      Lazy. Ignorant.

      America: our highest paid profession is thief.

      by Paul Goodman on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:20:39 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

    •  So GOTV doesn't matter. That would ... (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      dinotrac

      ...be a big surprise to the people - including loads of young people - who did GOTV work in 2008.

      Don't tell me what you believe. Tell me what you do and I will tell you what you believe.

      by Meteor Blades on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 09:07:29 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  Gotta read more carefully... (0+ / 0-)

        I never said GOTV doesn't matter.
        I said Coakley didn't lose because of GOTV.
        However incompetent her campaign may have been, it was all but impossible for voters not to be aware of the election, the candidates, and its importance.

        That fact was underscored by 2,248,471 in the special election.  That was more than the 2,155,678 who voted for Senator in the 2006 midterm election.

        In a special election, which is ordinarily expected to draw far less voter interest than even a midterm.

        I'm sure some votes were left on the table, but 110,000 is a lot of votes to make up.

        Free speech? Yeah, I've heard of that. Have you?

        by dinotrac on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 09:38:23 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Excuses are for losers dinotrac (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          dinotrac

          The fact remains that the GOP got out probably every vote possible. Want to venture what the % TO was for the 18-29 Brown universe of voters. Bet it was at least 70%.

          •  I'd agree about excuses. (0+ / 0-)

            The fact is that Coakley lost the election on merit.
            If people didn't vote for her in that charged political environment, they really didn't want to vote for her and they really didn't care about keeping Scott Brown from going to Washington.

            Free speech? Yeah, I've heard of that. Have you?

            by dinotrac on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 12:02:06 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

  •  The Dumb-ocrats ... (0+ / 0-)

    The election proves that Dumb-ocrats fail to understand that in order to make policy, you have to be good at politics. Or just sexy.

    But with Lieberman fighting for Health Insurance companies, and Kerry and Lieberman fighting for Coal (and anyone who uses the word Clean to describe Coal has never been to W. Virginia) what is the difference between the Republicanista and the Dumb-ocrats?

    Obama has brains and good judgment. However, he and the Democrats needs to exercise power with the self-assuredness of G. W. Bush (without the arrogance and disdain for the Constitution.)

    •  So what you're saying is (0+ / 0-)

      that you want a Benevolent Dictator?

      The trouble with that is, it lasts one generation (if you're lucky) and the successors are not benevolent, not competent, or neither. History proves this over and over and over again.

      If it's
      Not your body
      Then it's
      Not your choice
      AND it's
      None of your damn business!

      by TheOtherMaven on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 10:29:23 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  my generation has no concept of a vote mattering (4+ / 0-)

    the power has been in business, not the people since before we were voting age
    also there isn't much political teaching in school

    change those two things
    and at the very least you have a starting point

    •  Your Generation grew up with Republicans in power (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      CParis

      Republicans have been in power since 1980. Reagan, Bush, 1980-1992, Bush, 2000-2008. Clinton was President from '92 to 2000, but during much of his term, the Republicans had control of Congress. The Republican Supreme Court decided on the winner of the 2000 election.

      If your generation thinks your vote doesn't matter then your generation needs to read the Constitution, read the Declaration of Independence (available in concise form with the Gettysburg address from the American Constitution Society) and read the history of the labor, civil rights, and anti-war movement - which is American history that you have to find out for yourself.

      But as you mention, "the power has been in business and there isn't much political teaching in school."

      It's a system problem.

      •  Yup! (0+ / 0-)

        The GOP gained power through getting voters to turn out for EVERY election - town council, school board, county freeholders, state legs, etc.  They were able to fill these spots, gain experience and dictate policy because many Dem/Independents didn't show up to vote.

        Never interrupt your enemy when he is making a mistake. ~ Naploeon Bonaparte

        by CParis on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:33:56 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Perhaps with the SCOTUS and corporations today (0+ / 0-)

        you might understand why young people don't think who is elected matters.  

        Why is this hard to understand?

        Man's capacity for justice makes democracy possible, but man's inclination to injustice makes democracy necessary. ~ Reinhold Niebuhr

        by bvig on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:43:11 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

  •  Dude! Seriously! (4+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Minerva, kyril, bvig, VitaminD

    Coakley ran a spectacularly horrid campaign. I mean it was FAIL on a massive scale. It was as if she never wanted the job in the first place, Coakley all but handed Scott "Naked" Brown that seat on a silver platter.

    My observations?

    I don't think this has that much to do with the "youth vote". I think it was more of a case of a candidate who was a complete and utter failure (and she appeared to be OK with that).

    -8.00, -8.26 "Fascism is capitalism plus murder." - Upton Sinclair

    by djMikulec on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:16:37 AM PST

  •  Quiet campuses kept kids from voting (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    kyril, bvig

    Most Massachusetts colleges are just now coming back to life, and Monday was a holiday. The kids who vote were ignored by Coakley -- it could have made the difference.  Too bad.

    •  Tire of the excuses (0+ / 0-)

      Always with the excuses.  I am tired of the excuses being made for young voters not participating.

      They don't participate and yet, they feel compel to whine about everything. I am thirty-two and I have never missed a vote since I turned eighteen. Voting requires very little energy expenditure and minimal time.

  •  You mean 18-29 year olds didn't like the mandate? (6+ / 0-)

    Why, it makes absolutely no sense that young people entering a job market that increasingly provides nothing in the way of benefits would be hesitant to vote for a candidate who would help pass a law forcing them to spend 20% of their take-home pay on private junk insurance that will not actually cover them if they get sick.

    A few weeks ago a snotty like-minded liberal friend sneered at me after my drunken "Kill this bill" speech.  I argued that aside from the troubling civil liberty aspect, passing a bill with a mandate and no public option would ultimately be worse politics than abject Clintonian failure in the long run.  I said the Democrats would lose the youth vote for a generation because the mandate would be seen as a massive tax increase on the younger middle-class generation that's already getting shafted.

    "Whatever, I have insurance!" was his counterargument.

    •  Thanks!!!! Why are people out of touch with young (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      eg4190

      voters concerns.  The mandate is a big deal!

      Man's capacity for justice makes democracy possible, but man's inclination to injustice makes democracy necessary. ~ Reinhold Niebuhr

      by bvig on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:44:28 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  someone wrote a diary on this yesterday (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    kyril

    Here's what I said:

    I think what's happening is all of the young people who were "fired up and ready to go" in 2008 aren't seeing what they thought they'd see. Fair or not, there hasn't been much "audacity" in Washington, at least not much that would actually help us out. I know personally, that I'm finding this all incredibly frustrating, and I'm someone that has voted in every possible election since I turned 18, so someone who really doesn't care and/or just voted for the first time in 2008 isn't going to be all that motivated to go to the polls.

    I haven't seen much outreach to younger voters, but then I admit I may just be missing it.

    and

    Young people largely support Democratic policies, it wasn't just all about Obama for a lot of us, I would even say most of us. Obama simply made it easier to get the word out about the election. I always voted, but Obama did motivate me to volunteer and vote and get more involved, and I've stayed involved (although I'm starting to regret that decision). Obama showed other Democrats how to get our attention. Coakley clearly missed the memo, and didn't one of the Governors who lost also write off young people? Stuff like that isn't exactly a motivator. Obama TRIED to get our vote, that's the difference.

    here's the diary to see them in context

  •  This was the meaningful message from MA (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    kyril

    Obama should have a SWAT team focused like a laser on what it will take to mobilize these folks in the fall.  It will be the difference in races all across the country.

    Nobody changed their minds in voting for Obama in 2008.  We just swamped them with turnout.

    Note also, on the other side, the GOP had terrific success copying Democratic mobilization techniques and blew past their marks in mobilizing their own base.  

    And speaking of that base, maybe 85% of Brown voters, this was a referendum on Obama - McCain voters turned out big-time.  These people want Obama to be drawn and quartered on national television, fed to dogs, the dogs drawn and quartered and then dumped in acid vats, the vats buried, and the ground above salted.  They were foaming at the mouth outside my polling place - I thought they comprised the best ad for Coakley of the campaign.  But it wouldn't matter if no one went out to vote in the first place.

    Reagan's GOP leveraged Reagan-hate deftly to undermine Democrats, I also hope Obama's people are studying that analog...

    There is no planet B

    by Minerva on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:18:31 AM PST

  •  They could easily have been motivated (0+ / 0-)

    On Tuesday, only 15% of young voters cast ballots, compared with 57% of the 30-and-over population.

    After all, this is a generation that could have been motivated by superficial messages like the current google searches for hot pix of the two daughters of Mr. PickupBagger.

    As I noted elsewhere, even stupid messages like Coakley beerbonging made viral on the intertubes would have helped.

    "...calling for a 5" deck gun is not parody. Not by a long shot." (gnaborretni)

    by annieli on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:18:36 AM PST

  •  Jeezus. What a week. (0+ / 0-)

    My gloating winger partner sent me this.  I couldn't laugh.  In fact, I nearly wept. I just pretended I had seen it already.  Much truth is said in jest.  

    Strength of character does not consist solely of having powerful feelings, but in maintaining one's balance in spite of them - Clausewicz

    by SpamNunn on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:18:38 AM PST

  •  Wonderful video from Cornel West (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    kck, kyril

    to Obama from BBC here:

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/...

    I agree with it, wholeheartedly.

    *this space available for lease if you have something appropriately witty for me to share*

    by xysea on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:20:08 AM PST

  •  Ah, the stark difference between... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    kyril

    ...Dem voters & Dem base. The DNC knew that Obama's supporters did not translate into a bigger Democratic Party so what did they do about it? I ask earnestly because I don't know that they failed to do anything, just unaware.

    Respect for delayed gratification is a good thing, surely attempting great transformative cultural change, but not in the world of politics. Younger people seem to have this awareness better today. There's a place for incrementalism and there's a place for radical change and when lives and livelihoods are at stake incrementalism seems, well, sinful.

    Surely today's youthful voters grew up seeing their American worker parents given pink slips and having vital services taken or kept from them all in the name of economic reform or austerity and with no notice, no incrementalism. They know pink slips have been sent with no prior notice the week before Christmas to hundreds of thousands of people in the same company all to raise the year-end stock price.

    They can see when companies rein in their government also for the accumulation of wealth.

    Let's learn from the young voters who stayed home.  

    HR 676 - Health care reform we can believe in - national single-payer NOW.

    by kck on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:20:24 AM PST

  •  Yup the young voters.. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    LeighAnn

    who did not get what they wanted in 1 year...sat on their hands...no pony...no vote...and then the older teabaggers win...yipeeee!!!.../snark

    Obama - Change I still believe in

    by dvogel001 on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:20:40 AM PST

  •  When I turned 21 (0+ / 0-)

    This was the voting age back then. I voted and I voted a straight Republican ticket. In 5 years I became a Democrat. I did not change my mind at all about voting in every election. In 1970 I missed the November election only because I had moved back to Texas from Michigan. I missed a special election in 1974. I don't believe that I have missed any election since. Oh, I have missed Republican primaries, but it is illegal to vote in both primaries.
    I strongly believe this is the model we at dailykos should be promoting, not giving credence to the idea that any good can come of boycotting elections.
    At times I have heard people say they voted in every election, and they would almost always turn out to be Republicans. Apparently an article of faith in the GOP. One thing I kept when when I changed parties.

  •  CHANGE We REALLY Can Believe In, NOT the (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    xysea

    same old bullshit repackaged . . . . . .

    because everything is going to hell . . .

    and pissing around lying about the desire to change isn't getting it done . . . . . . . . . . .

    We aren't deaf, dumb, or blind . . . . . . .

    We see you're in it for yourselves only . . .

    It's all about wealth for yourselves and protecting the status quo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    so don't sell us corruption and tyranny pretending it's liberty and justice for all . . . . . . . .

    Go SELF-FORNICATE!  Where's my damn pitchfork!

  •  What's the difference? (0+ / 0-)

    What's the difference between a Democratic Senate with 60 votes (yeah right) and 59 votes?
    Despite my belief that there is little difference I still got out and voted for Coakley.  My main reason was that Brown ran a dishonest campaign, void of ideas, and that it would be an embarrassment to have him represting our state.  I also like Coakley--she's intelligent and accomplished.  That said, because the Democrats in the House, Senate, and White House have been so weak and ineffective this year I can console myself in thinking that Tuesday's result will make no difference.
    As long as the Obama Administration and Democrats continue to take the "centrist" position (rightwing in almost any other country) I think they'll continue to have trouble attracting liberal voters.  They have shunned the base in a futile effort to satisfy a bipartisan fetish.  They will never get Republicans to work honestly with them so if they want a dedicated base that will turn out they better start embracing a more liberal agenda.

  •  Voting (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    scott5js

    should be thought of as a part of everyday life instead of some secondary special event.  Maybe it should be taught differently or discussed differently on the news.  More a matter of course - like going to school, going to work, going to the store, just something that is automatic.  The way voting is set up in the US today(and I am sure it is by design), people tend to think of it as difficult, time consuming and scary.  

  •  I think we should send 'Obama Sucks' brigades (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Trial Lawyer Richard

    Right to college campuses, for instance.  That way, younger voters can hear how disgusting/disappointing/corrupt the Democrats are more directly.  That can only help turnout in the future.

    And seriously, please don't tell me that a constant drumbeat of this bullshit for the past eight months had no effect, and that 'people think for themselves.'  That's the 'only words' argument, and it's nonsense.

    Andrew Mellon & GOP: 'In a Depression, assets return to their rightful owners'

    by Tuffie on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:24:45 AM PST

  •  Look, you have to WORK for the Youth Vote (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    kyril, xysea

    Obama is going to have to WORK for it again in 2012. Remember during the campaign when Clinton wrote the youth off, and Obama worked for our vote? We aren't totally apathetic, but we (like any other voter) want to know what you are going to do for us specifically. If we don't think you are going to do anything for us, well then we will be less inclined to donate to, volunteer, and/or vote for you.

    •  No, the youth vote has to work for a better world (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      pistolSO

      Nothing is handed to anyone.  Voting is a participatory sport.  If the younger voters opt out of the voting process, they have no voice.  It is they who have to work to participate.

      •  BS, if you want the youth vote you have to (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        kyril

        work for the youth vote, you don't sit around and wait for it to work for you. If that's the case then what the hell is the point of campaigning?

        •  Trial Lawyer Richard is right (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Trial Lawyer Richard, AJsMom

          The cozy comfortable world that college students are in tends to fool one.

          That isn't the way the world works.  The world doesn't come looking for you.  If you expect that, you will be disappointed.

          The reality is that if we can see that there are things about the world that need to change in some way, then we have to become committed to doing what it takes, even when it is not entertaining and fun.  

          The world after graduation will prove that eventually.  

          hope that the idiots who have no constructive and creative solutions but only look to tear down will not win the day.

          by Stuart Heady on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:54:38 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  I call B.S. on that. (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Stuart Heady

          I am a political organizer for over 30 years.  I have organized rallies, get togethers, sent out brochures, helped run TV ads, and done everything from the bottom up to get the youth vote.  They don't vote except in extreme circumstances.  Face the fact.

          I can tell you, no matter how many posts you put here, political operatives and candidates know that only a fraction of the youth voting age people will show up and vote.

          •  Trial Lawyer Richard is a teacher (1+ / 0-)
            Recommended by:
            Trial Lawyer Richard

            I know,

            "We don't want no education...teacher, leave those kids alone!"

            but, as someone with about the same level of experience, the problem is that he is absolutely right.

            This condition only really changes when there is something unusual that moves the perception of the election into a more entertaining and exciting status.  If it involves the dull realities of more usual circumstances, kids just don't see that they have a stake in the outcome.  

            That is pretty much the condition.  Citizenship participation usually comes with the level of maturity attained with marriage, and other commitments to a community of a long term nature, like having kids.  

            hope that the idiots who have no constructive and creative solutions but only look to tear down will not win the day.

            by Stuart Heady on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 09:36:50 AM PST

            [ Parent ]

    •  They should work. (0+ / 0-)

      No, the youth of America should WORK for building a better America by participating in the process.

      Get off your asses and vote.  

  •  Young voters are frequently no-shows. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    scott5js

    I have spoken to many of them.  They confuse "activism" and blogging with doing your civic duty for the political system. They need to register and vote.  It is their world and their issues that are being decided....without their participation in large part.

  •  they don't have jobs, what were they doing? (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Trial Lawyer Richard

    skiing?

  •  Overall, a really huge, permanent problem (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    scott5js

    Is that voting and citizenship are caught up in the entertainment and consumer culture matrix.

    We think we are voting for TV characters in a reality show.  If someone isn't telegenic, we don't think beyond that.  

    Perhaps the real danger in the Supreme Court decision is that the advertising psychology behind the creation of the entertainment ethos is likely to become a further brainwashing in favor of corporate types like Brown.  

    The unleashed tide of corporate money is not going to just affect the conventional campaign ad.  

    What we have already seen is an ability to orchestrate an entire environment in a way that is so pervasive, most people don't realize they are being affected.  The youth are especially vulnerable because they haven't quite broken out of the child mode of thinking everything is about entertaining them.  

    That's what this shows.

    hope that the idiots who have no constructive and creative solutions but only look to tear down will not win the day.

    by Stuart Heady on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:29:05 AM PST

  •  A bigger issue (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    John Lane, kyril

    I hate to say it but I think a much bigger, underlying issue is that many of the progressive young people who were mobilized by Obama, now realize that 'change' actually meant, total and complete perpetuation of the status quo, particularly when it comes to corporate power.  Young people thought the work they did to elect Obama meant our paradigm might finally shift, but over the last year have realized that voting for a democrat is really no different then voting for a republican.  The whole thing is a scam, run by corporate interests.  Until we fix that problem, I know I personally am much less motivated to participate in mainstream politics.  

    I think Obama himself will find this to be true in 2012, unless he stops consistently groveling to corporate power.  Instead, what likely will happen, is Obama will harness the new unlimited donations available from corporations (made available after today's supreme court ruling), to run a $700 million marketing campaign.

    •  corportations don't vote (0+ / 0-)

      unless he can make a way for a corporation to count as 1 million votes he is in a lot of trouble catering to his current crap corp agenda.

    •  what you are missing (0+ / 0-)

      is that the total mental environment we live in is like the world depicted in the movie, The Matrix.  

      What pill do we take in order to see this clearly?

      We are looking at a TV show version of reality, instead of the real way things actually work.

      So our analysis is about the wrong thing.    We want the world to change in a way that accords with a fundamental about the way the consumer culture matrix operates:

      Our nervous systems are conditioned from our earliest consciousness that everyting conforms to a plotline convention, with a beginning, a middle, and a satisfying resolution in a quick time frame.

      This conditioning of our nervous systems is basic to an approach we have to politics, unless we have freed ourselves from the Matrix by becoming aware of this.  

      The current falling out with Obama is largely the result of this nervous system at the root of this.

      More than likely, the overall conditioning will prevail and we will become enthralled to a Matrix like future that the movie's creators evidently were intuitively concerned about.  

      Unless we become more reality-based and conscious.  

      hope that the idiots who have no constructive and creative solutions but only look to tear down will not win the day.

      by Stuart Heady on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:38:29 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  I would have thought twice about it. (0+ / 0-)

    I haven't posted here in a long long time, but I wanted to come in and say one thing.

    The party has done nothing with the supermajority.  Nothing.  They've bought into the idea that it takes 60 firm votes to do anything, which has never, ever been true.

    They compromised on the stimulus, they compromised on climate, they are compromising healthcare into a state of unrecognizability.

    I'm at the point where I just don't have anywhere to turn.  I vote for Democrats, I get nothing.  I don't vote, and Republicans get free reign to do whatever they want.

    What I'd like to see is for the Democratic leadership to get destroyed this year, but for us to keep a narrow majority.  Eliminate the head, and maybe the body will grow a new head that can actually think.

    This sums up how I feel about our party right now:
    http://www.talkingpointsmemo.com/...

  •  I absolutely do not wish to minimise (0+ / 0-)

    the importance of voter rurnout, the youth vote in particular, however traditonally 'special elections' and mid-term elections attract fewer voters than general elections when a new President is being contemplated.

    A great deal of the youth turnout, from my personal experience anyway working for the Obama campaign then on voter turnout at the local university was the excitement generated by the 'cult like atomosphere' of the candidates personality and historical nature of the election.

    I honestly  don't know how the national apparatus of governing, which is very different from the local apparatus of campaigning, can generate that kind of excitment in these bye-elections for individual candidates based on specific local issues and concerns.  Should Obama have dropped Haiti to spend more time in Boston?  I guess i am asking myself the unanswerable question, what personal responsibility does each individual citizen have to the democratic process?.

    I believe we the voters, need to examine our own role and stop asking our 'leaders' to do our job for us.

    I also think Democrats need to examine exactly what this massive increase in so-called Independant voters really means to their own ability to advance a progressive or liberal or centrist democratic agenda for the nation.

    As usual, I don't have many answers, but after Tuesday I sure as hell have a great many questions. Not the least of which, is what role the netroots is playing in actually WINNING elections?  or are we just using the technology as a platform to air own own personal agendas,  grievances, visions, dreams, issues etc.

    I know a lot about what bloggers are AGAINST. I'm not so clear on what they are FOR or how they hope to get there from here?

    Have a nice day.  

  •  I saw it mentioned somewhere (FDL?) that Brown (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    kyril

    had been targeting young voters w/some of his TV ads during Colbert, Ferguson, etc...

    I wonder if Coakley ever even bothered?

    " It's shocking what Republicans will do to avoid being the 2012 presidential nominee."

    by jwinIL14 on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:36:40 AM PST

  •  Obama wanted to make public service cool (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    kyril

    I would also say disillusionment with things like the public option being dropped from health care reform are another big red flag to why they did not show.  Why is he abandoning most of what got him elected?  

  •  How do we do outreach to young voters? (0+ / 0-)

    Suggestions?

    Media Reform Action Link http://stopbigmedia.com/

    by LNK on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:37:18 AM PST

    •  Run community organizers (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Radical def

      and teachers and professors and humanitarian aid workers and nurses and doctors and food bank volunteers as your candidates.

      Skip the police officers, attorney generals, prosecutors, and sheriffs.

      If you do nothing else, that will be a start.

      Every horror committed by man begins with the lie that some man is not a man. - Jyrinx

      by kyril on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:52:34 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Hollow rhetoric no longer inspires (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Deward Hastings, John Lane

    The young people I know consider themselves to have been abandoned by Obama.  They won't listen to his speeches any longer, considering them hollow rhetoric without any desire to back them up with action.
    What does Obama actually support? Wall Street, health insurance industry and the Pentagon.  Not much to inspire there.

    •  Polling says otherwise. (0+ / 0-)

      The youth favor Obama by about 80%.  The people who really, really don't like him come mostly from the 30-44yo and seniors age groups.

    •  Excuses (0+ / 0-)

      Abandoned after a year? Come one.  They need to grow up if they think voting for Obama in November would have solved all the worlds problems.  The President is but one cog in the government wheel.

       Well they aren't going to get anything now that there isn't Democratic majority.  Talk about shooting off your foot to spite your face.

  •  Voting is a Civic Duty and staying informed (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    scott5js, Trial Lawyer Richard

    is the duty of citizens.

    Nothing should depend on the popularity contest aspect of elections.

    Media Reform Action Link http://stopbigmedia.com/

    by LNK on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:38:56 AM PST

    •  What happens if you like neither candidate (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      kyril

      you stay home.  

      Perhaps they're more informed than you think.

      Man's capacity for justice makes democracy possible, but man's inclination to injustice makes democracy necessary. ~ Reinhold Niebuhr

      by bvig on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:46:41 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

      •  if you are really informed (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        LNK

        you vote.  

        The reason for not voting is really a selfish disregard that it matters to others in a community.  A lot of times people don't vote if they have no stake in the community they have moved into.  Sometimes this takes as much as ten years to develop for people who work, are married and have kids going to school, after they have moved in to a place.  

        People who are younger and who have less concern about what is going on with other people and with the community, have less of a sesne of why anything matters that they aren't involved with.

        hope that the idiots who have no constructive and creative solutions but only look to tear down will not win the day.

        by Stuart Heady on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:49:36 AM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  Some have only been there a few months (0+ / 0-)

          and when I was in college, there were strong movements to stop college voters from voting in VA who were out of state because we weren't really part of the community but our own separate entity.  Transient residents.  

          Perhaps it's selfish disregard, or perhaps it's really confusion at which is the lesser of two evils and withholding judgment.

          Man's capacity for justice makes democracy possible, but man's inclination to injustice makes democracy necessary. ~ Reinhold Niebuhr

          by bvig on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:57:40 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  Try to make the election close (0+ / 0-)

        Like voting for the weaker candidate or voting against the incumbent.

  •  What the movie, The Matrix again (0+ / 0-)

    This bears repeating.  

    The total mental environment we live in is like the world depicted in the movie, The Matrix.  

    What pill do we take in order to see this clearly?

    We are looking at a TV show version of reality, instead of the real way things actually work.

    So our analysis is about the wrong thing.    We want the world to change in a way that accords with a fundamental about the way the consumer culture matrix operates:

    Our nervous systems are conditioned from our earliest consciousness that everyting conforms to a plotline convention, with a beginning, a middle, and a satisfying resolution in a quick time frame.

    This conditioning of our nervous systems is basic to an approach we have to politics, unless we have freed ourselves from the Matrix by becoming aware of this.  

    The current falling out with Obama is largely the result of this nervous system at the root of this.

    More than likely, the overall conditioning will prevail and we will become enthralled to a Matrix like future that the movie's creators evidently were intuitively concerned about.  

    Unless we become more reality-based and conscious.  

    Given that Republicans are unscrupulous and crassly interested in manipulation and inheritors of the legacy that created Madison Avenue, it may be a while before there is a substantial awakening that can oppose this.

    hope that the idiots who have no constructive and creative solutions but only look to tear down will not win the day.

    by Stuart Heady on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:41:55 AM PST

  •  Duh! (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    kyril

    When young voters see no change -
    They realize that it is politics as usual.
    And stay home.

  •  Not voting is sometimes perversely logical (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    kyril, bvig

    We all know the old saw that if you don't vote you may be ceding your ballot to the candidate you like least--- and that's true enough.

    But consider this: If you don't want your vote to count as a vote FOR the Republicans, and you don't want your vote to count FOR the status quo Dems, perhaps not voting sends the intended message.

    And what are the stakes in doing this? In a presidential race, very high as we learned from 2000. There's only one president.

    But in a race that will decide whether there are 58 or 59 or 60 Senators in a Democratic caucus, the stakes aren't that high.

    Voters want to feel good about their vote, and they want want it to be a positive one. Hence, enthusiasm and high turnout for Obama, and lack of enthusiasm and low turnout for Coakley.

    Resist much, obey little. ~~Edward Abbey, via Walt Whitman

    by willyr on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:43:23 AM PST

  •  Ok I haven't seen this mentioned anywhere so I'll (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lirtydies, Stuart Heady, kyril

    try to offer a view, as a college student from MA at a MA college.

    The difference between 2008 and 2010? In 2008 you're looking at national trends of young voters. In 2010 you're looking at youth voting within a single state. Why is that important? Because youth voter registration (specifically college students) drives in MA, from my experience, have been registering college students to their home states. In 2008, if you had a college student from Ohio going to Tufts, would you want him or her to register in MA or OH? Apply that to any swing state. MA college voter registration is negligible because MA has always gone blue. I think that plays a lot into it.

    So if you look at youth not voting in MA, I don't think you NEED to draw it was because youth didn't care. Everyone I registered to vote for the primary, or had been registered for the Boston mayoral, or had been registered from some previous occasion, voted. There was a push by student groups to get students out. I think one of the most important things to realize is that unlike most college states, we don't use college students.

    So lets have a little perspective with that. If there had been a national election, then you could compare the two %. But I think it being only in one state, and the reluctance of people to change registration to a "blue" state from a "swing state" played a large part in that.

    Additionally, a lot of people who come to school in Boston come from NJ NY and other close eastern seaboard states. And what has happened recently? VA election, ME election, NJ election. Expecting to have students from those places continually change their voter registration is ridiculous. Its reasonable to assume that college students will continue to vote, as long as we're given a reason. Just don't forget that not all the blame for Coakley not hitting Obama numbers in youth in MA is her campaign's fault.

    •  An actual on the ground analysis (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      kyril

      Thank you.  Obviously a lot of this is arguing about how many angels can fit on the head of a pin.

      hope that the idiots who have no constructive and creative solutions but only look to tear down will not win the day.

      by Stuart Heady on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:46:44 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  I would like to see some statistics... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lirtydies

    Comparing this election to a presidential election seems a bit off. How about comparing it to past special elections or even non-presidential elections? It is pretty well known that young people do not turn out in large numbers to vote except in presidential elections and even then not always.

    I have no doubt the current political climate may have turned some off but I think we need to be careful not to lose some other variables here.

  •  there is a general impatience with the system. (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Deward Hastings, kyril, bvig

    it reminds me of radical vs liberal back in the 60s. maybe best expressed by phil ochs in, "love me, love me, love me, i'm a liberal." liberals were always system advocates, "you must work through the system, if there is something wrong with the system, you must work through the system to fix it." radicals were willing to take extra legal steps - sit ins, guerrilla theatre, etc. - because they recognized the inherent corruption of the system. seems to be similar to what is going on now, only there are factions forming both left & from the right. the republicans have largely embraced the radical factions of the right. the democrats & take every opportunity to (the censure of move on & a.c.or.n. are prime examples) distance themselves from the "dirty fuckin' hippies." they not only distance themselves from their natural base, but they spend their energies playing to the republican base. loyalty is a two way street.

    i tell ya boys it's a cryin' shame, all the pretty girls just look the same

    by rasbobbo on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:47:24 AM PST

  •  You have to make a targeted turnout effort (4+ / 0-)

    that's what happened in 2008.

    We registered new voters and tracked them all the way through the election.  We had on campus programs.  We thought about things like absentee ballots and when and where to register students (who always have change of address issues that make it harder for them to vote when the time comes).

    And of course the candidate issues are there.

    And sure, there's structural and message issues and everything else.

    In a special election turnout usually favors the demographic groups who vote most often.  I would like to see how this youth turnout rate compares to other special elections, not the Presidential race.

    In the end mobilization matters a lot - a campaign that works at getting young voters to turn out.

    This was a special election where the Democratic candidate appears to have had no actual GOTV plan period, let along one designed to get students and young voters out, to figure out whether students would be at home because of the holiday break and therefore needed to apply for an absentee ballot, etc. etc.

  •  I'm not surprised. I wasn't particularly (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    creamer

    interested in midterm or special elections when I was that age.

    Obama excited them in 08, and I assume they just checked whatever had a (D) next to their name while voting for him.

    Divide and rule, a sound motto. Unite and lead, a better one. ::Goethe::

    by Jeremy10036 on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:54:57 AM PST

  •  What has the President done for the young? (0+ / 0-)

    Some of us thought that the President might give at least one Oval Office talk to the young people of America after all they did for him.  I can't figure out what happened to him after he got elected. He's definitely not the same person.  If I had known that Rahm Emanuel and Larry Summers were his friends, I never, ever, would have worked on the Obama campaign.

  •  Wow, I'm shocked! (0+ / 0-)

    Not really...

  •  Visited MA once, spent lots of $$... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    trinite

    but I'll never go again.  

  •  The lesson here: (0+ / 0-)

    America is a shopping mall and the Democrats had better have a cool boutique
    to compete with the Republican branding game.

    Otherwise we are bored.

    hope that the idiots who have no constructive and creative solutions but only look to tear down will not win the day.

    by Stuart Heady on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 08:59:37 AM PST

  •  They don't want the youth vote... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    trinite

    because young people generally are progressives.

    •  Then they should organize, participate and vote. (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      creamer

      Only by entering and participating in the system will they make a difference.  If they spent one tenth the time they spend blogging on voting and organizing, we'd have a better progressive movement.

      •  We need progressive candidates. (0+ / 0-)

        Also, the media and all avenues of information are now controlled by corporate America, so anything progressive is consistently ridiculed, rejected, or reformed.  I can't understand how so many people watch Fox News.  It's really pathetic.

        •  the reason you don't have more progressive (0+ / 0-)

          candidates is because people aren't seeing through the media generated illusion.  Young people, especially are not seeing through it because they are generally still children who are mostly interested in being entertained.

          In local elections you see this is the meetings about how to reach out to different constituency groups.  It may be that there are no issues to get younger voters interested, so the youth vote is ignored.

          I have heard it said that if people aren't interested in the issues and won't do anything to become informed, then it is best they not vote.

          There are conscious election strategies based on walking around the youth vote for this sort of reason.  One might think it strictly practical - don't waste resources where the investment won't pay off - or one might think it cynical.

          But that is what happens when people who have to decide where to put resources could decide it isn't worth it.  

          Politics isn't an entertainment.  

          hope that the idiots who have no constructive and creative solutions but only look to tear down will not win the day.

          by Stuart Heady on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 09:24:34 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

      •  If you continue to delude yourself (0+ / 0-)

        that voting has any meaning in this country, you haven't been paying attention.  The progressive "movement" in this country has been completely squelched.  Despite the fact that the vast majority of human beings on Earth hold largely progressive views, the abdication of complete control to corporations has rendered any progressive" movement" DOA.

        Progressives have a "voice" to the extent that the corporate overlords can point to Finegold and Kucinich and say, look ma!  progressives in congress wooo

        The only way to fix this is to get rid of the existing system.  Entering and participating in this present hopelessly corrupt system only perpetuates it.

        And now, corporations have been given carte blanche by SCOTUS to openly buy candidates (they  have been doing it for years on the low down).

        This Republic is DEAD.  The Democratic process in this country is destroyed.  RIP USA

        •  That argument only works in a dorm room debate (1+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          Trial Lawyer Richard

          The emotional extreme sort of position.

          Reality is much more complex and people committed to making progress no matter what they have to suffer through, will find a way here and there.

          Those who made progress in the past weren't able to succeed because they gave up at the first sign it wasn't going to be fun.  

          hope that the idiots who have no constructive and creative solutions but only look to tear down will not win the day.

          by Stuart Heady on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 09:27:53 AM PST

          [ Parent ]

        •  So..... (0+ / 0-)

          ....we should all hide under the bed and let the GOP do with us what they want?

          •  Lawyer richard (0+ / 0-)

            Is that what some parents raised? I said it before some of these kids need to suck it up. Haven't they played competitive athletics before? Like, you're not going to win every time you play?

            Some of these kids really need to get a grip. Get involved and stay involved. Oh by the way with so many kids back home with mom/dad maybe enough of us didn't stay on their asses and embarrass them enough to vote.

  •  We need Voting Week, not just day n/t (0+ / 0-)

    Hell hath no fury like the vast robot armies of a woman scorned

    by Mike E on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 09:18:09 AM PST

  •  Not a surprise (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    littlebird33

    People turned out for Obama not the Democratic Party.

  •  They had nothing to vote for. (0+ / 0-)

    On the other hand, you have different fingers.

    by Bas575 on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 09:22:50 AM PST

  •  Too bad they couldn't (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    littlebird33

    Tweet, text or FB their votes!

    •  that would work for the gnat attention span (0+ / 0-)

      citizenship without any commitment and only a superficial interest, people with the attention span of a gnat!

      hope that the idiots who have no constructive and creative solutions but only look to tear down will not win the day.

      by Stuart Heady on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 09:29:15 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  Encouraging voter turnout (0+ / 0-)

    If the US created a system whereby anyone who voted could deduct $20 from his or her tax bill (per occasion) turnout among 18-30 year olds would go through the roof (even in minor elections).  

    Sadly, it seems clear now that Obama and his minions merely rode a gigantic wave of voter discontent last year and didn't arrive in DC with any sense of how they wanted to govern.  This is the biggest opportunity squandered I'll see during my lifetime.  

    •  in some ways encourages superficial results (0+ / 0-)

      Do you really want to see more brainless voting by people with no real commitment beyond an immediate selfish concern?

      We need less of that!

      hope that the idiots who have no constructive and creative solutions but only look to tear down will not win the day.

      by Stuart Heady on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 09:38:22 AM PST

      [ Parent ]

  •  My kids, 22 & 25 didn't vote (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    MrJersey, SCharb

    in MA on Tuesday. My husband and I, the old folks, did. Of course, they would have had to get absentee ballots, but they did do that in 2008.

    And we're talking very dedicated and eager progressives. Obama is just not reaching them, and they've moved on to other interests. Both, however, would like to see health reform go through, since neither has it now.

    It is simply self-defeating for any community to discriminate against half its population. Jimmy Carter

    by coral on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 09:37:13 AM PST

  •  Coakley was the anti-Obama (0+ / 0-)

    in terms of personal appeal (no charisma), her status (she's been in government forever), and how she ran her campaign (bloody awful).

  •  Those poll numbers are ephemeral (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    littlebird33

    Here's the poll number that Democrats need to focus on:

    43 % of voters now call themselves Independents.  Reportedly, that number is higher among younger voters.  What does the mean for the Democratic Party?
    It means that voters don't trust the Democratic Party (or the Republican Party, either) to translate campaign promises into legislation and programs that serve the voter's interests.

    I suspected that was the case when the nation began having election results close to 50/50. Voters, finding neither party really committed to them, are virtually flipping a coin on Election Day.  The only strategy this group of people have left to them, for the time being, is to vote against the incumbent party when the heartburn gets unbearable, even when they don't really like the alternative, either.

  •  We should make fake GOP and Teabag ads for MA (0+ / 0-)

    Snarkily thanking the voters for killing HCR for the rest of the country.

    Then maybe close the ad with 10 seconds of GOP attacks on MA and Ted Kennedy.

    Maybe a fitting final frame in the ad would be a closeup of the Bury Obamacare with Kennedy sign.

    Young apathetic voters disgust me,  I am still young, but never missed an election.

    HELP WANTED: DNC Chairmen, Apply online at Democrats.org EEOC

    by George Pirpiris on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 09:56:55 AM PST

  •  No-reason, straightforward absentee voting (0+ / 0-)

    MA needs it.

    I came in an hour and a half late to work on Tuesday; lots of people didn't.  It's one thing to do it once every four years, it's another to do it all the time.

    Yes, I could technically request one on the grounds of "outside of my precinct" since I leave at 6:45 and while I usually get home at 7, if I miss my train/bus connection, it's 8, and I don't risk that on election day.

  •  It's not Coakley or Brown or Massachusetts (0+ / 0-)

    It's young people. They don't turn out for off-year/midterm/special elections. Here are some numbers from census.gov:

    In 2008 (presidential year), 48.5% of eligible 18-24 year olds voted.

    In 2006 (midterm election), 22.1% of them voted.

    ---

    The median age of eligible voters is about 45; half are older, half are younger.

    Here's how the people aged 45+ turned out:

    In 2008, they were 53.2% of eligible voters, 58.2% of actual voters. Pretty close to even.

    In 2006, people aged 45+ were 52.4% (about half) of eligible voters, 64.9% (almost two-thirds) of actual voters.

    ---

    As a general rule, the older you get, the more likely you are to vote. And in midterms, the effect is even stronger.

    Listen, strange women lying in ponds distributing swords is no basis for a system of government.

    by Dbug on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 10:06:04 AM PST

  •  The GOTV lists I called from (0+ / 0-)

    contained only a couple of people under age 30. Granted I got in on phonebanking on the evening of the 18th, but still I was struck by the number of 70- and 80-somethings on my lists (hardcore voters all, btw).

  •  I'm shocked (0+ / 0-)

    Young people not turning out to vote... shocking.

  •  Well, I could have said that without checking... (0+ / 0-)

    The young were energized in 2008.

    What did they do when they had to put up with the REALITIES of politics (snail pace, compromises, etc.)? They picked up their marbles and went home. Probably voted libertarian (democratic or corporatist versions) or didn't vote at all.

    Is it the party's fault? I am going to step out on a limb and say NO. These little whiners could not bear the realities of politics and stepped aside.

    And that, kiddies, is how the GOPers take you around the corner and under the tree and give it to you hard. (Sorry, but that is the reality). You, boys and girls, let the GOP win happpen.

    Thanks, but no thanks.

    Ugh. --UB.

  •  The voters turned out but the Politicians didn't (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    ProgressiveMan

    Where was John Kerry, Barney Frank, Delahunt, Markey, Lynch, Capuano, and the rest?  These are lifetime elected federal Dems and not one lifted a finger to help her.  John Kerry lifted his pinky nail at the bitter end; I will give him just that.  20 plus years and that is all you could do?  Really??  This was a federal election and Coakley was a strictly local candidate and no one saw this coming?  Please, I don’t buy that.  And I don’t buy that silly diary of yesterday of western Mass vs. eastern Mass.  Yes she ran a terrible campaign, but why was she allowed to??  At this level and with what was at stake, you don’t run your own campaign; it is run for you by the experts.   The whole entire Mass delegation was a complete no show!!  Capuano lost in the primary and he couldn’t help out in the general?  Why; and why was this allowed, Nancy?  No one helped Martha Coakley, I live here I know, it was pathetic!  While I think the voters did this and the polls do show that, I also think it was done to us too. Voters can be moved, motivated and manipulated with the right support and ads; she had none.  I am not that naïve that I think voters did this alone; it was done to them as well or at the very least, allowed to happen.  WHY?? 5 minutes of any one of the Dems consultant’s time could have destroyed Brown.  Naked pictures; come on!  Coakley’s ads were so bad that they were actually ads for Brown.  But why were they allowed to happen?? Where was the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, Menendez?? You have one race in a completely blue state and you can’t bring it in?  Are you kidding me?  Say what you want about Chuck Schumer, personally I think he is an unsung hero of the party, but this would never have happened on his watch.  Same thing about Howard Dean, unsung hero, and brought the races in.  Tim Kaine current DNC chair, 0 for 3 now; what a great idea he was!  I think the party needs to seriously re think both Kaine and Menendez.  So where were they and why?   What was the real reason that no one showed up to support Martha Coakley??

  •  There are three good reasons for this (0+ / 0-)

    Marijuana, winter break, and Mooninites.

  •  Terrible diaries that lack basic math... (0+ / 0-)

    ...this was a special election in an off-year. If you told 100 political pros in December that Coakley goes from 310K votes in the primary to over 1000K in the general they would have said (to a person) she won in a walk. Now everyone knows the level of interest and frustration, easy to look back, harder to look forward.

    I have seen crazy diaries here about East v. West competition (Coakley got lots more support in the Dem primary from Eastern Mass), lack of coordination with Mayor Menino (she got a lot more votes than Menino and his competitors combined), lack of enthusiasm among the democratic base (huge activity and turnout coming down the stretch)...none if it proven by the numbers. This level of turn-out can't be countered by GOTV. This was a statement from people dissatisfied with the direction in Washington (COakley's failing...with everyone at the national level was not seeing this and creating messaging accordingly). The failure will be repeated in November of this year unless you use the Democratic majorities in Congress to do things that improve the economic lives of ordinary Americans.

    Barack Obama was elected President in a two year election cycle. We just had a 5 month election mostly consummed with a primary campaign. Telling me the turnout was lower than the presidential year doesn't tell me anything I don't know. The numbers show the election was very similar to the Governor's race in 2006. Lots of suburban men came out to vote both times to defeat Dem women candidates.

    Here is a tidbit from Rasmussen who did one of the few exit polls..."While there was a somewhat similar correlation to views about Democratic Governor Deval Patrick, there was a clear suggestion that perceptions of the governor’s performance hurt Coakley. Among those voters who approve of the president’s job performance but disapprove of the governor’s, Brown won 93% to seven percent (7%). These voters accounted for just over 15% of all voters. " The deciding factor were those people pissed at Dems in Mass period. You need more than a few weeks to change that perception.

    •  hang on a moment (0+ / 0-)

      A lot of this makes sense. But how do you square

      This was a statement from people dissatisfied with the direction in Washington...

      with the Rasmussen result you quote at the end? Not really contradictory, but there is some tension there, no?

  •  new poll: drop-off among all progressive voters (0+ / 0-)

    A post-election poll commissioned by Women’s Voices. Women Vote (WVWV) reveals that while independents proved decisive in the Massachusetts election for the U.S. Senate, there is a disconnect between voting and the desire for change among key constituencies in the electorate that is driving recent elections.

    The results of the poll offer clear evidence that the voting in Massachusetts is a continuation of trends that WVWV first reported last November after the elections in New Jersey and Virginia: decreased turnout among Rising American Electorate (RAE) – women, youth, African Americans, and Latinos; Republicans beginning to make inroads with some traditionally Democratic voters; the existence of the "marriage gap," and a striking disconnect between voters who voted for and still support President Obama and their electoral participation.
    Summarizing these trends,
    • Turnout is an important factor driving the results in these elections.  Voters in the Rising American Electorate are disengaged and their share of the electorate has dropped.

    • Changes in the margin of voting by RAE groups are also a factor.  Progressive candidates are not gaining the share of votes among RAE voters that they have in 2008 and 2006.  Coakley won the RAE vote but by a smaller margin than in the past, and the RAE represented a smaller vote share than in recent elections.

    • The "marriage gap" -- differences in the voting rates and preferences between unmarried and married women – continues to drive electoral outcomes.  There was a 17point marriage gap in terms of partisanship; however, the impact of the unmarried women’s vote was somewhat muted due to their decreased participation.

    • Voters have divided emotions about the pace of change and the direction of the country, but generally support the policies advocated by President Obama and Democrats.  

    post-election poll

  •  A reason to vote? Please. (0+ / 0-)

    People aren't just counting votes for candidates; they're counting voters and demographics which is the reason so many issues that affect younger Americans are never addressed, because that block isn't showing up at the polls.  You don't care.  They don't care.  

    •  Doesn't matter. (0+ / 0-)

      It is up to them, the young voters, to care.  The politicians shouldn't be responsible for whether a young voter is motivated to participate. It is their future at stake and they should be expected to have an interest.

      IT is more like, they(youth voters) don't care therefore politicians pay little attention to them.

  •  It wasn't "cool" to vote for Coakley (0+ / 0-)

    It was, however, cool to vote for Obama in 2008.  Wat the kiddies to vote?  Let them do it by cell phone texting (hopefully not while driving).

    Mark Sanford vacations in Argentina but John Ensign prefers the Hamptons.

    by mojave mike on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 12:46:32 PM PST

  •  It was also basic 101 campaign mistakes (0+ / 0-)
    There was NO absentee ballot push.  Zip. Nada. None.
    I forgot to get one for my college daughter, until Friday, and it was too late!!  City Hall was closed! And closed on Monday!
  •  first day of school (0+ / 0-)

    I posted this about a few weeks ago, one of the fundamental mistakes the Dem majority in MA made was to have the special election on the first day of the Spring term for colleges

    most kids drove back to school on Monday for the first day of classes on Tuesday.

    Had this election been held 7 days earlier the youth vote would have been there

  •  they got the guns (0+ / 0-)

    but we got the numbers

    as long as we can stay engaged

    disenchantment and disenfranchisement go hand in hand

    "a lie that can no longer be challenged becomes a form of madness" -Debord

    by grollen on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 02:41:09 PM PST

  •  That is suprising (0+ / 0-)

    Considering they all owe about a quarter of a million bucks a piece to pay back the current debt, you would figure they would want to get involved sooner rather than later...

    We mock what we do not understand.

    by Tea Bag You on Thu Jan 21, 2010 at 05:46:50 PM PST

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site