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Five years ago, in the drowning of New Orleans, a milestone of Louisiana history went almost unobserved: the 70th anniversary of the assassination of the state's controversial Governor and then US Senator Huey Pierce Long, Jr.

This year marks that event's 75th anniversary, and here at Daily Kos the name "Huey Long" is now associated with the scheming of a campaign operative for a man who represents the opposite of what the real Huey Long stood for. This is an attempt to set the record straight for Huey Long, who was shot on September 8, 1935 and died on September 10, 1935.

To that end, I humbly submit my 1992 review of T. Harry Williams's Pulitzer Prize-winning biography of Long (the review's been on the web so long it's on the second Google page of searches for "huey long"). If you can find a copy, one of Ken Burns's earliest projects was on Long. While it's hardly a detailed study of Long's policies or actions, it's particularly interesting for the interviews in which members of the state's ruling class express their hatred for Long and his intrusion into their turf, which puts one in mind of the Washington elite's attitude toward Clinton.

There's much more out there, but, as always, I like to close with words from Huey Long himself, from his autobiography Every Man a King:

CHAPTER XXXVI
THE MADDENED FORTUNE HOLDERS AND THEIR
INFURIATED PUBLIC PRESS!

The increasing fury with which I have been and am to be, assailed by reason of the fight and growth of support for limiting the size of fortunes can only be explained by the madness which human nature attaches to the holders of accumulated wealth.
What I have proposed is:--

THE LONG PLAN

  1. A capital levy tax on the property owned by any one person of 1% of all over $1,000,000 [dp: $14,275,000 in 2005 dollars]; 2% of all over $2,000,000 [$28,550,000] etc., until, when it reaches fortunes of over $100,000,000 [$1,427,500,000], the government takes all above that figure; which means a limit on the size of any one man's forturn to something like $50,000,000 [$713,750,000]--the balance to go to the government to spread out in its work among all the people.
  1. An inheritance tax which does not allow one man to make more than $1,000,000 [$14,275,000] in one year, exclusive of taxes, the balance to go to the United States for general work among the people.

The forgoing program means all taxes paid by the fortune holders at the top and none by the people at the bottom; the spreading of wealth among all the people and the breaking up of a system of Lords and Slaves in our economic life. It allows the millionaires to have, however, more than they can use for any luxury they can enjoy on earth. But, with such limits, all else can survive.

That the public press should regard my plan and effort as a calamity and me as a menace is no more than should be expected, gauged in the light of past events. According to Ridpath, the eminent historian:

"The ruling classes always possess the means of information and the processes by which it is distributed. The newspaper of modern times belongs to the upper man. The under man has no voice; or if, having a voice, his cry is lost like a shout in the desert. Capital, in the places of power, seizes upon the organs of public utterance, and howls the humble down the wind. Lying and misrepresentation are the natural weapons of those who maintain an existing vice and gather the usufruct of crime."

--Ridpath's History of the World, Page 410.

In 1932, the vote for my resolution showed possibly a half dozen other Senators back of it. It grew in the last Congress to nearly twenty Senators. Such growth through one other year will mean the success of a venture, the completion of everything I have undertaken,--the time when I can and will retire from the stress and fury of public life, maybe as my forties begin,--a contemplation so serene as to appear impossible.
That day will reflect credit on the States whose Senators took the early lead to spread the wealth of the land among all the people.

Then no tear dimmed eyes of a small child will be lifted into the saddened face of a father or mother unable to give it the necessities required by its soul and body for life; then the powerful will be rebuked in the sight of man for holding what they cannot consume, but which is craved to sustain humanity; the food of the land will feed, the raiment clothe, and the houses shelter all the people; the powerful will be elated by the well being of all, rather than through their greed.

Then those of us who have pursued that phantom of Jefferson, Jackson, Webster, Theodore Roosevelt and Bryan may hear wafted from their lips in Valhalla:

EVERY MAN A KING

Originally posted to darrelplant on Thu Sep 09, 2010 at 03:25 PM PDT.

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