Skip to main content

   Today around the world, from the uprising in India by traditional peoples against Tata Motors massive factory development, to the massacre in the Amazonas Province of  Peru,  Native people are striving to protect their lands from resource extraction and environmental pollution. No ideology unites them, no international organization can protect them from armies and corporate militias and death squads.  National governments call those who resist "terrorists" and so class any actions of self-defense.  Today the only organized resistance to global development exercised by transnational corporations and the developed world nations from which their power has risen is increasingly seen by the poor and dispossessed of the world is al Qaeda.  
  What is new  is the combination of drug war, religious terror and new media. But what seems also to be ignored is that everywhere in the world where there is change driven by global economics there is unrest and this unrest is a problem for the West as it is for China and yet it is an opportunity for al Qaeda for it could form the basis for a new ideological challenge to Christian Capitalism, as well as Chinese State Capitalism and Social Democratic capitalism.

One could imagine a new movement like the Khmer Rouge only projected internationally where the main ideological idea is the protection of indigenous culture and local control couched in a political analysis where wealth inequality and an identified transnational ruling elite are pictured as the enemy.    But there is nothing new about this situation and reminds one immediately of the situation in the first century of our common era when millions of Jews had fled the religious intolerance, political chaos and tribal conflict that led to the Roman occupation and later the two “insurgent” wars against fanatic nationalists.  
What is significant is the failure of the west to consider the causes of the current rising successes of insurgents to recruit and expand their operations.  The fact that al-Qaeda’s North African branch appears to be engaged in transporting drugs as reported by Devlin Barrett (Associated Press, 19 December 2009) is only a natural evolution of the blindness that afflicts Western governments.  In America the war on drugs has turned most of South and Central America into a battlefield and allied with the operations of authorities under the Patriot Act erodes American civil liberties.
    Together counter insurgency operations and drug eradication and interdiction assaults have turned the world into an open American attack plan.  The fallout from these operations, not only in loss of lives but income and the chaos and corruption that has followed, is creating the new armies America and the west face everyday in new fields of resistance. Most of the casualties have been in tribal areas or where tribal populations have been pressed into urban masses.  The conditions of life in these areas only fuels rebellion more.  As Louis Dupree noted in his work on Afghanistan in the 1970s, it has been the fantasies of the west over drugs and tribes that have lead to the most serious disasters and mistakes in foreign policy in the past 200 years.  19th century Europe and its colonial spin-offs saw tribalism as its main enemy.  To eliminate local power structures – kinship relations – would result in acculturation and order.  This has largely been the strategy and rationale for globalism and staying in both Iraq and Afghanistan.  Eliminate tribalism and you get docile workers, more profit and an end to resistance and terror.  Instead the 21st century is reaping a harvest of uprisings driven and magnified by the very acculturation that was expected to be so positive (profitable?).  Drugs and money play a significant role in the acceleration of that process.
  As Sociologist Max Weber noted in the middle of the 19th century, peasants removed from their lands become docile and easily adapted to new forms of work, and Kevin Starr found in his study (Inventing the Dream) of the early 20th century that the invention of mass media made the manipulation of masses of rootless people an effective substitute for police and military action. Canetti (Crowds and Power) found that mass media conditioned people to act as crowd elements and has promoted a consciousness of crowd in modern society.  The lack of reason and response to fact we are seeing in American political debate is evidence of how far this has developed.  From crowd consciousness to mob action is only a small step.  Murdock with his Fox News (see my entry on him at: http://www.dailykos.com/... and Murphy of Liberty News instill this way of thinking every day.  However, media has come to be the voice of not just nations, but religions and ideologies.  The cross-purposes and new techniques seem to be capable of motivating people to mass murder as in Rwanda and the states of the former Yugoslavia.  However, all that is missing is a means to organize this resistance is for al Qaeda to see the opportunity and to fabricate an ideology that can be translated across cultural and religious barriers. The outcome of such an ideology might be a collapse of social complexity in urban wars, where fanaticism and millenarianism like that of the Christian right blend with visions of a nuclear apocalypse (see John Hagee's Beginning of the End: the Assassination of Yizhak Rabin and the Coming of the Antichrist, Nashville, Thomas Nelson Publishers, 1996, a New York Times bestseller!).
   Using religion and ideology as a weapon is not new and currently the US is engaged in such a program that may backfire.  Major General Douglas Stone told reporter Andrew K. Woods of plans developed by the U.S. Army to utilize prisoners in the various camps held by the military for a grand reorganization of Islam into a more peaceful religion.  Possessing a doctorate in public administration, and a degree from Stanford Business School and having made a fortune in Silicon Valley, General Stone outlined how the military would win the “battlefield of the mind.”  Under his direction, military prisons like Abu Ghraib were transformed after 2006 into seeing their detainees as strategic assets that could be reshaped to spread the seeds of a new Islam to the Middle East and Asia.  Aided by the Rand Corporation, Stone and the U.S. military have undertaken a reeducation process and successfully released their charges (students) back to their home countries.  Of the 8,000 men released since 2006 only 24 have been recaptured, what Stone considers to be proof of success, interpreting this as a recidivism rate of less than 1%.
   While this idea of Stone’s and the program he describes may be simply a U.S. military disinformation project specially designed to discredit those returning or to increase suspicions among anti-U.S. groups in the Middle East, the concept is of interest as it reflects the first time in history that one military has used a religious sect as a counterintelligence movement.  The issue of ethics aside, the idea of using religion as a weapon wielded by an enemy is dangerous, though during the Counter Reformation there were some efforts that came close to the effect if not the intent they were hardly successful.
  There is a liability to the leaders of a Qaeda.  By diluting their messages to encompass such a wider ideological perspective they may loose their core population support.  Like the earlier effort of the Soviet Comintern, control of locally appropriated issues and movements is difficult and can have considerable unintended consequences.

   It is of interest to note that where two of the most successful rebellions of non-European peoples in the Americas took place were where (Yucatan and Bahia) natives and slaves had not been deprived of kinship by either the slave system or the hacienda system.  We are seeing a combination of effects, drugs, religion, ideology and mass media all promoting anti-government action and directed toward specific “enemies.”
 By ending the drug war we can begin to defuse the avalanche of conflict.  By calling a peace conference at the United Nations and inviting al Qaeda we might be able to end the war on terror and create a plan to protect indigenous peoples at the same time.   By removing American forces from the Middle East we can go far to reducing the antagonistic posture we have presented for half a century.  What is better, paying our enemies not to fight us in Iraq and Afghanistan or ending the war on terror by actually coming to a diplomatic confrontation on issues?

Niccolo Caldararo, Ph.D.
Dept of Anthropology
San Francisco State University

Originally posted to niccolo caldararo on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 01:03 PM PST.

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  Bullshit! (4+ / 0-)

    Today the only organized resistance to global development exercised by transnational corporations and the developed world nations from which their power has risen is increasingly seen by the poor and dispossessed of the world is al Qaeda.  

    What a load of shit.

    What about the WSF? A few million people in Central and South America.

    I have no doubt that the Establishment will tar and feather any People or Popular figure as a 'terrorist', but that doesn't make it real.

    I'll try to read the rest, but not sure if I want to or not.

    Democracy - 1 person 1 vote. Free Markets - More dollars more power.

    by k9disc on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 01:11:59 PM PST

    •  travel (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      DocGonzo, cookseytalbott, JDsg, fairleft2

      You might want to take a look at the scoreboard on what has been happening to people who have protested against development in the past 10 years since 9/11.  Nearly in every country protesters are labeled terrorists.  Repression is at the highest level in decades.  Then go out and travel, see how it is to travel today around the world.  The globe is turning into a police state. Every incumbent government sees in its rivals the seeds of unrest and excuses anti-democratic measures by the name of terror.

      •  Yes but Al-Qaida (4+ / 0-)

        advocates religious based violence. This is not some group of happy indigenous peoples striving for a return of "self-rule". These are people that first of all enjoy violence and second are for killing anyone different than them. Even Hamas can't deal with them.... and that is saying something.

        I mean read the Ynet story - these people think the year is 900 A.D. These folks are not "protesting" development - they are actually trying to re-create the past.

        This is not the Na'vi against Blackwater don't confuse real-life with a feel good movie.

        Fuck you (strike) Thank you and have a nice day! - Interceptor7 in one of the funniest diaries yet!

        by volleyboy1 on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 02:59:41 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

      •  Right. (1+ / 0-)

        And why would you suggest that Al Qaeda be the organizational banner under which the People are organized?

        Your thesis seems to feed this faulty People's movements are terrorists frame instead of stepping outside of it.

        Democracy - 1 person 1 vote. Free Markets - More dollars more power.

        by k9disc on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 03:07:44 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  direct (0+ / 0-)

          In studying peoples and history one has to look at the direction of a movement and its opportunities.  I cannot ignore the fact that al Qaeda has moved into the drug business at locations that make sense from both strategic and developmental points.  Also, if you do look at the frustration people feel world wide over development and the collapse of the economies, the obvious advantage for a group that claims to have as its goal the destruction of liberal capitalism and the American "crusaders"  is to infiltrate and propagandize.  The return of even a small propaganda investment would be great.  You might want to read up on the Assassins (Hashishiyun, followers of Hasan as-Sabah) who spread terror throughout the Middle East and south central Asia from the 10th to the 13th centuries.  They were called the killers of kings, they ruled vast lands and contributed to the people in money and aid.  The rumor of their support was often enough to turn back the actions of many kings or lords.  Saladin failed to defeat them, only the Mongols succeeded at a tremendous cost.

          •  Pointing out AQ and ignoring WSF and such (0+ / 0-)

            is like making Corporate Globalization all about Blackwater.

            Sure Xe is corporate, and is globalizing, but it's not the lens through which we should view corporate globalization.

            I totally agree with you that AQ is taking on globalization, but they're not the only movement, and not anywhere near the most powerful.

            Also, lumping the WSF in with AQ does a great disservice to peaceful and promising alternative to corporate globalization.

            The establishment, has, and is going to make, the same argument your essay here is.

            Democracy - 1 person 1 vote. Free Markets - More dollars more power.

            by k9disc on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 05:32:34 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

  •  Al Qaeda has no basis (5+ / 0-)

    it is purely a destructive force and even then its importance has been mightily overblown

    Oh no, the dead have risen and they're voting Republican. - Lisa Simpson

    by LaFeminista on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 01:13:56 PM PST

  •  RECIPE: Fried Guinea Pig (Ayacucho-style) (5+ / 0-)

    Fried Guinea Pig (Ayacucho-style)
    CUY CHAQTADO

    1 guinea pig, de-haired, gutted, and cleaned
    1/2 c. flour
    1/4 - 1/2 t. ground cumin
    salt and black pepper to taste
    1/2 c. oil
    Pat dry the skin of the guinea pig and rub in the cumin, salt, and pepper. Preheat oil. Dust the carcass with the flour and place it on its back in the oil, turning to cook both sides. Alternately, the guinea pig can be cut and fried in quarters.
    Serve with boiled potato or boiled manioc root, and a salad of cut tomatoes and slivered onions bathed in lime juice and a bit of salt. Have cold beer on hand.

    Subsidies without cost controls, regulatory reform means that citizens get a little more awful insurance at a huge cost to taxpayers. Like Part D but worse.

    by Inland on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 01:14:50 PM PST

  •  Lets not have a requirement (2+ / 0-)

    for joining the UN be you have to blow up and cause mass destruction first.

    Man's capacity for justice makes democracy possible, but man's inclination to injustice makes democracy necessary. ~ Reinhold Niebuhr

    by bvig on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 01:16:02 PM PST

  •  Channeling Marx? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    bugscuffle, Darmok

    sounds like the Noble Savages fighting to resist the bourgeoisie.

    "No man deserves to be praised for his goodness unless he has strength of character to be wicked." La Rochefoucald

    by Void Indigo on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 01:17:50 PM PST

  •  Inviting Al Qaida to a peace conference (3+ / 0-)

    Are you smoking crack? Here is a nice piece of work from them today:

    The Yemen-based wing of al-Qaeda called on Muslims in the Arabian Peninsula to wage jihad, or holy war, against Christians and Jews in the region.

    "The Christians, the Jews, and the treacherous apostate rulers have pounced on you...you have no other way out from this plight other than to wage jihad," the wing's deputy leader, Saeed al-Shehri, a former Saudi inmate at the US prison at Guantanamo Bay, said in an audio tape posted on a website often used by Islamist groups.

    http://www.ynet.co.il/...

    There you go - These are the folks that should be invited to a peace conference - Yeah.  

    Fuck you (strike) Thank you and have a nice day! - Interceptor7 in one of the funniest diaries yet!

    by volleyboy1 on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 01:20:39 PM PST

    •  sure (0+ / 0-)

      And I am sure thousands are listening.

      •  I'm sure that no one is listening (1+ / 0-)

        it's still a dumb idea. You are going to give a violent, sociopathic, religious based movement State status by inviting them to a Peace conference at the U.N.

        Exactly who do they represent? Why would you give them this power? They are not a popular force in any country they operate in, no one likes them, why do you make them a State Power.

        Fuck you (strike) Thank you and have a nice day! - Interceptor7 in one of the funniest diaries yet!

        by volleyboy1 on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 03:03:20 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  pleasetravel (0+ / 0-)

          You need to get out and see how America's actions are being seen by people in the world.

          •  I have travelled and lived overseas (1+ / 0-)

            I know how we are viewed. But a racist, sociopathic group (Al-Qaida) is not what most people want. I can tell you that.

            Fuck you (strike) Thank you and have a nice day! - Interceptor7 in one of the funniest diaries yet!

            by volleyboy1 on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 03:09:52 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  seethem (0+ / 0-)

              That is how you see them.  They are working on their PR and the outcome could be nothing that we will like.

              •  That is not "how I see them" that is (1+ / 0-)

                who they are. That is like saying the Khmer Rouge "only had a PR problem". That is the level of psychosis that we are talking about here.

                Fuck you (strike) Thank you and have a nice day! - Interceptor7 in one of the funniest diaries yet!

                by volleyboy1 on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 03:27:37 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  obvious (0+ / 0-)

                  It is obvious that you are happy with what you know.  Do  not try to learn anything else that might conflict that knowledge.

                  •  Sigh.... I always want to learn new (1+ / 0-)

                    things but legitimizing Al-Qaida is not one of those things. They are illegitimate. They are racist, thugs. I really don't need to see anything contrary to what they, themselves admit.

                    Fuck you (strike) Thank you and have a nice day! - Interceptor7 in one of the funniest diaries yet!

                    by volleyboy1 on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 04:14:49 PM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  soTaliban (0+ / 0-)

                      So how do you feel about how we are paying the Taliban not to fight us now, and we are sitting down to work with them?

                      •  Not great ... to be honest. (1+ / 0-)

                        but I think we need a completely new strategy in Afghanistan - like building up local economies and concepts of democracy. BUT.... we are just re-arming the Talibs for when we leave. Oh Well.

                        Fuck you (strike) Thank you and have a nice day! - Interceptor7 in one of the funniest diaries yet!

                        by volleyboy1 on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 04:33:27 PM PST

                        [ Parent ]

                        •  leave (0+ / 0-)

                          What we do need is a new perspective.  Both Israel and Iraq and Afghanistan have been distractions for the undemocratic governments of the Middle East.  Our presence has kept their people aimed at us rather than at the economic and political problems they face.  Israel has long functioned in this way and it was brilliant of the British to create Israel when they did after first smashing the Ottomans and then setting up the infrastructure of a Western state that could act to attract all the energies of the Arab-speaking and Islamic peoples in the area.
                            Should Iraq not explode if we left, and I am not sure that will be anytime soon, and if India and Pakistan do not go to war over Afghanistan if we left, then we might see some pressure on local governments from their own people.  However, I doubt it as al Qaeda will keep people focused on the USA.  IF we did meet with them and they did make any proposals that were insane it would undermine their credibility among the very people they are supposed to be striving for justice.

                          •  Have you read their press releases (0+ / 0-)

                            IF we did meet with them and they did make any proposals that were insane it would undermine their credibility among the very people they are supposed to be striving for justice.

                            IF... IF... holy crap they make Sarah Palin sound like Albert Einstein. The only thing accomplished by meeting with them would be the publicity they seek. They would say: "Look we are now mainstream that the U.S. has bowed down to meet with us. See what we accomplished."

                            They represent disparate groups spread out over a numbar of nations. Exactly what / who would they represent in meeting with us? The only thing that would accomplish is to grow their power. That is all.

                            They represent the worst in all of us. There are some people you do not talk to - EVER.

                            Fuck you (strike) Thank you and have a nice day! - Interceptor7 in one of the funniest diaries yet!

                            by volleyboy1 on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 04:54:32 PM PST

                            [ Parent ]

                          •  publicity (0+ / 0-)

                            al Qaeda does not seem to have any difficulty with publicity events or getting their message out.  In fact, meeting in an international setting might be more damaging to them with their more radical elements than any gain they could conceive of receiving politically.  Think of how the IRA was considered 10 years ago and what happened to their radical base as they engaged in talks.

  •  don't give them ideas (0+ / 0-)

    Nothing could destroy the socialist movement more than Al Qaeda trying to jojn it. Maybe the only thing worse would be if W Bush said he was a socialist.

    The Bush Administration already made a mistake with Bernanke, and the Obama Administration appears desperate to follow suit. -kos

    by vintage clothes on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 01:22:23 PM PST

    •  socialist? (0+ / 0-)

      I am not saying they are going to be socialist.  I am saying that they are on the verge of a transformation in the opposition to power.  Religion is their cloak for common action.  On the other hand populist Sara Palin is the one who as governor taxed the oil companies and gave it to the people.  That is redistribution of wealth, socialism as I recall.  Her band of mixing religion with populist jargon could become America's answer to al Qaeda.  That would be a disaster, but what some Christian fundamentalists desire.

  •  seems like a nice idea... (0+ / 0-)

    but I don't see where you are getting that al Qaida would be interested in doing what you propose.

    You got time to lean, you got time to clean.

    by gooners on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 01:23:20 PM PST

    •  dailyreports (0+ / 0-)

      Their are daily reports of new actions by al Qaeda world-wide, one cannot ignore that they are addressing billions of people who feel oppressed.  Their movement into drug smuggling should be a wake up call.

      •  Yes, they can't raise money through (1+ / 0-)

        legitimate sources but they can through drug trafficking. Are you surprised?

        Fuck you (strike) Thank you and have a nice day! - Interceptor7 in one of the funniest diaries yet!

        by volleyboy1 on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 03:04:40 PM PST

        [ Parent ]

        •  notsure (0+ / 0-)

          I am not sure that is the case.  The particular situation noted in North Africa has more to do with the local oppression and economic conditions there than to the interests of the locals to join a religious group or al Qaeda to make money off drugs.  The Sahara is an area of transit and of movement of peoples across vast areas.  If one is going to build a long term uprising across world boarders the best strategy is to invest the crossroads of distant zones and the misery of the vast poor in the great urban areas.  It is time to ask how to end the problem, not to ignore the potential of the enemy to take advantage of the terrain.

          •  Who says ignore them???? (1+ / 0-)

            I just say don't give them State legitimacy like you seem to want to give them. They simply don't deserve that kind of power.

            You give them way more credit than they deserve.

            Fuck you (strike) Thank you and have a nice day! - Interceptor7 in one of the funniest diaries yet!

            by volleyboy1 on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 03:30:28 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

            •  whatIwant (0+ / 0-)

              What I want is an end to the war on terror.

              •  Interesting.... (1+ / 0-)

                Again.... Think Space Bar.... It's a good thing.

                As far as the "War on Terror" - it has to change to focus more on Al-Qaida and less on movements that may be loosely affiliated but not taking orders from the core leadership group. The more we give Al-Qaeda legitimacy though it gains more power, and by legitimacy I mean including them in negotiations for anything.  

                I think we have to be more efficient in knowing our enemy.

                Fuck you (strike) Thank you and have a nice day! - Interceptor7 in one of the funniest diaries yet!

                by volleyboy1 on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 03:54:37 PM PST

                [ Parent ]

                •  stasis (0+ / 0-)

                  So you think that al Qaeda will not grow, will not expand any more than they have and that their operations will remain in stasis for the future?

                  •  Who ever said that? (0+ / 0-)

                    I think they will grow in certain areas, they will decline in others. Depends on what the response of the West to various movements is. More Drone strikes recruits. More USAID projects, or Peace Corps type activities tends to diminsh their effectiveness.

                    They are a quick fix answer to crushing poverty and political abuse, but, it doesn't take the locals to learn their psychotic, and Sociopathic nature. Then they are done.

                    They prey upon lack of education in local populaces. They are not deserving of State status.

                    Fuck you (strike) Thank you and have a nice day! - Interceptor7 in one of the funniest diaries yet!

                    by volleyboy1 on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 04:39:13 PM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                  •  What prey tell, does your answer (0+ / 0-)

                    have to do with my comment btw. Where in my comment does it imply that I see "Stasis" from Al-Qaida. You imply they are a legitimate resistance group - I state they are not but that does not mean their growth or decline is in a static state.

                    Fuck you (strike) Thank you and have a nice day! - Interceptor7 in one of the funniest diaries yet!

                    by volleyboy1 on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 04:43:52 PM PST

                    [ Parent ]

                    •  imply (0+ / 0-)

                      I implied nothing of the kind.  Like the sun rising I may rail against the brightness, but it still is there.  al Qaeda is there, they must be dealt with but one should use one's head to do so.

                      •  Way to state the obvious. (0+ / 0-)

                        Of course we should use our head to deal Al-Qaida. The most effective way is to take away the means of recruiting.

                        What are their tools - we need to take away the causes that lead people to them. Rather than deal with them and legitimize their horrid goals - we need to make their recruiting that much harder.

                        Fuck you (strike) Thank you and have a nice day! - Interceptor7 in one of the funniest diaries yet!

                        by volleyboy1 on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 04:58:35 PM PST

                        [ Parent ]

          •  BTW do you know how to use (1+ / 0-)

            the space bar. It is the big key at the bottom of the keyboard and it separates words. Try it... you may like it.

            Fuck you (strike) Thank you and have a nice day! - Interceptor7 in one of the funniest diaries yet!

            by volleyboy1 on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 03:32:45 PM PST

            [ Parent ]

  •  Can we just say it and move on; Al Qaeda won! (0+ / 0-)
    For the sake of a few smelly ass old muslims living in caves; the world is changed; America is changed and living in quivering fear while they stare at dank humid granite and laugh their fucking asses off!  
  •  Geez Louise. (3+ / 0-)
    What twaddle.

    Why don't you try reading the rules, Shankopotamus?

    by bugscuffle on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 01:36:59 PM PST

  •  Help me, Obi-Wan; you're my only hope! (2+ / 0-)
    Makes about as much sense as this diary.
  •  The United States (0+ / 0-)

    is the most powerful defender of the world of the past.
    The world of extraction and exploitation without end.
    The country of the New Gilded Age and the new age of imperial colonialism.
    The world moves on.
    America stands still.
    And terrorism, even if the motives are good, will be counterproductive.  As useful as the contras against the Sandinistas.

    You cannot present a monster with a flower. Nora Astorga.

    by vivens fons on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 02:31:36 PM PST

  •  Jihad vs McWorld (0+ / 0-)

    That battle is already what the Qaeda is fighting. The explanation of it has been published since 1992 as Jihad vs McWorld. The Qaeda and its fellow faithy orgs are just another way of incorporating, competing with global corps to exploit the maximum number of our large but finite human population.

    The future is here, and it ain't what it used to be.

    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro." - HST

    by DocGonzo on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 04:22:25 PM PST

  •  Help me out here Professor (0+ / 0-)

    It is of interest to note that where two of the most successful rebellions of non-European peoples in the Americas took place were where (Yucatan and Bahia) natives and slaves had not been deprived of kinship by either the slave system or the hacienda system.

    Both of those revolts were unsucessful.  However the revolt in Haiti was sucessful and it was carried out in a place where natives and slaves had been deprived of kinship by the slave system.  

    "Es mejor morir de pie que vivir de rodilla." E. Zapata

    by Mas Gaviota on Mon Feb 08, 2010 at 05:49:55 PM PST

    •  notsure (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      Mas Gaviota

      I am not sure Melville Herskovits would agree with that assessment given his study of the people of the island and their culture did show considerable cultural retention from West Africa.  My own work related to native healing practices also supported this idea.  See my article in The Science of the Total Environment v. 191 1996: 245-269.

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site