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This is the 187th diary on the earthquake disaster in Haiti. The first diary was by Dallasdoc and previous diaries are linked below. This is the Justice, Not Charity edition of the diary.


"The Haitian people are asking not for charity, but for justice."
The Uses of Haiti last paragraph pg. 307

What, then is to be done? Speaking of events since the 1991 coup, Noam Chomsky has noted that "honest commentary would place all of this in the context of our unwavering opposition to freedom and human rights in Haiti for no less than 200 years." The first order of business, for citizens of the United States, might be a candid and careful assessment of our ruinous policies towards Haiti. Remorse is not a very fashionable sentiment. But for many, old-fashioned penitence might be the first step towards a new solidarity, a pragmatic solidarity that could supplant both our malignant policies of the past and the well -meaning but unfocused charity that does not respond to Haitian aspirations. The Haitian people are asking not for charity, but for justice.

This is where Paul Farmer's book The Uses of Haiti ends. This is where our new diary begins. Farmer answers our question- what to do first, "The first order of business, for citizens of the United States, might be a candid and careful assessment of our ruinous policies towards Haiti." that is what this diary will attempt to do (mainly through the discussion that takes place in the comments). Many of us are new to learning about Haiti. But we really want to help. This diary is a place to learn about Haiti, about US policy towards Haiti, and to advocate for Haiti.

Please take a couple of minutes to see/complete (takes 5 minutes) today's action alert directly below today's topic.   Join us for today's news discussion and more.    



Today's Topic:

LATE UPDATE:   MUST LISTEN KPFA, Brian Concannon Discusses Haiti’s Upcoming Elections on KPFA’s Flashpoints  It starts at 40 minutes into

show.  

lash points on KPFA Paci fica Radio

A special report from Kevin Pina on the deci sion by Wyclef Jean to run for pres i dent of Haiti.
Listen to the report that begins at 40:00 min utes into the program.
Guests include:
Brian Concannon, Director, Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti
Andre Joseph, Miami-based radio producer and political commentator
Wadner Pierre, Haitian Journalist in Haiti

I hope I am completely wrong.

Just days after President Preval confirmed that Haiti is excluding it's most popular political party Lavalas Fanmi (FL),  Wyclef throws his hat into the race.  How can the Provisional Electoral Council (Conseil Electoral Provisoire, or CEP) approve Wyclef's candidacy, that has legitimate constitutional issues, and at the same time exclude the Famni Lavalas Party for nonsense, made up, "technical reasons?"  The CEP will approve Wyclef's candidacy (if they don't I will be truly surprised) because he is a strong supporter of former President Clinton and neoliberal policy.  Another strike against Wyclef is his NGO's misuse of some money that was donated help Haiti.  On top of that he does not speak fluent French and Haitian Creole is "rusty."  

Imagine a person running for US President that did not speak English well?

One good thing is that Haitians are not as easily fooled as US citizens.  They are politically informed and if given a fair election are more than capable of deciding who they want.  My issue is the exclusion of the Lavalas Party and Wyclef's backing of the coup and the elite.

Wyclef is a member of Haiti's elite.  He produced a pro - Elite propaganda film. He is a backer of the 2004 ousting of Haiti's democratically elected President, Aristide.
MUST READ: SF Bay View,  Wyclef Jean for president of Haiti?  Look beyond the hype:

Fanmi Lavalas has already been banned from the next round of elections, so enter Wyclef Jean. Jean comes from a prominent Haitian family that has virulently opposed Lavalas since the 1990 elections. His uncle is Raymond Joseph – also a rumored presidential candidate – who became Haitian ambassador to the United States under the coup government and remains so today. Kevin Pina writes in “It’s not all about that! Wyclef Jean is fronting in Haiti,” Joseph is “the co-publisher of Haiti Observateur, a right-wing rag that has been an apologist for the killers in the Haitian military going back as far as the brutal coup against Aristide in 1991.
“On Oct. 26 [2004] Haitian police entered the pro-Aristide slum of Fort Nationale and summarily executed 13 young men. Wyclef Jean said nothing. On Oct. 28 the Haitian police executed five young men, babies really, in the pro-Aristide slum of Bel Air. Wyclef said nothing. If Wyclef really wants to be part of Haiti’s political dialogue, he would acknowledge these facts. Unfortunately, Wyclef is fronting.”

As if to prove it, the Miami Herald reported on Feb. 28, 2010, “Secret polling by foreign powers in search of a new face to lead Haiti’s reconstruction …” might favor Jean’s candidacy, as someone with sufficient name recognition who could draw enough votes to overcome another Lavalas electoral boycott.

Wyclef Jean supported the 2004 coup. When gun-running former army and death squad members trained by the CIA were overrunning Haiti’s north on Feb. 25, 2004, MTV’s Gideon Yago wrote, “Wyclef Jean voiced his support for Haitian rebels on Wednesday, calling on embattled Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to step down and telling his fans in Haiti to ‘keep their head up’ as the country braces itself for possible civil war.”

He produced Ghosts of Cite Soleil which is pure right wing propaganda.  Producing this film means that Wyclef is either a pro - elite, neoliberal pawn for the US, or he knows nothing about the history of the country he wants to lead.  Either one makes him a bad choice, imo.

Jean also produced the movie, “The Ghosts of Cite Soleil,” an anti-Aristide and Lavalas hit piece, which tells us that President Aristide left voluntarily, without mention of his kidnapping by the U.S. military, and presents the main coup leaders in a favorable light. It features interviews with sweatshop owners Andy Apaid and Charles Henry Baker without telling us they hate Aristide because he raised the minimum wage and sought to give all Haitians a seat at the table by democratizing Haiti’s economy, a program opposed by the rich in Haiti.

It uncritically interviews coup leader Louis Jodel Chamblain, without telling us he worked with the Duvalier dictatorship’s brutal militia, the Tonton Macoutes, in the 1980s; that following the coup against Aristide in 1991, he was the “operations guy” for the FRAPH paramilitary death squad, accused of murdering uncounted numbers of Aristide supporters and introducing gang rape into Haiti as a military weapon.

Damming The Flood (Pg. 43)

A different sort of threshold was crossed when in September 1993 Constant's deputy Jodel Chamblain himself reportedly killed, in broad daylight, one of the few prominent Aristide supporters who had not gone into hiding - the well - connected bussinessman and philanthropist Antoine Izmery. Aristide's Justice Minister Guy Malary was killed in similar circumstances the next month; Father Jean-Marie Vincent's turn would follow in August 1994. "Haiti's 'old guard," noted the US Department of Justice in 1993, "appears to have united behind the de facto government to brutally punish not only those who work to return Aristide to power but also anyone engaging in even the most basic kinds of political activity."

The US and International Community do not like the Lavalas Fanmi and have gone to great lengths to exclude FL from participating in the elections.  Wyclef may be the perfect candidate for the US and Haiti's small ruling class, the elites.  He will happily enact Clinton's failed neoliberal Plan known the Death Plan in Haiti.  I hope I am wrong.

The CEP has a history of  excluding the Lavalas Party from elections for made up reasons.
The IJDH's report is helpful:

A. April 2009 Elections
On April 19, 2009, Haiti held elections for 12 of the 30 seats in the Senate. The Provisional Electoral Council (CEP) originally approved FL as a party, but excluded every FL candidate from taking part in the April 2009 vote. Two separate groups of FL submitted lists of candidates, as representatives of separate FL factions, but the CEP rejected the submissions. When the factions then jointly submitted one list of candidates, the CEP further required an original signature (non-facsimiled) from party leader former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide.
The CEP created this new requirement knowing that President Aristide was
Africa and would be unable to deliver it.
>

The CEP’s exclusion of FL was not justified under Haitian law. The CEP’s mandate does not give it authority to exclude legally recognized political parties, such as FL. Moreover, if the two groups claiming to be FL tried to register for the elections, a more fair remedy would have been for the CEP to decide which groups was the representative of the party the Council had accepted for registration, rather than excluding both groups.
Otherwise, any party could get pushed off the ballot by a group of people filing a duplicate set of candidates.

Instead, the CEP effectively silenced Haiti’s largest political party that was critical of President Préval’s government. FL has won every election it has contested, including 90% of the seats in the 2000 parliamentary elections.

FL challenged the CEP’s exclusion in court. The leader of the UN Security Council delegation, Jorge Urbina, applauded FL’s legal challenge to their exclusion and stated that, “All members of the council were glad to hear from (Lavalas) that they are using every legal instrument in their power to reverse this decision” and warned that, “The country cannot allow a political crisis.”

( IJDH has a short update of the report here and a useful 1 page summary here)

So they exclude the FL from the election because a document was faxed with sworn affidavit from President Aristide that is banned from Haiti so he can not deliver it personally and that was not the law until he faxed the document and the CEP could not think of a valid reason to exclude him.  But they won't exclude Wyclef for lacking one of Haiti's Constitutional requirements. Now there is an obvious issue here.

Is Wyclef Jean eligible to run for president of Haiti?:

Constitutional requirements

Article 135 of the Constitution states that the president must be at least 35 years old; a native-born Haitian and have never renounced Haitian nationality; the owner in Haiti of at least one real property and have his habitual residence in the country; have been relieved of this responsibilities if he has been handling public funds; have resided in the country for five consecutive years before the election; and have never been sentenced to death, personal restraint, or penal servitude or lost of civil rights for a crime.

Wyclef appears to meet at least five of the six requirements, according to the Haitian Ambassador to the United States, who also happens to be Wyclef’s uncle.

Potential roadblock: residence

However, one category may throw a wrench in any potential run for Haiti's highest office.

Wyclef spends much time in the United States, and it is unclear if his stints living in Haiti will qualify him for having resided in the country for five consecutive years before the election.

The Provisional Electoral Council (CEP) will rule on this if Wyclef decides to run for president,...

The US and International Community (IC) are funding the upcoming election in Haiti despite their earlier objection to the unconstitutional way Preval appointed the CEP.  After their initial objections,  the US and IC have been silent since  Preval's refusal to appoint new members to the CEP and the CEP's refusal to allow all legitimate political parties to participate in the election.  The CEP excluded Haiti's most popular party, Lavalas Famni, and 14 other parties for "technical" (made up) reasons.  It is said that Preval did this so that his party would have the upper hand in the election.  In my opinion, that may be true but the US and IC are calling the shots from behind the scene. Preval handpicked the people on the board.  One of the members is currently facing criminal charges for corruption and  Preval even refused to replace him.  

The CEP suffers a credibility crisis because a) the CEP was established through a process not recognized by the Haitian Constitution; b) a predecessor CEP, including a majority of the current members, improperly excluded all candidates presented by Haiti’s largest political party, Fanmi Lavalas, from 2009 Senatorial elections; and c) before the elections scheduled for February 2009 were postponed, the CEP announced the exclusion of 14 political parties from the elections. The current CEP is also involved in corruption scandals, with one member facing criminal charges.

Wyclef is a strong supporter of Former President Clinton's Haiti policy.  For more information about Clinton's policy for Haiti see, here.

TIME, Wyclef Jean to Run for President of Haiti

Jean insists he's not playing "the naive idealist." He gets much of his platform, he says, "right out of the playbook" of former U.S. President Bill Clinton, the U.N.'s special envoy to Haiti, whose pragmatic vision of bringing business, government and civil society together for development ventures was bearing fruit on the island before the earthquake hit.

Damming The Flood (Pg. 48)

To induce Aristide to accept these things and to placate the army that had overthrown him the Bush and Clinton administrations had an equally simple strategy - they colluded  in the killing of his supporters.  All through the interminable negotiations between Aristide and Cedras, explains Allan Nairn, "the US had a very clear, systematic policy of supporting the forces of terror in Haiti while at the same time, back in Washington, twisting Aristide's arm.  He had a gun to his head, figuratively, just as his supporters had guns to their heads literally.  It was outright political extortion."

Jeremy Scahill on Democracy Now! responds to Clinton being appointed as UN envoy to Haiti.  Must See!

http://www.youtube.com/...

tout moun se moun —
(every human being is a human being)



Action Alert:

983 signatures the goal is 1000.  This is to stop Haitian's from being evicted from homeless camps.  The Petition to stop rape got results, see UN Human Rights Council Resolution: Accelerating efforts to eliminate all forms of violence against women: ensuring due diligence in prevention.

Action Alerts:

Aid
Evictions: Stop Forced Evictions of Haiti's Earthquake Victims Institute For Justice & Democracy in Haiti has a petition, here.

The UN and Haitian Government agreed on April 22 to an immediate 3-week moratorium on forced evictions which expired, Thursday, May 13th. Within that period reports of evictions continued. Humanitarian aid, including food, water and sanitation facilities have been cut off in targeted camps (1, 2). In other locations, residents are being harassed and abused by the police. The people most affected by the earthquake, those who have lost their families, homes and livelihoods, now live in fear that they may be violently forced to leave their present settlements without viable options established for relocation (2).

Additional Action Alerts:

TransAfrica Forum

Stand up and be counted (Partners in Health)

HAITI ACTION COMMITTEE ACTION ALERT

Institute for Justice & Democracy in Haiti

Jubilee USA

Let the  Interim Haiti Recovery Commission (IHRC) know how they are doing.  but read this first please.

Contact Us
We want to hear from you.

If you have general questions or comments, please email us at: info@cirh.ht
For press inquiries please contact: press@cirh.ht

Phone number: (509) 25 19 31 31

Damming The Flood, (pg. xxxiv): Mantra from Aristide's 1990 campaign:

"Alone we are week, together we are strong; all together we are Lavalas, the flood [yon se`l nou feb, ansanm nou fo, ansanm nou se Lavalas]."

Aristide



Join us Thursday's  for book day :   Current book is Damming The Flood: Haiti, Aristide, And The Politics Of Containment, by Peter Hallward: Chapter 3:

This is our book list so far:
Isabel Allende (h/t Deoliver47):  Island Beneath the Sea
Jean-Bertrand Aristide:  In the Parish of the Poor;  Eyes of the Heart
Beverly Bell:  Walking on Fire  
Edwidge Danticat:  Brother, I'm Dying; The Farming of Bones; Krik? Krak!; Breath, Eyes, Memory
Paul Farmer:  The Uses of Haiti; Partner To The Poor:  A Paul Farmer Reader;  Getting Haiti Right This Time: The U.S. and the Coup
Peter Hallward:  Damming The Flood (2010 updated edition will be out soon. You can pre-order it now. h/ty NY brit expat published date is 9/6/10)
C.L.R. James:  The Black Jacobins, (h/t Deoliver47)  
Tracy Kidder:  Mountains Beyond Mountains  
Maurice Lemoine:  Bitter Sugar: Slaves Today in the Caribbean [1985]  
Paule Marshall:  The Chosen Place, The Timeless People
Timothy T. Schwartz:  Travesty in Haiti  
Amy Wilentz:  The Rainy Season - Haiti after Duvalier
PIH has a new website.  They have recommended reading, a book list, links to websites with action alerts, and articles.,

videos:
Aristide and the Endless Revolution; Life and Debt; The Agronomist  and Poto Mitan.

Any suggestions? We are looking for books, articles, websites where we can get accurate information about Haiti. Please share any information.

I found one.  The World Traveler - Haiti page.: This website has links to articles about Haiti and it has excerpts from books including The Uses of Haiti and Damming The Flood.  



Sources We Like

Council on Hemispheric Affairs (COHA)
Canada Action Network
Center For Economic and Policy Research
Common Dreams.org
Democracy Now!
Flashpoint Radio
Global Policy Forum
HaitAction.Net
Haiti Action Committee Action Alert  
Institute for Justice & Democracy in Haiti (ijdh)  
Kim Ives is the editor of Haiti Liberte
Partners in Health (PIH)
PIH-For Advocates
Rabble.ca
SF Bay View
TransAfrica Forum.



Past diaries in this series:

The World Traveler - Haiti page.: This website has links to articles about Haiti and it has excerpts from books including The Uses of Haiti and Damming The Flood.  
Deadly Force, Deadly Fears: How Many More Oscar Grants? this is not a diary about Haiti.  But it does shine a light on racist policies affect on communities.
Be sure to also see diaries by Bev Bell for informed ground-level information on Haiti's needs.
FishOutofWater takes a moment to explore the benefits of Partners in Health's commitment to solar powered health centers.
Meteor Blades points the way to a better and more sustainable future for Haitians in Haiti Could Use a New Deal.
As the MSM (in the United States) turns attention away from Haiti, Deoliver47 reminds us that things are not suddenly all better: Raining Disease and More Deaths.
For some good pre-earthquake background on Haiti, see Daisy Cutter's Book Review: "Damming the Flood" by Peter Hallward, pt 1. This diary was published in July 2008 and presents a history of Haiti up to 1999 using Hallward's book as a reference. Excellent.
ShelterBox:carolina stargazer is still watching the store. The next ShelterBox diary is planned for Tuesday morning, but activity in diary will be monitored until then. Matching funds are available.

Thursday is Haiti diary book day. Here is the Book List

UPCOMING DIARIES

Tuesday:  allie123  (this week Wednesday)
Thursday:  Book day - RunawayRose
Sunday:   Open

If you would like to volunteer to contribute a diary to continue this series, please volunteer in the comments below. Norbrook has created a Google documents file with the source code for the first version of the diary with the NGO list. allie123 created a Google doc for the new series Justice, Not Charity. However, because we are cutting back to 2 or 3 diaries a week we will be adding a focus and new information to each diary now.

The icons and March 13 formatting revision of this diary series are courtesy of the html artist known on Daily Kos as Pluto. The "Help Haiti" image at the top of the diary that has become the "logo" of this series is courtesy of AuntKat. Big thank you to swampus for maintaining the google doc for months.

Originally posted to allie123 on Wed Aug 04, 2010 at 05:04 PM PDT.

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Comment Preferences

  •  I'd rather see this Jean as President of Haiti (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    cville townie, Aji

    Politics is like playing Asteroids - You go far enough to the left and you end up on the right. Or vice-versa.

    by Jonze on Wed Aug 04, 2010 at 05:08:59 PM PDT

  •  Thanks for the vital backgrounder (9+ / 0-)

    I was not aware of Wyclef's background, but it sounds depressingly predictable.  I'm not sure the people of Haiti will ever have possession of their government until the US and European countries lose the habits of imperialism.  

  •  So he's actually gonna do it, huh? (4+ / 0-)

    Haiti can't catch a break, no way, no how.

    Authentic Native American silverwork, jewelry, photography, and other art here.

    by Aji on Wed Aug 04, 2010 at 05:19:33 PM PDT

  •  Hi allie (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    RunawayRose, allie123

    was listening to this the other night and it made me think of your Haiti diaries..

  •  Kind of interesting: (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    RunawayRose

    TIME, Answering the Call:

    Either way, the Haiti work has made O'Brien and the Irish the world's newest poster boys for enterprise-oriented aid of the kind championed by leaders like former U.S. President Bill Clinton, the U.N.'s special envoy to Haiti, and his New York City – based Clinton Global Initiative (CGI). "Denis' efforts on behalf of Haiti redevelopment," Clinton says, "exemplify the CGI model" of joint business, government and civil-society ventures. O'Brien coordinates CGI's Haiti Action Network, which has committed more than $100 million to education, infrastructure and business-development projects — efforts that were bearing fruit when the quake hit.
    (See pictures of Haiti's tent cities.)

    Clip

    Critics in Ireland and the U.K. accuse O'Brien of playing cell-phone populist — "acting the saint in stricken Haiti," as a London Daily Mail article suggested — to deflect attention from a tribunal looking into his financial relationship with the Irish minister who awarded Esat's license in 1996. O'Brien denies any impropriety; he is suing the Daily Mail for libel.
    (See pictures of Haiti's gingerbread houses.)

    Read more: http://www.time.com/...

  •  Finally a little good news! (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    RunawayRose

    New Program Makes Prosthetics Available to All Haitian Children Who Lost Limbs in Earthquake:

    Today the Knights of Columbus announced a new program - "Hope for Haiti's Children" - to make assistance available to every child in Haiti who lost a limb in the earthquake. The Board of Directors of the Knights of Columbus approved a resolution last weekend that commits the organization to providing prosthetic limbs and therapy over the next two years for all the approximately 800 children who lost an arm or leg in the earthquake. The estimated cost of providing the prosthetic limbs and therapy is $1 million.

    This is not easy.  The problem is they are doing it for two years and children grow and will need adjustments and probably new prosthetic limbs.  Not complaining about the generousity just pointing out the need for Haiti to keep expand available healthcare.  It was something President Aristide was working expanding health care before the coups.  

    He started a school for Doctor's but after the coup it was closed and is now a camp for US or the UN, I can't remember which.  But isn't that telling.

  •  US returns 323 Haitians (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    RunawayRose

    Haiti: U.S. Returns 323 Migrants Arrested at Sea - http://nyti.ms/...

  •  Two words Allie... (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    allie123

    Imagine a person running for US President that did not speak English well?

    George Bush?

    Ok, not so funny, but I hope you get my point.  Also, why is it that people who have money (see: Meg Whitman and Linda McMahon) feel like they are the only ones who can lead a country?

    If I wasn't a christian man, I'd be kicking yo ass! ~Daddy Rich

    by Dahankster on Wed Aug 04, 2010 at 07:19:30 PM PDT

  •  Can we keep the propaganda separate from efforts (0+ / 0-)

    to bring aid and comfort to a still-suffering Haitian people? Or is it always more important to measure who's d*ck is bigger and fight over scraps?

    It's sad that many have not learned one of the cruelest lessons of the earthquake... when the tremors came, it did not distinguish between the so-called elites and the so-called regular people. Death abounded in ALL families. The struggle continues still as death is just around the corner for thousands who are holding on by a string.

    Recriminations, finger-pointing, labeling based on rumor, innuendo and propaganda will only TURN OFF necessary investment sources from outside Haiti who will need to see security/reconciliation in Haiti before putting their money/resources in play.

    "We will extend a hand if you are willing to unclench your fist" --- President Barack Obama, 1-20-2009.

    by tier1express on Wed Aug 04, 2010 at 07:25:48 PM PDT

    •  whose (0+ / 0-)

      "We will extend a hand if you are willing to unclench your fist" --- President Barack Obama, 1-20-2009.

      by tier1express on Wed Aug 04, 2010 at 07:28:05 PM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  This is not soley (0+ / 0-)

      a fund raising diary.  This is about learning about Haiti.  It is well documented that a small group of elites team up with the US and IC to oppress the vast majority of Haitians.  Do you have Documentation that this is not true because you call it rumors.  And honestly are you talking about the same land owning elites that are evicting Haitians from the sheet camps?  I am not concerned about the people that exploit the vast majority of Haitians.  You are in the wrong diary. There are fundraising diaries but this one is about learning the ugly truth.

      •  With Haiti, the question is always WHOSE "truth". (0+ / 0-)

        "We will extend a hand if you are willing to unclench your fist" --- President Barack Obama, 1-20-2009.

        by tier1express on Wed Aug 04, 2010 at 07:42:54 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  No, with Haiti like anywhere else (0+ / 0-)

          there is one truth.  Now who knows if anyone may be questioned but the truth means the truth.  

          Furthermore with Haiti, like anywhere else, there are facts that help one find the truth.  The class division is not in doubt.  The oppression of the vast majority of Haitians is well documented.  The elite's abuse, exploitation and oppression of the vast majority of Haitians is also well documented.

          Where are you getting your information?  I am open to learning but people that come to the diary, especially anti -  Aristide people, and call this a propaganda diary should at least have some supporting facts.

          I ask anti - Aristide people to back up their allegations about Aristide with sources and links.  No one has provided anything.  I know that he was not perfect, he was inexperienced and many say he made to many compromises.  Those things do not equal him being corrupt and all the other stuff people say,

      •  Learned a long time ago that most in Haitian (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        parryander

        politics have their OWN agenda. No one's hands are completely clean. And that's why I take everything with a huge grain of salt. At one party, I hear X is the devil incarnate and Y is the one great hope. Next party, it's the reverse.  I am 35 years old and I feel comfortable saying with conviction that I have not yet seen a true leader focused solely on the best interests of the Haitian people. And no matter who we're talking about, the policies/politics always boil down to a perverse, local version of "trickle down" economics with everyone ultimately out to see what they can get for themselves... before the scraps run out. And the saddest part of all is that those who would truly be able to lead the country --- to do better by the people --- are reluctant to become involved because of the history of brutality.

        "We will extend a hand if you are willing to unclench your fist" --- President Barack Obama, 1-20-2009.

        by tier1express on Wed Aug 04, 2010 at 08:10:19 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  There are facts (0+ / 0-)

          and Aristide is a true leader that has the best interest of Haitians.  I say that because there are facts that back it up.  The programs he created, the length that the elite went to to block his increase in the minimum wage and he was still able to get a small one.

          So if you decide that there are such things as facts and evidence than maybe you will be able to take a position.  It is not easy standing up for something.  You will be subject to personal attacks, such as the ones you have made agains me, but if you believe something is right than you have to be willing to stand up for it.

          I am not saying that I know that much.  I am just saying that if you make allegations support them.  I am eager to learn.  But you answer my question with nothing but pop psychology jargon.

          Maybe before making allegations get the facts to back them up.  

          I have been wrong before and will be wrong again and don't have a problem with that.  It just means I am willing to learn.  But you haven't convinced me of anything other than you like to try to intimidate people with broad accusations.

          I don't see any reason for you to come to my diaries.  All you do is attack.  I doubt you even read them.  So it is ok; we disagree and unless you are willing to learn, and I don't mean learn from me, I mean learn from books on our list and investigating US - Haiti policy yourself, there is only one reason for you to come to my diary and that is to start an argument.

          •  What attacks have I made against YOU? (0+ / 0-)

            Are you a Haitian politician? If so, I did not even realize.

            If you think my one or two comments over the course of several months constitute some pattern of "attacks" then you have very thin skin and a lack of cognitive ability to boot as my negative assessments were not aimed at you as messenger but rather at the politicians who have actively contributed to Haiti's desperate state --- even before the earthquake.

            BTW, the reason I read your diaries is because you do include a lot of helpful information in how to actually mobilize on behalf of and support the Haitian people. Links I have shared with people offline who have asked for credible sources of information on how to help in Haiti. But I'll take your advice and skip your diaries going forward. As I look toward Haiti's future, I have no interest in being or fighting with apologists for a string of brutal pseudo-leaders who have only succeeded in raiding the country's coffers for their own benefit while the people have languished. Peace.

            "We will extend a hand if you are willing to unclench your fist" --- President Barack Obama, 1-20-2009.

            by tier1express on Wed Aug 04, 2010 at 08:43:34 PM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I was going to copy just the part of your (0+ / 0-)

              first comment that was an attack and I realized it is your whole comment.

              http://www.dailykos.com/...

              You say that MY diary is a contest between whose d@#k is largest?  That some people (obviously meaning me since you are talking about my dairy) haven't learned anything since the quake etc...

              If you don't realize that those are insults, not constructive criticism then you must have some interesting relationships.  

              And as far as you not using all information available to help Haiti, even if it means getting information from my diary, then that shows how limited your dedication to Haiti is.

              I can't make you continue to help Haiti that is your choice.  You can be like most of the rest of the world and abandon Haiti again.

              •  Oy, pressed wrong button. Long reply deleted. (1+ / 0-)
                Recommended by:
                parryander

                Perhaps it is what's best.

                Couple of points.

                Unless YOU are a politician, I was not counting you specifically among the "whose is bigger" crowd. Was making a comment on the state of discourse ahead of the elections and how even well-meaning folks are being dragged into the usual muck.  

                You have done fantastic work in providing a comprehensive list of orgs and other resources. Based on what I am able to engage with, that list is pretty static. Moreover, reading your diaries is a poor measure of my (or anyone's) committment or lack thereof to my ancestral home.

                I demonstrated FOR Aristide almost 20 years ago. Whatever my assessment of him/ his presidency/ affiliates is, it's not knee-jerk. There's plenty of bitter disappointment to go around on all sides.  If Haiti has a savior, he/she is has yet to materialize. Peace!

                "We will extend a hand if you are willing to unclench your fist" --- President Barack Obama, 1-20-2009.

                by tier1express on Wed Aug 04, 2010 at 09:43:41 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  The lists of NGOs (0+ / 0-)

                  that you appreciate are not mine.  If you look at my diary the list is much shorter.  So you should thank Dallasdoc and the dkos community for the list.  

                  I have done all the things that you disagree with.  

                  If twisting what I say into some kind of Aristide worship makes you feel good, go for it.  And I am the one that told you there is no point in you reading it.  You said you got valuable information that you passed on to people.  And the information that I provide does change.

                  I took out many of the NGOs that in my politically biased way are not doing a good job.  I left one on that I will be taking off today.  

                  I added the book list (books rec'd by community), the sources and the articles.  Well everything except the stuff you like.  So yes since you have what you need from the diary there is no need for you to come back.

                •  and I forgot to say (0+ / 0-)

                  I am not trying to tell Haitian people who to elect.  I am saying that the Fanmi Lavalas should not be excluded.  Now tell me why you think that is so complex an issue.  It is pretty clear cut.  Not everything is complicated.  Most things may be when it comes to Haiti but not everything.  Just like interviewing on of the leaders of FRAPH, a person responsible for many deaths, as if you are interviewing a non killer is just clear cut wrong!  So in my opinion if you don't have studied the situation in Haiti and don't have an opinion about anything other than it is complicated then good for you.  Why don't you take the time to write a diary about it.  

                  And yes my opinion, which is irrelevant except that this is my diary and I make it clear when it is my opinion vs. information that I get from sources.  I am happy to discuss things with people that disagree but not people that try to intimidate me.  

                  WyclefJean also produced the movie, “The Ghosts of Cite Soleil,” an anti-Aristide and Lavalas hit piece, which tells us that President Aristide left voluntarily, without mention of his kidnapping by the U.S. military, and presents the main coup leaders in a favorable light. It features interviews with sweatshop owners Andy Apaid and Charles Henry Baker without telling us they hate Aristide because he raised the minimum wage and sought to give all Haitians a seat at the table by democratizing Haiti’s economy, a program opposed by the rich in Haiti.

                  It uncritically interviews coup leader Louis Jodel Chamblain, without telling us he worked with the Duvalier dictatorship’s brutal militia, the Tonton Macoutes, in the 1980s; that following the coup against Aristide in 1991, he was the “operations guy” for the FRAPH paramilitary death squad, accused of murdering uncounted numbers of Aristide supporters and introducing gang rape into Haiti as a military weapon.

                  Damming The Flood (Pg. 43)

                  A different sort of threshold was crossed when in September 1993 Constant's deputy Jodel Chamblain himself reportedly killed, in broad daylight, one of the few prominent Aristide supporters who had not gone into hiding - the well - connected bussinessman and philanthropist Antoine Izmery. Aristide's Justice Minister Guy Malary was killed in similar circumstances the next month; Father Jean-Marie Vincent's turn would follow in August 1994.

                  What is so complicated about this?

  •  Aid still not getting to the people (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    capelza

    AidWest vs. Aid Waste:

    Yet over 6 months since the quake, much of that money is sitting in the coffers of the largest aid organizations. Aswe have noted numerous times before, many aid agencies are choosing to save much of your donations for longer term projects as opposed to immediate relief. Writing for the 6 month commemoration, ABC news reported that of the $1.138 billion donated to the 23 largest charities, "At least 62.7 percent, $714.3 million, has been allocated for future Haiti relief efforts or is unassigned." Yet the situation on the ground remains dire, over a million Haitians still have only the most basic form of shelter, and even that is barely able to hold up under the increasing rain.

  •  More News: (0+ / 0-)

    Haiti Liberte, Canada’s Failed Aid to Haiti:

    Few of the countries pledging to the Fund are in a rush to pay up. According to the undated pledge page on the Fund’s website, only three countries have met their pledges — Brazil, Australia and Estonia, for a total of US$64 million. Canada says it will pay up “soon.” But Cannon and Oda voiced a reason for their delay at the Jul. 12 press conference. They said they are concerned by Bill Clinton’s remarks the preceding week in which he criticized laggard donor countries for their failure to pay. Cannon said: “I want to be able to, with Minister Oda, discuss with [Clinton] so that we scope all that out and get a better sense of what he means by those comments.” Canada’s government has been telling its people that its response to the earthquake was swift and generous. Clinton’s remarks were an embarrassment to it. The Fund’s total pledges amount to a paltry US$509 million. The $5.3 billion-plus fi gure which the international media reports as pledged consists of money promised to Haiti by the world’s governments and aid agencies at the March 31 conference, in all forms and covering the next 18 months.

    For Haiti, there is a major concern with the promises. The record following previous natural disasters is that the majority of funds promised are never paid. There is every reason to believe that this will again be the case unless significant political pressure demands an aggressive and meaningful reconstruction aid from the world’s big powers. There is another flaw in the international financial promises: very little aid is going to Haitian organizations. Dr. Paul Farmer of the prestigious Partners In Health testified before the Congressional Black Caucus in Washington, DC on Jul. 27 that of the $1.8 billion in earthquake relief sent to Haiti to date, only 3% was delivered to the Haitian government. Even Canada’s outgoing Governor General, the Haitian-born Michaëlle Jean, was moved to say in France recently: “The time has come to break with the logic of aid that has transformed Haiti into a laboratory [for NGOs]” [Agence France Presse, Jul. 20]

  •  I really do admire Sean Penn, may not agree 100% (0+ / 0-)

    Sean Penn interview with Charlie Rose July 20:

    Penn speaks respectively of the government in Haiti. His respect and admiration for the Haitian people comes through very strongly. He mentions briefly the legacy of the Aristide and Fanmi Lavalas government of 2000-2004. He describes the social reforms that the government attempted; unfortunately, he also recycles some of the unfounded charges against it.

  •  Brian Concannon Talks about the election: (0+ / 0-)

    MUST LISTEN KPFA, Brian Concannon Discusses Haiti’s Upcoming Elections on KPFA’s Flashpoints  It starts at 40 minutes into

    show.  

    lash points on KPFA Paci fica Radio

    A spe cial report from Kevin Pina on the deci sion by Wyclef Jean to run for pres i dent of Haiti.

    Lis ten to the report that begins at 40:00 min utes into the program.

    Guests include:

    Brian Concannon, Director, Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti

    Andre Joseph, Miami-based radio producer and political commentator

    Wadner Pierre, Haitian Journalist in Haiti

    Haiti: Where is the Money?

    Despite the large amount of money pledged — over 50 percent of Americans donated to the Haiti relief effort — the efficiency of the effort has been weakened by structural problems, bureaucratic inactivity, the scope of the disaster, and other interests trying to keep their privileges while giving the appearance of change.  For example, the American Red Cross is holding more almost 70 percent of the money it raised for Haiti, which is unacceptable when Haitians are in dire need of food, shelter, and medical care.

  •  Brian Concannon (0+ / 0-)

    say's Wyclef is not eligible to run for President of Haiti.  He does not meet the constitutional requirement.

    IC and US is backing him (most likely because they are not objecting to his unconstitutional candidacy and Lavalas exclusion)  and he will probably be let to run.  

    He said that people in US excited about it but he has not seen that excitement in Haiti.  

  •  Wyclef files papers? Let's see what happens? (0+ / 0-)

    I will be surprised if they reject his candidacy.

    AP, Wyclef files to run for Haiti president:

    PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — Singer Wyclef Jean has filed the paperwork to run for president of his native Haiti.
    The hip hop star was greeted by dozens of supporters as he arrived Thursday with his wife and daughter at an electoral council office in Port-au-Prince. The deadline to file candidacy papers is Saturday. He had been fielding rumors of his candidacy for years.      

    clip

    But Yele came under criticism when post-quake scrutiny revealed alleged improprieties including that it had paid Jean to perform at fundraising events and bought advertising airtime from a television station he co-owns.
    Jean tearfully defended the organization in a news conference weeks after the quake. Yele also hired a new accounting firm after the allegations surfaced.
    On Wednesday, The Smoking Gun website posted documents online indicating Jean personally owes $2.1 million in back taxes to the U.S. government.
    Tanenbaum declined to comment on the new allegations.

  •  test (0+ / 0-)

    994 signatures the goal is 1000.  This is to stop Haitian's from being evicted from homeless camps.  The Petition to stop rape got results, see UN Human Rights Council Resolution: Accelerating efforts to eliminate all forms of violence against women: ensuring due diligence in prevention.

    Action Alerts:

    Aid
    Evictions: Stop Forced Evictions of Haiti's Earthquake Victims Institute For Justice & Democracy in Haiti has a petition, here.

    The UN and Haitian Government agreed on April 22 to an immediate 3-week moratorium on forced evictions which expired, Thursday, May 13th. Within that period reports of evictions continued. Humanitarian aid, including food, water and sanitation facilities have been cut off in targeted camps (1, 2). In other locations, residents are being harassed and abused by the police. The people most affected by the earthquake, those who have lost their families, homes and livelihoods, now live in fear that they may be violently forced to leave their present settlements without viable options established for relocation (2).

    Additional Action Alerts:

    Let the  Interim Haiti Recovery Commission (IHRC) know how they are doing.  but read this first please.

    Contact Us
    We want to hear from you.

    If you have general questions or comments, please email us at: info@cirh.ht
    For press inquiries please contact: press@cirh.ht

    Phone number: (509) 25 19 31 31

  •  test (0+ / 0-)

    Action Alerts:

    Election:

    To stand in solidarity with Haiti at this crucial time, please contact US government officials, your local senators, and representatives and tell them that  Lavalas must be allowed to participate in free, democratic elections.  The ban on Lavalas in the upcoming elections must be revoked.

    White House: 202-456-1111
    Email at www.whitehouse.gov
    US State Department: 202-647-4000
    Toll Free Contact  1 (866) 266-6678
    Congressional switchboard: 202-224-3121

    Additional Action Alerts:

    Aid

    Let the  Interim Haiti Recovery Commission (IHRC) know how they are doing.  but read this first please.

    Contact Us
    We want to hear from you.

    If you have general questions or comments, please email us at: info@cirh.ht
    For press inquiries please contact: press@cirh.ht

    Phone number: (509) 25 19 31 31

    White House: 202-456-1111
    Email at www.whitehouse.gov
    US State Department: 202-647-4000
    Congressional switchboard: 202-224-3121

  •  test (0+ / 0-)

    Action Alert: Election:

    Lavalas has the support of the largest percentage of the Haitian electorate and elections that forbid their presence is essentially undemocratic and disenfranchising the choice of the vast majority of Haitians.  It is like if Democrats were excluded from a US election accept worse because the Lavalas Party is considerably more popular in Haiti than the Democratic Party is in the US.

    To stand in solidarity with Haiti at this crucial time, please contact  President Obama, your senators, and representatives and tell them that  Lavalas must be allowed to participate in free, democratic elections.  The ban on Lavalas in the upcoming elections must be revoked.

    White House: 202-456-1111
    Email at www.whitehouse.gov
    US State Department: 202-647-4000
    Toll Free Contact  1 (866) 266-6678
    Congressional switchboard: 202-224-3121

  •  test (0+ / 0-)

    Action Alert: Election:

    Lavalas has the support of the largest percentage of the Haitian electorate and elections that forbid their presence is essentially undemocratic and disenfranchising the choice of the vast majority of Haitians.  It is like if Democrats were excluded from US elections.

    Imagine having a US election and excluding the Democrats.

    To stand in solidarity with Haiti at this crucial time, please contact US government officials, your local senators, and representatives and tell them that  Lavalas must be allowed to participate in free, democratic elections.  The ban on Lavalas in the upcoming elections must be revoked.

    White House: 202-456-1111
    Email at www.whitehouse.gov
    US State Department: 202-647-4000
    Toll Free Contact  1 (866) 266-6678
    Congressional switchboard: 202-224-3121

  •  test (0+ / 0-)

    === INTRODUCTION===

    This is the 189th diary on the earthquake disaster in Haiti. The first diary was by Dallasdoc and previous diaries are linked below. This is the Justice, Not Charity edition of the diary.


    "The Haitian people are asking not for charity, but for justice."
    The Uses of Haiti last paragraph pg. 307

    What, then is to be done? Speaking of events since the 1991 coup, Noam Chomsky has noted that "honest commentary would place all of this in the context of our unwavering opposition to freedom and human rights in Haiti for no less than 200 years." The first order of business, for citizens of the United States, might be a candid and careful assessment of our ruinous policies towards Haiti. Remorse is not a very fashionable sentiment. But for many, old-fashioned penitence might be the first step towards a new solidarity, a pragmatic solidarity that could supplant both our malignant policies of the past and the well -meaning but unfocused charity that does not respond to Haitian aspirations. The Haitian people are asking not for charity, but for justice.

    === Body ===

    This is where Paul Farmer's book The Uses of Haiti ends. This is where our new diary begins. Farmer answers our question- what to do first, "The first order of business, for citizens of the United States, might be a candid and careful assessment of our ruinous policies towards Haiti." that is what this diary will attempt to do (mainly through the discussion that takes place in the comments). Many of us are new to learning about Haiti. But we really want to help. This diary is a place to learn about Haiti, about US policy towards Haiti, and to advocate for Haiti.

    Please take a couple of minutes to see/complete (takes 5 minutes) today's action alert directly below today's topic.   Join us for today's news discussion and more.    



    Today's topic:

    tout moun se moun —
    (every human being is a human being)



    Action Alert:

    Action Alert: Election:  

    The International Community Should Support Prompt and Fair Elections in Haiti.  Fanmi Lavalas has the support of the largest percentage of the Haitian electorate and elections that forbid their presence is essentially undemocratic and disenfranchising the choice of the vast majority of Haitians.  The US and International Community should not fund illegitimate elections.

    It is like the Democratic Party being excluded from participating in our upcoming midterm elections.

    To stand in solidarity with Haiti at this crucial time, please contact US government officials, your local senators, and representatives and tell them not to fund illegitimate elections that  Lavalas must be allowed to participate in free, democratic elections.  The US should withhold aid for the elections unless the ban is lifted.  The ban on Lavalas in the upcoming elections must be revoked.

    White House: 202-456-1111
    Email at www.whitehouse.gov
    US State Department: 202-647-4000
    Toll Free Contact  1 (866) 266-6678
    Congressional switchboard: 202-224-3121

    Damming The Flood, (pg. xxxiv): Mantra from Aristide's 1990 campaign:

    "Alone we are week, together we are strong; all together we are Lavalas, the flood [yon se`l nou feb, ansanm nou fo, ansanm nou se Lavalas]."

    Aristide



    Top Story: See comments for Today's News Update:

    TOP STORY:

    Mark Schuller (he is one of the best people to get information from) Falling through the cracks or unstable foundations?:

    Mounds of concrete are also blocking Haiti's reconstruction, causing severe traffic jams and preventing people from being able to return to their home and rebuild. Despite the Sisyphian yellow-shirt teams toiling in the hot sun for $5 a day, the rubble can't be collected and removed because the government doesn't have nearly enough trucks, a symptom of the lack of funds. At this pace people will still be wheelbarrowing crumbled houses well into 2015, Haiti's next presidential election.

    Another serious road block is the issue of sorting out land ownership. Even before the national registry fell under the rubble, land tenure has always been a complex and contentious issue in Haiti. Many areas of Port-au-Prince were settled either by tonton makout - Duvalier's death squads - given land for their service or by squatters. In many cases land ownership was never officially registered. Even if this logistical logjam were cleared, the vast majority of Port-au-Prince residents, up to 85%, did not own their homes before the earthquake. According to some UN sources, rents for "green houses" (those that passed inspection) have gone up 300% in several areas.



    Join us Thursday's  for book day :   Current book is Damming The Flood: Haiti, Aristide, And The Politics Of Containment, by Peter Hallward: Chapter 4:

    This is our book list so far:

    Isabel Allende (h/t Deoliver47):  Island Beneath the Sea, here:  
    Jean-Bertrand Aristide::  In the Parish of the Poor, here;  Eyes of the Heart here;  
    Beverly Bell:  Walking on Fire, here:  
    Edwidge Danticat:  Brother, I'm Dying here;  The Farming of Bones here;  Krik? Krak! here;  Breath, Eyes, Memory here:
    Paul Farmer:  The Uses of Haiti here;  Partner To The Poor:  A Paul Farmer Reader here;  Getting Haiti Right This Time: The U.S. and the Coup here:  
    Peter Hallward:  Damming The Flood here (2010 updated edition will be out soon. You can pre-order it now) here. h/ty NY brit expat published date is 11/30/10):  
    C.L.R. James:  The Black Jacobins here, (h/t Deoliver47):  
    Tracy Kidder:  Mountains Beyond Mountains here:  
    Maurice Lemoine:  Bitter Sugar: Slaves Today in the Caribbean [1985] here:  
    Paule Marshall:  The Chosen Place, The Timeless People here:  
    Timothy T. Schwartz:  Travesty in Haiti here:  Amy Wilentz:  The Rainy Season - Haiti after Duvalier here
    PIH has a new website here;  They have a recommended reading list here;  a book list, links to websites with action alerts, and articles.

    videos:
    Aristide and the Endless Revolution here;  Life and Debt here;  The Agronomist here;  Poto Mitan here.
    Any suggestions? We are looking for books, articles, websites where we can get accurate information about Haiti. Please share any information.
    I found one.  The World Traveler - Haiti page.: This website has links to articles about Haiti and it has excerpts from books including The Uses of Haiti and Damming The Flood.  

    "Dye mon, gen mon."

    Translation: Beyond the mountain is another mountain.

    (A proverb of both patience and the recognition of how difficult life in Haiti is.)

    ijdh:
    Anyone interested in democracy and rights has reason to be interested in Haiti. Over two centuries ago, Haitians challenged the notions of human rights taking root in Europe and the nascent United States, insisting that all people are human and that slavery could have no place in any republic worthy of the name. This was the beginning of the modern human rights movement.
    — Paul Farmer, Co-Founder, Partners in Health



    Sources We Like

    Institute for Justice & Democracy in Haiti (ijdh)  
    Canada Action Network
    Center For Economic and Policy Research
    Democracy Now!
    Flashpoint Radio
    HaitAction.Net
    HaitiAnalysis
    Haiti Action Committee Action Alert  
    Kim Ives is the editor of Haiti Liberte
    Partners in Health (PIH)
    PIH-For Advocates
    Rabble.ca
    SF Bay View
    TransAfrica Forum.

    RELIABLE SOURCE ARTICLES:
    Any articles that we missed?  Please leave comment.

    Haiti's History  
    President Aristide  
    US-Haiti-trade policy
    Agriculture  
    Immigration
    Vulture Capitalism: (will add more articles).



    Video:

    Brian Concannon and Paul Farmer Video, Change Haiti Can Believe In: here,
    Watch: Haiti Dreaming for More Than $3 a day,
    Life and Debt,
    Watch 60 minutes:  Edwidge Danticat on US immigration detentions,
    Jeremy Scahill on Democracy Now! responds to Clinton being appointed as UN envoy to Haiti.  Must See!.

    NEWS ORGANIZATIONS:

    Al Jazeera English
    AlterNet
    BBC
    Caribbean Net News, CNN
    Council on Hemispheric Affairs (COHA)
    Common Dreams.org
    guardian.co.uk
    Haitian Times
    Huffington Post
    IPS
    MiamiHerald.com
    NPR
    reliefWeb
    The Daily Beast
    The Root.

    Aid - Change?
    Nicole Lee, "Haiti: An Opportunity For A New Model," here.
    Mark Schuller, "Falling through the cracks or unstable foundations?" here
    IJDH, “Haitians in IDP Camps are living better now than before the earthquake? Are you kidding me?” here
    Bev Bell interview, "Making money from the earthquake in Haiti" listen here
    IJDH, "Challenges Facing Haiti’s Justice Sector: Prepared for Congressional Briefing" here
    Kim Ives, "Land Ownership at the Crux of Haiti's Stalled Reconstruction" here.
    Kim Ives talks about it with Amy Goodman on Democracy Now!, here
    CIRH, Interim Haiti Recovery Commission here, Clinton & Bellerive co-chairs, 26 members 13 foreigners and 13 of Haiti's elite business people.  One of which Reginald Boulos was a backer of both coups. Another memberGarry Lissade, the former lawyer for Cedras during the 1993 Governor's Island post-coup negotiations.  
    Mark Schuller, "Tectonic Shifts? The upcoming donors' conference for Haiti" here,
    HOPE legislation Summary of HOPE legislation here: This is the same trade policy that we usually have to force Haiti to accept. But now we art told to celebrate it as an accomplishment? When did sweatshops become reason to celebrate?  
    CounterPunch, "How NGOs are Profiting Off a Grave Situation: Haiti and the Aid Racket" here,
    Democracy Now!, "Humanitarian Aid, New Colonialism?" here
    More Articles, here..

    The now requisite warnings:

    Please do your research before donating. The Charity Navigator tool is a useful resource for this purpose. For those not familiar, Charity Navigator evaluates and rates charities according to their financial responsibility and sustainability. Their homepage now lists comprehensive information the major organizations on the ground in Haiti now. (h/t DeepHarm and deb s) An additional resource for researching charities is the Better Business Bureau's Wise Giving Alliance site.

    A note about ratings listed here: We have looked up all of the charities listed here and we've put ratings next to the ones that have actually been rated. It looks like this: (****/A). The number of stars (1-4) indicates the rating from Charity Navigator and is also a clickable link to a detailed review of that particular charity. The letter grade is from AIP and is explained here.



    NGOs:

    The Aristide Foundation for Democracy (AFD) was created in 1996 by former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide (the first democratically elected president of Haiti) with a simple principle in mind: "The promise of democracy can only be fulfilled if all sectors of Haitian society are able to actively participate in the democratic life of the nation."

    Fonkoze (****) , a micro-lending organization in Haiti. From their Web site:

    Fonkoze is Haiti’s Alternative Bank for the Organized Poor. We are the largest micro-finance institution offering a full range of financial services to the rural-based poor in Haiti. Fonkoze is committed to the economic and social improvement of the people and communities of Haiti and to the reduction of poverty in the country.

    According to their Web site, their offices have taken quite a hit. This is another one in the category of long-term rebuilding. (h/t parryander and dizzydean)

    Haiti Emergency Relief Foundation (HERF):

    Haiti’s grassroots movement – including labor unions, women’s groups, educators and human rights activists, support committees for political prisoners, and agricultural cooperatives – are funneling needed aid to those most hit by the earthquake. They are doing what they can – with the most limited of funds – to make a difference. Please take this chance to lend them your support. All donations to the Haiti Emergency Relief Fund will be forwarded to our partners on the ground to help them rebuild what has been destroyed.

    Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti:

    Mission

    We strive to work with the people of Haiti in their non-violent struggle for the consolidation of constitutional democracy, jus tice and human rights, by distributing objective and accurate information on human rights conditions in Haiti, pursuing legal cases, and cooperating with human rights and solidarity groups in Haiti and abroad.
    IJDH draws on its founders’ internationally-acclaimed success accompanying Haiti’s poor majority in the fields of law, medicine and social justice activism. We seek the restoration of the rule of law and democracy in the short term, and work for the long-term sustainable change necessary to avert Haiti’s next crisis.

    "IJDH is simply the most reliable source for information and analysis on human rights in Haiti." — Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA)

    Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti:

    L'Athletique D'Haiti:

    “While many children and parents see the club as a way to make it to the Haitian National team and also as a route ?to college scholarships or professional teams outside of Haiti, there’s more to the program than sports. By encouraging youngsters from wealthier families to compete with those from the slums, Robert Duval is also chipping away at the barriers of long divided Haitian society. And as Duval points out, ‘Some of these kids have a lot of talent, not only for soccer. Maybe it’s school or music or writing poetry. But sports will lift them to the next level of life.’” ?- Finbar O’Reilly, National Post, Canada

    The Lambi Fund (****) is a secular non-profit nonprofit whose mission is "to assist the popular, democratic movement in Haiti. Its goal is to help strengthen civil society as a necessary foundation of democracy and development. The fund channels financial and other resources to community-based organizations that promote the social and economic empowerment of the Haitian people." They support "projects that embrace the following principles: non-violent, non-partisan, community-based, promoting the advancement of women, using education and training for empowerment, and promoting the overall democratic movement."

    Partners in Health (****/A+) has now started a BLOG about its efforts called Stand with Haiti. It has very useful information. Partners in Health is also putting out a call for health volunteers, in case you are a medical professional who can help out that way.
    PIH 6 month report!  And website with slide show, Six months have now passed since a devastating earthquake  ripped through Haiti.

    The Jean Cadet Restavek Foundation. Restaveks are child slaves. This is an organization for children run by a Haitian man who is a former child slave.

    Reiser Relief, a group that parryander works with.  
    Matching funds currently available at this link for Reiser Relief.
    A total of $20K in matching funds have been provided for Reiser Relief from Razoo.

    ShelterBox: TexMex is busy moving, but carolina stargazer is still watching the store. The next ShelterBox diary is planned for Tuesday morning, but activity in
    diary will be monitored until then.

    SOIL is based in Haiti (founded by two American females) and although their regular mission is :Sustainable Organic Integrated Livelihoods (SOIL) is a non-profit organization dedicated to protecting soil resources, empowering communities and transforming wastes into resources in Haiti, they are in the streets in PAP providing normal disaster relief services and translation (they speak Kreyol). They have said that all donations in the next 30 days (at least) will go directly to their relief work rather than their usual mission. They have been in Haiti for several years and are very familiar with it.



    Social Networking Efforts:

    New Media Advocacy Project
    The New Media Advocacy Project combats poverty and human rights violations by using digital video, Internet social networking, and interactive media to strengthen social justice legal advocacy in courts, legislatures, and communities.




    Past diaries in this series:

    The World Traveler - Haiti page.: This website has links to articles about Haiti and it has excerpts from books including The Uses of Haiti and Damming The Flood.  
    Be sure to also see diaries by Bev Bell for informed ground-level information on Haiti's needs.
    FishOutofWater takes a moment to explore the benefits of Partners in Health's commitment to solar powered health centers.
    Meteor Blades points the way to a better and more sustainable future for Haitians in Haiti Could Use a New Deal.
    As the MSM (in the United States) turns attention away from Haiti, Deoliver47 reminds us that things are not suddenly all better: Raining Disease and More Deaths.
    For some good pre-earthquake background on Haiti, see Daisy Cutter's Book Review: "Damming the Flood" by Peter Hallward, pt 1. This diary was published in July 2008 and presents a history of Haiti up to 1999 using Hallward's book as a reference. Excellent.
    ShelterBox:carolina stargazer is still watching the store. The next ShelterBox diary is planned for Tuesday morning, but activity in diary will be monitored until then. Matching funds are available.

    Thursday is Haiti diary book day. Here is the Book List

    UPCOMING DIARIES

    Tuesday:  *** Open ***
    Thursday: Aji
    Sunday:   allie123 book diary

    If you would like to volunteer to contribute a diary to continue this series, please volunteer in the comments below. Norbrook has created a Google documents file with the source code for the first version of the diary with the NGO list. allie123 created a Google doc for the new series Justice, Not Charity. However, because we are cutting back to 2 or 3 diaries a week we will be adding a focus and new information to each diary now.

    The icons and March 13 formatting revision of this diary series are courtesy of the html artist known on Daily Kos as Pluto. The "Help Haiti" image at the top of the diary that has become the "logo" of this series is courtesy of AuntKat. Big thank you to swampus for maintaining the google doc for months.

  •  test (0+ / 0-)

    Al Jazeera English, here:  AlterNet, here:   BBC, here:  Caribbean Net News, here:  Council on Hemispheric Affairs (COHA), here:  Common Dreams.org, here: guardian.co.uk, here:  Haitian Times, here:  Huffington Post, here:  IPS,

  •  test (0+ / 0-)

    NEWS ORGANIZATIONS:

    Al Jazeera English, here: AlterNet, here:  BBC, here:  Caribbean Net News, here:  CNN, here:  COHA, here:  Common Dreams.org, here: gaurdian. co.uk, here:  Haitian Times, here:  Huffington Post, here: IPS, here:  MiamiHerald.com, here:  NPR, here:  ReliefWeb, here: The Daily Beast, here:  The Root, here.

  •  test (0+ / 0-)

    RELIABLE SOURCE ARTICLES:
    Any articles that we missed?  Please leave comment.

    History,here: President Aristide, here:  Trade Policy, here:  Agriculture, here:  Immigration, here:  
    Vulture Capitalism, here (will add more articles).



    Video:

    Brian Concannon and Paul Farmer Video, Change Haiti Can Believe In: here, Haiti Dreaming for More Than $3 a day  Watch, here: Life and Debt, here:
    Edwidge Danticat on US immigration detentions 60 minutes, here:

  •  test (0+ / 0-)

    This is where Paul Farmer's book The Uses of Haiti ends. This is where our new diary begins. Farmer answers our question- what to do first, "The first order of business, for citizens of the United States, might be a candid and careful assessment of our ruinous policies towards Haiti." that is what this diary will attempt to do (mainly through the discussion that takes place in the comments). Many of us are new to learning about Haiti. But we really want to help. This diary is a place to learn about Haiti, about US policy towards Haiti, and to advocate for Haiti.

    Please take a couple of minutes to see/complete (takes 5 minutes) today's action alert directly below today's topic.   Join us for today's news discussion and more.    



    Today's topic:

    tout moun se moun —
    (every human being is a human being)



    Action Alert:

    Action Alert: Election:  

    The International Community Should Support Prompt and Fair Elections in Haiti.  Fanmi Lavalas has the support of the largest percentage of the Haitian electorate and elections that forbid their presence is essentially undemocratic and disenfranchising the choice of the vast majority of Haitians.  The US and International Community should not fund illegitimate elections.

    It is like the Democratic Party being excluded from participating in our upcoming midterm elections.

    To stand in solidarity with Haiti at this crucial time, please contact US government officials, your local senators, and representatives and tell them not to fund illegitimate elections that  Lavalas must be allowed to participate in free, democratic elections.  The US should withhold aid for the elections unless the ban is lifted.  The ban on Lavalas in the upcoming elections must be revoked.

    White House: 202-456-1111
    Email at www.whitehouse.gov
    US State Department: 202-647-4000
    Toll Free Contact  1 (866) 266-6678
    Congressional switchboard: 202-224-3121

    Damming The Flood, (pg. xxxiv): Mantra from Aristide's 1990 campaign:

    "Alone we are week, together we are strong; all together we are Lavalas, the flood [yon se`l nou feb, ansanm nou fo, ansanm nou se Lavalas]."

    Aristide



    Top Story: See comments for Today's News Update:

    TOP STORY:

    Mark Schuller (he is one of the best people to get information from) Falling through the cracks or unstable foundations?:

    Mounds of concrete are also blocking Haiti's reconstruction, causing severe traffic jams and preventing people from being able to return to their home and rebuild. Despite the Sisyphian yellow-shirt teams toiling in the hot sun for $5 a day, the rubble can't be collected and removed because the government doesn't have nearly enough trucks, a symptom of the lack of funds. At this pace people will still be wheelbarrowing crumbled houses well into 2015, Haiti's next presidential election.

    Another serious road block is the issue of sorting out land ownership. Even before the national registry fell under the rubble, land tenure has always been a complex and contentious issue in Haiti. Many areas of Port-au-Prince were settled either by tonton makout - Duvalier's death squads - given land for their service or by squatters. In many cases land ownership was never officially registered. Even if this logistical logjam were cleared, the vast majority of Port-au-Prince residents, up to 85%, did not own their homes before the earthquake. According to some UN sources, rents for "green houses" (those that passed inspection) have gone up 300% in several areas.



    Join us Thursday's  for book day :   Current book is Damming The Flood: Haiti, Aristide, And The Politics Of Containment, by Peter Hallward: Chapter 4:

    This is our book list so far:

    Isabel Allende (h/t Deoliver47):  Island Beneath the Sea, here:  
    Jean-Bertrand Aristide::  In the Parish of the Poor, here;  Eyes of the Heart here;  
    Beverly Bell:  Walking on Fire, here:  
    Edwidge Danticat:  Brother, I'm Dying here;  The Farming of Bones here;  Krik? Krak! here;  Breath, Eyes, Memory here:
    Paul Farmer:  The Uses of Haiti here;  Partner To The Poor:  A Paul Farmer Reader here;  Getting Haiti Right This Time: The U.S. and the Coup here:  
    Peter Hallward:  Damming The Flood here (2010 updated edition will be out soon. You can pre-order it now) here. h/ty NY brit expat published date is 11/30/10):  
    C.L.R. James:  The Black Jacobins here, (h/t Deoliver47):  
    Tracy Kidder:  Mountains Beyond Mountains here:  
    Maurice Lemoine:  Bitter Sugar: Slaves Today in the Caribbean [1985] here:  
    Paule Marshall:  The Chosen Place, The Timeless People here:  
    Timothy T. Schwartz:  Travesty in Haiti here:  Amy Wilentz:  The Rainy Season - Haiti after Duvalier here
    PIH has a new website here;  They have a recommended reading list here;  a book list, links to websites with action alerts, and articles.

    videos:
    Aristide and the Endless Revolution here;  Life and Debt here;  The Agronomist here;  Poto Mitan here.
    Any suggestions? We are looking for books, articles, websites where we can get accurate information about Haiti. Please share any information.
    I found one.  The World Traveler - Haiti page.: This website has links to articles about Haiti and it has excerpts from books including The Uses of Haiti and Damming The Flood.  

    "Dye mon, gen mon."

    Translation: Beyond the mountain is another mountain.

    (A proverb of both patience and the recognition of how difficult life in Haiti is.)

    ijdh:
    Anyone interested in democracy and rights has reason to be interested in Haiti. Over two centuries ago, Haitians challenged the notions of human rights taking root in Europe and the nascent United States, insisting that all people are human and that slavery could have no place in any republic worthy of the name. This was the beginning of the modern human rights movement.
    — Paul Farmer, Co-Founder, Partners in Health



    Sources We Like

    Institute for Justice & Democracy in Haiti (ijdh)  
    Canada Action Network
    Center For Economic and Policy Research
    Democracy Now!
    Flashpoint Radio
    HaitAction.Net
    HaitiAnalysis
    Haiti Action Committee Action Alert  
    Kim Ives is the editor of Haiti Liberte
    Partners in Health (PIH)
    PIH-For Advocates
    Rabble.ca
    SF Bay View
    TransAfrica Forum.

    RELIABLE SOURCE ARTICLES:
    Any articles that we missed?  Please leave comment.

    History,here: President Aristide,here:  
    Trade Policy, here:  Agriculture, here:  Immigration, here:  
    Vulture Capitalism, here (will add more articles).



    Video:

    Brian Concannon and Paul Farmer Video, Change Haiti Can Believe In: here,
    Haiti Dreaming for More Than $3 a day  Watch, here: Life and Debt, here:
    Edwidge Danticat on US immigration detentions 60 minutes, here: Jeremy Scahill on Democracy Now! responds to Clinton being appointed as UN envoy to Haiti, here.

    NEWS ORGANIZATIONS:

    Al Jazeera English, here: AlterNet, here:  BBC, here:  Caribbean Net News, here:  CNN, here:  COHA, here:  Common Dreams.org, here: gaurdian. co.uk, here:  Haitian Times, here:  Huffington Post, here: IPS, here:  MiamiHerald.com, here:  NPR, here:  ReliefWeb, here: The Daily Beast, here:  The Root, here.

    Aid - Change?
    Nicole Lee, "Haiti: An Opportunity For A New Model," here.
    Mark Schuller, "Falling through the cracks or unstable foundations?" here
    IJDH, “Haitians in IDP Camps are living better now than before the earthquake? Are you kidding me?” here
    Bev Bell interview, "Making money from the earthquake in Haiti" listen here
    IJDH, "Challenges Facing Haiti’s Justice Sector: Prepared for Congressional Briefing" here
    Kim Ives, "Land Ownership at the Crux of Haiti's Stalled Reconstruction" here.
    Kim Ives talks about it with Amy Goodman on Democracy Now!, here
    CIRH, Interim Haiti Recovery Commission here, Clinton & Bellerive co-chairs, 26 members 13 foreigners and 13 of Haiti's elite business people.  One of which Reginald Boulos was a backer of both coups. Another memberGarry Lissade, the former lawyer for Cedras during the 1993 Governor's Island post-coup negotiations.  
    Mark Schuller, "Tectonic Shifts? The upcoming donors' conference for Haiti" here,
    HOPE legislation Summary of HOPE legislation here: This is the same trade policy that we usually have to force Haiti to accept. But now we art told to celebrate it as an accomplishment? When did sweatshops become reason to celebrate?  
    CounterPunch, "How NGOs are Profiting Off a Grave Situation: Haiti and the Aid Racket" here,
    Democracy Now!, "Humanitarian Aid, New Colonialism?" here
    More Articles, here..

    The now requisite warnings:

    Please do your research before donating. The Charity Navigator tool is a useful resource for this purpose. For those not familiar, Charity Navigator evaluates and rates charities according to their financial responsibility and sustainability. Their homepage now lists comprehensive information the major organizations on the ground in Haiti now. (h/t DeepHarm and deb s) An additional resource for researching charities is the Better Business Bureau's Wise Giving Alliance site.

    A note about ratings listed here: We have looked up all of the charities listed here and we've put ratings next to the ones that have actually been rated. It looks like this: (****/A). The number of stars (1-4) indicates the rating from Charity Navigator and is also a clickable link to a detailed review of that particular charity. The letter grade is from AIP and is explained here.



    NGOs:

    The Aristide Foundation for Democracy (AFD) was created in 1996 by former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide (the first democratically elected president of Haiti) with a simple principle in mind: "The promise of democracy can only be fulfilled if all sectors of Haitian society are able to actively participate in the democratic life of the nation."

    Fonkoze (****) , a micro-lending organization in Haiti. From their Web site:

    Fonkoze is Haiti’s Alternative Bank for the Organized Poor. We are the largest micro-finance institution offering a full range of financial services to the rural-based poor in Haiti. Fonkoze is committed to the economic and social improvement of the people and communities of Haiti and to the reduction of poverty in the country.

    According to their Web site, their offices have taken quite a hit. This is another one in the category of long-term rebuilding. (h/t parryander and dizzydean)

    Haiti Emergency Relief Foundation (HERF):

    Haiti’s grassroots movement – including labor unions, women’s groups, educators and human rights activists, support committees for political prisoners, and agricultural cooperatives – are funneling needed aid to those most hit by the earthquake. They are doing what they can – with the most limited of funds – to make a difference. Please take this chance to lend them your support. All donations to the Haiti Emergency Relief Fund will be forwarded to our partners on the ground to help them rebuild what has been destroyed.

    Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti:

    Mission

    We strive to work with the people of Haiti in their non-violent struggle for the consolidation of constitutional democracy, jus tice and human rights, by distributing objective and accurate information on human rights conditions in Haiti, pursuing legal cases, and cooperating with human rights and solidarity groups in Haiti and abroad.
    IJDH draws on its founders’ internationally-acclaimed success accompanying Haiti’s poor majority in the fields of law, medicine and social justice activism. We seek the restoration of the rule of law and democracy in the short term, and work for the long-term sustainable change necessary to avert Haiti’s next crisis.

    "IJDH is simply the most reliable source for information and analysis on human rights in Haiti." — Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA)

    Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti:

    L'Athletique D'Haiti:

    “While many children and parents see the club as a way to make it to the Haitian National team and also as a route ?to college scholarships or professional teams outside of Haiti, there’s more to the program than sports. By encouraging youngsters from wealthier families to compete with those from the slums, Robert Duval is also chipping away at the barriers of long divided Haitian society. And as Duval points out, ‘Some of these kids have a lot of talent, not only for soccer. Maybe it’s school or music or writing poetry. But sports will lift them to the next level of life.’” ?- Finbar O’Reilly, National Post, Canada

    The Lambi Fund (****) is a secular non-profit nonprofit whose mission is "to assist the popular, democratic movement in Haiti. Its goal is to help strengthen civil society as a necessary foundation of democracy and development. The fund channels financial and other resources to community-based organizations that promote the social and economic empowerment of the Haitian people." They support "projects that embrace the following principles: non-violent, non-partisan, community-based, promoting the advancement of women, using education and training for empowerment, and promoting the overall democratic movement."

    Partners in Health (****/A+) has now started a BLOG about its efforts called Stand with Haiti. It has very useful information. Partners in Health is also putting out a call for health volunteers, in case you are a medical professional who can help out that way.
    PIH 6 month report!  And website with slide show, Six months have now passed since a devastating earthquake  ripped through Haiti.

    The Jean Cadet Restavek Foundation. Restaveks are child slaves. This is an organization for children run by a Haitian man who is a former child slave.

    Reiser Relief, a group that parryander works with.  
    Matching funds currently available at this link for Reiser Relief.
    A total of $20K in matching funds have been provided for Reiser Relief from Razoo.

    ShelterBox: TexMex is busy moving, but carolina stargazer is still watching the store. The next ShelterBox diary is planned for Tuesday morning, but activity in
    diary will be monitored until then.

    SOIL is based in Haiti (founded by two American females) and although their regular mission is :Sustainable Organic Integrated Livelihoods (SOIL) is a non-profit organization dedicated to protecting soil resources, empowering communities and transforming wastes into resources in Haiti, they are in the streets in PAP providing normal disaster relief services and translation (they speak Kreyol). They have said that all donations in the next 30 days (at least) will go directly to their relief work rather than their usual mission. They have been in Haiti for several years and are very familiar with it.



    Social Networking Efforts:

    New Media Advocacy Project
    The New Media Advocacy Project combats poverty and human rights violations by using digital video, Internet social networking, and interactive media to strengthen social justice legal advocacy in courts, legislatures, and communities.




    Past diaries in this series:

    The World Traveler - Haiti page.: This website has links to articles about Haiti and it has excerpts from books including The Uses of Haiti and Damming The Flood.  
    Be sure to also see diaries by Bev Bell for informed ground-level information on Haiti's needs.
    FishOutofWater takes a moment to explore the benefits of Partners in Health's commitment to solar powered health centers.
    Meteor Blades points the way to a better and more sustainable future for Haitians in Haiti Could Use a New Deal.
    As the MSM (in the United States) turns attention away from Haiti, Deoliver47 reminds us that things are not suddenly all better: Raining Disease and More Deaths.
    For some good pre-earthquake background on Haiti, see Daisy Cutter's Book Review: "Damming the Flood" by Peter Hallward, pt 1. This diary was published in July 2008 and presents a history of Haiti up to 1999 using Hallward's book as a reference. Excellent.
    ShelterBox:carolina stargazer is still watching the store. The next ShelterBox diary is planned for Tuesday morning, but activity in diary will be monitored until then. Matching funds are available.

    Thursday is Haiti diary book day. Here is the Book List

    UPCOMING DIARIES

    Tuesday:  *** Open ***
    Thursday: Aji
    Sunday:   allie123 book diary

    If you would like to volunteer to contribute a diary to continue this series, please volunteer in the comments below. Norbrook has created a Google documents file with the source code for the first version of the diary with the NGO list. allie123 created a Google doc for the new series Justice, Not Charity. However, because we are cutting back to 2 or 3 diaries a week we will be adding a focus and new information to each diary now.

    The icons and March 13 formatting revision of this diary series are courtesy of the html artist known on Daily Kos as Pluto. The "Help Haiti" image at the top of the diary that has become the "logo" of this series is courtesy of AuntKat. Big thank you to swampus for maintaining the google doc for months.

  •  test (0+ / 0-)

    This is where Paul Farmer's book The Uses of Haiti ends. This is where our new diary begins. Farmer answers our question- what to do first, "The first order of business, for citizens of the United States, might be a candid and careful assessment of our ruinous policies towards Haiti." that is what this diary will attempt to do (mainly through the discussion that takes place in the comments). Many of us are new to learning about Haiti. But we really want to help. This diary is a place to learn about Haiti, about US policy towards Haiti, and to advocate for Haiti.

    Please take a couple of minutes to see/complete (takes 5 minutes) today's action alert directly below today's topic.   Join us for today's news discussion and more.    



    Today's topic:

    tout moun se moun —
    (every human being is a human being)



    Action Alert:

    Action Alert: Election:  

    The International Community Should Support Prompt and Fair

    Elections in Haiti.  Fanmi Lavalas has the support of the largest percentage of the Haitian electorate and

    elections that forbid their presence is essentially undemocratic and disenfranchising the choice of the vast

    majority of Haitians.  The US and International Community should not fund illegitimate elections.

    It is like the Democratic Party being excluded from our upcoming midterm elections.

    To stand in solidarity with Haiti at this crucial time, please contact US government officials, your local
    senators, and representatives and tell them not to fund illegitimate elections that  Lavalas must be allowed to
    participate in free, democratic elections.  The US should withhold aid for the elections unless the ban is lifted.
    The ban on Lavalas in the upcoming elections must be revoked.

    White House: 202-456-1111

    Email at www.whitehouse.gov

    US State Department: 202-647-4000

    Toll Free Contact  1 (866) 266-6678

    Congressional switchboard: 202-224-3121

    Damming The Flood, (pg. xxxiv): Mantra from Aristide's 1990 campaign:

    "Alone we are week, together we are strong; all together we are Lavalas, the flood [yon se`l nou feb, ansanm nou fo, ansanm nou se Lavalas]."

    Aristide



    Top Story: See comments for Today's News Update:

    TOP STORY:

    Mark Schuller (he is one of the best people to get information from) Falling through the cracks or unstable foundations?:

    Mounds of concrete are also blocking Haiti's reconstruction, causing severe traffic jams and preventing people from being able to return to their home and rebuild. Despite the Sisyphian yellow-shirt teams toiling in the hot sun for $5 a day, the rubble can't be collected and removed because the government doesn't have nearly enough trucks, a symptom of the lack of funds. At this pace people will still be wheelbarrowing crumbled houses well into 2015, Haiti's next presidential election.

    Another serious road block is the issue of sorting out land ownership. Even before the national registry fell under the rubble, land tenure has always been a complex and contentious issue in Haiti. Many areas of Port-au-Prince were settled either by tonton makout - Duvalier's death squads - given land for their service or by squatters. In many cases land ownership was never officially registered. Even if this logistical logjam were cleared, the vast majority of Port-au-Prince residents, up to 85%, did not own their homes before the earthquake. According to some UN sources, rents for "green houses" (those that passed inspection) have gone up 300% in several areas.



    Join us Thursday's  for book day :   Current book is Damming The Flood: Haiti, Aristide, And The Politics Of Containment, by Peter Hallward: Chapter 4:

    This is our book list so far:

    Isabel Allende (h/t Deoliver47):  Island Beneath the Sea, here:  

    Jean-Bertrand Aristide::  In the Parish of the Poor, here;  Eyes of the Heart here;  

    Beverly Bell:  Walking on Fire, here:  

    Edwidge Danticat:  Brother, I'm Dying here;  The Farming of Bones here;  Krik? Krak! here;  Breath, Eyes, Memory here:

    Paul Farmer:  The Uses of Haiti here;  Partner To The Poor:  A Paul Farmer Reader here;  Getting Haiti Right This Time: The U.S. and the Coup here:  

    Peter Hallward:  Damming The Flood here (2010 updated edition will be out soon. You can pre-order it now) here. h/ty NY brit expat published date is 11/30/10):  

    C.L.R. James:  The Black Jacobins here, (h/t Deoliver47):  

    Tracy Kidder:  Mountains Beyond Mountains here:  

    Maurice Lemoine:  Bitter Sugar: Slaves Today in the Caribbean [1985] here:  

    Paule Marshall:  The Chosen Place, The Timeless People here:  

    Timothy T. Schwartz:  Travesty in Haiti here:  

    Amy Wilentz:  The Rainy Season - Haiti after Duvalier here

    PIH has a new website here;  They have a recommended reading list here;  a book list, links to websites with action alerts, and articles.

    videos:
    Aristide and the Endless Revolution here;  Life and Debt here;  The Agronomist here;  Poto Mitan here.
    Any suggestions? We are looking for books, articles, websites where we can get accurate information about Haiti. Please share any information.
    I found one.  The World Traveler - Haiti page.: This website has links to articles about Haiti and it has excerpts from books including The Uses of Haiti and Damming The Flood.  

    "Dye mon, gen mon."

    Translation: Beyond the mountain is another mountain.

    (A proverb of both patience and the recognition of how difficult life in Haiti is.)

    ijdh:
    Anyone interested in democracy and rights has reason to be interested in Haiti. Over two centuries ago, Haitians challenged the notions of human rights taking root in Europe and the nascent United States, insisting that all people are human and that slavery could have no place in any republic worthy of the name. This was the beginning of the modern human rights movement.
    — Paul Farmer, Co-Founder, Partners in Health



    Sources We Like

    Institute for Justice & Democracy in Haiti (ijdh)  

    Canada Action Network

    Center For Economic and Policy Research

    Democracy Now!

    Flashpoint Radio

    HaitAction.Net

    HaitiAnalysis

    Haiti Action Committee Action Alert  

    Kim Ives is the editor of Haiti Liberte

    Partners in Health (PIH)

    PIH-For Advocates

    Rabble.ca

    SF Bay View

    TransAfrica Forum.

    RELIABLE SOURCE ARTICLES:
    Any articles that we missed?  Please leave comment.

    History,here:

    President Aristide,here:  

    Trade Policy, here:  

    Agriculture, here:  

    Immigration, here:  

    Vulture Capitalism, here (will add more articles).



    Video:

    Brian Concannon and Paul Farmer Video, Change Haiti Can Believe In: here,
    Haiti Dreaming for More Than $3 a day  Watch, here: Life and Debt, here:
    Edwidge Danticat on US immigration detentions 60 minutes, here: Jeremy Scahill on Democracy Now! responds to Clinton being appointed as UN envoy to Haiti, here.

    NEWS ORGANIZATIONS:

    Al Jazeera English, here: AlterNet, here:  BBC, here:  Caribbean Net News, here:  CNN, here:  COHA,

    here:  Common Dreams.org, here: gaurdian. co.uk, here:  Haitian Times, here:  Huffington Post, here:

    IPS, here:  MiamiHerald.com, here:  NPR, here:  ReliefWeb, here: The Daily Beast, here:  The Root, here.

    Aid - Change?

    Nicole Lee, "Haiti: An Opportunity For A New Model," here.

    Mark Schuller, "Falling through the cracks or unstable foundations?" here

    IJDH, “Haitians in IDP Camps are living better now than before the earthquake? Are you kidding me?” here

    Bev Bell interview, "Making money from the earthquake in Haiti" listen here

    IJDH, "Challenges Facing Haiti’s Justice Sector: Prepared for Congressional Briefing" here

    Kim Ives, "Land Ownership at the Crux of Haiti's Stalled Reconstruction" here.

    Kim Ives talks about it with Amy Goodman on Democracy Now!, here

    CIRH, Interim Haiti Recovery Commission here, Clinton & Bellerive co-chairs, 26 members 13 foreigners and 13 of Haiti's elite business people.  One of which Reginald Boulos was a backer of both coups. Another memberGarry Lissade, the former lawyer for Cedras during the 1993 Governor's Island post-coup negotiations.  

    Mark Schuller, "Tectonic Shifts? The upcoming donors' conference for Haiti" here,

    HOPE legislation Summary of HOPE legislation here: This is the same trade policy that we usually have to force Haiti to accept. But now we art told to celebrate it as an accomplishment? When did sweatshops become reason to celebrate?  

    CounterPunch, "How NGOs are Profiting Off a Grave Situation: Haiti and the Aid Racket" here,

    Democracy Now!, "Humanitarian Aid, New Colonialism?" here

    More Articles, here..

    The now requisite warnings:

    Please do your research before donating. The Charity Navigator tool is a useful resource for this purpose. For those not familiar, Charity Navigator evaluates and rates charities according to their financial responsibility and sustainability. Their homepage now lists comprehensive information the major organizations on the ground in Haiti now. (h/t DeepHarm and deb s) An additional resource for researching charities is the Better Business Bureau's Wise Giving Alliance site.

    A note about ratings listed here: We have looked up all of the charities listed here and we've put ratings next to the ones that have actually been rated. It looks like this: (****/A). The number of stars (1-4) indicates the rating from Charity Navigator and is also a clickable link to a detailed review of that particular charity. The letter grade is from AIP and is explained here.



    NGOs:

    The Aristide Foundation for Democracy (AFD) was created in 1996 by former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide (the first democratically elected president of Haiti) with a simple principle in mind: "The promise of democracy can only be fulfilled if all sectors of Haitian society are able to actively participate in the democratic life of the nation."

    Fonkoze (****) , a micro-lending organization in Haiti. From their Web site:

    Fonkoze is Haiti’s Alternative Bank for the Organized Poor. We are the largest micro-finance institution offering a full range of financial services to the rural-based poor in Haiti. Fonkoze is committed to the economic and social improvement of the people and communities of Haiti and to the reduction of poverty in the country.

    According to their Web site, their offices have taken quite a hit. This is another one in the category of long-term rebuilding. (h/t parryander and dizzydean)

    Haiti Emergency Relief Foundation (HERF):

    Haiti’s grassroots movement – including labor unions, women’s groups, educators and human rights activists, support committees for political prisoners, and agricultural cooperatives – are funneling needed aid to those most hit by the earthquake. They are doing what they can – with the most limited of funds – to make a difference. Please take this chance to lend them your support. All donations to the Haiti Emergency Relief Fund will be forwarded to our partners on the ground to help them rebuild what has been destroyed.

    Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti:

    Mission

    We strive to work with the people of Haiti in their non-violent struggle for the consolidation of constitutional democracy, jus tice and human rights, by distributing objective and accurate information on human rights conditions in Haiti, pursuing legal cases, and cooperating with human rights and solidarity groups in Haiti and abroad.
    IJDH draws on its founders’ internationally-acclaimed success accompanying Haiti’s poor majority in the fields of law, medicine and social justice activism. We seek the restoration of the rule of law and democracy in the short term, and work for the long-term sustainable change necessary to avert Haiti’s next crisis.

    "IJDH is simply the most reliable source for information and analysis on human rights in

    Haiti." — Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA)

    Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti:

    L'Athletique D'Haiti:

    “While many children and parents see the club as a way to make it to the Haitian National team and also as a route ?to college scholarships or professional teams outside of Haiti, there’s more to the program than sports. By encouraging youngsters from wealthier families to compete with those from the slums, Robert Duval is also chipping away at the barriers of long divided Haitian society. And as Duval points out, ‘Some of these kids have a lot of talent, not only for soccer. Maybe it’s school or music or writing poetry. But sports will lift them to the next level of life.’” ?- Finbar O’Reilly, National Post, Canada

    The Lambi Fund (****) is a secular non-profit nonprofit whose mission is "to assist the popular, democratic movement in Haiti. Its goal is to help strengthen civil society as a necessary foundation of democracy and development. The fund channels financial and other resources to community-based organizations that promote the social and economic empowerment of the Haitian people." They support "projects that embrace the following principles: non-violent, non-partisan, community-based, promoting the advancement of women, using education and training for empowerment, and promoting the overall democratic movement."

    Partners in Health (****/A+) has now started a BLOG about its efforts called Stand with Haiti. It has very useful information. Partners in Health is also putting out a call for health volunteers, in case you are a medical professional who can help out that way.
    PIH 6 month report!  And website with slide show, Six months have now passed since a devastating earthquake  ripped through Haiti.

    The Jean Cadet Restavek Foundation. Restaveks are child slaves. This is an organization for children run by a Haitian man who is a former child slave.

    Reiser Relief, a group that parryander works with.  
    Matching funds currently available at this link for Reiser Relief.
    A total of $20K in matching funds have been provided for Reiser Relief from Razoo.

    ShelterBox: TexMex is busy moving, but carolina stargazer is still watching the store. The next ShelterBox diary is planned for Tuesday morning, but activity in
    diary will be monitored until then.

    SOIL is based in Haiti (founded by two American females) and although their regular mission is :Sustainable Organic Integrated Livelihoods (SOIL) is a non-profit organization dedicated to protecting soil resources, empowering communities and transforming wastes into resources in Haiti, they are in the streets in PAP providing normal disaster relief services and translation (they speak Kreyol). They have said that all donations in the next 30 days (at least) will go directly to their relief work rather than their usual mission. They have been in Haiti for several years and are very familiar with it.



    Social Networking Efforts:

    New Media Advocacy Project
    The New Media Advocacy Project combats poverty and human rights violations by using digital video, Internet social networking, and interactive media to strengthen social justice legal advocacy in courts, legislatures, and communities.




    Past diaries in this series:

    The World Traveler - Haiti page.: This website has links to articles about Haiti and it has excerpts from books including The Uses of Haiti and Damming The Flood.  
    Be sure to also see diaries by Bev Bell for informed ground-level information on Haiti's needs.
    FishOutofWater takes a moment to explore the benefits of Partners in Health's commitment to solar powered health centers.
    Meteor Blades points the way to a better and more sustainable future for Haitians in Haiti Could Use a New Deal.
    As the MSM (in the United States) turns attention away from Haiti, Deoliver47 reminds us that things are not suddenly all better: Raining Disease and More Deaths.
    For some good pre-earthquake background on Haiti, see Daisy Cutter's Book Review: "Damming the Flood" by Peter Hallward, pt 1. This diary was published in July 2008 and presents a history of Haiti up to 1999 using Hallward's book as a reference. Excellent.
    ShelterBox:carolina stargazer is still watching the store. The next ShelterBox diary is planned for Tuesday morning, but activity in diary will be monitored until then. Matching funds are available.

    Thursday is Haiti diary book day. Here is the Book List

    UPCOMING DIARIES

    Tuesday:  *** Open ***
    Thursday: Aji
    Sunday:   allie123 book diary

    If you would like to volunteer to contribute a diary to continue this series, please volunteer in the comments below. Norbrook has created a Google documents file with the source code for the first version of the diary with the NGO list. allie123 created a Google doc for the new series Justice, Not Charity. However, because we are cutting back to 2 or 3 diaries a week we will be adding a focus and new information to each diary now.

    The icons and March 13 formatting revision of this diary series are courtesy of the html artist known on Daily Kos as Pluto. The "Help Haiti" image at the top of the diary that has become the "logo" of this series is courtesy of AuntKat. Big thank you to swampus for maintaining the google doc for months.

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