Skip to main content

School's in almost everywhere, and teachers are working hard. But how much do they earn for their efforts, and how do salaries differ state by state? And could YOU live on these salaries and still enjoy your work?

For kids, a typical school day is about six to eight hours. Not so for teachers, whose work load includes additional hours for grading tests and papers, preparing lessons, gathering materials, making classroom displays, and meeting with students, parents and administrators. [And I’m probably leaving out a lot of other things, like contorting learning opportunities into preparation for standardized tests, and attending classes for the extra credits that earn higher pay.] So, how much is all of this effort worth in salary dollars? The answer depends a great deal on geography. States may fund schools, but local districts generally determine salaries, and they vary widely from state to state, and even within states.

At a helpful website called Teacher Salary Info, you can click on a state and find out salary ranges, plus information about median household income and home prices [to help prospective teachers get a handle on how well or poorly one might live on an educator’s income in that state], and state expenditures per pupil. Created by a teacher for other teachers, the website offers, on each state’s page, an extended description of the ins and outs of the state’s educational structure and funding, and other tips about the overall teaching environment. The website also includes graphs depicting, state by state: average teacher salary compared to median house price; and average teacher salary compared to median household income.

Designed to help both new and experienced teachers make informed decisions about where to work, Teacher Salary Info clearly believes in the value and satisfaction of teaching, but it presents a realistic picture of the world in which teachers work.

"Teachers... love to teach, but hate how little [they] are paid." That’s both the opening and the bottom line of Teacher Salary Info. By way of explanation, the site says:

 

A 2006 study done by the National Education Association [found that] 50% of teachers leave the profession within five years because of poor working conditions and low salaries. Yet, according to the 2006 General Social Survey, teaching ranks among the Top 10 most gratifying jobs with 69% of teachers reporting they were very satisfied with their jobs.

So, would you be satisfied to teach if your salary range fell into one of the categories in the chart? [Scroll to the end of the linked article to see it.]Just asking. And, by the way, study this chart carefully, because if you live in almost any US state, there may be a standardized test on this information later

Originally posted to Lefty on Tue Aug 24, 2010 at 07:21 AM PDT.

EMAIL TO A FRIEND X
Your Email has been sent.
You must add at least one tag to this diary before publishing it.

Add keywords that describe this diary. Separate multiple keywords with commas.
Tagging tips - Search For Tags - Browse For Tags

?

More Tagging tips:

A tag is a way to search for this diary. If someone is searching for "Barack Obama," is this a diary they'd be trying to find?

Use a person's full name, without any title. Senator Obama may become President Obama, and Michelle Obama might run for office.

If your diary covers an election or elected official, use election tags, which are generally the state abbreviation followed by the office. CA-01 is the first district House seat. CA-Sen covers both senate races. NY-GOV covers the New York governor's race.

Tags do not compound: that is, "education reform" is a completely different tag from "education". A tag like "reform" alone is probably not meaningful.

Consider if one or more of these tags fits your diary: Civil Rights, Community, Congress, Culture, Economy, Education, Elections, Energy, Environment, Health Care, International, Labor, Law, Media, Meta, National Security, Science, Transportation, or White House. If your diary is specific to a state, consider adding the state (California, Texas, etc). Keep in mind, though, that there are many wonderful and important diaries that don't fit in any of these tags. Don't worry if yours doesn't.

You can add a private note to this diary when hotlisting it:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from your hotlist?
Are you sure you want to remove your recommendation? You can only recommend a diary once, so you will not be able to re-recommend it afterwards.
Rescue this diary, and add a note:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary from Rescue?
Choose where to republish this diary. The diary will be added to the queue for that group. Publish it from the queue to make it appear.

You must be a member of a group to use this feature.

Add a quick update to your diary without changing the diary itself:
Are you sure you want to remove this diary?
(The diary will be removed from the site and returned to your drafts for further editing.)
(The diary will be removed.)
Are you sure you want to save these changes to the published diary?

Comment Preferences

  •  I'm one of the 50% (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    TheGreatLeapForward, lgmcp, croyal

    Who left because of working conditions and low pay. I miss the kids, but I have to feed the one I fathered.

    It is better to light one candle than to curse the darkness - Eleanor Roosevelt

    by Fish in Illinois on Tue Aug 24, 2010 at 07:28:45 AM PDT

  •  Please (0+ / 0-)

    First, I can verify that the chart is wrong (unless I am missing something with the methodology) because my MIL teaches in Ohio and makes over $70k.  Second, the salaries are fine for a profession that gets 8 weeks off in summer, 2 at Christmas, and one in the spring.  Now, if we had a year round school year you might have a case.

    •  70K in Ohio (0+ / 0-)

      Hmm. Thanks for the feedback. I was going by what the website had. Their site lists "salary range." I'm wondering if incentives, extra pay for coaching/clubs, etc. and other add-ons would account for the difference.

      •  Not for her, she does the minimum (0+ / 0-)

        required and is counting down the days til retirement.  And I still say you have to account for the copious vacation time that teachers get into the equation.

        •  Well there you have it, if she's near retirement. (0+ / 0-)

          Seniority benefits are enormous relative to the salaries of begining teachers.  For this reason, the median figures would really be more informative than the mean.

          "The extinction of the human race will come from its inability to EMOTIONALLY comprehend the exponential function." -- Edward Teller

          by lgmcp on Tue Aug 24, 2010 at 09:18:35 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

    •  I was very lucky to have been brought up (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      SilverOz, edtastic

      by two teachers. They were always home by the late afternoon, no weekend work, summers and lots of holidays off. And good benefits. And they liked their jobs.  I'm sympathetic to teachers wanting to make more, but I don't really think that the package that teachers get is any worse, in general, than what they'd make in the corporate world (especially when adjusting for hours, vacation, benefits, and job risk).

      I'm in the I-fucking-love-this-guy wing of the Democratic Party!

      by doc2 on Tue Aug 24, 2010 at 08:24:58 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  You really have no idea (9+ / 0-)

      8 weeks off in the summer?  Yeah right, that's the time for professional development.  

      As for the rest of the year, 60+ hours of work per week.  Class time, prep time, grading time.

      You have no idea WTF you are talking about.

      "Empty vessels make the loudest sound, they have the least wit and are the greatest blabbers" Plato

      by Empty Vessel on Tue Aug 24, 2010 at 08:36:09 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  If the tradeoffs are really so fine (4+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      BlackSheep1, sngmama, millwood, edtastic

      why do something like 70% of new teachers leave the profession within five years?  Even if, as you argue, the timeoff was terrific and the money was adequate, evidently there are stressors that make it ultimately not worthwhile for a great many who planned and trained for it.

      "The extinction of the human race will come from its inability to EMOTIONALLY comprehend the exponential function." -- Edward Teller

      by lgmcp on Tue Aug 24, 2010 at 09:24:32 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

    •  ah, thanx, SilverOz, for devaluing (3+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      sngmama, millwood, Empty Vessel

      teaching even more.

      It is of course a profession in which women can labour honorably.

      Your comment

      Second, the salaries are fine for a profession that gets 8 weeks off in summer, 2 at Christmas, and one in the spring.  Now, if we had a year round school year you might have a case.

      almost word-for-word echoes the wingnut editor at my local (Lubbock, Texas) paper's regular rants against considering teaching anything but a "part time job."

      You are therefore considered with equal seriousness.

      LBJ & Lady Bird, Sully Sullenberger, Molly Ivins, Barbara Jordan, Ann Richards, Drew Brees: Texas is No Bush League! -7.50,-5.59

      by BlackSheep1 on Tue Aug 24, 2010 at 10:39:56 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Excuse me (0+ / 0-)

        Find me a degreed professional who doesn't work 50-60 hours a week anymore.  Also, those pay ranges are pretty much in line with other bachelors degree holders, who do not get nearly the kind of benefits that teachers do.  

        •  no excuse required (0+ / 0-)

          as you clearly don't see teaching as a valuable profession.

          I'm done with this conversation.

          LBJ & Lady Bird, Sully Sullenberger, Molly Ivins, Barbara Jordan, Ann Richards, Drew Brees: Texas is No Bush League! -7.50,-5.59

          by BlackSheep1 on Tue Aug 24, 2010 at 11:29:57 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

  •  Meh, the stats seem skewed (0+ / 0-)

    there are some states with extreme outliers (Illinois WTF?)that make me think that the data wasn't collected/labled uniformly, so not sure we can make a super-accurate conclusion on averages.

    However, the average seems to be perhaps slightly less than a skilled worker with a bachelors/masters degree in this country would make (I'm thinking auditors, techies, engineers, etc). I think there is a quality-of-life trade-off though; I know teachers work heavy hours during the school year, but 2 months of paid vacation is nice.

    Too big to fail = too big to exist.

    by Liberaltarianish on Tue Aug 24, 2010 at 07:54:13 AM PDT

    •  Outliers (2+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      sngmama, lgmcp

      The extreme range in Illinois may be the result of the difference in pay ranges between rural districts and the Chicago area. By the way, for this same reason, it might be more helpful to look at median salaries, rather than average. If anyone has a source for that, please share.

      •  I thought of that, but 20k for a full-time (0+ / 0-)

        teacher to start? Really? I'm thinking more like aids were included into the data set.

        Too big to fail = too big to exist.

        by Liberaltarianish on Tue Aug 24, 2010 at 08:02:01 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

        •  No, LIberaltarianish, in Texas 20-25K is good $$ (2+ / 0-)
          Recommended by:
          sngmama, millwood

          for teachers. Football coaches, of course, make more.

          Dammit.

          And then you get guys like Mike Moses. Superintendents. Million-dollar plus salaries, and the only reason they ever set foot in a classroom is to bitch.

          LBJ & Lady Bird, Sully Sullenberger, Molly Ivins, Barbara Jordan, Ann Richards, Drew Brees: Texas is No Bush League! -7.50,-5.59

          by BlackSheep1 on Tue Aug 24, 2010 at 10:41:57 AM PDT

          [ Parent ]

          •  Wrong, BlackSheep1? (0+ / 0-)

            Someone pointed out that these are min/max figures in the diary, and that perhaps we need to look at medians, but $20-$25k does not seem to be "good" per your assertion.

            Average Salaries

            Too big to fail = too big to exist.

            by Liberaltarianish on Tue Aug 24, 2010 at 11:04:16 AM PDT

            [ Parent ]

            •  I live in West Texas. Rural districts (0+ / 0-)

              and consolidated independent districts. But the big city school district here is LISD. A teacher who has 40 years experience can make $45,800 and change here. Does that sound like a decent salary to you?

              The teacher who starts out with a PhD -- that's a Doctorate -- can make $38,000 annually. Does that sound like a good living for a family -- married couple and a child or two?

              That's in a district where teachers are perceived, in the public eye, and painted by local media, as not professionals who work a 55-hour week during the school term and then spend 40 hours a week in professional development (or more) during the summertime, but as "part time workers" when they're not being called outright parasites.

              The right wing wants you to believe no teacher deserves a living wage (and all kids should be home schooled then go to work as soon as they can pass a GED test). It's anti-civilization propaganda.

              LBJ & Lady Bird, Sully Sullenberger, Molly Ivins, Barbara Jordan, Ann Richards, Drew Brees: Texas is No Bush League! -7.50,-5.59

              by BlackSheep1 on Tue Aug 24, 2010 at 11:28:42 AM PDT

              [ Parent ]

              •  I believe teachers should be well-paid, but (0+ / 0-)

                you're consistently quoting figures and not giving any back-up for them...so I'm not sure I'm going to believe your assertions or general statements.

                Too big to fail = too big to exist.

                by Liberaltarianish on Tue Aug 24, 2010 at 12:16:41 PM PDT

                [ Parent ]

                •  I wasn't just quoting figures (0+ / 0-)

                  but the LISD site's pay scale is a PDF.
                  Help yourself:http://hr.lubbockisd.org/modules/groups/integrated_home.phtml?&gid=1197294&sessioni d=532cbb096fea9665356431cc4bf2e885

                  LBJ & Lady Bird, Sully Sullenberger, Molly Ivins, Barbara Jordan, Ann Richards, Drew Brees: Texas is No Bush League! -7.50,-5.59

                  by BlackSheep1 on Tue Aug 24, 2010 at 08:02:31 PM PDT

                  [ Parent ]

    •  looking at some states, the numbers are not (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      millwood

      very good. Oregon shows a relatively low range despite having very high housing prices in the areas where most teachers work.

      Teachers are not paid during the summer. They can elect to spread their pay out over that time, but they are not paid for that time. If they were, their salaries would probably be more on par with the other professions you mention.

  •  I am a supporter of teachers, but (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lgmcp, edtastic

    will qualify some of your statements, at least out here in California.

    Some teachers are working hard. Some are not. Some are excellent. Some are horrible. Some work a lot of extra hours and are underpaid for that. Some do the absolute minimum and are overpaid.

    Once a teacher is tenured, hard work, performance, and committment have nothing to do with their job security, pay or benefits. It is all based on seniority, with some adjustments for education level. That leaves us with a situation like what we have in LA, a pool of mediocrity, as the great teachers are balanced out by teachers doing the minimum and scraping by each year with the same pay as their hard working brethren. Some people are motivated by love of their profession and concern for the children they teach, but many need their salary and jobs tied into their performance to incentize them to perform at a high level.

    There are usually two responses to this from the teachers union. One is that the School District is horrible, inefficient and broken. I agree, but that doesn't change anything about what I posted above. It just means we need a large scale change in LA.

    The second is that evaluating on test scores is insane. That I don't agree on. I think that value added evaluation based on test scores, which accounts for students starting positions, and social/economic situation should be part of the measurement of performance, but obviously, it should only be a portion. There is no perfect means of evaluating teachers, but there is certainly ways that are more effective than having toothless evaluations that don't effect pay or job retention, which is what is happening now. Until we reward those that do well for doing well, and hold those accountable that don't, we will be continually held back by a pool of teachers on the extremes of performance.

  •  Discussion omits pension & other benefit problems (0+ / 0-)

    See the recent Pew Center report called "The Trillion Dollar Gap."

    The link on this diary (and the summary for some of the states that I looked at in the Teacher Salary Info) omits the very important pension and benefit information that is cruising into the public's consciousness as one huge problem. In the Pew summary, they say that $1 trillion underestimates the pension underfunding in the states for teachers and other state employees.

    I read comments on blogs from teachers who presently retired and who are future retirees who think they've dodged this bullet. After all, the onus is supposed to fall on the taxpayers, who are on the hook to make up the shortfall in many states. Some states have already changed their pension plans from defined benefits to defined contributions, but that applies to teachers and others hired after the date of the state legislation.

    Haven't many teachers made a choice to spend many years at a profession they love, while looking forward to a decent pension plan with other benefits attached?

    Sign of the future: I read yesterday that the California governor has a 'secret plan' to raid CalPERS of $2 BILLION towards that state's huge budget deficit. (The state has done nothing much to take a realistic look at CalPERS, the nation's biggest pension fund, and its risky investments. And potential civil and criminal activities, imo.)

    Also note when you read the Pew report that the analysis only includes amounts through the 2008 fiscal year, which in most states is in June 2008, before state pension funds (and most other investments) tanked.

    I wouldn't take anything for granted as the pension fund crisis moves out of the shadows from New Jersey (SEC settlement this week), to Illinois, to California, and as Pew says, "to a state near you."

  •  A comparison for England and Wales (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    edtastic

    (All figures for September 2010) Sorry these figures are very complicated as they reflect both experience, professional standards, special responsibilities and subject leadership skills.

    Teachers in these two countries start on a "main scale" salary that starts at £21,588 or up to £27,000 if they work in inner London - the extra reflects the additional cost of living. With five annual increases which can only be stopped for bad performance, this rises to £31,552 / £36,387
    Details

    In addition at any point they can receive extra salary for additional duties:

    Classroom teachers who take on extra responsibility could be awarded a Teaching and Learning Responsibility (TLR) payment. To get a TLR2 payment, teachers have to show they have a specific responsibility, which focuses on teaching and learning and needs professional skills and judgment. This responsibility must be one that exceeds that of the standard classroom teacher and it should be clearly defined in your job description

    These payments range from £2535 to £12,393 although special needs teachers have separate allowance of £2001 or £3954
    Details

    Once they have reached the top of the "main scale" or salary level M6 they:

    can apply to be assessed against eight national standards and if they meet the standards, cross the ‘threshold’ to the upper pay scale. The threshold provides an opportunity for good classroom teachers to progress from M6 to a higher salary range.

    This means that an inner London teacher would progress to £41,497 (plus any responsibility allowance) Every two years they can apply for further progression to a maximum of £47,000
    Details

    Those who take on leadership responsibilities - say leading a department or subject area - can also progress to the "advanced teacher status". There are various bands of pay level depending on the responsibility that could take an inner London teacher to £64,036
    Details

    Headteachers (principals) can earn up to £112,181 for very large high schools in inner London
    Details

    In brief, most classroom teachers earn more than the average pay for their area. To contrast, an ordinary MP's salary is £64,766, a minister of state £106,136;  the Speaker of the Commons £144,520 and the Prime Minister £197,689.(.pdf)

    Maybe I should also address Silveroz's point since it is often made:

    Second, the salaries are fine for a profession that gets 8 weeks off in summer, 2 at Christmas, and one in the spring.  Now, if we had a year round school year you might have a case.

    In my experience both working in central administration and as a member of an individual school's "school board" appointed by my party; this is certainly not a true position for most teachers at least in the UK. Apart from the exertions of teaching leading almost literally to a burn out before the 5ish week summer break, many spend their "off duty" time and vacations improving their skills and, especially in the summer, preparing learning plans for the new year.

    "Israel was born out of Jewish terrorism." Sir Gerald Kaufman, British MP and son of Holocaust survivor.

    by Lib Dem FoP on Tue Aug 24, 2010 at 08:55:49 AM PDT

    •  BTW (1+ / 0-)
      Recommended by:
      lgmcp

      I should point out that apart from some areas outside of London, a teacher would still have to have a partner with a second income in the home to be able to afford to purchase a property.

      "Israel was born out of Jewish terrorism." Sir Gerald Kaufman, British MP and son of Holocaust survivor.

      by Lib Dem FoP on Tue Aug 24, 2010 at 09:03:01 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  the salary chart (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    lgmcp, DorothyT, edtastic

    cries for some explanation. For example, isn't it unusual for one job position to have a salary range of $50k from minimum to maximum?

    Minimum salary is entry level, that's easy to understand. The maximum salary amount would be more meaningful with explanation of requirements to achieve the max -- i.e., years in job, additional education requirements, if any. I suspect that any teacher achieving max salary has had to complete added education. And median salary info would help, with years in job.

    Slavery is the legal fiction that a person is property. Corporate personhood is the legal fiction that property is a person. -Jan Edwards

    by SoCalSal on Tue Aug 24, 2010 at 09:09:44 AM PDT

  •  In the early 90's I was teaching (3+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    DorothyT, millwood, edtastic

    public school in the Bay Area.  My salary was high relative to beginning teacher salaries in the rest of the nation.  But calculating in the REAL hours I was spending, it came out to well below minimum wage.

    "The extinction of the human race will come from its inability to EMOTIONALLY comprehend the exponential function." -- Edward Teller

    by lgmcp on Tue Aug 24, 2010 at 09:16:33 AM PDT

    •  Shenanigans! Man you people are gullible. (0+ / 0-)

      We've always got a serial exaggerator(sp).

      If you started at $25k in the early 90's, if your salary evened out to EXACTLY $5.15/hr, you would have had to average working about 93 hrs/week. If minimum wage was lower than $5.15, then you would've had to make even more.

      93 hours/week is more than 13 hours/day, 7 days a week, 365 days/year.

      Shenanigans. We don't have to believe you worked for below minimum wage in order to understand the plight of underpaid teachers.

      Too big to fail = too big to exist.

      by Liberaltarianish on Tue Aug 24, 2010 at 11:36:01 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

      •  Except that I WAS working more (0+ / 0-)

        than 13 hours per day, a LOT more.  I was working from 5 a.m. until 10 p.m. five days a week, and approximately half that on weekends.  I worked through meals.  The only time I didn't work was when showering and driving.  Maybe I was obsessive, maybe my efficiency sucked, but I was working my ass off, to the tune of about 96 hours per week.

        "The extinction of the human race will come from its inability to EMOTIONALLY comprehend the exponential function." -- Edward Teller

        by lgmcp on Tue Aug 24, 2010 at 11:52:48 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

      •  And my AP physics students (1+ / 0-)
        Recommended by:
        Liberaltarianish

        had an 87% pass rate for college credit, the highest the district had ever seen.

        "The extinction of the human race will come from its inability to EMOTIONALLY comprehend the exponential function." -- Edward Teller

        by lgmcp on Tue Aug 24, 2010 at 12:08:40 PM PDT

        [ Parent ]

  •  i'm intrigued by Illinois. They have the lowest (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    croyal

    starting salary in the country (lower than Tennessee), but the highest maximum salary in the country.

    Wonder what the reasoning is there?  

    My hunch would be that they hire teachers at a low salary with the hope of someday earning $118,000 a year, but that relatively few actually do make that much, and the average is pretty low.  Just a wild guess.

    Anybody from Illinois know the answer?

    "A man of true science uses but few hard words, and those only when none other will answer his purpose..." - Melville

    by ZedMont on Tue Aug 24, 2010 at 09:53:27 AM PDT

    •  Wow (0+ / 0-)

      I have no idea about your question, but here in El Paso, only administrators could hope to make 6 digit salaries.

      El Paso ISD starts most teachers at a relatively high starting salary for Texas (around $52k in general), but that's because they have a hard time attracting teachers here. The pay for bilingual and high school math and science is considered competitive (in the $60-75k range), but you don't have much hope of your salary increasing very much. They really don't like giving returning teachers pay increases. I think this is because they don't except teachers to stay here very long, as must don't, so they invest more in attracting new teachers than retaining old hires. Really fucked up, I know, but this is El Paso.

      -8.50, -7.64 Autism Speaks does not speak for me. I can speak for myself. I am a person, not a disease. I want to be respected, not "cured."

      by croyal on Tue Aug 24, 2010 at 10:22:46 AM PDT

      [ Parent ]

  •  I was in Canada recently (1+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    edtastic

    and just despaired when I learned of the pay gap between Texas teachers and Canadian teachers. I'm currently just a sub, but if I was a sub in Canada, I could be making almost twice as much as I do here. Even if I was paying higher taxes, I'd still be taking home much more than I currently am.

    It was quite depressing meeting young Canadian teachers only 1 or 2 years into their career and making more and living more comfortably than I could be even if I worked a decade in the school system here. It made me want to get out the education field altogether. I don't think I could handle a fulltime teaching job, the pay scale isn't that much of an incentive, and I can't support myself anymore as an self-empolyed tutor (besides the increasing number of parents who think schools should provide tutoring at no cost to them, I can't compete with the new tutor businesses that can take medical insurance for special needs kids, which had been my tutoring niche for the past 2 decades). Right now, I think working at Home Depot or Lowe's might be a better career option for me than education, even though I'm a damn good teacher.

    -8.50, -7.64 Autism Speaks does not speak for me. I can speak for myself. I am a person, not a disease. I want to be respected, not "cured."

    by croyal on Tue Aug 24, 2010 at 10:15:35 AM PDT

  •  Why are there still summer breaks? (2+ / 0-)
    Recommended by:
    edtastic, Liberaltarianish

    Wasn't the purpose so that the kids could work on the family farms?  How much of that is going on nowadays?

    No one will believe it's the Blues if you wear a suit, `less you happen to be an old person, and you slept in it.

    by dov12348 on Tue Aug 24, 2010 at 10:35:05 AM PDT

    •  I am pretty sure (0+ / 0-)

      That CT is one state with the highest teacher' s salaries.

      I began my 41st year of teaching in CT- with a Master's, making in the lower 90,000 range. Those with a 6th year make over 100,000.

      CT also has the hardest Praxis tests to pass. Most have to take the test at least twice, of not more than twice.

      However, CT teachers do not pay into social security; we pay into a pension fund the state is supposed to match. Once I retire I will paid 75 percent of the average of my last three years of pay.

      I can buy into the town's medical plan- at full price - about 700 a month. Probably going to wait until Medicare.

      •  Okay. Not sure how that... (0+ / 0-)

        ...addresses my question, though.

        No one will believe it's the Blues if you wear a suit, `less you happen to be an old person, and you slept in it.

        by dov12348 on Tue Aug 24, 2010 at 11:49:22 AM PDT

        [ Parent ]

Subscribe or Donate to support Daily Kos.

Click here for the mobile view of the site