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From Restore Fairness blog
It’s impossible for Congress to ignore the drumbeats of  a 100,000 people, descending on D.C. this weekend, to march for just and humane immigration reform. With the pressure for concrete action mounting, President Obama met Senators Charles Schumer (D-NY, head of the Senate’s Immigration Subcommittee) and Lindsey Graham (R-SC) last week. And today, for the first time, we are seeing the framework for immigration reform in an Op-Ed in the Washington Post.

It's impossible for Congress to ignore the drumbeats of  a 100,000 people, descending on D.C. this weekend, to march for just and humane immigration reform. With the pressure for concrete action mounting, President Obama met Senators Charles Schumer (D-NY, head of the Senate's Immigration Subcommittee) and Lindsey Graham (R-SC) last week, giving them that much needed nudge to introduce immigration reform legislation into the Senate. The Senators for their part asked the President to be more engaged in getting support for immigration reform.

The two Senators have been involved in discussions about immigration reform legislation for months. Today, for the first time, we are seeing the framework for immigration reform in an Op-Ed in the Washington Post, no doubt triggered by a need for answers from those coming to D.C.

Throughout our history, immigrants have contributed to making this country more vibrant and economically dynamic. Once it is clear that in 20 years our nation will not again confront the specter of another 11 million people coming here illegally, Americans will embrace more welcoming immigration policies.

The framework, rests on four pillars: ending illegal employment through biometric Social Security cards, enhancing border and interior enforcement, managing the flow of future immigration to correspond to economic realities, and creating a tough but fair path toward legalization for the 11 million people currently in the U.S. without authorization.

The President for his part welcomed the news.

I am pleased to see that Senators Schumer and Graham have produced a promising, bipartisan framework which can and should be the basis for moving forward.  It thoughtfully addresses the need to shore up our borders, and demands accountability from both workers who are here illegally and employers who game the system.

The announcement will no doubt trigger intense debate over the specifics of the legislation. But many feel that the framework marks an important bipartisan step forward. Any reform legislation must move away from an enforcement only approach and enact humane immigration policies which keep families together and restore fairness to the broken immigration system. Detention continues to be substandard and unjust while immigration raids and other enforcement actions continue to tear apart families, workplaces, communities, and congregations. The idea of a biometric card triggers many concerns about privacy and security.

Meanwhile the anti-immigration squad is playing out their strategies to counteract immigration reform. Yesterday, the Center for Immigration Studies released a 27 page report lashing out against immigration advocacy groups such as the National Council for La Raza and the Southern Poverty Law Center for "manipulating the press" with research and campaigns in favor of reform, clearly in retaliation to the extensive research done by these groups linking CIS with white nationalist and racist rhetoric. At the event to release the report, Campus Progress turned the tables by asking CIS Executive Director Mark Krikorian about a quote in one of CIS’s reports that said,

If small time con-artists and Third-World gold diggers can obtain green cards with so little resistance, then surely terrorists can (and have) done the same.

Krikorian's response. The basis of the statement was justified but the language used,

it was colorful language that was too colorful. Um, but, is it beyond the pale, I would say no.

It's exactly to counteract such racism that you need to be in D.C. this weekend. To get your voice heard above the racist din, call or tweet your Senator and write to your local newspaper. Speakers at the march will include (among many) Roman Catholic Cardinal Roger Mahony of Los Angeles; Marc Morial, president and CEO of the National Urban League; Janet Murgía, president and CEO of the National Council of La Raza; and Southern California radio DJ "El Piolín". Not only do we need reform, we need good reform, and for that our voices need to get stronger and more urgent.

Learn. Act. Share.www.restorefairness.org

Originally posted to Lets Breakthrough on Fri Mar 19, 2010 at 01:03 PM PDT.

Poll

Do you think Schumer and Graham's blueprint for reform is a good blueprint?

26%9 votes
50%17 votes
23%8 votes

| 34 votes | Vote | Results

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Comment Preferences

  •  Tip Jar (6+ / 0-)

    Take action to fix a broken immigration system. www.restorefairness.org

    by Lets Breakthrough on Fri Mar 19, 2010 at 01:03:58 PM PDT

  •  Will there be more legal visas? (0+ / 0-)

    I understand that under this proposal, future visa issuance would favor highly skilled immigrants. Unless there is a drastic increase in visas for unskilled central and south Americans, we will continue to have tons of illegal immigration. (Assuming the economy turns around.)

    "The true strength of our nation comes not from the might of our arms or the scale of our wealth, but from the enduring power of our ideals." - Barack Obama

    by HeyMikey on Fri Mar 19, 2010 at 01:12:26 PM PDT

  •  A good start (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    mahakali overdrive

    First, of all, it looks very much like the basic ideas that Bush II put forth a few years back that his own party shot down.

    I always thought that was about the only reasonable proposal that came out of that administration.  

    It didn't seek the idiocy of mass deportation or sealing off the border to everyone.

    It provides a path to citizenship and a temp worker visa plan.  We need to see more details for sure, but its a reasonable good start.

    ======

    "Sick Around the World"

    http://pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/sickaroundtheworld/

    Watch it, send it along to all you know.

    by oxfdblue on Fri Mar 19, 2010 at 01:19:52 PM PDT

    •  There has always been a Republican interest (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      oxfdblue

      in naturalizing immigrants for surplus capitalist labor value.

      I believe many Democrats support immigration reform because of a belief in civil and human rights and equality.

      But somewhere on the surface, the two seem, at times, to intersect.

      Our country is very behind in viewing immigrants as human beings, yet, and while some Republicans will advocate for their labor value (and very, very occasionally for religious reasons or because they hope religious Christian immigrants increase their vote count)... I barely regard their support AS support.

      Let us realize the arc of the moral universe is long but it bends toward justice. - MLK

      by mahakali overdrive on Fri Mar 19, 2010 at 01:38:54 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  My feedback? (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    Sentido, sfbob, mahakali overdrive

    Open the borders. Let em in, let em out. I was born here, but why should that mean that I get to live in the world's richest country and but a baby born in Nicaragua has to live in poverty? IMO, let them in.

    I'm in the pro-Obama wing of the Democratic Party.

    by doc2 on Fri Mar 19, 2010 at 01:29:23 PM PDT

  •  I'll be marching for immigration reform this Sun (2+ / 0-)

    and this diary hits on squarely on the head here:

    Any reform legislation must move away from an enforcement only approach and enact humane immigration policies which keep families together and restore fairness to the broken immigration system. Detention continues to be substandard and unjust while immigration raids and other enforcement actions continue to tear apart families, workplaces, communities, and congregations. The idea of a biometric card triggers many concerns about privacy and security.

    I haven't fully reviewed the exact proposals, however, I already feel they will fall short of the metric I would consider humane. Thus said, because immigration is big-business, we will, for better or worse, receive unexpected bipartisan support. However, my concern here is outlined above, in terms of families, psychological effects, human rights, human dignity, the material conditions of deportation raids and facilities, privacy rights, and other adjacent issues like addressing NAFTA.

    Thus said, I'm pleased the administration is looking at this at all. But when this is all done, I don't believe we will have a perfect system of human rights for undocumented persons in place. I believe we'll have a slightly better system of legislative procedure toward naturalization. This one is definitely a long-haul fight against a systemic situation of both xenophobia and capitalist interests that do not value human life, which is the job of all Democrats, first and foremost. I will be marching in my area. I hope others decide to continue to aggressively pursue what may be a lifelong struggle for the civil rights of undocumented people to be fully realized.

    Until all are free, none are free.

    Let us realize the arc of the moral universe is long but it bends toward justice. - MLK

    by mahakali overdrive on Fri Mar 19, 2010 at 01:35:44 PM PDT

  •  Bookmark. (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    mahakali overdrive

    Moderation in most things. Except Reactors. IFR forever!

    by billmosby on Fri Mar 19, 2010 at 01:40:23 PM PDT

  •  Two ways to do this part? (0+ / 0-)

    Once it is clear that in 20 years our nation will not again confront the specter of another 11 million people coming here illegally, Americans will embrace more welcoming immigration policies.

    Open borders or effective borders.

    Any other suggestions?

    Moderation in most things. Except Reactors. IFR forever!

    by billmosby on Fri Mar 19, 2010 at 02:11:31 PM PDT

  •  Opposing Immigration is not racist, (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    billmosby, IowaPopulist

    Some feel that overpopulation adversely effects quality of life and that overpopulation damages the environment.

    And then others also think that immigration will make HCR reform more expensive.

    •  Opposing immigration when it's skewed (0+ / 0-)

      toward xenophobic exclusion toward Latinos in a highly selective fashion has proven categorically, statistically, and ethically to be deeply racist.

      At present, we have a lower immigration rate than we have in the past 100 years.

      We systematically target Latinos for deportation and have shown serious, proven, documented racial bias in either finding -- or deporting -- non-Latinos. Just factual information that has been studied for some time now. And well worth understanding at a much deeper level. While I don't feel all people who don't support immigration are implicitly racist, I do feel the information they've received to create anti-immigration views are systemically racist and filled with many, many myths. Many are economic, indeed.

      Let us realize the arc of the moral universe is long but it bends toward justice. - MLK

      by mahakali overdrive on Fri Mar 19, 2010 at 05:01:12 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  a lower immigration rate? (0+ / 0-)

        what are you smoking? we immigrate 1.5 million to 2 million people a year, the most in the world!

        your argument about a lower rate is a misdirection,

        1.5 million to 2 million of the US population in 1900 would give you a higher immigration rate as a percentage of the population

        but if you do that as a percentage of today's population 300 million, that will look lower, but in fact 1.5 to 2 million a year is a lot of people to continually absorb and hope you find jobs for besides building more infrastructure to handle that population growth. Plus you have a welfare state that is beyond generous and is abused systematically.

        Again i ask what are you thinking?  we don't need more people in this country period, esp with 25 million unemployed legal Americans here.

  •  Watch out for the temp worker trap (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    billmosby, mahakali overdrive

    I would like to be proven ewrong, but this immigration fight is going to devolve into this:

    Corporations fighting for endless supply of indentured temporary workers with little rights so they can be used up and thrown away at will.

    vs

    We on the left (some of us anyways) fighting for some form of legalization for the undocumented, and also humane solutions for families and hopefully equal treatment for LGBT.

    So basically it will be the corporate right pushing for a second class citizenry, while we on the left pushing for making everyone first class citizens. This is how it's going to break. We better steel ourselves for this fight. Don't let them gain an inch on indentured servitude.

    •  The first part of that describes (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      mahakali overdrive, IowaPopulist

      pretty much what we have now.

      Oh, and as one who is over 60, it seems more and more to resemble my current situation, come to think of it. The part about being thrown away...

      Moderation in most things. Except Reactors. IFR forever!

      by billmosby on Fri Mar 19, 2010 at 03:13:28 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Except the corporations want to expand that (2+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        billmosby, mahakali overdrive

        Just like in Bush's immigration reform attempt. Basically the corporations want to 1) have an unlimited supply of hungry people beholden to them, and 2) be the gatekeeper of who gets to come here, and who gets to stay here.

        Same with H1b's too. First it was 65,000 slots. Then it's 100,000. Gutierez' bill wants to increase it to unlimited for US university graduates (actually  don't have too much problem with that. But I would like to see more 'buy-in' from these college grads. They can afford it too). H1b is another form of indentured servitude.

  •  If enforcement measures will be truly effective (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    billmosby

    in preventing future illegal immigration, then I think it is acceptable to amnesty those who are here now. However, we must also insist on a reduction in future legal immigration. In 2005 our population was 296 million. The Pew Research Center forecasts that it will increase 48% to 438 million in 2050, and 82% of that increase will be immigrants who arrive during that time interval and the descendants of those immigrants. We are already the third most populous country on Earth, and with more than twice as many people as when I was born I have seen a marked decline in quality of life.

    The notion that our "economy" needs immigration is just pro-business, Chamber of Commerce nonsense. American workers need as little immigration as possible, particularly low-income workers who compete for jobs with the poorly educated immigrants who are a large part of the current immigrant mix. During periods of low immigration the economy grows in a balanced way, with increasing wages, not just more workers but with stagnant wages and increasing business profits, which is the current pattern, driven in part by high immigration rates.

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